Announcement of Classes: Spring 2013

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, you can log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B are posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall).

CHERNIN MENTORING PROGRAM:Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join the Chernin Mentoring Program!

The Chernin Mentoring Program fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Chernin groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for the Chernin Program, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one credit for an independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, 143N, 143T, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43B. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143N, or 143T. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 1. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 1, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2012 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2013 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 25 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.


Course # Sec. Course Time Instructor
Course Area
R1A 1 Reading and Composition: Black and Yellow: Contemporary African American and Asian American Writing MWF 10-11 Lee, Seulghee
Reading and Composition
R1A 2 Reading and Composition: How to Read "How to Read Poetry" MWF 1-2 Acu, Adrian Mark
Reading and Composition
R1A 3 Reading and Composition: The Bonds of Taste MWF 2-3 Weiner, Joshua J
Reading and Composition
R1A 4 Reading and Composition: Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Representations of Numbers in 19th-Century Literature MW 4-5:30 Kolb, Margaret
Reading and Composition
R1A 5 Reading and Composition: Big Novels TTh 8-9:30 Ling, Jessica
Reading and Composition
R1A 6 Reading and Composition: note new topic: Autobiography MWF 12-1 Beck, Rachel
Reading and Composition
R1A 7 Reading and Composition: Special Friends TTh 11-12:30 Shelley, Jonathan
Reading and Composition
R1A 8 Reading and Composition: "Work Hard, Play Hard": Work, Leisure, the Victorians and Us TTh 12:30-2 Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Reading and Composition
R1A 9 Reading and Composition: Adventures of the Unheroic: A Hero’s Journey in Fourteenth-Century Poetry TTh 2-3:30 Crosson, Chad Gregory
Reading and Composition
R1A 10 Reading and Composition: Aspiring Minds and Expelling Bodies: A Brief Survey of Satire TTh 3:30-5 Jeziorek, Alek M
Reading and Composition
R1A 11 Reading and Composition: Eros in Shakespeare TTh 5-6:30 Castillo, Carmen
Reading and Composition
R1B 1 Reading and Composition: What Is Enlightenment? MWF 9-10 Mangin, Sarah
Reading and Composition
R1B 2 Reading and Composition: The Poetry of the Past MWF 9-10 Garcia, Marcos Albert
Reading and Composition
R1B 3 Reading and Composition: Representative Men MWF 10-11 Dumont, Alex
Reading and Composition
R1B 4 Reading and Composition: “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I feel fine)” MWF 11-12 Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Reading and Composition
R1B 5 Reading and Composition: Indecision MWF 11-12 Ty, Michelle
Reading and Composition
R1B 6 Reading and Composition: Early American Literature - Pessimism and Unease MWF 12-1 Junkerman, Nicholas
Reading and Composition
R1B 7 Reading and Composition: The English of France MWF 12-1 Perry, R. D.
Reading and Composition
R1B 8 Reading and Composition: Ethnicizing America MWF 12-1 Xiang, Sunny
Reading and Composition
R1B 10 Reading and Composition: This is Not Real. MWF 2-3 Creasy, CFS
Reading and Composition
R1B 11 Reading and Composition: The Sonic Artifact MWF 2-3 Le, Serena
Reading and Composition
R1B 12 Reading and Composition: Asian American Speculative Realism MWF 2-3 Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Reading and Composition
R1B 13 Reading and Composition: Difficult Literature MWF 3-4 Taylor, Bradford Alden
Reading and Composition
R1B 14 Reading and Composition: Revelation and Revision MW 4-5:30 O'Connor, Megan
Reading and Composition
R1B 15 Reading and Composition: Revolution and Counter-Revolution in the Long 20th Century TTh 8-9:30 Richards, Jill
Reading and Composition
R1B 16 Reading and Composition: “So this is Dyoublong?”: Reading Modern Ireland TTh 9:30-11 Tazudeen, Rasheed
Reading and Composition
R1B 17 Reading and Composition: Creation and Creativity TTh 11-12:30 Saltzman, Benjamin A.
Reading and Composition
R1B 18 Reading and Composition: The Parallel Discourses of Sex and Race: The Problems of Othering Sexuality TTh 12:30-2 Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Reading and Composition
R1B 19 Reading and Composition: U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture TTh 2-3:30 Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Reading and Composition
R1B 20 Reading and Composition: A Poetic Education in the American Grain TTh 3:30-5 Miller, Christopher Patrick
Reading and Composition
R1B 21 Reading and Composition: Bad Writing TTh 5-6:30 Mansouri, Leila
Reading and Composition
R1B 22 Reading and Composition: Thinking Through Poetry TTh 5-6:30 Lee, Richard Z
Reading and Composition
24 1 Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Sonnets M 12-1 Nelson, Alan H.
