Announcement of Classes: Fall 2011

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Medieval Literature

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117A

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Marno, David
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 2 le Conte


Other Readings and Media

The Norton Shakespeare (ed. S. Greenblatt)

Description

This class focuses on Shakespeare's early career and works, that is, on the "Elizabethan" Shakespeare. We'll be reading a very limited number of plays and some poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular" and "irregular." What is the rule, and what is the exception in Shakespeare's works? How is a comedy supposed to end? How does it end? What makes a tragic hero? Is Hamlet a tragic hero? What are the rules of theater? What are the rules of literature? Who creates them and why? When do they get transgressed, and why? A tentative list of the plays includes Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, Richard III, 1 Henry IV, Midsummer Night's Dream, and The Merchant of Venice. We'll also read some of the sonnets and a longer poem, Venus and Adonis. There will be a midterm and a final paper; no exam but we'll conclude one class every week with a brief response paper to the lectures.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 120 Latimer


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: The Norton Shakespeare (2nd Edition)

Description

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, something like an obsession—for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to George Eliot to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Sarah Kane and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Zizeck. We will be especially concerned with five large issues: compassion; political representation and its discontents; the nature of identity and subjectivity; colonialism; and the relation between the ways Shakespeare’s plays make meaning and the ways they produce emotional experience. We will read Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Julius Caesar, Henry V, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, King Lear, The Winter’s Tale, Coriolanus, and The Tempest. If you already own a good single-volume edition of the plays (for example, The Riverside Shakespeare or The Arden Shakespeare), don’t feel at all obliged to buy The Norton Shakespeare.


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new room: 126 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Titles are subject to change, but will likely include works by Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Mary Leapor, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Gray, William Collins, William Cowper, James Macpherson, Thomas Chatterton, Lawrence Sterne, Oliver Goldsmith, George Crabbe, Robert Burns, and Janet Little. The required books for the course will be available exclusively at Analog Books, located just one block up Euclid Avenue from the North Gate entrance to the Berkeley campus.

Description

Unfamiliar to many undergraduates, eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms of writing and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the form—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with the first gothic horror stories. Poets reckoned with a literary market and tidal wave of printed works that threatened to render all writing mere commodities. They thematized their position as misunderstood guardians of creative spirit, sometimes of a national past, negotiating a complex commercial world. Women writers cannily intervened in the republic of letters, even as their public writing was seen as semi-scandalous. All helped develop a new sense of Literature with a capital “L”—not just writing but imaginative writing that might play a special role in society, from protecting classical values in a modernizing world, to promoting a standard national language, to cultivating sentimental feelings for others in an increasingly anonymous society.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Zola, Émile: La Bête Humaine; Dreiser, Theodor: Sister Carrie; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Mann, Thomas: Doctor Faustus; Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Gibson, William: Neuromancer

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics-- history, modernism and empire. These are some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel; how has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel; and lastly how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?


British Literature: 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: Note new format: Lectures MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: Note new MW lecture room: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Auden, W. H.: Selected Poems; Beckett, Samuel: Murphy; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim: A Tale; Eliot, T. S.: Selected Poems; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves; Yeats, W. B.: Collected Poems

Description

A survey of the modernist period in British and Irish writing, with special attention given to some of the period’s central figures and works. Students should be prepared to read adventurously and to read a lot. We will attempt about a work (novel or volume of poems) per week, making a central exception for Joyce’s Ulysses, which will slow us to about a chapter per day.

Please note that this class will first meet on Monday, August 29; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 2. 


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 155 Kroeber


Other Readings and Media

Baym, Nina, ed.: Norton Anthology of American Literature. Volume A: American Literature to 1820.; Brown, William Hill: The Power of Sympathy; Foster, Hannah: The Coquette; Brown, Charles B.: Wieland, ed. Jay Fliegelman

Description

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of discovery and exploration through the literature of the American Revolution and the formations of an early national culture. Topics to be discussed include: the role of Puritanism in American society, ethnic difference and the experience of the frontier, evangelism and secularism, the social makings of the new republic, the rise of the novel in America, and the literary place of women and slaves. Readings will also look closely at the language of rights and representation within a revolutionary culture that staged encounters between neoclassical models and romantic sensibilities and between a will to independence and a respect for history. Authors will include William Bradford, John Winthop, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Samuel Sewell, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Olaudah Equiano, Royall Tyler, Susanna Rowson, Hannah Foster, and Charles Brockden Brown.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: note new room: 101 Moffitt


Other Readings and Media

Lerner, B.: Mean Free Path; Rankine, C.: Don

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Whitman and Dickinson and then move through both expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the Objectivists, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Poets considered may include Dunbar, Eliot, Pound, Stein, Toomer, Williams, McKay, Stevens, Hughes, Olson, Oppen, Niedecker, Moore, Bishop, O’Hara, Ashbery, Guest, Duncan, Ginsberg, Baraka, Spicer, Palmer, Hejinian, and several younger contemporaries. Along that route we’ll consider renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter, who and what counts as a poetic subject, strategies of fragmentation and citationality, and the task and materials of the long poem. Primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a large Course Reader. There will be a take-home midterm, a final essay, and a final exam.


