Announcement of Classes: Fall 2008

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

250/1

Research Seminar:
Ecocriticism Meets Biopolitics

M 3-6

"This research seminar addresses two areas of literary and critical theory concerned with animal/human divides and the relationship between place, language and politics. ""Biopolitics"" commonly refers to the politicization of those areas of life that...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Turn to Language and the Writing of Everyday Life

MW 1:30-3

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of 20th/21st century �realism�; it will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, literary histori...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Colonial America in the Atlantic World

T 3:30-6:30

This course will locate colonial and early national texts from North America in the broad circuit of the Atlantic world, examining that Atlantic context both as a cultural arena and as a critical construction. Through close literary readings, we will ...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

T 3:30-6:30

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, and from prospectus conference to the first dissertation chapter. The workshop will provide a collaborative c...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

W 3-6

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical sch...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

205A/1

Graduate Readings:
Old English

MW 9-10:30

This class is intended to equip students with the linguistic and cultural knowledge necessary to read and analyze Old English texts in prose and verse. Much of the work for the earlier part of the course will consist of in-class translation and commen...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

212/1

Graduate Course:
Readings in Middle English

TTh 12:30-2

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

217/1

Graduate Course:
Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

"I expect this course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey and also to have seminar-like intellectual crossfire. We will take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but rather than approaching them systematically, we will wai...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

243B/1

Graduate Course:
Poetry Writing Workshop

M 3-6

"The point will be to write poetry in public spaces, to write with an eye toward performance/ publication. My assumption is that people entering the class will enter with projects underway and/ or with a strong interest in the problems and issues of p...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

246E/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include B...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

246J/1

Graduate Proseminar:
American Literature, 1855-1900

TTh. 2-3:30

"We will read widely in prose from the mid-nineteenth through the early-twentieth century, with particular attention to the ways in which pragmatism functioned as a seam for American literature and popular culture. We will begin - and - end the course...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald

250/3

Research Seminar:
William Blake

W 3-6

What does Blake mean by ?the Poets Work,? and how can that work be achieved ?Within a Moment? that has the length of a historical ?Period? but is also as brief as ?a Pulsation of the Artery?? We will read enough of Blake?s poetry to let us grapple wit...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

250/6

Research Seminar:
Modernist Critical Prose

W 3-6

"It is an odd fact of modernist literary history that a large number of the period?s major figures produced as much critical prose--by turns polemical, self-authorizing, speculative, outlandish, and extreme--as poetry or fiction. Scaling from aestheti...(read more) Blanton, Dan

302/1

Graduate Course:
The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Th 3:30-5:30

Please email dbeam@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

310/1

Graduate Course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Poetry and the Varieties of English

MWF 9-10

"Students are often enjoined to read �the great authors� in order to absorb �good English.� But English has so many variations across time and space that it�s hard to imagine what that could possibly mean. In this course, we�ll read a lot of poetry in...(read more) Natalia Cecire

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Fictional Educations

MWF 10-11

"Everyone experiences childhood, but representing that experience from the perspective of adulthood is often an act as much of imagination as of memory. This course will engage with texts that undertake that imaginative act. We will discuss how these ...(read more) Arcadia Falcone

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Contemporary African American and Asian American Experimental Poetry

MWF 11-12

"Within the traditions of contemporary African American and Asian American poetry, a category of self-identified ?experimental? writing has emerged recently. What is minority ?experimental? poetry? One of the primary aims of this course is to familiar...(read more) Chris Chen

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Industry

MWF 2-3

"The problem of labor preoccupied writers of prose, fiction, and poetry during the reign of Queen Victorian, a period of industrial and urban expansion in England. The discourse around labor overlapped with aesthetic discourse, as both addressed the a...(read more) Jhoanna Infante

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Noir Fiction and Film

MW 4-5:30

"This course focuses on the period of American fiction and cinema often referred to as �Noir,� a cycle of crime and detective stories dating roughly from 1939 to 1958. We will begin the semester by trying to get at what exactly makes noir fiction and ...(read more) Chris Eagle

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Playing with Literature

TTh 8-9:30

"For this course, we will look at a handful of texts that equate �reading� and �writing� with �playing.� In these texts, stories become games, books become toys, and passive reading becomes active participation. We will consider a handful of theoretic...(read more) Jesse Costantino

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
The African Writer

TTh 9:30-11

"Africa's literatures are old, rich, and vast, from epic poems and religious verse to an extensive dramatic and storytelling folk culture that can be found in almost every corner of the continent. This class, however, will focus on *modern * African w...(read more) Aaron Bady

