Announcement of Classes: Spring 2011

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Performing Revenge

MWF 3-4

Murder, mutilation, madness, imprisonment, adultery, cannibalism, torture, and rape: this gruesome list forms not only revengers’ prime motives, but also the tools of their vengeance.  Is this only fitting or a perverse paradox?  What is the morality...(read more) Bahr, Stephanie M
Bahr, Stephanie

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Nineteenth-Century American Consolation Novels

TTh 5-6:30

In this class, we will study the nineteenth-century American consolation novel.  Reading consolation novels in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the following question:  How did these texts both reflect a...(read more) Auclair Fritz, Tracy

R1B/4

Reading and Composition

This section has been canceled....(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MWF 3-4

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different k...(read more) Bednarska, Dominica

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1990s, we’ll read stories of death, captivity, and the pursuit of misery. Jul...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 12:30 - 2

In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1990s, we’ll read stories of death, captivity, and the pursuit of misery. Jul...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
The Monster in the Mirror

TTh 2-3:30

A woman in the shape of a monster a monster in the shape of a woman the skies are full of them         ~Adrienne Rich A monster can be defined as a creature who is not human and who is exiled from human society.  We will refine and complicate this w...(read more) Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Apocalyptic and Dystopian Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, governmental corruption—we’ve learned to live with it.  But a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature helps awaken us to the horrors of these regrettably familiar aspects of life in the twent...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Free Speech and You

TuTh 5-6:30

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.  You find y...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
Other Minds

TTh 5-6:30

It’s often been suggested that fiction is defined by the access it grants us to other minds.  While historians speculate about what their subjects must have thought, novelists can provide their readers direct access to the inner workings of character...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley

W 11-12

The goal of the course is to help students to feel confident in talking about the arts and to take pleasure in that confidence, as well as to feel at home in the various venues that exhibit art and performance at Berkeley. We will discuss how best to...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 9:30-11

Introduction to the Writing of Verse is a reading course as well as a writing course, designed to introduce you to poems written in a wide range of poetic forms and styles, with a wide variety of subjects and approaches. It is also designed to offer ...(read more) Beck, Rachel
Beck, Rachel

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions ...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings thi...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course will offer a survey attempting to represent the most important imaginative writing in Britain and the U.S. from about 1680 to 1860. My primary interest is in providing the critical and social frameworks that will help you not only enjoy w...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course is an introduction to British and America literature from the late-seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries.  We will trace how literary forms and genres adapt across the period to new kinds of knowledge and understanding, while c...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world. We will concentrate on t...(read more) Blanton, Dan

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modern...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
The "Odd Woman"

TTh 9:30-11

"So many odd women--no making a pair with them." This course will examine the figure of the "odd woman" in a variety of texts. The term "odd women" arose in the nineteenth century to describe women who could not (and in some cases would not) marry. N...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Reading and Eating

TTh 12:30-2

What does it mean to "digest" something, and what does reading have to do with eating? From Adam and Eve eating the apple to communicants eating the body and blood of Christ, eating in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England was fraught with confu...(read more) Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 2-3:30

Children's Literature is a complex subject of intersecting concerns. Ideas about childhood and about what is good or bad for children rub up against commercial interests and the interests of educators and parents, not to mention those of the (suppose...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Woody Allen

Thurs. 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology. The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Ar...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

115A/1

The English Renaissance (Through the 16th Century)

TTh 2-3:30

An interdisciplinary exploration of literature produced in England mainly from 1550 to 1600 -- a period of considerable shifts not only in social, political, and ideological formations, but also in literary production and consumption. Our general app...(read more) Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko

117B/1

Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomedies). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll c...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 3:30-5

This course will focus on Shakespeare's plays as plays, as moment-to-moment actions on the minds of audiences. I will take up some other topics related to the plays--Shakespeare's stage, printing practices, socio- and political contexts (and so on)--...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joseph

125B/1

The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel--as opposed, for instance, to the poem or the essay--...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 2-3:30

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into literary texts; and t...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

TTh 12:30-2

In the wake of the Civil War, six crises preoccupy American fiction: nationality, cities, race, wealth and misery, technology, and gender. In this course we will explore the ways in which these areas of urgent concern intersect one another. Two seven...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

131/1

American Poetry:
How to Read: 20th-Century American Poetry

TTh 9:30-11

This course will provide an overview of American modernist poetry, addressing key concepts in modernism including impersonality, the crisis of representation, and abstraction. Among these, however, the course will take as its primary area of investig...(read more) Cecire, Natalia
Cecire, Natalia

132/1

The American Novel

MWF 1-2

A survey of major novels written in the United States between the end of slavery and the start of the Civil Rights Movement. Two essays, midterm, and final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

MW 4-5:30

A survey of major African American writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath. There will be a midterm, two essays, and a final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

