Announcement of Classes: Fall 2022

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
“Alternative realities are true”: Animist Materialism in Contemporary Literature from West Africa and its Diaspora

MWF 9-10

Almost forty years ago, the pop star Madonna sang that “we are living in a material world, and I am a material girl.” But is this really a material world? And are we only material beings? While Madonna’s claim is a response to capitalism’s demand to a...(read more) Gamedze, Londiwe

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Millennial Narratives

MWF 11-12

“how long can a culture persist without the new? What happens if the young are no longer capable of producing surprises?”     —Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism “The air we breathe is toxic, the water we drink is full of microplastics, and our food ...(read more) Lackey, Ryan

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
“Minorities, Yes; But Oppressed, No”: Asian American Racialization from "Yellow Peril" to the "Model Minority Myth" and Beyond; or, Racialization & Representation in the Construction of Asian American Identity

MWF 12-1

This class intends to take a historical approach to studying the racial formation of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States since the late nineteenth century. Asian American historiography has often been concerned with delineating the contour...(read more) Dowling, Rumur

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Poetry of Protest

MWF 1-2

This Rhetoric and Composition course examines protest poetry in the United States as a social phenomenon and literary tradition from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore and think critically about “protest poetics” in its various sha...(read more) Haas, Andrew J

R1A/6

Reading and Composition

Class description to come.

No instructor assigned yet.

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Circe: Interpretations of A Witchy Woman

MWF 2-3

“Humbling women seems to me a chief pastime of poets. As if there can be no story unless we crawl and weep.” --Madeline Miller, Circe​ Although Madeline Miller’s 2018 novel, Circe, recently prompted new interest in the witch of Aeaea, Circe has bee...(read more) Funderburg, Katie

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Madwomen

MWF 3-4

Madness often takes shape in literature as a kind of shattering, a disillusionment or awakening that leaves fragmented subjectivity in its wake. The figure of the madwoman in particular has been of vital importance to feminist thought in twentieth cen...(read more) Karczmar, Naima

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
My Brilliant Friend: Reading Female Friendship

MWF 4-5

While popular media has commented on the recent emphasis on female friendship in literary fiction, the phenomenon has elided scholarly attention. In this course, we will both interrogate and think beyond the question of appeal: as a particular encount...(read more) Chaudhuri, Uttara Chintamani

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Magic and Modernity, or Enchantment after Enlightenment

MWF 9-10

“The absence of myth is also a myth: the coldest, the purest, the only true myth.”  In a moment when digital covens cast binding spells on Trump, viral Tik Tok investors combine crypto trading with astrology, and Pew Research claims there are 1.5 m...(read more) Sulpizio, Catherine

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Bleak House

MWF 10-11

This course teaches reading, writing, and researching skills by applying them to one big book, Charles Dickens’ Bleak House, which was not always one big book. Originally published in 20 monthly installments from 1852 to 1853, Bleak House has always p...(read more) Cohan, Nathan

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Working Class Chicanx Literature

MWF 10-11

In this course, we’ll read some classic as well as more contemporary works of chicano/a/x literature focusing specifically on the lives and labors of agricultural, industrial and domestic workers. How are these different kinds of laboring–the work of ...(read more) Bircea, Jason

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Love Story

MWF 11-12

What does it mean, in Taylor Swift's 2008 hit single “Love Story,” when the besotted speaker declares, “It's a love story, baby, just say, 'Yes'” -- and what, in this declaration, is the difference between the love story and love itself? Along thes...(read more) Choi, 최 Lindsay || Lindsay Chloe

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Thinking with Literature, Art, and Film

MWF 11-12

Do poems take up truths? Can a novel be a way of thinking about something? What can you learn—about yourself, about others, about the world—from a film? This course considers the ways that literature, art, and film are not only a part of our creative ...(read more) Ostas, Magdalena

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

MWF 12-1

Book List: Ford, John: ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore; Marlowe, Christopher: Edward II; Shakespeare, William: As You Like It. Other Readings and Media: Edward II (film), dir. Derek Jarman (1991) Paris is Burning (film), dir. Jennie Livingston (19...(read more) Scott, Mark JR

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
A History of Monsters

MWF 12-1

Undead hordes, bloodthirsty beasts, and uncanny human hybrids are nothing new to the human imagination. The literature and folklore of most (if not all) human cultures is full of tales that bring our imagined fears to life. In this course, our read...(read more) Gable, Nickolas

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Writing the American City: From Redlining to Climate Change

