Announcement of Classes: Spring 2012

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
American Song

MWF 9-10

Course Description:  This course revolves around the popular American Song form from the mid-19th century to the present.  We will approach the American song not just as a historical artifact aided by inventions in technology (sheet music, phonograph...(read more) Sullivan, Khalil

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Apocalypse / Now

MWF 10-11

The stolen title of this course perfectly captures the two topics this class will explore. The first is "nowness," or what it is to live in our time; the second is the notion of apocalypse—perhaps better understood as the unmaking of nation, of civil...(read more) Cullen, Ben

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Ideas of the University: School, Work, and the World

MWF 11-12

This seems like a good a time to figure out, and maybe even start to articulate, what we are all doing here. We will read and write around the concepts of education, work and leisure, trying to come to some understanding of how they function and inte...(read more) Larner-Lewis, Jonathan

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Autobiography

MWF 12-1

“I have become a question to myself”                                            —Augustine, Confessions “I know that [my accusers] almost made me forget who I was—so persuasively did they speak.” “But suppose I ask you a question”                    ...(read more) Ketz, Charity Corine

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
Refusal and Resistance in Tragedy

MWF 1-2

Tragedy, roughly speaking, is a form of dramatic art that asks whether human suffering can be made to signify. In this class, we will trace a figure who recurs throughout the corpus of tragic plays written in Europe from antiquity to the present: a p...(read more) Moore, Stephanie Anne

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
The Social Practice of Love

MWF 3-4

De La Rochefoucauld famously wrote that “plenty of people would never fall in love if they had not heard other people talk about it.” Where do we find this “talk about love” that has such suggestive power?  This course will explore some key texts in ...(read more) Weiner, Joshua J

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Communication of Poetic Effects in Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

We use language to express our thoughts and to be understood: to communicate.  In communication we rely on the shared knowledge and the shared assumptions of our audience in order to ensure as effective communication as possible.  In poetic language ...(read more) Castillo, Carmen

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Ghosts of the Past

TTh 8-9:30

This course will focus on the presence of the past in various literary genres and texts. We will examine how the past is embodied through flashback, memory, and recurrence, and explore the formal means by which the past structures or intrudes upon na...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Writing About Literarary Experience

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, one play, a good deal of verse, some short stories, some contemporary song lyrics—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literatu...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Totality Chic

MWF 10-11

Where did the sandwich you ate for lunch come from? Where were the lettuce and tomatoes farmed? Who harvested them? Where did they come from, and why? What river or reservoir contributed the water? How about the electricity used -- how was that gener...(read more) Fan, Christopher Tzechung

R1A/11

Reading & Composition:
American Exposures

TTh 12:30-2

Dear reader, this is a course that thinks about Facebook while it is pretending to contemplate American literary history. Perhaps you can identify. This course worries that maintaining a fascinating individual identity comes with far too much baggage...(read more) Clinton, Daniel Patrick

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
19th- and 20th-Century Experiment/alisms

TTh 3:30-5

What does it mean to undertake an experiment? Why might one wish to describe a work of art as “experimental”?  Is there any value in a failed experiment?  Beginning with these questions, this course will explore the hope, euphoria, and despair that a...(read more) Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
21st-Century Native American Fiction

MWF 9-10

This course will examine a variety of texts written by or about Native Americans in the first decade of the 21st century. Course requirements will include two preliminary essays (3-5 pp), and a final research component (10-15 pp). At the end of the s...(read more) Gillis, Brian

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
U.S. Autobiography as Ethnography

MWF 9-10

How should we read the “I” under the burden of representation?  What is the relationship between singular life and group consciousness?  How does the act of self-documentation produce a social record?  In this course, we will explore these questions ...(read more) Rana, Swati

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
No Man's Land--Dividing Lines in the Great War

MWF 10-11

This is the second class in the Reading and Composition series and, as a result, it will focus on the writing process, critical reading, and research, all of which culminate in a research paper due at the end of the semester. This class intends to de...(read more) Jeziorek, Alek M

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Research

MWF 11-12

This course will be about research in two senses: first, we will learn how to perform research on a number of Victorian texts; second, we will discuss the way research itself is represented in these texts. In other words, we’ll be researching Victori...(read more) Terlaak Poot, Luke

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Speaking the Unspeakable, Voicing the Unspoken

MWF 12-1

This course, while seeking to build on the basic writing tenants introduced in R1A by essaying longer expository and argumentative pieces with an emphasis on learning and utilizing research skills, will focus on exploring the unspeakable and unspoken...(read more) Seeger, Andrea Yolande

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Beyond Islands

MWF 12-1

The meaning behind this class’s title is twofold. While it will use islands—which frequently inhabit a strange, fantastical space—as a guiding theme for its selection of texts and readings, this class encourages thinking beyond that theme to the wide...(read more) Shelley, Jonathan

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
The Gothic: Revivals and Survivals

MWF 1-2

The word “Gothic” still evokes stock images of darkness, decay, and danger, from the mouldering Castle Dracula to the inky bayous of True Blood. The source of these images is ultimately the Gothic novel tradition. From The Castle of Otranto to Dracul...(read more) Cannon, Benjamin Zenas

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Strange Cases

MWF 1-2

Per the title of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1886 novella, this course will explore a number of “strange cases”—serpent seductresses, mesmerized corpses, duplicitous doppelgangers, spectral monkeys (and other inexplicable apparitions), monstrous bodies,...(read more) Mershon, Ella

