Announcement of Classes: Fall 2011

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

T. B. A.

Description

An approach to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 2
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Leitch (ed.), Vincent: Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Graduate Readings: State of the Art Film: 1963

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: note new time: W 12-3
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

David Bordwell, On the History of Film Style; Andras Balint Kovacs, Screening Modernism; there will also be a course reader on b-space.

Description

The course centers on the conception and practice of the so-called international art film around 1963. Without making a fetish of the date, it may be agreed that 1963 was a remarkable year: for quality of product, for the upsurge in points of distribution, and for the diversity of cinematic modernisms on offer. To stay within this moment's own canon (which has not entirely remained in our own), our primary object of study will be the films on Cahiers du cinema's top-ten list for 1963, reproduced below:

1. Contempt (Jean-Luc Godard)
2. The Birds (Alfred Hitchcock)
3. The Exterminating Angel (Luis Bunuel)
4. Adieu Philippine (Jacques Rozier)
5. The Trial Of Joan Of Arc (Robert Bresson)
6. Muriel (Alain Resnais)
7. The Nutty Professor (Jerry Lewis)
8. Les Carabiniers (Jean-Luc Godard)
9. Salvatore Giuliano (Francesco Rosi)
10. (Federico Fellini)

To these we will add, also from 1963, The Leopard (Luchino Visconti), The Silence (Ingmar Bergman), and High and Low (Akira Kurosawa).

This course will fulfill the department's nonhistorical requirement.

This class is cross-listed with Film 240 section 3.


Graduate Readings: The Novel in Theory

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

 Hale,  D:  The Novel: An Anthology of Crit and Theory;  Barthes,  R:  S/Z, translated by Richard Miller;  Genette,  G:  Narrative Discourse;  James,  H:  What Maisie Knew;  Hurston,  Z:  Their Eyes Were Watching God;  Eagleton,  T:  Literary Theory: An Introduction; a course reader

Description

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools have made novels the privileged object of critical attention. Topics of discussion include the difference between narrative and the novel; the location of novelistic difference in the representation of time and space; the definition of subjectivity in terms of vision and voice; the valorization of grammatical structures; the search for a masterplot; the historicization of genre; the confusion of realism and reality; and the belief in a politics of form. Readings will be drawn from, but not limited to, works by H. James, Shklovsky, Lukács, Jameson, Barthes, Girard, Genette, Booth, Bakhtin, Bhabha and Spivak. James's What Maisie Knew and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God will serve as test cases. Two short papers will facilitate the work of theoretical analysis and discussion.

This course fulfills the Ph.D. program's nonhistorical requirement.


Graduate Readings: On Life

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below

Description

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s The Meaning of Life and Elizabeth Grosz’s The Nick of Time. In exploring the meaning of life, Eagleton takes us on a tour of the many meanings of life. In readings of Darwin, Nietzsche, Bergson and Deleuze, Grosz identifies life with temporality or a way of holding the past, present and future together.

The course will then be divided into four major sections, combining literary and philosophical works: Romanticism, Nietzscheanism, Bergsonism, and Bio-power.

In our discussion of Romanticism we shall focus on what M. H. Abrams long ago determined to be its core concept—life. We shall explore the significance of the Romantics’ interest in the scientific attempts to understand life, monstrous life forms and life’s interconnectedness.

Our study of Nietzscheanism will culminate in a reading of Mann’s Dr. Faustus whose protagonist embodies the temptations and dangers of Nietzschean Lebensphilosophie, but we shall begin with Nietzsche’s own affirmation of life against asceticism. We shall also study the interpretation of his philosophy developed by Georg Simmel whose influence on cultural studies and philosophy is still underestimated. Anticipating Martin Heidegger, and in response to The Great War, Simmel registers the cultural shift from the affirmation of life to the authentic facing of death.

We shall then move to the study of Bergsonism. We shall read Bergson’s most culturally influential work, not his more strictly philosophical works. We shall investigate the fear of mechanical inelasticity and becoming automaton, his critiques of limits of mechanistic thinking about life, and his valorization of intuition and process as the epistemology and ontology suited to life, respectively. We shall then discuss how these ideas are thematized in works by D.H. Lawrence, Aimé Césaire and Leopold Senghor. But we will also attend to the visual arts to explore how vitalist themes were played out. On the one hand, Bergsonism provided a language with which to appreciate African art; on the other hand, the vitalist themes of Bergson and Georges Sorel were appropriated by the European fascist avant-garde.