MWF 12-1

The American city is an incredibly complex and dynamic organism—and the subject of a great body of literature—both fiction and non-fiction. This course will trace and critically engage how American urban development has been written about from the ear...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Thinking through Memory in Poetry and Fiction

MWF 1-2

How and why do we remember? What does 'memory' mean to both an individual and a culture? How do fictional narrators construct their memorial landscapes? In this class we will explore the topic of memory as it appears in a wide variety of genres and st...(read more) Swensen, Dana

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Writing Politics

MWF 1-2

When we think of politics, we probably picture politicians debating, people organizing, or some sort of voting process. But are there other ways of “doing” politics, other appropriate verbs? This course will think about how we can associate the verb (...(read more) Wang, Jacob

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Nature Writing in English Literature

MWF 2-3

The perceived divide between humans and the natural world has been defined as one of the most important frameworks under which our thoughts and behaviors are constructed. This has unquestionably been the case in the English-speaking world, whose lands...(read more) Tomasula y Garcia, Alba

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Writing the American City: From Redlining to Climate Change

MWF 2-3

The American city is an incredibly complex and dynamic organism—and the subject of a great body of literature—both fiction and non-fiction. This course will trace and critically engage how American urban development has been written about from the ear...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Practical Criticism

MWF 3-4

What is “criticism”? We wouldn’t be wrong to associate this word with disgruntled critics, snobs, and fault-finders looking for ways to put others down. As Raymond Williams notes, “criticism” comes from the Greek kritikos—“a judge.” “Criticism” also n...(read more) Ritland, Laura

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
A Childhood

TTh 8-9:30

This course will focus on canonical British texts that claim either to represent for a child or to represent to a child.  As we track these texts’ supposed invention of a certain kind of British childhood—and with it a certain kind of British identity...(read more) Yniguez, Rudi

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Writing with Beowulf

TTh 5-6:30

This is not a class about Beowulf. As a course in the university’s R&C program, this is primarily a class on writing; as an R1B, it’s also a class on the skills of careful research and forceful argument. It is, though, a class that uses Beowulf...(read more) Stevenson, Max

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Out of Obscurity

MWF 3-4

During this course we will read together, and write about, artists of all kinds who lived the majority of their life in obscurity--from familiar literary figures like Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Lorine Niedecker, to the Swedish artist ...(read more) Davidson, William

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Thinking with Literature, Art, and Film

MWF 9-10

Do poems take up truths? Can a novel be a way of thinking about something? What can you learn—about yourself, about others, about the world—from a film? This course considers the ways that literature, art, and film are not only a part of our creative ...(read more) Ostas, Magdalena

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Frankentext: Reproduction and Literature

MWF 4-5

Reproduction (literally, “bringing into existence again”) can refer to making copies of works of art or the creation of offspring. The focus of this class will be Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein and its adaptations in the 20th and 21st centurie...(read more) Zodrow, Kristin

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Writing the American City: From Redlining to Climate Change

MWF 4-5

The American city is an incredibly complex and dynamic organism—and the subject of a great body of literature—both fiction and non-fiction. This course will trace and critically engage how American urban development has been written about from the ear...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
Silence

TuTh 8-9:30

We are all silent at times. We keep quiet over dinner with our relatives or nod passively at work. Some people dislike silence, equating it with being alone and lonely, while others look forward to spending time with their thoughts, seeking out silenc...(read more) D'Silva, Eliot

R1B/23

Reading and Composition

Class description to come.

No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/24

Reading and Composition:
Science Fiction

TuTh 6:30-8

“We have no need of other worlds. We need mirrors. We don't know what to do with other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can't accept it for what it is.”       -Stanislaw Lem, Solaris. Science fiction, or speculative fiction as i...(read more) Delehanty, Patrick

R1B/25

Reading and Composition:
Factual Fictions of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

TuTh 6:30-8

Fake News! Alternative Facts! In recent years, our political discourse has been polarized, each side accusing the other of fudging the facts. But just what is a fact? And what if the opposite of fact isn’t understood as lying, but rather as fiction? T...(read more) Struhl, Abigail
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Song

W 2-3 pm

Literature and music are too often separated. The old epic poem begins “I sing” – but the poet doesn’t mean it literally. Performers sometimes concentrate on producing a beautiful or powerful sound, rather than making the words audible. We praise ...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

TuTh 2-3:30

What is a poem? What is poetry? What powers of language are particular to poems and poetry? In this course, we will explore various answers to these difficult if not unanswerable questions while acquainting ourselves with some of the forms poetry has ...(read more) Bernes, Jasper

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
The Wild, Wild West-- California and the Politics of Possibility