American Novel

English 132

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 102 Wurster


Other Readings and Media

Hawthorne, N.: The Scarlet Letter; Twain, M.: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; James, H.: Daisy Miller; Cahan, A.: Yekl: A Tale of the New York Ghetto; Dreiser, T.: Sister Carrie; DuBois, W. E. B.: Dark Princess; West, N.: The Day of the Locust; Nabokov, V.: Pnin; Kingston, M.: China Men; Morrison, T.: A Mercy

Description

Rather than define a canon, this survey will trace how the novel has contributed to nation-formation in the U.S. How has the novel helped to define what it means to be American, starting from the country’s fledgling days as an outpost of Europe? To what extent has the novel form been able to incorporate the diversity of American experiences—and to what extent has it promoted exclusions of race, gender, and class? What are the limitations of both novel and nation—and how has the American novel expressed these limitations?


African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

English 133A

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Gates, H.: The Classic Slave Narratives; Franklin, J.: Three Negro Classics; Chesnutt, C.: The Conjure Woman; Walker, D.: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens

Description

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; and yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an embrace of literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exploration of selected works from the canon of African American literature. We will concern ourselves not only with the conceptual distinctions between orality and literacy, but also with how those distinctions gather force within debates over the power of language in politics and history: Rather than a teleological progression from orality to literacy, why does one find in much African American literature a promiscuous coupling of the two? What particular role does speech (e.g., confession, testimony) play in the formation of the subject? What are the politics of speaking, reading, and writing in early America? How might slaves have apprehended the power of orality – rhetoric, eloquence, performative speech – at a time when magnificent effects seemed to follow from the act of “declaring” independence?


Topics in American Studies: Black Reconstruction

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Khalil Gibran Muhammad, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America; Frances Harper, Iola Leroy; Langston Hughes, Selected Poems; Charles Chesnutt, Portable Charles W. Chesnutt; Jacob Lawrence, The Great Migration; W. E. B. Du Bois, Souls of Black Folk; Bryan Wagner, Disturbing the Peace; Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns

Description

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner has written. And nowhere was this revolutionary process more dramatic, more all-encompassing, than in the United States -- the only society in the history of the world where ex-slaves were granted citizenship rights and meaningful political representation directly on the heels of emancipation. Reconstruction was an exceptional event in world history, to be sure, but one that swelled with the main currents of its time. It was an experiment in statecraft that tried to remake society all at once, turning a traditional situation where individuals were restricted by inherited relations of dependency into a modern scene based upon the liberty to contract. This course aims to grasp Reconstruction, in all its complexity, as a narrative problem. We will be thinking in the abstract about the nature of historical transition, and in particular about the role of violence in times of transition, while we look to some of the major literary and historical works from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries that turned Reconstruction into a story to be passed down. We will observe how these works sustain their most parochial commitments -- blood, family, race, nation -- by adapting the moral vocabulary of the market, and we will try to understand how those commitments became variously inflected as romance, tragedy, and farce. We will pay close attention to the formal strategies (marriage plots, framing devices, and analepses) that propel these narratives from slavery to freedom as well as to the developing conditions (the stratification of the book trade, the professionalization of historical research, the emergence of the cinema) that determined how those strategies could be employed.

The readings for this course have not yet been finalized but will include works by Albion Tourgée, Frances Harper, George Washington Cable, Charles Chesnutt, Sutton Griggs, William Dunning, Woodrow Wilson, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Carter Woodson, and W. E. B. Du Bois.


Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910: Chicana and Chicano Novels

English 137B

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 109 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Acosta, O.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Acosta,  O.: The Revolt of the Cockroach People; Castillo,  A.: Sapogonia; Cisneros,  S.: Caramelo; Gaspar de Alba,  A.: Desert Blood, The Juarez Murders; Plascencia,  S.: The People of Paper; Ruiz,  R.: Happy Birthday Jesus; Santiago,  D.: Famous All Over Town; Villanueva,  A.: Naked Ladies

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a general knowledge of post-1970 Chicano/a novels. Our study will focus on both the form and content of each novel. As we shall see, the formal features and thematic representations of Chicano/a novels have been influenced to a large degree by a broad range of social experiences: living in the borderlands of language, culture, geography, and nationality; growing up female in a male-centered environment; fighting racism; engaging in class struggle; encountering various forms of organized state repression; migrating and immigrating; getting involved in political movements; and becoming expressive in art and literature. Because this is a reading intensive course, we will spend considerable time in class discussing the novels and conducting collective close readings of selected passages. We'll be attentive to the manner in which the act of storytelling in Chicano/a novels contributes to the formation of complex and sometimes contradictory cultural identities. We'll also read and discuss essays on narrative theory and history to facilitate our analysis of the aesthetic and social issues that inform the writing of these novels and to understand how they expand and enrich twentieth-century American literature.