The course will conclude with the recent discussion of the nature of life in the theorization of biopower, biopolitics and the homo sacer.

Required readings (the reading will be composed of both selections and whole texts from the following books):

Introduction
Terry Eagleton The Meaning of Life: A Very Short Introduction
Elizabeth Grosz The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution and the Untimely

The Romantics
Mary Shelley Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus
M. H. Abrams “The World’s Song of Life and Joy”
Denise Gigante Life: Organic Form and Romanticism
Timothy Morton Ecology Without Nature

Nietzscheanism
Friedrich Nietzsche On The Genealogy of Morals
Georg Simmel The View of Life: Four Metaphysical Essays with Journal Applications
Thomas Mann Dr. Faustus: The Life of the Composer Adrian Leverkühn as Told by a Friend

Bergsonism
Henri Bergson Creative Evolution
Henri Bergson Comedy
D.H. Lawrence Women in Love
Aimé Césaire Cahier d’un Retour Au Pays Natal (English and French edition), ed. Abiola Irele
Souleymane Bachir Diagne African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson and the Idea of Négritude
Mark Antliff Avant-garde Fascism: The Mobilization of Myth, Art and Culture in France, 1909-1939

Biopower and Biopolitics
Michel Foucault Society Must Be Defended
Thomas Lemke Biopolitics: An Advanced Introduction
Kazuo Ishiguro Never Let Me Go


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 5
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

No texts

Description

This is a practical writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transitions from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar. It provides a collaborative critical community in which participants can try out successive versions of their dissertation projects and learn how others are constructing theirs. It will begin with a review of a range of prospectuses from the past to help demystify the genre and enhance understanding of its form and function. And if all goes according to plan, it will end with every member of the workshop having submitted a prospectus to his or her committee.


Graduate Readings: Anglophone Poetry

English 203

Section: 6
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Larkin, P.: Collected Poems; Heaney, S.: Poems 1965-1975; Heaney, S.: Field Work; Hughes, T.: Crow

Description

This class will broadly survey British, Irish, and postcolonial poetry after 1945. It is a large and multifaceted body of work, and much of it remains under-read, especially in the American academy. We will think through the development of a late modern and postmodern aesthetic among contemporary British poets, the ways in which this wonderfully various canon (or set of overlapping canons) registers and reinflects the double crucible of decolonization and globalization, and the disparate pressures (historical, cultural, literary-historical, formal) at work within the formation of this field of British and Anglophone poetry.

We will look closely at poems by, among a few others, W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Stevie Smith, Dylan Thomas, Philip Larkin, Thom Gunn, Elizabeth Jennings, W.S. Graham, Roy Fisher, Roger McGough, Derek Walcott, Kamau Brathwaite, Christopher Okigbo, Wole Soyinka, Hugh MacDiarmid, Ted Hughes, David Jones, Basil Bunting, Geoffrey Hill, J.H. Prynne, Peter Riley, Tom Raworth, Ian Hamilton Finlay, W.S. Graham, Thomas Kinsella, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Michael Longley, Medbh McGuckian, Eavan Boland, Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin, Paul Muldoon, Ciaran Carson, Craig Raine, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Geraldine Monk, David Dabydeen, Tony Harrison, Denise Riley, Carol Ann Duffy, Jackie Kay, Lorna Goodison, Grace Nichols, Maggie O’Sullivan, Caroline Bergvall, Catherine Walsh, and Keston Sutherland. Most poems, along with a number of critical essays, will be contained in a course reader and/or online.

This course fulfills the 20th-century literature requirement for degree distribution requirements.


Graduate Readings: What was Asian American Literature?

English 203

Section: 7
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Choi, S.: American Woman; Ghosh, A.: Sea of Poppies; Jin, H.: War Trash; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Lee, C. R.: Native Speaker; Ong, H.: Fixer Chao; Ozeki, R.: My Year of Meats; Truong, M.: The Book of Salt; Yamashita, K.: I-Hotel

