Announcement of Classes: Spring 2014

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, you can log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B are posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall).

BERKELEY CONNECT (previously designated "The Chernin Mentoring Program"):  Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98 sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198 sections 6 and 7 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198 sections 1-5 and 8-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43B. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, or 143N. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 7. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 7, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2013 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2014 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 31 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.


Course # Sec. Course Time Instructor
Course Area
R1A 1 Reading & Composition: That Way Madness Lies MWF 9-10 Kelly, Tyleen
R1A 2 Reading & Composition: The Afterworlds of the American Revolution, 1776-1819 MWF 1-2 Trocchio, Rachel
R1A 4 Reading & Composition: The Matter of Troy TTh 9:30-11 Hobson, Jacob
R1A 5 Reading & Composition: From Nature Writing to Ecopoetics TTh 11-12:30 Emerson, Maude
R1A 6 Reading & Composition: Life on the Inside and Outside TTh 12:30-2 Alexander, Edward Sterling
R1A 7 Reading & Composition: Sympathy and the Problem of Identification TTh 2-3:30 Ding, Katherine
R1A 8 Reading & Composition: Getting Outside Ourselves: Beyond Wilderness TTh 3:30-5 McWilliams, Ryan
R1B 1 Reading & Composition: How to Be Popular MWF 9-10 Dumont, Alex
R1B 2 Reading & Composition: Profane Illuminations MWF 10-11 Ahmed, Adam
R1B 3 Reading & Composition: (note new topic): Documents and Literature of the Undocumented MWF 10-11 Huerta, Javier
R1B 4 Reading & Composition: The Way We Read Now MWF 11-12 Ling, Jessica
R1B 5 Reading & Composition: Defenses of Poetry MWF 11-12 Ketz, Charity Corine
R1B 6 Reading & Composition: Representing American Education MWF 12-1 Huang, Lynn
R1B 7 Reading & Composition: Persuasion MWF 12-1 Moore, Stephanie Anne
R1B 8 Reading & Composition: Regions MWF 1-2 Chow, Juliana H.
R1B 9 Reading & Composition: Human Environments: Ecology, Evolution, and Literature MWF 2-3 Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
R1B 10 Reading & Composition: Representing California MWF 2-3 Lee, Richard Z
R1B 11 Reading & Composition: The Poetics of Honor MWF 3-4 Acu, Adrian Mark
R1B 12 Reading & Composition: Are There Stories? MWF 3-4 Greer, Erin
R1B 13 Reading & Composition: Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold MW 4-5:30 Hsu, Sharon
R1B 14 Reading & Composition: Photographic Memories MW 4-5:30 Yoon, Irene
R1B 15 Reading & Composition: Saints and Soldiers TTh 8-9:30 Borja, Jasmin
R1B 16 Reading & Composition: American Beauties TTh 9:30-11 Fleishman, Kathryn
R1B 17 Reading & Composition: The Hazards of Belief TTh 11-12:30 Langione, Matt
R1B 18 Reading & Composition: Making Heirs and Heirlooms TTh 12:30-2 Lorden, Jennifer
R1B 19 Reading & Composition: Still Life: Nature and Art TTh 3:30-5 Stancek, Claire Marie
R1B 20 Reading & Composition: Reader's Block TTh 3:30-5 Vandeloo, David Conigliaro
R1B 21 Reading & Composition: On the Case TTh 5-6:30 Cordes Selbin, Jesse
R1B 22 Reading & Composition: Shakespeare and Film TTh 5-6:30 Bahr, Stephanie M
20 1 Modern British and American Literature: Music and Literary Modernism TTh 3:30-5 Le, Serena
Special Topics
24 1 Freshman Seminar: The Arts and Culture at Berkeley and Beyond W 3-4 Padilla, Genaro M.
24 2 Freshman Seminar: Seeking Justice: The Art of Argument W 2-4 (1/29-3/12 only) Friedman, Donald M.
Freshman Seminars
24 3 Freshman Seminar: Mark Twain's Boys W 12-1 Hutson, Richard
Freshman Seminars
24 4 Freshman Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock W 2-3 Goble, Mark
Freshman Seminars
37 1 Chicana/o Literature and Culture MWF 1-2 Padilla, Genaro M.
Chicana/o and/or Latina/o
43B 1 Introduction to the Writing of Verse TTh 9:30-11 Gregory, Jane
Creative Writing Workshops
45A 1 Literature in English: Through Milton MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12 Arnold, Oliver
Introductory Surveys
45B 1 Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11 Goldsmith, Steven
Introductory Surveys
45B 2 Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3 Duncan, Ian
Introductory Surveys
45C 1 Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1 Abel, Elizabeth
Introductory Surveys
45C 2 Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4 Flynn, Catherine
Introductory Surveys
84 1 Sophomore Seminar: Woody Allen W 2-5 Bader, Julia
Sophomore Seminars
84 2 Sophomore Seminar: Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Films W 7-10 P.M. Starr, George A.
Sophomore Seminars
102 1 Topics in the English Language: The Structure of the English Language TTh 11-12:30 Hanson, Kristin
English Language and Linguistics
110 1 Medieval Literature: Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland - Visions of Other Worlds MWF 2-3 Thornbury, Emily V.
Old English
Middle English
111 1 Chaucer TTh 11-12:30 Miller, Jennifer
Middle English
114A 1 English Drama to 1603 TTh 2-3:30 Miller, Jennifer
Renaissance and Early Modern
117S 1 Shakespeare TTh 12:30-2 Altieri, Charles F.
Shakespeare
117S 2 Shakespeare MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4 Arnold, Oliver
Shakespeare
118 1 Milton TTh 3:30-5 Turner, James Grantham
Renaissance and Early Modern
120 1 Literature of the Later 18th Century TTh 9:30-11 Sorensen, Janet
British 18th-Century
121 1 Romantic Period MWF 2-3 Francois, Anne-Lise
British 19th-Century
127 1 Modern Poetry TTh 2-3:30 Blanton, C. D.
British 20th- and 21st-Century
American Literature
Poetry
130A 1 American Literature: Before 1800 MW 9:30-11 Tamarkin, Elisa
130D 1 American Literature: 1900-1945 TTh 11-12:30 Goble, Mark
American Literature
Novel
Poetry
C136 2 Topics in American Studies: The Great Exhaling: American History, Culture, and Politics, 1946-1952 TTh 3:30-5 + disc. sec. 201: W 2-3; disc. sec. 202: W 3-4; disc. sec. 203: Thurs. 10-11; disc. sec. 204: Thurs. 11-12 Moran, Kathleen and Marcus, Greil
American Literature
141 1 Modes of Writing: Exposition, Fiction, Verse, Etc. TTh 9:30-11 Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Creative Writing Workshops
143A 1 Short Fiction TTh 12:30-2 Kleege, Georgina
Creative Writing Workshops
143A 2 Short Fiction TTh 2-3:30 Tranter, Kirsten
Creative Writing Workshops
143B 1 Verse TTh 11-12:30 Shoptaw, John
Poetry
Creative Writing Workshops
143B 2 Verse W 3-6 Giscombe, Cecil S.
Creative Writing Workshops
143N 1 Prose Nonfiction Thurs. 3:30-6:30 Solnit, Rebecca
Creative Writing Workshops
161 1 Introduction to Literary Theory: Free Speech, in Theory TTh 2-3:30 Langan, Celeste
Novel
Poetry
Literary Theory
165 1 Special Topics: Donne: Poetry, Prose, Letters MW 4-5:30 Marno, David
165 2 Special Topics: Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century TTh 11-12:30 Lavery, Joseph
British 19th-Century
165 3 Special Topics: Modern Short Story Masters: James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, and Flannery O'Connor TTh 2-3:30 Campion, John
American Literature
World Literature
Special Topics
166 1 Special Topics: Theory of the Poet MWF 11-12 Thornbury, Emily V.
Poetry
Literary Theory
Special Topics
166 2 Special Topics: Contemporary British and Irish Poetry TTh 11-12:30 Falci, Eric
British 20th- and 21st-Century
Poetry
Special Topics
166AC 1 Special Topics in American Cultures: Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America TTh 11-12:30 Lee, Steven Sunwoo
American Cultures
171 1 Literature and Sexual Identity: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism MW 4-5:30 Abel, Elizabeth
British 20th- and 21st-Century
American Literature
Novel
174 1 Literature and History: Writing the British Nation TTh 12:30-2 Savarese, John L.
British 18th-Century
British 19th-Century
Novel
Poetry
Literary Theory
180A 1 Autobiography: Disability Memoir TTh 3:30-5 Kleege, Georgina
Special Topics
180H 1 Short Story MW 4-5:30 Chandra, Vikram
World Literature
Special Topics
180L 1 Lyric Verse TTh 9:30-11 Hass, Robert L.
Poetry
180N 1 The Novel MWF 12-1 Gordon, Zachary
Novel
190 1 Research Seminar: American Gothic MW 4-5:30 Donegan, Kathleen
American Literature
Research Seminars
190 2 Research Seminar: Charles Darwin and George Eliot MW 4-5:30 Duncan, Ian
British 19th-Century
Novel
Research Seminars
190 3 Research Seminar: Reflections of the French Revolution TTh 9:30-11 Knox, Marisa Palacios
British 19th-Century
Research Seminars
190 4 Research Seminar: Samuel Beckett TTh 11-12:30 Blanton, C. D.
British 20th- and 21st-Century
Novel
Drama
Research Seminars
190 5 Research Seminar: Reading Like a Victorian TTh 11-12:30 Browning, Catherine Cronquist
British 19th-Century
Novel
Research Seminars
190 7 Research Seminar: Cybernetics; or Control and Communication in the Postwar Novel TTh 12:30-2 Bernes, Jasper
American Literature
Novel
Research Seminars
190 8 Research Seminar: Moby Dick TTh 12:30-2 Breitwieser, Mitchell
American Literature
Novel
Research Seminars
190 9 Research Seminar: Literature of the Ocean TTh 12:30-2 Sorensen, Janet
British 18th-Century
Novel
Poetry
Research Seminars
190 11 Research Seminar: American Poetry After 1950 TTh 3:30-5 Altieri, Charles F.
American Literature
Poetry
Research Seminars
190 12 Research Seminar: Henry James TTh 3:30-5 Breitwieser, Mitchell
American Literature
Novel
Research Seminars
190 13 Research Seminar: Realism and Naturalism TTh 3:30-5 Goble, Mark
American Literature
Novel
Research Seminars
190 14 Research Seminar: Crisis and Culture: The 1930s, 1970s, and Post-2008 in Comparative Perspective TTh 3:30-5 Lee, Steven Sunwoo
Research Seminars
190 15 Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock MW 11-12:30 + films Tues. 7-10 P.M. Miller, D.A.
Film
Research Seminars
190 16 Research Seminar: Film Melodrama/The Woman's Film MW 5:30-7 P.M. + films W 7-10 P.M. Bader, Julia
Film
Research Seminars
H195B 1 Honors Course TTh 12:30-2 Serpell, C. Namwali
Honors and Tutorial Courses
H195B 2 Honors Course TTh 8-9:30 Langan, Celeste
Honors and Tutorial Courses
202 1 History of Literary Criticism W 2-5 Kahn, Victoria
English Language and Linguistics
Renaissance and Early Modern
Literary Theory
Graduate Courses
203 1 Graduate Readings: American Enlightenment and Revolution M 2-5 Tamarkin, Elisa
Graduate Courses
203 2 Graduate Readings: Campus/Novel/Theory Tues. 3:30-6:30 Serpell, C. Namwali
British 20th- and 21st-Century
American Literature
Novel
Literary Theory
Graduate Courses
203 4 Graduate Readings: African American Literature in the Twentieth Century F 11-2 Wagner, Bryan
American Literature
African American Literature
Graduate Courses
205B 1 Old English: Reading Beowulf TTh 2-3:30 O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Old English
Graduate Courses
243B 1 Poetry Writing Workshop M 11-2 O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Creative Writing Workshops
Graduate Courses
246E 1 Restoration and Early 18th Century TTh 12:30-2 Turner, James Grantham
British 18th-Century
Graduate Courses
246J 1 American Literature, 1855 to 1900 TTh 11-12:30 Best, Stephen M.
American Literature
African American Literature
Graduate Courses
246L 1 Literature in English, 1945 to the Present: In the Archive with American Fiction and Poetry TTh 9:30-11 Saul, Scott
American Literature
Graduate Courses
250 1 Research Seminars: Religion and Poetry in Early Modern England W 11-2 Marno, David
Renaissance and Early Modern
Poetry
Graduate Courses
250 2 Research Seminars: Aesthetics and the Orient Thurs. 3:30-6:30 Lavery, Joseph
British 19th-Century
World Literature
Literary Theory
Graduate Courses
310 1 Field Studies in Tutoring Writing TBA