Studies in World Literature in English: Postcolonial Classics

English 138

Section: 1
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 30 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Achebe, C.: Things Fall Apart; Naipaul, V.S.: A House for Mr. Biswas; Salih, T.: Season of Migration to the North; Ba, M.: So Long a Letter; Rushdie, S.: Midnight's Children; Desani, G.V.: All About H. Hatterr; Tutuola, A.: The Palm-Wine Drinkard and My Life in the Bush of Ghosts; Roy, A.: The God of Small Things; Coetzee, J. M.: Disgrace

Description

What is a classic? A perennial preoccupation for critics and lay readers, this question takes on a specific urgency in the context of postcolonial literature. This course will consider a series of postcolonial literary works now viewed as classic, while inquiring into the processes by which they have been assigned that status. We'll address questions of aesthetic and political value, trace the formation of a postcolonial canon, and consider the relationship of these works to both European and "native" classical traditions. Note: The final booklist may diverge somewhat from the one currently listed, but is sure to include Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas and Achebe's Things Fall Apart (the latter should be read in the Norton Critical Edition).


Modes of Writing

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 210 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Zee Zee Copy

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Furman, L.: PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2011: The Best Stories of the Year

Description

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend. Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction. Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life. The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 10 photocopied pages of your original fiction writing, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: note new room: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Cassil and Oates, R. V., and Joyce Carol, eds.: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction

Recommended: Mukherjee, B.: The Middleman & Other Stories

Description

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of the short story. Students admitted to the course will be required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction, complete assignments on specific aspects of narrative strategy, and participate in workshop discussions.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 15 photocopied pages of your original fiction writing, along with an application form, to Professor Mukherjee's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

See below

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems; image & figure; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second, third, and no person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision. Our emphasis will be placed on recent possibilities, but with an eye & ear always to renovating traditions. I have no “house style” and only one precept: you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss five or so in rotation (I’ll respond to every poem you write). On alternate days, we’ll discuss recent illustrative poems drawn from our course reader (no other books will be assigned). If the past is any guarantee, this course will be delightful.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Texts by contemporary poets, T. B. A.

Description

I’ll ask students to be interested in form as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment. Poems can be formally navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to get it right but to see how it feels to get involved in it, that and to look at what the poem (or the essay or joke or speech) does and at the ways the world presses on it, and at how it presses back on the world. What’s the relationship of poetry to cultural iconography, to issues of representation of race and class and gender?

The other thing I’ll ask is that students be interested in poetry as a series of local public events, as a thing that takes shape awkwardly (and beautifully for that) in unlikely venues. We’ll work, in part, on that “local” and that “public” with poets from Mills College; with them, we’ll figure out how to stage some performances.

Workshop. Discussions. Reading (and student-led discussions of readings). Weekly writing assignments. Field trips. Performances.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse: Poetry and the Poetics of Sound, Voice, & Performance

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: Goldman, Judith
Goldman, Judith
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Scott, Jordan: Blert; Bergvall, Caroline: Meddle English; Toscano, Rodrigo: Collapsible Poetics Theater; Mullen, Harryette: Recyclopeida; there will also be a course reader and/or texts posted electronically.

Description

In this course, we’ll work towards new understandings of sound, of the human voice and voicing, of language’s relationship to the voice and to its own sonic dimensions, and of the ways in which visual and musical and other sonic media exploit and implicate the voice and language. This intensive exploration of sound, voice, and language will in turn enable students to create sonically sensitive writing and performance.

Topics/modes on the way to creating this work include: theorizing the ontology of sound and the conditions of hearing and listening; defining and critiquing distinctions among noise, sound, music, and voice (understanding relations between sonic orders and social-political-psychic orders); studying and troubling the metaphysical and phenomenological foundations of voice, in part in relation to theories of lyric poetry; studying the sonic materiality of language through phonetics, prosody, and rhyme, by working intensively on selected poems and songs; considering the sonic effects of repetition and refrain and the capacity of the verbal to represent sounds outside of language; thinking through accent, polymorphous Englishes, multi-lingual works, and creative translation; exploring the relationship between the textual page/visual score and oral performance; examining film sound and acoustic aspects of visual art; learning about historical and contemporary performance poetries and related forms (like poet’s theater and film narration).