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

2-3:30

No additional information about this class is available at this time. ...(read more) Carlo Arreglo

R1A/14

Reading & Composition:
The Garden and the Century of Revolution: English Poetry, 1600-67

TTh 3:30-5

"Earth felt the wound, and nature from her seat Sighing gave signs of woe, that all was lost. -- John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667)We will read and write about environmentally engaged poetry of seventeenth-century England as we develop practical fluenc...(read more) Brendan M. Prawdzik

R1A/15

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

TTh 5-6:30

No additional information about this class is available at this time....(read more) Karen Leibowitz

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Authenticity, Fraud, and Representation

MWF 9-10

"Visual art may include: Rubens, Goya, Corot, Warhol, Koons. This course will consider the relationship between concepts of fraud and authenticity in literature, using this basic opposition to explore questions about originality, representation, and i...(read more) Ben Cannon

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
The Southernization of America : The 1930s to the 1950s

MWF 11-12

"In 1927, the Mississippi River flooded some 27,000 square miles of American heartland, displacing hundreds of thousands of Southerners. Two years later, the stock market bottomed out and triggered the Great Depression. These national catastrophes pro...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Stylin�

MWF 2-3

"In this class we will consider style as a literary and a cultural problematic. We will endeavor to find precise ways of talking about the distinctive style of a text, and we will think about style in a broader sense, as a currency that promises creat...(read more) Stephen Katz

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
"The Ghostly Time of the �Present� has no Boundaries

Instructor: David Menilla"

MWF 3-4

"The texts we will read in this course will challenge us to think about how a story is constructed. Our imagination and critical thinking skills will be stretched to their limits by novels which disrupt assumptions we may have about how a story develo...(read more) David Menilla

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Vagrancy

TTh 8-9:30

"When did it become potentially criminal to be poor? Why is vagrancy a source of such contention and anxiety for so many? What are some of the popular myths and fantasies about vagrancy and homelessness, and where did they come from? What are the stor...(read more) Ruth Baldwin

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Literature and the City

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will consider the ways in which literature has responded to the city and its accompanying modes of life: alienating, unhealthful and frightening; thrilling, liberatory and glamorous; the site of torments and marvels; of endless workdays a...(read more) Jasper Bernes

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Illogical Fictions

TTh 11-12:30

"As you will learn in this course, the key to good writing is impeccable logic, but as you will also learn, good writing is often terribly illogical. Although that statement may make little sense, it should give you a good idea of the kinds of logic y...(read more) Monica Miller

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Imagining Elizabeth

TTh 12:30-2

"This course will examine the many ways in which the figure of Queen Elizabeth I fired the imagination of her contemporaries and of recent writers and directors. We will use Elizabeth as a touchstone; a central topic around which we will build skills ...(read more) Fiona Smythe

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
In the Wake of War

TTh 2-3:30

Wars punctuate and define our history. Governments declare armistices, but do we ever really move past the moment of battle? In the wake of death, what new forms of living emerge? In this course, we?ll focus on texts which play out the days, months an...(read more) Gina Patnaik

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Secrecy and Detection

TTh 3:30-5

"The critical reader may easily fall into the habit of regarding even the most innocent tale as a case awaiting solution, such that every bright country cottage or society salon becomes a crime scene to be scrutinized by the inch. Leaving aside the qu...(read more) Dan Clinton

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Documents

TTh 5-6:30

"The document is a fragment that takes on a life of its own. An idea, a perception, an image gets uprooted and reframed, sculpted or distorted, and formed into something new. The result has an aura of 'the real'. Think of documents like your passport,...(read more) Josh Weiner
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth Night

M 12-1

"This seminar will investigate the nature of Shakespearean comedy in Twelfth Night, which involves disguise, cross-dressing, gender-bending, mistaken identities, and misdirected affections. The seminar will read the entire play through in the first we...(read more) A. Nelson

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
POSTPONED TILL SPRING 2009

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Rethinking Hemingway

W 2-3

The past two decades have seen a dramatic reassessment of Ernest Hemingway. Departing from earlier critical traditions that first celebrated him as a macho sportsman, then vilified him as a misogynist, a homophobe, and a racist, the current critical r...(read more) Snyder, Katie

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
The Mystery of Edwin Drood

M 3-5 (September 15 through November 3 only)

"Dickens's last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, is the most successful mystery story ever written. Dickens died before finishing it, or solving the mystery. Unlike other mystery stories, it fails to reassure us that justice is done, and forces us t...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
The Monster in the Mirror: Frankenstein and Dracula

W 4-5

We will read Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, together with some film versions of these two archetypal horror tales, appreciating them as mirror opposites of each other, and investigating what they have to tell us about human age...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

W 2-3

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 10-11 in 50 Birge (Starting 9/17), plus one hour of discussion section F 10-11

This course will concentrate on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Spenser's Faery Queene (Book I); and Milton's Paradise Lost; additional works in the Norton Anthology will be read for the sake of historical context. If this course has a thesis, it is that ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan H.