TuTh 2-3:30

The Golden State – fast fame, endless sunshine, and gold in the ground. California has long occupied an iconic place in the American and global imagination as the land of limitless opportunity, utopian pinnacle of the promise getting ahead, making it ...(read more) Saha, Poulomi

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

MW 9:30-11

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of short fiction—to explore the elements that make up the genre, and to enable students to talk critically about short stories and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writ...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TuTh 8-9:30

This is an introductory creative writing workshop in which participants write, revise, and discuss their original works of poetry in a collaborative group setting. We'll rely on a series of writing prompts, technical exercises, and a wide-ranging surv...(read more) Nathan, Jesse

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 1-2

What is the English literary tradition? Where did it come from? What are its distinctive habits, questions, styles, obsessions? This course will answer these and other questions by focusing on five key writers from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance:...(read more) Nolan, Maura

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

TuTh 10-11

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Swift, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Brontë, Melville, Eliot, Douglass, Dickinson,...(read more) Puckett, Kent

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 2-3

This course will examine different examples of British, Irish, American, and global Anglophone literature from the middle of the 19th century through the middle of the 20th. Moving across a number of genres and movements, we will focus on the ways nov...(read more) Gang, Joshua

90/1

Practices of Literary Study:
Murderers, Madmen and Dissolutes: Cormac McCarthy and His Progeny

TuTh 12:30-2

The heroes of Cormac McCarthy's novels occupy the borderlands of the American imagination and court its darkest urges. He is a writer fascinated by violence and the sacred, by loneliness and worship, by the American jeremiad and the scream in the fore...(read more) Danner, Mark

90/2

Practices of Literary Study:
Reading and Writing about Science Fiction

MW 2-3:30

As a genre, science fiction has always pushed at the limits of the human—What makes us different from machines or animals? What is our place in the universe? What can the future tell us about the present day and the historical past? Yet science fictio...(read more) Snyder, Katherine

90/3

Practices of Literary Study:
Walt Whitman and the Idea of America

TuTh 9:30-11

Whitman worked on Leaves of Grass for forty years, over at least six editions. In this course we'll devote ourselves to reading Leaves of Grass, comparing versions as well as reading selections from his prose, such as his famous 1855 preface and vario...(read more) Nathan, Jesse

90/4

Practices of Literary Study:
Seamus Heaney and the Twentieth Century

TuTh 2-3:30

In this course, we'll read the poetry of Seamus Heaney, from his early work to his last poems. We'll also take a look at some of his prose and translations. Our hope is to use the oeuvre of Seamus Heaney as a lens with which to view the history and po...(read more) Nathan, Jesse

90/5

Practices of Literary Study:
Poetry and Revolution

TuTh 5-6:30

Why write a poem? What powers are specific to poetry? In this course, we will seek answers to these questions and others by examining the many varieties of poems written in English since the sixteenth century: sonnets and ballads, odes and riddles, mo...(read more) Bernes, Jasper
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

The Seminar on Criticism:
"Atlantic Haunts, Black Possession"

MW 5-6:30

An introduction to black diasporic criticism, this seminar uses various angles of approach toward the notion of the spirit, the haunt, and the possession in order to trace a tradition of black presence English literatures and cultures. We will study f...(read more) Ellis, Nadia

100/2

The Seminar on Criticism:
The African-American Essay

TuTh 3:30-5

Readers of James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, and other black writers have often turned to their essays with a goal of better understanding their literary work.  In this course we will consider the African-American essa...(read more) Best, Stephen M.

100/3

The Seminar on Criticism:
Satire

MW 5-6:30

Satire is a corrosive and uncomfortable mode, designed to lacerate, to excoriate, to deplore, scorn, and disdain. But it selects its objects carefully and measures them precisely. Satire does not usually undertake to represent the world accurately; bu...(read more) Blanton, C. D.

100/4

The Seminar on Criticism:
Styles of Austen and Wilde

TuTh 11-12:30

Jane Austen and Oscar Wilde are nineteenth century style icons. Wilde was a celebrity in his own time and Austen has had avid fans, imitators, and adaptors for centuries. But what exactly are the styles of Austen and Wilde? What is style? Using Austen...(read more) Eisenberg, Emma Charlotte

100/5

The Seminar on Criticism:
The Victorian Novel

TuTh 8-9:30

  Focusing on the Victorian novel, this course will examine why it emerged as the dominant literary form in nineteenth-century Britain. What made the novel so popular, and in what ways did the novel shape—and was shaped in turn—by the prevailing so...(read more) Banerjee, Sukanya