Description

Adapting the title of Kenneth Warren’s recent intervention in African American Studies, this course explores the history of Asian American literary formation, and the making of Asian American racial formation through literary agencies (specifically the novel’s) since the 1960s. The title is meant to evoke the historicizing perspective with which we will be regarding literary form, with an openness to the theoretical recasting of “Asian American history” that experiments—and utterly conventional iterations—of form may be capable of generating. The title is not meant to render apriori judgment on the terminal point of Asian American literature’s historical life. Nevertheless, we will no doubt be concerned with the extent to which the transnationalization of the values of Asian American Studies since the 1990s has simultaneously suggested the demise of Asian American pan-ethnicity as either an epistemologically valid or politically viable concept. Amidst this uncertainty, literary publishing by U.S.-based authors of Asian descent has proceeded apace, gaining increasing national and worldwide recognition. How is this work to be read? This course should be useful to those interested in pursuing future Asian American projects, as well as those more generally interested in questions of the relationships between the minor and the transnational, between racialization and globalization, and between what is ethnic literature and what is world literature. In addition to the fictional texts indicated in the book list, we will also read recent scholarly works in transnational Asian American and American Studies.

This course fulfils the requirement for a course organized in terms other than chronological coverage.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 202 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Baker, P.: Introduction to Old English (2nd ed.); Liuzza, R.: Old English Literature: Critical Essays

Description

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the semester, however, students should be capable of reading and translating a variety of Old English prose and verse texts, analyzing these works’ style, and situating them in the context of early medieval culture. Linguistic mastery is emphasized, and much of the in-class work for the course will consist of translation and close reading. However, coursework will also address a range of interpretative and literary-historical issues, as well as the tools and methods essential to scholars in the field of Anglo-Saxon literature. Depending on student interests, we may also consider topics such as palaeography; manuscript context; the interaction of Latin and Old English; and/or modern translations from Old English. 205A is normally a prerequisite for more advanced courses in Old English. No prior knowledge of Old English is assumed, and undergraduates may be admitted with the permission of the instructor.

This course satisfies the pre-1700 historical requirement OR one half of the language requirement (not both).


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be determined

Description

This workshop is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. It presupposes two things: that poetry as a project is as rigorous an undertaking as more typically scholarly undertakings; and that participants have an interest in theoretical concerns and see certain philosophical and/or social issues as relevant to poetry and to the particular technical problems (praxis or craft) that any work entails.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Hejinian's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 19th, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Graduate Proseminar: 18th Century

English 246F

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: F 12-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

Many eighteenth-century British writers imagined their world as one of increasing complexity. Technologies of print, ever more specialized divisions of labor, an expanding empire, major shifts in credit and commerce—the growth of a speculative market as we know it—, the boom in the literary market, and revolutionary movements all contributed to a mixed sense of triumph and dissolution. As we read a selection of British writing from the latter half of the eighteenth century, we shall consider the rhetorics and genres, such as the periodical essay, the novel, and the georgic poem, even the dictionary and the anthology of “great Literature” that attempted to render visible some sense of social organization and cohesion. These examinations might allow us to think about any or all of such critical questions as: how did writers attempt to establish new terms of literary value?—be they poets suffering a crisis of faith in the social value of poetic practice, fiction writers eager to legitimate the form of writing we have come to call the novel, or women or laboring class writers negotiating the scandal of public authorship; what new epistemological challenges did writers face, and how did the discourses of empiricism and moral philosophy contribute to or attempt to resolve them?; how did notions of sentiment and sympathy propose to overcome the social atomization threatened by capital relations; how did historicism, especially a new interest in literary history, offer another means of social consolidation? This course will include both primary texts and important secondary scholarship to help introduce ongoing critical conversations in eighteenth-century studies. Titles are subject to change, but will likely include works by Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Horace Walpole, Mary Leapor, Thomas Gray, William Collins, James Macpherson, Thomas Chatterton, Lawrence Sterne, Ann Radcliffe, Oliver Goldsmith, George Crabbe, Robert Burns, Janet Little. The required books for the course will be available exclusively at Analog Books, located just one block up Euclid Avenue from the North Gate entrance to the Berkeley campus.
            
Course Requirements:
The emphasis of this course is on reading, and the primary requirement is close and careful reading of the texts. Also required are one class presentation and two 8-10-page papers.


Graduate Proseminar: American Literature to 1855

English 246I

Section: 1
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

T. B. A.

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Tamarkin at tamarkin@berkeley.edu.