Course requirements: For workshop, students will write creative (and sometimes brief critical) responses to a wide variety of creative and critical texts and will perform and (learn how to) record their work. While we will engage with assigned prompts related to the course materials, students will also workshop their own independently conceived work. Everyone will write for every class, before and during class, individually and/or collaboratively. Students will have reading and listening homework for every session and should have access to the internet for retrieving texts, streaming audio files, and posting their work before class so that other students can read/listen to and comment on it.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Goldman's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Atwan, R., ed.: The Best American Essays, 6th College Edition

Description

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of creative nonfiction, particularly on the personal essay. Students admitted to the course will be required to write a minimum of 45 pages, complete assignments, and participate in workshop discussions.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 10-12 photocopied pages of your original nonfiction, along with an application form, to Professor Mukherjee's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Special Topics: (note new topic) Religion and Poetry in the Renaissance

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Marno, David
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

George Herbert and the Seventeenth-Century Religious Poets (ed. di Cesare); Milton, Complete Poetry (ed. Kerrigan); OR The Major Works (eds. Orgel and Goldberg) (or any scholarly edition that includes Paradise Lost and the shorter poems). Additional texts will be distributed electronically.

Description

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll do a case study of sixteenth and seventeenth century religious poetry to answer these questions. We’ll keep a dual focus throughout: what makes religious poetry a fascinating object for study is precisely that it is both poetry and religion, and it reflects the irreverent creativity of poetry as well as the reverence that religion seems to demand from its practitioners. In the odd cooperation of poetry and religion, both are often forced to show their unknown faces and hidden tendencies; our main goal in the course is to notice the moments when religious poetry tells us something new and exciting about poetic invention or religious belief.

In theory, there are three types of religious poetry in the early modern period: devotional poetry, prophetic poetry, and mystical poetry. Devotional poetry can be loosely defined as poetry that enacts or resembles religious practices such as prayer or liturgical acts. Prophetic poetry corresponds to the Scriptures in that it reports of a story and its report is ostensibly based on revelation. Finally, mystical poetry tends to focus on some sort of experience of the divine. We will approach the religious poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with these three categories in hand, but also with an open mind to any alternatives, variations, or departures. Although the course focuses on religious poetry, we’ll also look at secular poetry because, as we’ll see, religious and secular are not entirely separable categories in the period.

Authors include Philip and Mary Sidney, John Donne, George Herbert, Aemilia Lanyer, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan, Andrew Marvell, Thomas Traherne, and John Milton.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

This class is open to third- and fourth-year English majors only.


Special Topics: Engaging the Play: Being the Player

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: Note new room: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Cruz, N.: Anna In The Tropics; Wilson, A.: Joe Turners Come And Gone; Ruhl, S.: Dead Man's Cell Phone; Gotanda, P.: No More Cherry Blossoms; Vogel, P.: How I Learned To Drive; Hwang, D.: Yellow Face; Lori-Parks, S.: TopDog/UnderDog; Wallace, N.: One Flea Spare; Gotanda, P.: Yankee Dawg You Die; Letts, T.: Osage County; Baker, A.: Circle Mirror Transformation

Description

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be followed with students participating in the actual rehearsing and in-class performing of the discussed plays. This experiencing of the theater process will give insight as to how theater text spoken aloud, put on its feet, performed, can afford another kind of "reading" of what is written on page. The material to be covered will be drawn from contemporary American plays with an emphasis on Asian American themes and Professor Gotanda’s works. It is preferred that students not have a performance background. Grading will be determined by commitment to participation, not “expertise” of performance. Classes will be conducted to allow for a friendly, comfortable performing environment. Study will be supplemented by guest lecturers – live and by skype. The vantage point of Professor Gotanda as a playwright working in contemporary American theater will lend a living, in the field, dynamic to the class.


Special Topics: Race and Cultures of Mobility in American Literature

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 160 Kroeber


Other Readings and Media

Twain, Mark: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Du Bois, W.E.B., The Souls of Black Folk; Keller, Helen: The Story of My Life; Johnson, James: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; McKay, Claude: Home to Harlem; Heyward, DuBose: Porgy; Rankine, Claudia: Don't Let Me Be Lonely; Toomer, Jean: Cane; McCullers, Carson: The Member of the Wedding; Du Bois, W.E.B.: Dark Princess

