Announcement of Classes: Fall 2011

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Literary Experience

MWF 9-10

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, a good deal of verse, some short stories, maybe one play—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great and why we shoul...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Literary Experience

MWF 11-12

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, a good deal of verse, some short stories, maybe one play—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great and why we shoul...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Kitsch and "Bad Taste" in 20th Century America

MWF 12-1

Is there such a thing as a universal standard of good taste? When we judge a work of art, can our judgment hold true for everyone? Or does our cultural and social context determine our taste in art? In this class we will consider how what counts as g...(read more) Gaydos, Rebecca
Gaydos, Rebecca

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
California Stories

MWF 12-1

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous origin stories, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by several Califo...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
City and Country

MWF 2-3

The opposition between city life and country life goes back at least as far as ancient Rome, but today it takes on a new significance as urbanites are asked to respond to a problem that is often felt more sharply in rural areas – global climate chang...(read more) Bauer, Mark
Bauer, Mark

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
California Stories

MWF 2-3

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous origin stories, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by several Califo...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1A/19

Reading and Composition:
On the Road from the Closed to the New Frontier

TTh 3:30-5

The six decades between Frederick Jackson Turner’s 1893 declaration of the end of the American Frontier and John F. Kennedy’s inaugural commitment to a “New Frontier” of outer space mark a unique period of American mobility and exploration. Without a...(read more) Yoon, Irene
Yoon, Irene

R1A/21

Reading and Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

MWF 2-3

In this course, we will examine the “lost years” of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African American poetry ...(read more) Gardezi, Nilofar
Gardezi, Nilofar

R1A/24

Reading and Composition

TTh 9:30-11

T. B. A....(read more) Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
City Spaces

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will explore the representation of urban space in novels, poems, and nonfictional texts. The class examines the literary and historical depiction of actual cities such as Manchester, London, Chicago, and New York, and how the exper...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Performing Revenge

TTh 2-3:30

Murder, mutilation, madness, imprisonment, adultery, cannibalism, torture and rape: this gruesome list forms not only revengers’ prime motives, but also the tools of their vengeance.  Is this only fitting or a perverse paradox?  What is the morality ...(read more) Bahr, Stephanie M
Bahr, Stephanie

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing from Life

TTh 3:30-5

This course seeks to approach, in a loosely historical fashion, some of the problems associated with the literary recording of lives. During the first segment of the class, we will develop a broad perspective on the emergence of autobiography as a pr...(read more) Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Procrastination: Theory and Practice

Tues. 10-11

Why do we procrastinate? What can we do to stop it? This course explores procrastination both as a practical problem and as a springboard for theoretical inquiry into questions of choice, will, agency, rationality and morality. We'll read (slowly and...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility and Emma

Tues. 2-4 (9/6 - 10/25 only)

This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We'll read and discuss two novels: Sense and Sensibility and Emma. We'll approach the novels from a number of different perspectives, ...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
David Copperfield

M 3-5 (9/12 - 10/31 only)

In David Copperfield (1849-50), Charles Dickens writes a novel about a novelist named David Copperfield who writes a novel about Charles Dickens--for many of David's adventures and ordeals mirror Dickens's own experiences that prepared him to be a no...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/5

Freshman Seminar

W 3-4

T. B. A....(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Race and Ethnicity in Hollywood Cinema

MW 4-5:30 + film screenings Thurs. 7-10 P.M.

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced in the United States between the 1910s and 1970s. Major themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, passing and racial imperson...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

This course will introduce you to some central works from the earlier centuries of English literary history in order to help you develop strategies within which to read early literatures. Its particular focus on Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Dr. Fau...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these work...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

On the face of it, English 45B seems like a “neither/nor” course; neither a course in the great English "originals" (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton) nor a course in “modern(ist)” literature. It represents neither the supposed “origin” nor the ...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends at sea in Benito Cereno, with a tragic convergence of Europe, America, and Africa, just off “a small, desert, uninhabited island toward the southern extr...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This semester we will cut a selective path through a vast swathe of literature in English, tracing patterns of continuity and change from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. In the process we will encounter some of the key works of the past tw...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts.  We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovation...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert & Sposito, Gary

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture, Low Culture: Postmodernism and the Films of the Coen Brothers

Thurs. 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness. We will also read some fiction and at...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Know Thyself

M 2-4

This simple, two-word admonition carved over the entrance to the ancient temple at Delphi might be called the founding oracle of western humanism. The phrase itself is alive and well today, as a Google search will amply confirm, but what does it mean...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

110/1

Medieval Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer

117A/1

Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

This class focuses on Shakespeare's early career and works, that is, on the "Elizabethan" Shakespeare. We'll be reading a very limited number of plays and some poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular" a...(read more) Marno, David
Marno, David

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 9:30-11

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, so...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

Unfamiliar to many undergraduates, eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms of writing and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the form—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call n...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 3:30-5

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these th...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

Note new format: Lectures MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

A survey of the modernist period in British and Irish writing, with special attention given to some of the period’s central figures and works. Students should be prepared to read adventurously and to read a lot. We will attempt about a work (novel or...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 11-12:30