100/8

The Seminar on Criticism:
Romance as Colonial History

MW 11-12:30

This course is a study in the history of romance as a mode, genre, and concept from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the period to which romance eventually lent its name: Romanticism. We will attend closely to the formal ...(read more) Childers, Joel

104/1

Introduction to Old English

TuTh 2-3:30

This course is aimed at beginners, whether graduate* or undergraduate, familiarizing them with the principles and practice of linguistic decoding in relation to both medieval manuscripts and modern editions, as well as with the grammar and vocabulary ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer

107/1

The Bible as Literature

TuTh 9:30-11

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them in many ways but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven

111/1

Chaucer

MW 5-6:30

In the late fourteenth century, Geoffrey Chaucer created a fictional pilgrimage in which travelers competed with one another to tell a tale “of best sentence and moost solaas”—meaning, a tale that best combines moral seriousness with pleasure.  The re...(read more) Nolan, Maura

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

TuTh 5-6:30

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture would elevate human beings above their natural state...(read more) Marno, David

117B/1

Shakespeare:
Tragedy

TuTh 12:30-2

“We seem,” writes A. C. Bradley in his Shakespearean Tragedy, “to have before us a type of the mystery of the whole world, the tragic fact which extends far beyond the limits of tragedy. Everywhere, from the crushed rocks beneath our feet to the soul ...(read more) Puckett, Kent

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

MW 11-12:30

The period from the “Restoration” of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, influential novels like Ro...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

TuTh 3:30-5

A survey of major works of U.S. literature after the Civil War, with special attention to artistic experimentation in these years and to the rise of "realism" in literature.  The "Gilded Age" put unprecedented faith in ideals of progress and individua...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

133T/1

African American Literature and Culture:
The Art of Black Diaspora

MW 2-3

The black diaspora is, amongst other things, a literary tradition: a complex, cross-generic set of texts produced by black writers located in almost every nation across the globe, equal in complexity and variation to the modern concept of race that is...(read more) Ellis, Nadia

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

MW 12-1

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing—fiction and poetry. Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres. Students will write a variety of...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 9:30-11

A short fiction workshop with a focus on the craft of writing. In this course, we will be readers, writers, and editors of short fiction. We'll read a range of published short stories in order to explore the technical ways in which a short story is cr...(read more) McFarlane, Fiona

143B/1

Verse

MW 5-6:30

There’ll be writing prompts and there’ll be experiments involving old forms—the sonnet, the ghazal, the haibun, varieties of orature (including song). Old forms?  From an essay: “I find  [form] interesting as a site, as a point of disembarkation fo...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.

143B/2

Verse

MW 12:30-2

Musician and poet Sun Ra once noted, after writing a requiem for a former band member this is the first time a black man received his very own requiem. We’ll be reading and writing and close listening to music with the elegiac in mind, studying compar...(read more) Holiday, Harmony

143C/1

Long Narrative

MW 12:30-2

This course is for students who are interested in writing, or are already working on, a novel or novella. Through creative writing exercises, discussion and reading, we’ll generate ideas and explore how a novel is made; through workshops, you’ll share...(read more) McFarlane, Fiona

166/1

Special Topics:
Form and Invention in Native American Literature

MW 2-3

Book List to come. This course explores a wide range of literary production by Native American/Indigenous writers from the nineteenth century to present, drawing out the various linguistic and literary influences present in the works. The course is...(read more) Piatote, Beth

174/1

Literature and History:
The Seventies

TuTh 3:30-5

As one writer quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The Seventies” routinely come in for mockery as an era of bad taste — an era when enormous sideburns, leisure suits, extra-wide bell bottoms, pet rocks, and “diet” mackerel ...(read more) Saul, Scott

175/1

Literature and Disability:
States of Exception

TuTh 12:30-2

From the blind poet to the fat detective to the “twisted” villain, literature often foregrounds bodily difference as an exceptional condition. What are the stakes and effects of literature’s interest in the exception—and in implied or engendered norms...(read more) Langan, Celeste

177/1

Literature and Philosophy:
Cults in Popular Culture

TuTh 5-6:30

We are fascinated by cults. What is it about communities and groups that promise total belief and total enthrallment that so captures the imagination? This course will look at a range of representations of cults in popular culture—from the document...(read more) Saha, Poulomi

190/1

Research Seminar:
Ulysses

MW 5-6:30

This year marks the centenary of James Joyce’s Ulysses, widely considered the most important novel of the twentieth century. We will consider the book at a variety of scales: word, sentence, narrative strategy, and organizational structure. We will al...(read more) Flynn, Catherine