Research Seminar: Marxist Literary Theory

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: Tues. 9:30-11:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Jameson,  F.: Marxism and Form: Twentieth-century Dialectical Theories of Literature;  Adorno, et. al., T. : Aesthetics and Politics;  Sartre,  J-P.: Search for a Method; Vološinov,  V. N.: Marxism and the Philosophy of Language; Williams,  R.: Marxism and Literature; Derrida,  J.: Specters of Marx: The State of the Debt, the Work of Mourning, and the New International; Althusser,  L.: For Marx; a course reader

Recommended: Lukács, G.: Realism in Our Time (out of print)

Description

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to journalists who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism. "It does not seem to make much sense," he wrote, "to talk about the bankruptcy of Marxism, when Marxism is very precisely the science and the study of just that capitalism whose global triumph is affirmed in talk of Marxism's demise." What we can infer from Jameson's comments is the idea that historically Marxism has been useful not only for the critique of social systems, but for the study of literature and culture, as well. Two decades later—and with the political, economic and environmental contradictions of the "new world order" now in plain sight—critics might benefit once again from reassessing the appropriateness of Marxism for the study of literature and culture. This course will provide the opportunity for such a reassessment by focusing on the ways that Marxist social thought in the past ninety years has contributed to theories of literature and culture. We will attempt to understand and theorize the relation between the material conditions of social life and aesthetic forms. The goal of the course is to provide a broad introduction to the range of Marxist analysis and critique in contemporary literary and cultural studies. In the first part of the course, we will read several classic works of Marxist theory to ground our study historically. In the second part of the course, driven partly by student concerns and interests, we will analyze the compatibility of Marxist literary theory with feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Research Seminar: Victorian Poetry

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: W 3-6
Location: 104 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

In this course we will approach the literature and culture of the Victorian period through its poetry and poetics. We'll read a lot of both in order to do three related things. First, we'll consider in what terms the idea of the literary as it was embodied in the figure of the poem was understood in nineteenth-century British culture and society. What, we'll ask alongside the Victorian poet, is poetry? Who and what is it for? Why bother writing it instead of something else (a novel, a speech, literary criticism)? Second, we'll work to understand the ways in which an extreme self-consciousness about history, subjectivity, and the relation between the two that characterizes much of this poetry finds various forms in lyrics, ballads, dramatic monologues, verse novels, etc. Third, we'll take our reading of specifically Victorian poetry and poetics as an opportunity to think about more recent trends in poetics; what ways of thinking about poetry have since appeared because of, in spite of, or very decidedly against the Victorians and their poetry? To what degree has an idea (whether true or false) about the Victorians shaped how we read and value poetry today?


Research Seminar: The Recovery Imperative

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Latimer


Other Readings and Media

Baucom, I: Specters of the Atlantic; Dayan, C: The Law Is a White Dog; Derrida, J: Archive Fever; Hartman, S: Lose Your Mother; Love, H: Feeling Backward; Latour, B; Reassembling the Social; Palmie, S: Wizards and Scientists; Warren, K: What Was African American Literature?

A reader may include works by Theodor Adorno, Anjali Arondekar, Walter Benjamin, Vincent Brown, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Rita Felski, Jennifer Fleissner, Ranajit Guha, Saidiya Hartman, Jared Hickman, Steven Knapp, Bruno Latour, Friedrich Nietzsche, Paul Ricoeur, David Scott, Michael Taussig, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Slavoj Zizek.

Description

Men fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of defeat, and when it comes it turns out not to be what they meant, and other men have to fight for what they meant under another name.

-- William Morris (1886)

History moves as the shadow to Morris's prose, and that movement conspires with problems of interpretation and naming not only to produce the hidden history of the defeated, but to moderate the scholar's ambition to know the past. It is just this inertia that leads to the "promise" of continuous history, as Michel Foucault would mark it, the guarantee "that one day the subject, in the form of historical consciousness, will once again be able to appropriate, to bring back under his sway, all those things that are kept at a distance by difference, and find in them what might be called his abode." We have come to accept the redemption of the dead as a kind of critical second nature and to take as fundamental ambitions of all historical work the drive: [a] to restore agency, voice, and interiority to those to whom such qualities have been denied; [b] to continue, reanimate, or complete the political projects of those who were defeated by history; and [c] to make a part of the social order "all that which did not fit properly into the laws of historical movement" (Adorno). The "recovery imperative" thus names both a retrieval of the past and a repair of the subject. It seeks to undo Hegelian condemnations of those perceived to be "without a past" as unfit for it.