134/1

Contemporary Literature

TTh 12:30-2

This course will entail serious and sustained reflection upon the two terms invoked in its title: "literature" and "the contemporary." Our reading list will feature a series of very recent works (almost all written within the last decade), emphasizin...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Progressive Era

MWF 2-3

We will look at a number of books, films, etc. from or about the U.S. in the early 20th century, roughly 1890-1916. Modern United States begins to be formed definitively in this period, with important developments in the economy (large corporations, ...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicana and Chicano Films

MWF 10-11

An introduction to the study of Chicana/o films produced in the second half of the twentieth century.  In this course we will analyze films directed by Moctesuma Esparza, Paul Espinosa, Harry Gamboa, Jr., Efrain Gutierrez, Edward James Olmos, Sylvia ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Postcolonial Narrative

TTh 9:30-11

At the midpoint of the twentieth century much of the world was still ruled by a handful of European colonial powers. Today nearly all the world is comprised of formally independent nations. This course will consider the literature that has arisen as ...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 3:30-5

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing -- fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will wr...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M. J.)

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop where students will submit and discuss their own short fiction. We will also closely examine the work of published writers. Students will complete 3 short writing assignments and approximately 40 pag...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143B/1

Verse

MW 4-5:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing ...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

143B/2

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today--aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & ...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

TTh 12:30-2

This will be a course in the essay, and it is designed to help students who are writing an undergraduate thesis-length paper. We will begin by getting acquainted with various kinds of essays (narrative and descriptive, personal and research-based, cr...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing

TTh 3:30-5

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adven...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143N/3

Prose Nonfiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Rooms and Lives: a creative or literary nonfiction workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped in class three 10-20 page piece...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

152/1

Women Writers:
Early American Women Writers

TTh 2-3:30

This course will survey the writing of American women from narratives of colonial settlement through the novels of the early republic. During this period, women produced immensely popular works and developed major literary traditions that would funda...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic "Republic of Letters." Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the "Enlightenment" and "Romanticism" (terms for cultural movements and historical pe...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Medievalism and Art

MWF 11-12

Loved, hated, imitated, and mocked (sometimes by the same people), the medieval-inspired style of the Gothic Revival was inescapable in Britain and America during the nineteenth century, and its legacy is still visible today. In this class, we will t...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 + films Thurs. 7-10 p.m.

We will examine film noir's influence on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

Rather than focus simply on literary representations of disability, in this course we will try to think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act theory, ficti...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these tex...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While sc...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

190/1

Research Seminar:
Music and Poetry

MW 10-11:30

From a number of different angles, we will approach a single, complicated question: what is the relationship between poetry and music? The two arts have been paired for millennia, and there have been many moments in literary and musical history in wh...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

190/2

Research Seminar:
The Continental Renaissance

MW 10-11:30

This course will survey some of the major prose writings of the continental Renaissance. In addition to situating these works in their cultural and historical contexts, we will consider running topics such as the social function of rhetoric; humanism...(read more) Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph

190/3

Research Seminar:
Stages of Conflict: Alternative Early Modern English Theater Traditions

MW 4-5:30

This course will push against scholarly paradigms that have separated the early modern stage from the era's turbulent religious and political conflicts.  It will challenge assumptions about the early modern dramatic canon, exposing permeable borders ...(read more) Prawdzik, Brendan
Prawdzik, Brendan

190/4

Research Seminar:
Herman Melville

MW 11:30-1

This course takes a close and critical look at the literary career of Herman Melville, from his first sea narratives through Moby-Dick, his Civil War poetry, and Billy Budd.  We will read each work within its historical and intellectual contexts, wit...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

190/5

Research Seminar:
Literature of California Since WWI

MW 3-4:30

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cal...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

190/6

Research Seminar:
The Literature of Utopia, Anti-Utopia, & Dystopia

TTh 11-12:30

"A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not even worth glancing at, for it leaves out the one country at which Humanity is always landing. And when Humanity lands there, it looks out, and, seeing a better country, sets sail." Utopia evoke...(read more) Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven

190/7

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 11-12:30

This is an intensive seminar in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will learn how to read (to describe and interpret) Dickinson's poems, with pleasure and confidence, deeply and also broadly throughout her career. Topics will include early poetry &amp...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

190/8

Research Seminar:
My Lost City: (Post)-Modernist and Post-9/11 Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

In 1948, referring to the nuclear threat from the Soviet Union, E. B. White wrote that "the city, for the first time in its long history, is destructible. A single flight of planes no bigger than a wedge of geese can quickly end this island fantasy, ...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

190/9

Research Seminar:
Victorian Mysteries

TTh 12:30-2

This class will explore the invention of Mystery as a literary genre. We will discuss the historical development of professional detectives in the 1840s and the creation of detective fiction soon thereafter. We will read a gripping history of the fir...(read more) Leibowitz, Karen D.
Leibowitz, Karen

190/10

Research Seminar:
Homocinema

TTh 12:30-2 + film screenings Wednesdays 5-7:30 P.M.