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of discovery and exploration through the literature of the American Revolution and the formations of an early nationa...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

131/1

American Poetry

MW 4-5:30

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Whitman and Dickinson and then move through both expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the Objectivists, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Poe...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

132/1

American Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Rather than define a canon, this survey will trace how the novel has contributed to nation-formation in the U.S. How has the novel helped to define what it means to be American, starting from the country’s fledgling days as an outpost of Europe? To w...(read more) Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 11-12:30

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; and yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an embrace of literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an explor...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Black Reconstruction

MWF 2-3

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner has written. An...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicana and Chicano Novels

TTh 12:30-2

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a general knowledge of post-1970 Chicano/a novels. Our study will focus on both the form and content of each novel. As we shall see, the formal features and thematic representations of Chicano/a ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Postcolonial Classics

MW 4-5:30

What is a classic? A perennial preoccupation for critics and lay readers, this question takes on a specific urgency in the context of postcolonial literature. This course will consider a series of postcolonial literary works now viewed as classic, wh...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

141/1

Modes of Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will wri...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 12-1:30

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of the short story. Students admitted to the course will be required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction, complete assignments on specific aspects of narrative strategy...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

143B/1

Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & l...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

I’ll ask students to be interested in form as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment. Poems can be formally navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to g...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143B/3

Verse:
Poetry and the Poetics of Sound, Voice, & Performance

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we’ll work towards new understandings of sound, of the human voice and voicing, of language’s relationship to the voice and to its own sonic dimensions, and of the ways in which visual and musical and other sonic media exploit and imp...(read more) Goldman, Judith
Goldman, Judith

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

W 3-6

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of creative nonfiction, particularly on the personal essay. Students admitted to the course will be required to write a minimum of 45 pages, complete assignments, and participate in w...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

165/1

Special Topics:
(note new topic) Religion and Poetry in the Renaissance

TTh 11-12:30

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll do a case study of sixteenth and seventeenth century religious poetry...(read more) Marno, David
Marno, David

166/1

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play: Being the Player

TTh 2-3:30

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text. Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be followed with stu...(read more) Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip

166/2

Special Topics:
Race and Cultures of Mobility in American Literature

MWF 1-2

This course examines how nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. writers imagined the connections between race, mobility, and national identity. Movement in American literature is often understood to betoken freedom, exploration, and escape--whether o...(read more) Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our stu...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

175/1

Literature and Disability:
Representations of Disability in Literature

MWF 3-4

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama. Writing assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays and a take-home final examination. (This is a core course for the Disability Studies ...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 11-12:30

The medium of literature is language. This course will explore this relationship through a survey of literary forms defined by linguistic forms, and through consideration of how these literary forms are both like and unlike forms of non-literary lang...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30

“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…” -- Chaucer This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories. In thinking of short stories as artifacts produce...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

190/1

Research Seminar:
The Rejection of Closure: Slow Readings

MW 1:30-3

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Works by Larry Eigner, Rae Armantrout...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

190/2

Research Seminar:
Another Nature

MW 1:30-3

The poet... doth grow in effect another nature, in making things either better than nature brings forth, or quite anew. —Sidney In 1770, English painter George Stubbs painted a painting of a moose standing in front of a rocky crag. All wrong—moose li...(read more) Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles

190/3

Research Seminar:
The Writings of Daniel Defoe

MW 4-5:30

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe’s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and reli...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

190/4

Research Seminar:
Literature of California and the West pre-1920

MW 5:30-7

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cal...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

190/5

Research Seminar:
The New Journalism and the Nonfiction Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course focuses on the intersection of literature and journalism, with particular attention to the emergence of the New Journalism. The genre, defined in terms of its application of literary techniques to news reporting, often constructs stories ...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach

190/6

Research Seminar:
In Defense of Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course addresses the so-called “crisis in the humanities” by examining the history of this perceived crisis and its relationship to the formation of the field of literary studies. Can we still find solutions to our problems in literature or is l...(read more) Tanemura, Janice
Tanemura, Janice

190/7

Research Seminar:
Walter Scott and Jane Austen

TTh 11-12:30

The two major British novelists of the Romantic period were reading each other: warily, in Austen’s case—“Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. I do not like him, and do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it – but f...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

190/9

Research Seminar:
Asian American Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

If we accept that “Asian American” names a fictive ethnicity, what has been the power of Asian American literature’s social imagination? How has Asian American literature not only reflected the constructedness of Asian American identity but also cont...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

190/10

Research Seminar:
Contemporary Ethnic Surrealist Poetry and Poetics

TTh 12:30-2

Inspired by an eclectic mixture of influences ranging from Negritude to Sun-Ra, and from Yellow Peril pulp novels and films to counterfactual histories, a number of contemporary African American and Asian American poets have attempted to articulate w...(read more) Chen, Christopher
Chen, Christopher

190/12

Research Seminar:
Paradise Lost, Found, Lost Again

TTh 12:30-2

An intensive reading of John Milton’s great epic Paradise Lost and two works that adapt it in imaginative ways, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. The modern and Romantic texts will throw light back on Milton...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