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MWF3-4

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions f...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through the Mid-19th Century

MWF 9-10

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly become commonplace i...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through the Mid-19th Century

MW 2-3, F 2-3

This course will be a survey of some major texts in British and American literature written between 1670 and 1850. There will probably be two papers and mid-term and a final. Texts are three Norton anthologies, which come cheaper ordered together, the...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12, F 11-12

English 45C will offer a survey of major texts in British and American literature from about 1880 until 1950. Thanks to Lyn Hejinian, this class will provide a distinctive opportunity. Students admitted to her 143B/1 course will also enroll in this se...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, F 3-4

"A survey of English and American literature from the late nineteenththrough the mid-twentieth century, with attention given both to conceptions of literature intrinsically claimed by the texts assigned and to the historical and cultural grounds out o...(read more) John Bishop

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

Lectures TTh 12:30-2, plus one and a half hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Garrison

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Contemporary Native American Short Fiction

T 4-6, Sept 2 to Oct 21 only

Contemporary Native American stories are survival stories, reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences: they calculate indigenous positions, settle overdue accounts, note old debts, and demand an accounting. These a...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Socrates as a Cultural Icon

W 3-5

"Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. We will read Aristophanes' comic send-up of Socrates in Clouds and the P...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John

84/3

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture/Low Culture: Film Genres and the Cinema of Ang Lee

W 5:30-8:30 P.M.

This course will examine the formal techniques, expectations, experiences, and thematic concerns of some of Ang Lee's films, in the context of Hollywood and foreign films. We will also take advantage of the resources of Cal Performances and the Pacifi...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Late 18th-Century British Literature

MW 1:30-3

The theme of this course is the discourse of travel in later eighteenth-century British literature. In this, the period of the �grand tour,� developing ideas of cultural identity and national identity inflect travelers� perceptions of both the foreign...(read more) Murphy, Fiona
Murphy, Fiona

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Coercion and Reproduction (�birth,� �death,� �love,� and �family�) in modern Black Feminist Fiction .

MW 12-1:30

This course is premised on the notion that the threat of death (e.g. the threat of lynching) is the most fundamental mode of coercion and that oppressive social structures like slavery and Jim Crow society are grounded on the deployment of that threat...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Toni Morrison

MW 4-5:30

An examination of the development of various themes in Toni Morrison's fiction and the aesthetic rendition of these themes....(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Children's Literature: Up Close and Personal

MW 4-5:30

Please email kwright@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

100/7

Junior Seminar:
American Literature and the News

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the interconnections between American literature and the news throughout the 20 th-21 st centuries. We will read theoretical and primary texts to scrutinize how American writers, graphic novelists, and photojournalists affirm,...(read more) Nguyen, Marguerite
Nguyen, Marguerite

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Caribbean Literature

M 3-6

In 1955 the leading Caribbean intellectual and political leader Eric Williams characterized the new writing coming out of the region as ?a literature of poverty, oppression, ignorance, violence, sex, and racial friction.? From such inauspicious beginn...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Immigrant Narratives: Migration, Nation, Empire

TTh 12:30-2

This course examines the relationship between imperialism and migration through literary texts. We will look at notions of space, the homeland, and belonging. We will also pay attention to the way in which authors engage with U.S. imperial history....(read more) Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Literature of California and the West Up to World War I

TTh 2-3:30

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Henry James and Edith Wharton

TTh 2-3:30

This course considers major texts by Henry James and Edith Wharton in light of their shared fascination with marriage, manners, and extravagant wealth. Our readings will survey the shape of each author?s career, beginning with some of James?s earlier ...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

100/12

Junior Seminar:
"""The Parasite"" - Dyads in Modern and Postmodern Literature "

TTh 2-3:30

Jacques Lacan has said that ?the first object of desire is to be recognized by the other.? The subject does not desire autonomously; who he is and what he wants are the by-products of a social relation. In this course, we will focus on perverse manife...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika

105/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Anglo-Saxon England

MW 10:30-12

"Who were the Angelcynn? What were the English like before they were �English�?The name �Anglo-Saxon England� is a relatively modern term to designate peoples and kingdoms that, across several centuries before the Norman Conquest, knew themselves by v...(read more) O�Brien O�Keeffe, Katherine