Under the assumption that male homosexual fantasy is not the peculiar coinage of a homosexual brain, but the common, even central daydream of the normal world, the course identifies three modes of broaching it in narrative cinema. In Hollywood classi...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

190/11

Research Seminar:
Christopher Marlowe

TTh 2-3:30

Marlowe invented the modern theater, unleashing a power of spectacle, dialogue, and oratory that instantly addicted much of the teeming city of London and horrified the rest. This seminar will use the unbounded, amoral ambition of Marlowe's staged pr...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

190/12

Research Seminar:
"Rotten English"--on contemporary dialect literature

TTh 3:30-5

The English were unique in assuming that the word “barbarism” encompassed both language and social condition – taking it to refer to both the specific mistakes that non-native speakers made when essaying a strange language and the absence of culture ...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

190/13

Research Seminar:
Nathaniel Hawthorne

TTh 3:30-5

We will be reading Nathanial Hawthorne. Two ten page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation. English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major b...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/14

Research Seminar:
Modernist Poetry and Poetics

TTh 11-12:30

"Nothing changes from generation to generation except the thing seen and that makes a composition," Gertrude Stein writes in "Composition as Explanation," insisting that "each generation has something different at which they are all looking." This co...(read more) Fisher, Jessica
Fisher, Jessica

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Professor Sorensen in Fall 2010. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Sorensen will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

H195B/2

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Professor Picciotto in Fall 2010. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor PIcciotto will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in Novembe...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Medieval Studies

"Check back later for more information!"

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics

TTh 9:30-11

As an introduction to the problems and questions raised by aesthetics, this class will navigate between the following quotations, which can serve as our epigraphs: 1) "If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have to appro...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Birth and Death in Neo-slave and Jim Crow Feminist Narratives

TTh 2-3:30

Building on O. Patterson's notion of "social death" and my own definition of the "death-bound-subject," this course will examine black feminist (mostly neo-slave and Jim Crow) narratives that are concerned with the "birthing" of the death-bound-subje...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Tolstoy and Realism

M 6-9 P.M.

This is a team-taught course with Mark Danner, journalist, war correspondent and professor in the graduate school of journalism and Robert Hass from the English department. The aim of the course is to read through the major novels, novellas, and stor...(read more) Danner, Mark
Hass, Robert, and Danner, Mark

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Alfred Hitchcock

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at damiller@berkeley.edu. This course is cross-listed with Film 240 section 3....(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

205B/1

Old English

F 1-4

Ever since 1840, when two scholars simultaneously announced that the runes in three Old English poems spelled out the name "Cynewulf," the subject of this seminar has been entangled in controversy. Through a close reading of the four "signed" poems (...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

218/1

Milton

MW 1-2:30

We will explore John Milton's entire career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This graduate fiction workshop will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction. Workshop participants are required to (1) write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction (e.g. several short stories and/or chapters of a novel-in-progress)...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a. k. a. Blaise, B.)

246G/1

Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

A reading-intensive survey of major and minor texts of the Romantic period, with special attention to how writers understand "things"--particularly things like air, water, bodies, ideas, words, revolution, war, and poems....(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

246J/1

American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not” – f...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

250/1

Research Seminar:
Bondage and Freedom in Early Modern English Culture

W 3-6

We will begin with three aims (and then see where our various interests take us): (1) to piece out a literary, philosophical, and political history of the early modern exceptionalist claim that the English were uniquely free and freedom-loving and bo...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

250/2

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the End of Europe: 1914-45

W 3-6

In the summer of 1914, despite a century's talk of revolution, most of the major powers of Europe were titular monarchies (and most of the titular monarchs were cousins). Despite decades of rapid industrialization, most of the continent's economies r...(read more) Blanton, Dan

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Transnational and Comparative Turns in American Ethnic Literature

W 3-6

The study of race and ethnicity across national boundaries has become an academic norm. It is now widely accepted that nation-based methods and approaches risk limiting our understanding of ethnic literatures and histories. Thus, in African American ...(read more) Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven

250/4

Research Seminar:
Melville's Forms

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In 1986, in the influential volume Ideology and Classic American Literature, Sacvan Bercovitch and Myra Jehlen used "the example of Melville" to make their case for a historically and politically informed literary criticism. In this seminar, at a dif...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel

250/5

Research Seminar:
Writing and Reading Cultural History: Ireland in the 1930s

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The primary aim of this course is to consider how we read and study literary and cultural history. The focus of the course is on the culture of Ireland in the 1930s and by the end of this course students will have a broad understanding of this cultur...(read more) Pine, Emily

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

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ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, October 15.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43A, 43B, 143A, 143B, 143N, 243A): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43A or 43B, and only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, or 143N. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243A. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the appropriate application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 4. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 4, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2010 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime this November.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2011 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 28 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.