190/14

Research Seminar:
Words and Bodies in Space: Poems for the Stage

TTh 2-3:30

This course focuses on bringing canonical modern and contemporary poetry on the page, in conversation with slam poetry, performance poetry and finally performance theory. Whether we are talking about Homer or the Beat poets, how a poem is spoken has ...(read more) Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominica

190/15

Research Seminar:
American Captivities

TTh 2-3:30

The captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.” Although its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, the captivity narrative genre extended to the capture of sailors and pirates at se...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

190/16

Research Seminar:
Chaucer and His Contexts

TTh 2-3:30

The works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) have been canonized as the most important and best-known materials in Middle English literature. But Chaucer did not appear in a vacuum. On the contrary, Chaucer participated in several rich literary commu...(read more) Lankin, Andrea

190/17

Research Seminar:
History of the Book, 597-2011

TTh 2-3:30

In this research seminar, we will study the development of one of the most influential technologies ever created: the book. Beginning with the introduction of the manuscript codex into England, we will trace the book through many transformations: the...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

190/18

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

TTh 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings Thurs. 7-10 P.M.

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will co...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This course is intended to help students as they set off on the peculiar adventure known as the Honors Thesis. Help will take two forms. (1) We will study some critical texts that propose useful ideas for thinking about such topics as mass culture, n...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This course is designed to facilitate the writing of a senior honors thesis. We will begin by reading across a broad range of criticism and theory. Students will refine their research interests into a workable thesis topic, complete an annotated bibl...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

An approach to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory....(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

200/2

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

203/1

Graduate Readings:
State of the Art Film: 1963

note new time: W 12-3

The course centers on the conception and practice of the so-called international art film around 1963. Without making a fetish of the date, it may be agreed that 1963 was a remarkable year: for quality of product, for the upsurge in points of distrib...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 12:30-2

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical sc...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

203/4

Graduate Readings:
On Life

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s The Meaning of Life and Elizabeth Grosz’s The Nick of Time. In exploring...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

TTh 3:30-5

This is a practical writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transitions from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar. It...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Anglophone Poetry

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This class will broadly survey British, Irish, and postcolonial poetry after 1945. It is a large and multifaceted body of work, and much of it remains under-read, especially in the American academy. We will think through the development of a late mod...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

203/7

Graduate Readings:
What was Asian American Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Adapting the title of Kenneth Warren’s recent intervention in African American Studies, this course explores the history of Asian American literary formation, and the making of Asian American racial formation through literary agencies (specifically t...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

205A/1

Old English

TTh 11-12:30

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the semester,...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

MW 4-5:30

This workshop is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. It presupposes two things: that poetry as a project is as rigorous an undertaking as more typically scholarl...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: 18th Century

F 12-3

Many eighteenth-century British writers imagined their world as one of increasing complexity. Technologies of print, ever more specialized divisions of labor, an expanding empire, major shifts in credit and commerce—the growth of a speculative market...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

246I/1

Graduate Proseminar: American Literature to 1855

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Tamarkin at tamarkin@berkeley.edu....(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

250/1

Research Seminar:
Marxist Literary Theory

Tues. 9:30-11:30

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to journalists who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism. "It does not seem to make much sense," he wrot...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

250/2

Research Seminar:
Victorian Poetry

W 3-6

In this course we will approach the literature and culture of the Victorian period through its poetry and poetics. We'll read a lot of both in order to do three related things. First, we'll consider in what terms the idea of the literary as it was em...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Recovery Imperative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Men fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of defeat, and when it comes it turns out not to be what they meant, and other men have to fight for what they meant under another name. -- William Morris (18...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

250/4

Research Seminar:
Eros and Expression

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

At the core, highly selective readings from the most influential explorations of Eros, desire, and sexuality: Plato’s Symposium and passages from Phaedrus, episodes from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura and Ovid’s Metamorphosis A (including Narcissus and P...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as a both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teach...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, April 8.

CHERNIN MENTORING PROGRAM:Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join the Chernin Mentoring Program!

The Chernin Mentoring Program fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Chernin groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for the Chernin Program, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one credit for an independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, or 143N. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the appropriate application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, April 28. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, April 28, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE FALL. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This course is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must hand in: 1) a completed H195A application form (available from the racks on the wall outside the English Department office [322 Wheeler Hall]), along with: 2) an (unofficial) copy of the transcript(s) that include all your already-completed college courses (whether taken at UC Berkeley or elsewhere); 3) a list of the courses you are currently enrolled in; and 4) a photocopy of a critical paper you have written for another class, to the box on the counter inside the English Department office BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19, AT THE LATEST. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2009 semester and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES IN THE FALL, THE CLASS LISTS FOR H195A WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD IN THE HALL ACROSS FROM THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT. IF YOU ARE ADMITTED TO ONE OF THE H195A SECTIONS, YOU WILL NEED TO OTAIN YOUR CEC (CLASS ENTRY CODE) AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR, AND THEN YOU WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS AND ADD THE COURSE SOON AFTER THAT; NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN H195A BEFORE CLASSES START.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2011 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 29. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the April 29 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center , Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center , during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.