110/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Medieval Literature

TTh 9:30-11

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

111/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Chaucer

MW 5-6:30

This course will concentrate on Chaucer?s two greatest works, the Troilus and Criseyde and the Canterbury Tales, glancing more quickly at other bits of his oeuvre and at pieces of the literary tradition he assembled from Latin, French, and Italian sou...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

114B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
English Drama from 1603 to 1700

TTh 3:30-5

The English theater was the first mass medium, an avowedly commercial, hyper-competitive, fad-driven industry of sound and spectacle, which both catered to and ruthlessly parodied the sophisticated, novelty-craving consumerism of the seventeeth centur...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

115A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

TTh 2-3:30

"This will be a survey course, but a highly selective one. Although I plan to look at the best and/or most interesting work of several lesser sixteenth-century writers--for instance, some lyrics by Wyatt and some by Sidney, and Surrey's blank verse--I...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Elizabethan Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we�re going to trace the development of Shakespeare�s dramatic work over the first half of his career, as he became the premier playwright of London�s leading stage company. We�ll also read many of his sonnets, which are related themat...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 3:30-5

This course is designed to give you a sense of the range of Shakespeare�s career. Lectures will focus on two related topics: first, how Shakespeare uses plot and character to think about literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophica...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

119/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Augustan Age

TTh 2-3:30

"The period from the ""Restoration"" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the most influent...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

127/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Modern Poetry

MW 1-2, sections F 1-2

A survey of the modernist turn in poetry. This course will explore some of the more remarkable (and occasionally notorious) formal experiments of the twentieth century�s turbulent first half. We will contend with work from Britain, Ireland, and the Un...(read more) Blanton, Dan

130B/1

American Literature:
American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 11-12:30

This class moves from the early national period to the Civil War and surveys the oral and written histories, autobiographies, novels, stories, private letters, public appeals, speeches, and poems of this age of reform, romance, and rebellion. We will ...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

130C/1

American Literature:
American Literature: 1865-1900

MWF 10-11

A survey in United States literature from the Civil War to the beginning of the twentieth century. Course requirements include weekly reading responses, two essays, one midterm, and one final exam. ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

130D/1

American Literature:
American Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 2-3

This course will survey a range of significant works of American literature from the first half of the twentieth century, paying particular attention to literary form and technique ?- to formal innovation and style -- as responses to the experience of...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

133A/1

A.A. Literature:
African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

MWF 2-3

A survey of major African American writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath. There will be weekly writing, a midterm, two essays, and a final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

C136/1

Topics In American Studies:
American Literature and the City

Lectures TTh 12:30-2 in 390 Hearst Mining, plus one hour of discussion section per week

Co-taught by a literary scholar and a historian, this course offers an interdisciplinary examination of how the American metropolis has been portrayed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in novels, short stories, poetry, journalism, essays, phot...(read more) Otter, Sam and Henkin, David

143A/1

Short Fiction:
Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This is a course on the form, theory and practice of short fiction. Students are required to fulfill assignments on specific aspects of craft, analyze aesthetic strategies in selected stories by published authors, and to write approximately 45 pages o...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

143A/2

Short Fiction:
Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

A short fiction workshop, with accompanying readings from a contemporary anthology. Typically, workshops are free-wheeling explorations of form, style and content and this one will be no different. Course demands: depending upon the final size of the...(read more) Blaise, Clark
Blaise, Clark

143A/3

Short Fiction:
Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop where students will submit and discuss their own short fiction. We will also closely examine the work of published writers. Students will complete 3 short writing assignments approximately 40 pages of...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143B/1

Verse:
Verse

MW 4-5:30

"This version of English 143B will be tied in with Prof. Charles Altieri?s English 45C/1 class; for entrance into this 143B class, students must be enrolled in (or, under special circumstances, auditing) that 45C class. This 143b/45c connection is int...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

143B/2

Verse:
Verse

TTh 11-12:30

Please email jshoptaw@berkeley.edu for more information regarding this course. ...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Prose Nonfiction

TTh 2-3:30

This course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are expected to fulfill specific assignments and to write approximately 45 pages of original non-fictional narrative. ...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

143T/1

Poetry Translation:
Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

The purpose of the class is to give students a chance to work on verse translation, to share translations and give and receive feedback on their work, to read about the theory and practice of translation, and perhaps to try out different practices and...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: James Joyce

MWF 11-12

"A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaz...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

150/2

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CONVERTED TO 100/1

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150/4

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: Irish Writing From 1890 to the Present