Description

This course examines how nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. writers imagined the connections between race, mobility, and national identity. Movement in American literature is often understood to betoken freedom, exploration, and escape--whether on the open river or the open road, the western frontier or the New England retreat. Interrogating these romantic tropes and utopian mythologies, we will ask how representations of mobility (broadly understood) in fact map out the contested terrain of racial difference. How do narratives of travel and spectacles of the body in motion redraw the boundaries of national belonging? How does race organize space on the urban grid and in the poetic line? How does literary form mediate and meditate on the unequal distribution of mobility as a social resource? And how are notions of national progress and racial uplift inflected through discourses of ability and disability? Our readings will address these and other questions against an historical backdrop of regionalism, migration, territorial expansion, segregation, "slumming," and internationalism. Of particular concern will be the choreography of difference in popular culture and the uneven relationship between cultural visibility and social mobility.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Revision in Early America

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 101 LSA


Other Readings and Media

Morrison, T.: A Mercy; Shakespeare, W: The Tempest: A Case Study; Cesaire, A.: A Tempest; Jefferson, T.: Notes on the State of Virginia; Brown, W.: Clotel, or the President

Description

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our study will be organized around four early American sites: Landfall in the North Atlantic, Jamestown fort, Witchcraft at Salem, and Jefferson’s Virginia. These sites will function as interpretive nodes; in each place, African, Native, and European ways of making meaning collided and concepts of racial difference were created. The effect, of course, was never total, and we will study how racial constructions forged at each site have been re-imagined and revised throughout American cultural history to the present day.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.

It also satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Literature and Disability: Representations of Disability in Literature

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barker, P.: Regeneration; Dunn, K.: Geek Love; Finger, A.: Call Me Ahab; Lewis, V. A.: Beyond Victims and Villains; McCullers, C.: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Medoff, M.: Children of a Lesser God; Shakespeare, W.: King Lear; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III

Description

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama. Writing assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays and a take-home final examination. (This is a core course for the Disability Studies Minor.)


Literature and Linguistics

English 179

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Heaney, S.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation (bilingual edition); Woolf, V.: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

The medium of literature is language. This course will explore this relationship through a survey of literary forms defined by linguistic forms, and through consideration of how these literary forms are both like and unlike forms of non-literary language. These literary forms include meter; rhyme and alliteration; syntactic parallelism and other syntactic structures special to poetry; formulas of oral composition; and special narrative uses of pronouns, tenses and other subjective features of language to express point of view and render 'represented speech and thought'. The emphasis will be on literature in English, but comparisons with literature in other languages will also be drawn. No knowledge of linguistics will be presupposed, but linguistic concepts will be introduced, explained and used.


Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

-- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories. In thinking of short stories as artifacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty – how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories. So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form. We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures. Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


Research Seminar: The Rejection of Closure: Slow Readings

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Armantrout, R.: Versed; Clark, T. J.: The Sight of Death; Mackey, N.: Splay Anthem; Middleton, P.: Distant Reading: Performance, Readership, and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry; Mullen, H.: Sleeping with the Dictionary; Spahr, J.: Well Then There Now; Spicer, J.: My Vocabulary Did This to Me; Watten, B.: The Constructivist Moment

Description

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Works by Larry Eigner, Rae Armantrout, Jack Spicer, Harryette Mullen, Robert Grenier, Barrett Watten, Juliana Spahr, and Nathaniel Mackey are among those that will be considered. Such works will be read against the backdrop of their historical moment and contextual purport and in conjunction with assigned critical texts, but students will be expected to conduct their own research using primary and secondary sources in the process of coming to relevant, meaningful readings of the poems. Students will be asked to maintain a reading journal and to write several critical papers—some written individually, others written collaboratively.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Another Nature

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Whitman, W: Song of Myself and Other Poems, (ed. by Hass and Ebenkamp); Spicer, J: My Vocabulary Did This to Me: The Collected Poems of Jack Spicer, (ed. by Killian and Gizzi); Stevens, W: Wallace Stevens: Collected Poetry and Prose, (Library of America edition, ed. by Kermode and Richardson); The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism 2nd edition, (ed. by Leitch, V, et al)

Description

The poet... doth grow in effect another nature, in making things either better than nature brings forth, or quite anew. —Sidney

In 1770, English painter George Stubbs painted a painting of a moose standing in front of a rocky crag. All wrong—moose live in the swamp. But since the only moose that Stubbs had ever seen had been shipped from North America, he had falsely imagined the sublimity of its habitat. The twentieth-century American poet Robert Duncan brings up Stubbs’ moose in “Poetry, A Natural Thing” to rehearse a longstanding opposition between poetry and nature, and undercut that opposition a little bit. He suggests that the out-of-place moose—a “picture apt for the mind,” he calls it—is not only a perfect figure for the pure and delightful inventiveness of poetry, but also for its weird pathos. In this course, we’ll set poems and theories of poetry alongside ideas of nature to enrich our understanding of both. Are nature and/or poetry wild, real, objective, social, inner, autonomous, and/or other? To formulate your own opinion, you’ll write a series of close readings leading up to a long research paper built around a poem of your choice.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Writings of Daniel Defoe