190/3

Research Seminar:
Nineteenth Century American Ecologies

MW 3:30-5

What did “nature” mean in nineteenth-century America? How did writers, artists, and activists from the period represent and interact with the natural world around them? In this research seminar, we will approach these questions through the lens of wha...(read more) Bondy, Katherine Isabel

190/4

Research Seminar:
Material Dickinson

MW 11-12:30

This single author seminar will explore and compare the different kinds of textual materiality—manuscript, print, digital, and aural—in which Emily Dickinson’s writings have circulated. Questions will include: what are the ecological aspects of Dickin...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise

190/5

Research Seminar:
1922: Modernism's Year 1

MW 2-3:30

At the end of October 1921 (on his own birthday), writing in the small avant-garde magazine The Little Review, Ezra Pound declared a new calendar, celebrating the dawn of a new ‘Year 1’. This new calendar, he suggested, would be dated ‘p.s.U’, post sc...(read more) Blanton, C. D.

190/6

Research Seminar:
Crisis and Culture: The 1930s, 1970s, and post-2008 in Comparative Perspective

TuTh 9:30-11

This research seminar will explore the impact of economic crisis and systemic transformation on symbolic authority and cultural production.  To what extent is culture determined by economic forces, and to what extent is it separate from these forces? ...(read more) Lee, Steven S.

190/7

Research Seminar:
Medieval Sexualities

TuTh 5-6:30

Contact Jennifer Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu for more information about this class. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer

190/8

Research Seminar:
The Work of Ursula Le Guin

TuTh 5-6:30

“Science Fiction is often described, and even defined, as extrapolative. The science fiction writer is supposed to take a trend or phenomenon of the here-and-now, purify and intensify it for dramatic effect, and extend it into the future. “If this g...(read more) Jones, Donna V.

190/9

Research Seminar:
Modern California Books and Movies

MW 5-6:30

Besides reading and discussing fiction and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Writing will consist of a ...(read more) Starr, George A.

H195A/1

Honors Course

TuTh 11-12:30

H195 is a two-semester course that gives students the training they need to conduct original research and develop their findings into a successful scholarly essay, 40-60 pages in length. Crucial to this enterprise is an understanding of interpretat...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.

H195A/2

Honors Course

TuTh 11-12:30

H195A/B is a two-semester seminar that lays the groundwork for and guides you through the completion a 40-60 page Honors thesis on a subject of your choice. The first semester offers an inquiry into critical approaches, research methods, and theoretic...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) when space permits. Please contact the instructor if you have questions.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 11-12:30

This seminar introduces students to the practices of professional literary study. Our focus will be three of our discipline's most fundamental concerns: textual criticism and editing; the production, circulation, and reception of texts; and theories o...(read more) Gang, Joshua

201A/1

Topics in the Structure of the English Language:
Meter

TuTh 5-6:30

            This course offers an introduction to meter from the perspective of theoretical linguistics.  Fundamental to this approach is the assumption that any meter is shaped, sometimes consciously and sometimes not, not only by the meter’s own lan...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Transcendentalists and Pragmatists

Th 11-2

The course will trace genealogies of American thought from transcendentalism through pragmatism. In the first half, we will focus on the life in letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson and on Emerson’s relationship to the intellectual and social history of the...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

Th 2-5

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of independe...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Modernism and the Public Sphere

TuTh 3:30-5

A series of works in the last twenty years has complicated the notion that modernism is characterized by a preoccupation with interiority, arguing for public culture as a crucial space for the construction of modernism. This course asks how modernist ...(read more) Flynn, Catherine

211/1

Chaucer

MW 5-6:30

In the late fourteenth century, Geoffrey Chaucer created a fictional pilgrimage in which travelers competed with one another to tell a tale “of best sentence and moost solaas”—meaning, a tale that best combines moral seriousness with pleasure.  The re...(read more) Nolan, Maura

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

MW 12:30-2

This fall I’m going to ask that poetry workshop members join me in reading and thinking about location as an active process and about cross-genre writing as a response to and engagement with that process.  Those are my particular—though by no means ex...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.

246C/1

Graduate Proseminars (Renaissance)

W 2-5

According to one of the most influential, and contested, theories of modernity, our life in capitalism and bureaucratic rationality began in the early modern period “when asceticism was carried out of monastic cells into everyday life, and began to do...(read more) Marno, David

250/1

Research Seminars:
Freud

T 9-12

In this course, we will read (most of) the works of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, and little else. This will mean studying the changing models of consciousness; theories of dream interpretation, parapraxis, and libido; accounts of anal...(read more) Lavery, Grace

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tu 1-3 pm

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections linked...(read more) Lee, Steven S.