Despite these laudable ambitions, the recovery imperative has been the object of serious questioning of late, by scholars who wonder if redemptive or redressive history is the only kind we can either have or perform. This is work that has been written from a wide range of perspectives: the politics of refusal (Love), the critique of the social (Latour), the embrace of pessimism and failure (Scott), and the antisocial thesis (Edelman), to name a few. It is work, generally, that reflects the attempt to write from the perspective of that which avails against recovery, and to hold the negativity of the unfit in the space of critical writing (i.e., the disruptions that thwart efforts to determine political goals according to a model of representation). It is work that calls for, in the words of Mick Taussig, "muted and defective storytelling as a form of analysis."

As epithet, vociferation, and declamation often both render the defeated undeserving of history and make available to us the very existences we want to encounter, is there something productive about being "unfit for history"? What can the framing of redemptive historiography not countenance? Is the project of continuing or completing the political projects of the past foreclosed by our own present conjuncture? Is there something essentially redemptive in the critique of redemption?

We will begin by reading key texts in the tradition of the recovery imperative, along with recent work that sustains the claim to genealogical continuity between the past and the present (Dayan). We will then seeks to study the philosophical, critical, and ethical background of four moments in the critique of the recovery imperative: [1] critiques of symptomatic reading (Fleissner, Felski, Ricoeur, Marcus and Best); [2] interrogations of the archive as anamenesis, or a force that countervails memory (Arondekar, Baucom, Derrida, Hartman, Palmie); [3] the problem of looking "behind" or outside the object of representation (Love, Latour); and [4] explorations of the limits and paradoxes of Western conceptions of historical time (Chakrabarty, Hickman, Taussig).

Though my own expertise is in Atlantic slavery, the accent on philosophical and critical contexts means that no single literary period or canon will figure as primary in our conversations. I invite lively and passionate critique of the scholarly works we'll be reading, but my ultimate goal will be to weave that critique into a positive set of arguments about method: what is the methodology of the text in question?; is there a shared methodology across these texts?; how does one use the work of another scholar to assemble the fundaments of one's own?


Research Seminar: Eros and Expression

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Plato: The Symposium; Ovid: Metamorphoses; Shakespeare: Antony and Cleopatra; Cleland: Fanny Hill: Or, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure

Description

At the core, highly selective readings from the most influential explorations of Eros, desire, and sexuality: Plato’s Symposium and passages from Phaedrus, episodes from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura and Ovid’s Metamorphosis A (including Narcissus and Pygmalion), Lucian’s Erotes (sometimes attributed to an imitator), Montaigne’s essay “On Some Verses of Virgil,” Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (“Fanny Hill”), Mozart and Da Ponte’s Don Giovanni (in live performance), Kierkegaard’s “The Immediate Erotic Stages or the Musical Erotic” (in Either/Or), and the Schumann/Heine Dichterliebe. An even more selective list of twentieth-century essays may include Freud, Derrida, Foucault, and Kristeva. Texts will be read in translation with the original on hand for comparison. Participants will pursue and present their own research projects in the light of issues that arise in these texts – for example, you might be working on Petrarchism and its expropriation by women poets, or Enlightenment libertinism, or Keats, or Lacan’s “sublime.” I could circulate drafts of my own current projects, on the “erotic Renaissance” and responses to the art object, or the persistence of the physical in neo-Platonism, or evolving conceptions of “Romance” including Eric Rohmer’s last film, Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon.

Don Giovanni will be seen live at San Francisco Opera (subsidized by the James D. Hart Chair); other texts and sound recordings available via bSpace.

The requirement fulfilled by this course will be determined by the instructor based on the student's work.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 302

Section: 1
Instructor: Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Showalter, E.: Teaching Literature; Villanueva: Cross-Talk in Comp Theory: A reader; Davis, B. D.: Tools for Teaching (available online as part of netLibrary, accessible only through computers connected to the U. C. Berkeley campus network); a course reader

Description

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as a both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching close reading; running a section of a lecture course; responding to student papers; teaching writing (argumentation, organization, grammar, style) in the classroom; time management; grading; labor politics and the work of teaching. We’ll use the course as a place to invent, to debrief, and to collectively support development of each teacher’s own effective, distinctive pedagogical approach. You’ll have opportunities to practice teaching skills in experimental “microteaching” sessions, to get advice on everyday teaching problems as they come up, and to observe classes taught by and talk shop with more experienced English department teacher/mentors.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP. Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 4. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.