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe, ed. Richetti; Defoe, Daniel: Journal of the Plague Year, ed. Wall; Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders, ed. Blewett; Defoe, Daniel: Roxana, ed. Blewett

Description

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe’s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and religious as well as literary. Writings with less obvious claims on our attention than the prose fiction will figure prominently, although proportions can be adjusted as the course unfolds.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of California and the West pre-1920

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: MW 5:30-7
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Clemens, Samuel L.: Roughing It; Norris, Frank: McTeague; Austin, Mary: The Land of Little Rain; London, Jack: The Valley of the Moon

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Writing will consist of a term paper of 16-20 pages. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The New Journalism and the Nonfiction Novel

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Hersey, J.: Hiroshima; Mailer, N.: The Armies of the Night: History as a Novel, the Novel as History; Capote, T.: In Cold Blood; Didion, J.: Slouching Towards Bethlehem; Herr, M.: Dispatches; Wolfe, T.: The New Journalism

Description

This course focuses on the intersection of literature and journalism, with particular attention to the emergence of the New Journalism. The genre, defined in terms of its application of literary techniques to news reporting, often constructs stories around scenes, employs extended dialogue, or portrays another’s thoughts, all the while remaining confined to verifiable facts. Over the course of the semester we’ll both examine the way our different authors deploy such techniques and place their works and the genre as a whole in historical context. We will also examine the category in more theoretical terms, interrogating its stability and self-proclaimed novelty.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: In Defense of Literature

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Tanemura, Janice
Tanemura, Janice
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Babbitt, Irving: Literature and the American College: Essays in Defense of the Humanities; Du Bois, W .E. B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Stephenson, Neal: Snow Crash; Mullen, Haryette: Sleeping with the Dictionary; Ohmann, Richard: The Politics of Knowledge: The Commercialization of the University, the Professions, and Print Culture; Sontag, Susan: Against Interpretation; Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Sapphire: Push; Berry, Wendell: A Continuous Harmony: Essays Cultural and Agricultural; Hamid, Mohsin: The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Description

This course addresses the so-called “crisis in the humanities” by examining the history of this perceived crisis and its relationship to the formation of the field of literary studies. Can we still find solutions to our problems in literature or is literature made obsolete by the popularization of alternative methods of communication: Facebook, Twitter, blogs, etc.? We will examine the arguments within literary humanism, the novel’s relationship to self-formation and the notion of art as redemptive, alongside an examination of the institutionalization of literary studies. In the face of institutional and cultural crisis where literature is no longer viewed as capable of helping us deal with the contemporary problems of life, and is sometimes imagined as the cause of its problems (English teachers breeding anti-American ideas), how do we, as Gregory Jusdanis argues, fashion a new “defense of literature”?

Reader will include pieces by John Leo, John Dewey, Amy Tan, Michael Berubé, Carey Nelson, John Guillory, Marjorie Perloff, and Stanley Fish.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Walter Scott and Jane Austen

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Northanger Abbey; Austen, J.: Persuasion; Austen, J.: Mansfield Park; Austen, J.: Emma; Scott, W.: Waverley; Scott, W.: Redgauntlet; Scott, W.: The Antiquary; Scott, W.: Guy Mannering

Description

The two major British novelists of the Romantic period were reading each other: warily, in Austen’s case—“Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. I do not like him, and do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it – but fear I must”—and with a franker enthusiasm, in Scott’s: “Also read again, and for the third time at least, Miss Austen's very finely written novel of Pride and Prejudice. That young lady had a talent for describing the involvement and feelings and characters of ordinary life which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with.” In her lifetime Austen’s novels met with a modest commercial success, and were praised by a discerning few; Scott, who wrote the only substantial contemporary review of Austen’s work, was the most famous and influential author of the first half of the nineteenth century. By the end of the Victorian era, their achievements were viewed as equal and opposite: “between them they cover almost the entire possible ground of prose fiction,” wrote George Saintsbury in 1913. By the mid-twentieth century the drastic decline of Scott’s reputation measured Austen’s seemingly unstoppable rise to mass cult status and critical adulation. We will read four major novels by each author, and consider representative criticism of their work, the influential theories of the novel that have grown up around them, and the curious trajectory of their reputations.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Asian American Fiction

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Choi, S.: American Woman; Ghosh, A.: Sea of Poppies; Hamid, M.: The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Lee, C. R.: Native Speaker; Ong, H.: Fixer Chao; Truong, M.: The Book of Salt; Yamashita, K.: Tropic of Orange

Description

If we accept that “Asian American” names a fictive ethnicity, what has been the power of Asian American literature’s social imagination? How has Asian American literature not only reflected the constructedness of Asian American identity but also contributed to the building of Asian American racial formation? In the putative context of globalization, what kind of psychic identification, political affiliation, or social experience does “Asian American” name? This seminar will introduce students to Asian American literature and history, with particular attention to their interaction and mutual influence since the invention of the identity in the 1960s. Besides the influential fictional texts listed here, we will also read selected critical works in Asian American Studies. Active in-class participation and the production of a research paper are required. This course is appropriate for students engaged in activist Asian American projects (and seeking to reflect further on these) as well as those without prior background in Asian American Studies (and seeking initial orientation).

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Contemporary Ethnic Surrealist Poetry and Poetics

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Chen, Christopher
Chen, Christopher
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Cha, T: Dictee; Dinh, L: All Around What Empties Out; Foster, S: Atomik Aztex; Kaufman, B: The Ancient Rain: 1956-1978; Kelley (ed.), R: Black, Brown, & Beige: Surrealist Writings from Africa and the Diaspora (The Surrealist Revolution); Mullen, H: Recyclopedia; Mullen, H: Sleeping With The Dictionary; Richardson (trans.), M: Refusal of the Shadow

Description

Inspired by an eclectic mixture of influences ranging from Negritude to Sun-Ra, and from Yellow Peril pulp novels and films to counterfactual histories, a number of contemporary African American and Asian American poets have attempted to articulate what could be called a raced or ethnicized surrealist poetic practice in the United States. This seminar will focus on a number of important historical precursors to this poetic tradition, namely translations of the work of Aimé Césaire and other Negritude poets like Leopold Senghor. We will also conduct a broad survey of a range of highly influential poets like Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Lawson Fusao Inada, Janice Mirikitani, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha—all authors who have been central to the construction and revision of contemporary ethnic literary canons which have historically privileged realist, autobiographical narratives or the first person, confessional lyric voice. Throughout this seminar, we will investigate how margins and mainstreams are created and revised within ethnic literary traditions.

We will then focus upon a group of contemporary poets who have historically been marginalized within these emergent canons—poets like Elouise Loftin, Bob Kaufman, Jayne Cortez, Sonia Sanchez, Li-Young Lee, Linh Dinh, John Yau, Will Alexander, Harryette Mullen, Koon Woon, and Sesshu Foster. Considered together, these poets explore a satirical mode often obsessively focused on the structure and character of racial stereotypes and plumb the depths of what could be called postmodern popular culture’s vast racial unconscious—circulating through films, music, and advertising. Finally, we will attempt to identify shared thematic and formal features of contemporary ethnic surrealist writing and read this body of work against an older tradition of European surrealist literature and art committed to an anticolonial politics yet whose vision of non-Western art remained primitivizing.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Paradise Lost, Found, Lost Again

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus: The 1818 Text; Pullman, Philip: His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass / The Subtle Knife / The Amber Spyglass

Description

An intensive reading of John Milton’s great epic Paradise Lost and two works that adapt it in imaginative ways, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. The modern and Romantic texts will throw light back on Milton’s classic and – I hope – generate new insights. Students’ individual research interests will influence the discussion and the term paper.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Words and Bodies in Space: Poems for the Stage

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominica
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This course focuses on bringing canonical modern and contemporary poetry on the page, in conversation with slam poetry, performance poetry and finally performance theory. Whether we are talking about Homer or the Beat poets, how a poem is spoken has always been perceived as part of its meaning. But how do the performed elements of the poem influence its meaning? What is the difference between reading a poem and performing a poem? How do poems change when they are performed on stage? Does hip-hop or the poetry slam transform the category of poetry? How do we combine poetry with other media such as dance, visual art, and music? In what ways is the text of the poem extended by the stage and embodiment? In what ways do these constrain poetry written for the page? How can we think more critically as writers about what it means for our work and ourselves to take the stage? We will begin the semester by examining modernist and contemporary writers such as William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Gwendolyn Brooks, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbury, Bernadette Mayer, Mark Doty, and others. We will then examine poetry written specifically for performance by looking at writers such as Miguel Pinero, Patricia Smith, Alix Olson, Edwin Torres, Hal Sirowitz, and Maggie Estap and others. Finally we will turn to writings about performance. Using work by Richard Schechner, Shannon Jackson, Erving Goffman, Marco de Marinis, Eve Sedgwick and others, we will utilize theory to examine our analysis of how these poems can change and emerge in space when performed on stage. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students may also have the option of performing their own work.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: American Captivities

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Derounian-Stodala (ed.), K.: Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives; Baepler, P.: White Slaves, African Masters; Tyler, R.: The Algerine Captive; Rowson, S.: Slaves in Algiers; Gates (ed.), H. L.: The Classic Slave Narratives; Prince, M.: History of Mary Prince

Description

The captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.” Although its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, the captivity narrative genre extended to the capture of sailors and pirates at sea, Christians and Muslims on the Barbary Coast, and Africans enslaved and transported throughout the Atlantic world. In this course, we will study a range of Indian, pirate, and slave captivities, from the colonial period through the early nineteenth century. We will also pursue research in secondary sources, tracing traditions of literary criticism around the issue of captivity and the captive’s position. Students will learn hands-on research methodology, complete an annotated bibliography, and complete the course by writing a substantial research paper.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Chaucer and His Contexts

English 190

Section: 16
Instructor: Lankin, Andrea
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Chaucer, G.: The Canterbury Tales, ed. J. Mann

Description

The works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) have been canonized as the most important and best-known materials in Middle English literature. But Chaucer did not appear in a vacuum. On the contrary, Chaucer participated in several rich literary communities, responding to existing writings and becoming a figure to whom other writers responded. This class will read the Canterbury Tales and The House of Fame alongside some of the works’ sources, analogues and responses, therefore contextualizing Chaucer in a broad literary climate. It will also introduce students to issues of manuscript history and textual transmission, opening questions about how the texts we encounter have been produced.

We will read most texts in the original Middle English, but French, Latin and Italian materials will be available in translation. Students who have previously enrolled in English 111 (Chaucer) are encouraged to take this class, as it will explore Chaucer’s works from a different angle than most sections of English 111. Previous enrollment in English 45A or in another Middle English literature class is welcome, but not required; no prior knowledge of Middle English is necessary for this class.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: History of the Book, 597-2011

English 190

Section: 17
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler (see course description)


Other Readings and Media

Roberts, J.: A Guide to Scripts Used in English Writings up to 1500; Eliot, S.: A Companion to the History of the Book

Description

In this research seminar, we will study the development of one of the most influential technologies ever created: the book. Beginning with the introduction of the manuscript codex into England, we will trace the book through many transformations: the print revolution during the Renaissance; the effect of mechanization in the 19th century; and peer into the future with a look at today’s array of electronic “print” media. Along the way, we will think about what this technology does for and to literature, and will try to understand how texts interact with their physical embodiments.

On Tuesdays, the class will meet in the Bancroft Library, where we will work with primary material and learn about the proper handling of rare books and manuscripts. Thursdays will be spent (in 301 Wheeler) in discussions of a wide range of historical, theoretical, and practical issues: there will be a course reader in addition to the required textbooks. Your research for this course will help you develop skills for describing and understanding the lives of books and of the texts in them. You will learn to transcribe manuscripts, create editions, and accurately describe many kinds of books. You will also study the way in which format and content interact in books and in other media containing written words. Fifteen hundred years of book history will be open to you in your choice of a final research project.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock

English 190

Section: 18
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: TTh 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings Thurs. 7-10 P.M.
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Modleski, T.: The Women Who Knew Too Much; A Hitchcock Reader, Deutelbaum, M. and Pogue, L., eds.

Description

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will consider socio-cultural backgrounds, gender problems, and psychological and Marxist readings as well as star studies.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J: Pride and Prejudice; Barthes, R: Camera Lucida; Barthes, R: Mythologies; Barthes, R: S/Z; Flaubert, G: Three Tales; Miller, D.A.: Jane Austen, or the Secret of Style; Rochefoucauld, F: Collected Maxims

Description

This course is intended to help students as they set off on the peculiar adventure known as the Honors Thesis. Help will take two forms. (1) We will study some critical texts that propose useful ideas for thinking about such topics as mass culture, narrative and the novel, style, sexuality and gender, the literary, the photographic and the filmic. But (2) we won’t read these texts just for their ideas; we will also read them as writing, writing that is always saying something more, or something other, than the arguments being explicitly advanced in it. Not only do the chosen texts invite this double consideration; they encourage a critical writing practice whose texture would be rich enough to invite it, too By virtue of refusing the usual indifference of criticism to its own writing, they embody a value—let us call it “the Intrepid”—essential to anyone beginning an adventure.

We will also read, to keep us honest, some literature.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 19; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This course is designed to facilitate the writing of a senior honors thesis. We will begin by reading across a broad range of criticism and theory. Students will refine their research interests into a workable thesis topic, complete an annotated bibliography, and begin the process of writing, revising, and presenting their work (to be completed in the spring semester).

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 19; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!