Freshman Seminars
24 2 Freshman Seminar: Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court and The Prince and the Pauper W 3-4 Hutson, Richard
Freshman Seminars
24 3 Freshman Seminar: The Arts at Berkeley and Beyond T 4-5 Padilla, Genaro M.
Freshman Seminars
43B 1 Introduction to the Writing of Verse TTh 2-3:30 Loofbourow, Lili
Creative Writing Workshops
45A 1 Literature in English: Through Milton MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11 Nelson, Alan H.
Introductory Surveys
45A 2 Literature in English: Through Milton MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2 Arnold, Oliver
Introductory Surveys
45B 1 Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries MW 12-1+ discussion sections F 12-1 Duncan, Ian
Introductory Surveys
45B 2 Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4 Breitwieser, Mitchell
Introductory Surveys
45C 1 Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10 Lee, Steven Sunwoo
Introductory Surveys
British 20th- and 21st-Century
American Literature
45C 2 Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3 Flynn, Catherine
Introductory Surveys
84 1 Sophomore Seminar: Woody Allen W 2-5 Bader, Julia
Sophomore Seminars
102 1 Topics in the English Language: Meters of English Poetry MWF 1-2 Hanson, Kristin
English Language and Linguistics
114B 1 English Drama from 1603 to 1700 TTh 11-12:30 Jordan, Joseph P
Renaissance and Early Modern
Drama
117B 1 Shakespeare: Shakespeare after 1600 MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4 Landreth, David
Shakespeare
117S 1 Shakespeare TTh 12:30-2 Knapp, Jeffrey
Shakespeare
119 1 Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century TTh 12:30-2 Picciotto, Joanna M
Renaissance and Early Modern
British 18th-Century
Novel
Drama
Poetry
120 1 Literature of the Later 18th Century TTh 2-3:30 Sorensen, Janet
British 18th-Century
122 1 The Victorian Period TTh 2-3:30 Jordan, Joseph P
British 19th-Century
125A 1 The English Novel (Defoe through Scott) TTh 3:30-5 Starr, George A.
British 18th-Century
125B 1 The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad) TTh 11-12:30 Eichenlaub, Justin
British 19th-Century
Novel
125D 1 The 20th-Century Novel TTh 9:30-11 Jones, Donna V.
Novel
127 1 Modern Poetry MWF 12-1 Altieri, Charles F.
British 20th- and 21st-Century
American Literature
Poetry
130B 1 American Literature: 1800-1865 TTh 12:30-2 McQuade, Donald
American Literature
130D 1 American Literature: 1900-1945 TTh 12:30-2 Speirs, Kenneth
American Literature
132 1 American Novel TTh 3:30-5 Carmody, Todd
American Literature
133T 1 Topics in African American Literature and Culture: African Diaspora Literature: Conversations in Black TTh 11-12:30 Ellis, Nadia
African American Literature
World Literature
135AC 1 Literature of American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in Hollywood Cinema TTh 3:30-5 + M 6-9 films Wagner, Bryan
American Cultures
American Literature
Film
137T 1 Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: Chicano Art and Literature TTh 12:30-2 Padilla, Genaro M.
Chicana/o and/or Latina/o
Graduate Courses
138 1 Studies in World Literature in English: What Is South African Literature? TTh 2-3:30 Boniface Davies, Sheila
World Literature
141 1 Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.) : Writing Fiction, Drama, and Poetry TTh 2-3:30 Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Creative Writing Workshops
143A 1 Short Fiction MW 1:30-3 Chandra, Vikram
Creative Writing Workshops
143A 2 Short Fiction Tues. 3:30-6:30 Mukherjee, Bharati
Creative Writing Workshops
143A 3 Short Fiction Thurs. 3:30-6:30 Oates, Joyce Carol
Creative Writing Workshops
143B 1 Verse TTh 11-12:30 Shoptaw, John
Poetry
Creative Writing Workshops
143N 1 Prose Nonfiction: Like & Love Thurs. 3:30-6:30 Farber, Thomas
Creative Writing Workshops
143T 1 Poetry Translation Workshop TTh 12:30-2 Hass, Robert L.