MW 4-5:30

"This course surveys some of the most popular Irish literature in the last one hundred years. Irish Writing in the early part of the 20th century was part of a cultural revolution that culminated in a political revolution, a war of independence and th...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Virtual Worlds: Wonderland and Wessex: Lewis Carroll and Thomas Hardy

TTh 11-12:30

By focusing on the starkly different fictional worlds created by two (late) nineteenth-century writers, Lewis Carroll and Thomas Hardy, this course is designed to raise questions about the phenomenology of representation. How do these writers produce ...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

150/6

Senior Seminar:
The Literary Image

TTh 12:30-2

Reading relies on the neural and cognitive mechanisms of actual perception, but what this reliance tells us about the actual experience of readers is far from clear; there is no consensus regarding the proper definition or even the very existence of t...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

150/7

Senior Seminar:
Modern Horror

TTh 12:30-2

Within the past decade, the phenomenon of J-horror (originally Japanese, but now associated with other Asian countries) has gone from minor cult status to accepted Hollywood convention, due to the success of American adaptations like The Ring. But as ...(read more) Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa

150/9

Senior Seminar:
The New York School

TTh 2-3:30

"Met these four boys Frank O?Hara, John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch, and Jimmy Schuyler?at the Cedar Bar in ?52 or ?53. Met them through Bill (de Kooning) who was a friend of theirs and they admired Kline and all those people. Painters who went to the Cedar...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville

TTh 3:30-5

We will immerse ourselves in the careers of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, taking up issues of literary influence, biography, psychology, authorship, sexuality, aesthetics, and politics. Readings will include a variety of works by the two wr...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Utopian Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

160/1

Special Topics:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 9:30-11

What gives literature its special status, both as an art form and as a culturally important discourse? Does the value of literature reside in its power to improve society? In the quality of the emotion it produces? In the type of knowledge it makes po...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

165/1

Special Topics:
Greek Drama in Translation

TTh 9:30-11

"The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early sources ...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John

166/1

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

Visual art may include: Rubens, Goya, Corot, Warhol, Koons. This course will consider the relationship between concepts of fraud and authenticity in literature, using this basic opposition to explore questions about originality, representation, and id...(read more) Naiman, Eric

166/2

Special Topics:
The Global South: William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, & Sandra Cisneros

MWF 11-12

This course is an intensive and rigorous course in the literature of the Americas and in trans-American literary and cultural criticism. We will be reading intensively and extensively, and the format of our course requires constant attendance. Our cou...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

166/3

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines the intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays that not only track the social and hi...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Performance in the 20th-Century U.S.

MWF 11-12

"This course is two courses wrapped up in one. First, it offers a selected history of major innovations in American popular culture of the last hundred years ? from the origins of the American culture industries in blackface minstrelsy, ragtime, and j...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

170/1

Literature:
Literature and the Arts

MWF 11-12

"Literature, especially poetry, has in common with one other art, music, that a key element of its aesthetic structure is rhythm. This course will explore rhythm, considering how even its most basic forms are similar yet also different in each of thes...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

179/1

Literature:
Literature and Linguistics

MWF 2-3

It is a commonplace that the medium of literature is language. This course will develop a substantive understanding of this relationship through a survey of literary forms defined by special linguistic structures, and an exploration of how these struc...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

180A/1

Literature:
Autobiography: Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

"Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these tex...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180L/1

Literature:
Lyric Verse

TTh 11-12:30

We will spend much of the semester sorting out what the title of this course means. We?ll start by thinking about the so-called ?roots of lyric,? not only Sappho and Greek lyric, but other forms and shapes that are deeply buried within the matrices of...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

180N/1

Literature:
The Novel: The American Novel Since 1900

MWF 1-2

A survey of the American novel, its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextua- lity. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics�what is beautiful? how do we know? what ought we do?�i...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

195A/1

Honors Course:
Honors Course

MW 12-1:30

We will spend most of the first semester sampling readings in literary theory, introducing such topics as poststructuralism (Barthes, Derrida, Lyotard); sex, gender, and performativity (Irigaray, Butler, Sedgwick, Miller); and various modes of cultura...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

195A/2

Honors Course:
Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

The purpose of this section of H195 is to provide an exposure to literary theory that should be of equal value to honors projects belonging to earlier and later periods. The approach taken to the reading, however, will likely be most useful to student...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

195A/3

Honors Course:
Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

The fall component of this year-long course-- in which students develop a topic, conduct research, and write a thesis of 40+ pages--will provide an intensive introduction to key issues in literary theory and familiarize you with the tools and conventi...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste