Announcement of Classes: Summer 2022

Summer 2022 schedule is subject to change.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Sally Rooney: Popularity and the Popular

TWTh 9-11:30
Session: D

What makes a novel popular? What makes a person popular? When we read stories, why do we want to know the characters, go to the places they’re going and hear more of what they have to say? This class critically interrogates the idea of popularity by l...(read more) D'Silva, Eliot

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Thinking through Memory in Poetry and Fiction

TWTh 12-2:30
Session: A

How and why do we remember? What does ‘memory’ mean to both an individual and a culture? How do fictional narrators construct their memorial landscapes? In this class we will explore the topic of memory as it appears in a wide variety of genres and st...(read more) Swensen, Dana

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Poetry and the Art of Cultivation

TWTh 10-12
Session: C

What should we make of a poem that proposes to instruct its readers on the proper methods for manufacturing cider? Or on how to care for one’s sheep or cultivate sugarcane on a colonial plantation? Are such poems simply agricultural almanacs in verse?...(read more) Bircea, Jason
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

117S/1

Shakespeare

TWTh 5-7:30
Session: A

This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main topics we'd like to focus on is the oscillation between regular and irregular. What is the ...(read more) Marno, David

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Literatures of Decolonization

TWTh 12-2:30
Session: D

What do we mean by “decolonization,” really? Is it a political or economic process? Is it a psychological (or even spiritual) one? In this class, we will read works from a range of colonial and postcolonial lifeworlds: some written in the midst of vio...(read more) Dunsker, Leo

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TWTh 2-4:30
Session: A

Come write with us this summer! Learn to read like a writer by discussing the craft of creative writing, explore your own process by writing your own short stories and poems, and then get feedback in small peer workshops designed to help you become a ...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

165/1

Special Topics:
Writing at the University: A Writing Studio for Transfer Students

TWTh 10-12:30
Session: D

Having successfully completed their composition courses in community college, transfer students possess the writing skills necessary for academic success. Still, research shows that many transfer students arrive at the university lacking familiarity w...(read more) Atkinson, Nate

166/1

Special Topics:
Epic Poetry

MW 2-5
Session: C

This course will be a thorough investigation of one of the most important poetic forms in literary history: the epic poem. The epic poem in the period we will be looking at, which ranges from 20 BC to the 1660’s AD, held a prominence far above any oth...(read more) Delehanty, Patrick

166/2

Special Topics:
The Rise of the Young Adult

TWTh 4-6:30
Session: D

How can the young adult be a figure of propaganda and a deeply subversive figure? And what does it do today? The adolescent has been at the crux of the American national imaginary for a century now, leveraged for its political power, its physical limi...(read more) Baker-Gibbs, Ariel

166/4

Special Topics:
Introduction to Popular Fiction

TWTh 9:30-12
Session: A

Come and explore several different popular genres—detective fiction, science fiction, horror, fantasy, thriller, and the musical—to discover what makes these genres “popular” and in what ways they produce their mass appeal. Is popular fiction simp...(read more) Ghosh, Srijani

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Dreaming on Paper: Exceptional Mental States and the Written Word

TWTh 5:30-8
Session: D

In this course, we will consider what the American psychologist and philosopher William James broadly termed “exceptional mental states,” a category comprising such out-of-the-ordinary experiences as dreams, religious exultation, hallucination, trance...(read more) Furcall, Dylan

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Horror Genre

TWTh 12-2:30
Session: D

This course will examine the historical development of the horror genre in both film and literature. Horror is a notoriously comprehensive genre, borrowing from numerous story-telling and literary traditions—folktales, anonymous and literary, fantasti...(read more) Jones, Donna V.

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TWTh 3-5:30
Session: D

E.M. Forster begins his classic science fiction novella, “The Machine Stops,” with a question disguised as an invitation: “Imagine, if you can…” But what exactly is the use of imagination? And what exactly are its limits? In this course, we will pursu...(read more) Drawdy, Miles