Creative Writing Workshops
165 1 Special Topics: Modern Latin American Fiction MWF 12-1 Campion, John
Special Topics
165 2 Special Topics: From Basho to Rilke: Studies in Modern Poetry in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction TTh 3:30-5 Francois, Anne-Lise
Special Topics
166 1 Special Topics: African American Literature from Reconstruction to Renaissance TTh 9:30-11 Carmody, Todd
African American Literature
Special Topics
166 2 Special Topics: Readings for Fiction Writers TTh 12:30-2 Mukherjee, Bharati
World Literature
Creative Writing Workshops
Special Topics
166 3 Special Topics: Infrastructuralism: Reading Setting in Literature and Film TTh 3:30-5 Eichenlaub, Justin
Film
Literary Theory
Special Topics
166 4 Special Topics: Freud, Marx, Nietzsche TTh 3:30-5 Ring, Joseph
Literary Theory
Special Topics
173 1 The Language and Literature of Films: Italian Cinema/Italian American Cinema TTh 2-3:30 + films W 6-9 P.M. Miller, D.A.
Special Topics
180A 1 Autobiography: Disability Memoir TTh 3:30-5 Kleege, Georgina
Special Topics
180L 1 Lyric Verse TTh 11-12:30 Miller, Jennifer
Poetry
180N 1 The Novel TTh 9:30-11 Speirs, Kenneth
American Literature
Novel
180R 1 The Romance TTh 12:30-2 Ring, Joseph
Renaissance and Early Modern
Shakespeare
Special Topics
190 1 Research Seminar: American Regionalism MW 12-1:30 Breitwieser, Mitchell
Research Seminars
190 2 Research Seminar: Portraits in Black: Dictator, Autocrat, Caudillo M 3-6 Danner, Mark
Research Seminars
190 4 Research Seminar: Nonsense MW 4-5:30 Hanson, Kristin
Research Seminars
190 6 Research Seminar: "A Gallery of Wonders": Literature and the Culture of Consumption in Post-Civil War America TTh 9:30-11 McQuade, Donald
Research Seminars
190 7 Research Seminar: Modern Folk: American Culture in the Thirties TTh 9:30-11 Pugh, Megan
American Literature
Research Seminars
190 8 Research Seminar: Roland Barthes: The Critic as Artist TTh 11-12:30 Miller, D.A.
Novel
Literary Theory
Research Seminars
190 9 Research Seminar: Jane Austen TTh 12:30-2 Francois, Anne-Lise
British 19th-Century
Novel
Research Seminars
190 10 Research Seminar: Virginia Woolf TTh 2-3:30 Abel, Elizabeth
British 20th- and 21st-Century
Research Seminars
190 11 Research Seminar: Native America/Early America TTh 2-3:30 Donegan, Kathleen
American Literature
Research Seminars
190 12 Research Seminar: Mark Twain TTh 2-3:30 Hirst, Robert H.
American Literature
Research Seminars
190 13 Research Seminar: Multilingualism & Middle English Literature TTh 3:30-5 Miller, Jennifer
Research Seminars
190 14 Research Seminar: Thomas Pynchon TTh 5-6:30 P.M. Gordon, Zachary
Research Seminars
190 15 Research Seminar: California Literature Since WWI Tues. 6-9 P.M. Starr, George A.
Research Seminars
190 16 Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M. Bader, Julia
Research Seminars
H195B 1 Honors Course TTh 9:30-11 Falci, Eric
Honors and Tutorial Courses
H195B 2 Honors Course TTh 12:30-2 Saul, Scott
Honors and Tutorial Courses
203 1 Graduate Readings: New World Tropics TTh 11-12:30 Donegan, Kathleen
Graduate Courses
203 2 Graduate Readings: Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond TTh 2-3:30 Goldsmith, Steven
Graduate Courses
203 3 Graduate Readings: Ethnic Avant-Gardes F 11-2 Lee, Steven Sunwoo
American Literature
African American Literature
World Literature
Literary Theory
Graduate Courses
217 1 Shakespeare M 3-6 Arnold, Oliver
Graduate Courses
243B 1 Poetry Writing Workshop Tues. 3:30-6:30 Hass, Robert L.
Poetry
Creative Writing Workshops
246K 1 Literature in English, 1900-1945: The Modernist Novel MW 10:30-12 Flynn, Catherine
Graduate Courses
250 1 Research Seminar: Visuality, Textuality, Cultural Memory W 1-4 Abel, Elizabeth
British 20th- and 21st-Century
Graduate Courses
250 2 Research Seminar: Mass Entertainment Thurs. 3:30-6:30 Knapp, Jeffrey
Graduate Courses
310 1 Field Studies in Tutoring Writing TBA Staff
Honors and Tutorial Courses