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Recent Memoirs on Loss

MWF 2-3

In her review of Joyce Carol Oates’ A Widow’s Story (2011), Janet Maslin describes the memoir as a contribution to the growing “loss-of-spouse-market.” Indeed, from Calvin Trillin’s About Alice (2006) to Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking (20...(read more) Fritz, Tracy

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Late Victorians

MWF 2-3

"I don't believe there is much of a future to speak of. We're in a bit of a decadent spiral, aren't we? Sinking fast. Big brother all the way, baby. Which is why we prefer impressions to ideas. Situations to subjects. Brief flights to sustained ones....(read more) Naturale, Lauren

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Country and City

MWF 3-4

The opposition between city life and country life goes back at least as far as ancient Rome, but today it takes on a new significance as urbanites are asked to respond to a problem that is often felt more sharply in rural areas, whether it’s diminish...(read more) Bauer, Mark

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Storytelling

MWF 11-12

This course will develop your writing and research skills through careful study of works that, to varying degrees, concern the art of storytelling. We will closely read several authors ranging from Herodotus to Italo Calvino, all the while posing a n...(read more) Gordon, Zachary

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Crime

TTh 8-9:30

We like to describe the Victorians the way we think about our great-great aunts—well-meaning and sweet, but also uptight, prudish, and stodgy.  But just because polite Victorian society didn’t talk about sex, drugs, and crime doesn’t mean that they d...(read more) Baldwin, Ruth

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
Alternate Narratives

TTh 8-9:30

The texts we will read this semester have generally been read as stories of self-discovery. Through class discussion and close reading analysis, we will uncover the hidden themes and formal structures which complicate how we understand these stories....(read more) Menilla, David D.

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine the “lost years” of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African American poetry ...(read more) Gardezi, Nilofar

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Postcolonial China

MWF 9-10

Postcolonialism, as a discourse that analyzes and critiques the legacy of colonialism, has largely been developed to describe the experiences of former Western colonies in the Caribbean, India, and Africa.  This course examines the value and applicab...(read more) Lee, Amy

R1B/20

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portr...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Shakespearean Tragedy

TTh 12:30-2

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear. We will read and stu...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe

R1B/23

Reading & Composition:
Laughter and Literature

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will be taking laughter seriously. “No animal laughs, except man,” Aristotle declares. We will study the different theories that attempt to explain why we laugh. I must warn you, student, that it is not the purpose of this class to ...(read more) Huerta, Javier

R1B/24

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portr...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/25

Reading & Composition:
Paranoia

TTh 3:30-5

We all recognize its symptoms: feelings of persecution, irrational thinking, fear that others are plotting against you. We see its plots in popular culture -- dystopian fiction, political thrillers, and suspense films all move the story along with a ...(read more) Ahmed, Adam

R1B/26

Reading & Composition:
Shakespearean Tragedy

TTh 3:30-5

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear. We will read and stu...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe

R1B/27

Reading & Composition:
'They did not wear such hats'; or, Puritans in the New World

TTh 5-6:30

Taking as its focus that group of men and women who came to New England between 1620 and 1640, this course will hone your literary capacities, particularly your expository, argumentative, and research skills. There could be no better subject for spur...(read more) Trocchio, Rachel

R1B/28

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 5-6:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portr...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/29

Reading & Composition:
The Essay--Evidence and Idea

MW 9-10:30

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forward...(read more) Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth

R1B/30

Reading & Composition:
The Essay--Evidence and Idea

MW 12-1:30

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing, and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forwar...(read more) Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Bullets Across the Bay--Detective Narratives Set in San Francisco

W 9-10

Why are detective novels set in a place?  San Francisco has provided a favorite setting for the detective story since the work of Dashiell Hammett, especially with the publication of The Maltese Falcon (1930).  Of course, San Francisco is a city, but...(read more) Hutson, Richard

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 2-3

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required. This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelv...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are requir...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse:
Received Forms and Invented Forms

MW 10:30-12

In the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, a number of British poets adapted the Italian sonnet to craft a form that would become central to English literature: fourteen lines of iambic pentameter, with three rhymed quatrains and a closin...(read more) Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 11-12, + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings think about ...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 1-2, + discussion sections F 1-2

In this course you will explore some of the great foundational works of English literature, ranging from the very earliest period up to Milton's Paradise Lost. In the process, you will learn to understand--and even speak!--the forms of early English,...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11, + discussion sections F 10-11

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman...(read more) Puckett, Kent

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1, + discussion sections F 12-1

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose narrative and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and then Irelan...(read more) Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 10-11, + discussion sections F 10-11

This course examines a broad range of British and American texts spanning well over a century, with a primary focus on the emergence and development of early twentieth-century modernism. Topics for discussion will include the role of high art and art...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world.  We will concentrate on ...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Woody Allen

W 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology.  The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film A...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

101/1

History of the English Language

MWF 1-2

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, and up to its different forms in use throughout the world today.  Topics include changes in its core grammatical s...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

C107/1

The English Bible as Literature

TTh 9:30-11

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read these texts in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask ...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

117B/1

Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

117S/1

Shakespeare:
Selected Plays

TTh 12:30-2

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  We'll consider the range of plays he wrote, and why this range was important to him.  We'll also explore how different dramatic genres affect Shakespeare's representation of plot, character, and the liter...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

118/1

Milton

TTh 3:30-5

The most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon, rather than the rebel he was. Or he is assumed to be a remote religio...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

119/1

Augustan Age: Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's  first advice column, its first "women's magazine," and t...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of m...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

125C/1

The European Novel:
Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and the English Novel

TTh 3:30-5

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with two English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels respond to one another, resemble one another, and differ from one another, especially in their treatment of...(read more) Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 2-3:30

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into literary texts; and t...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 2-3:30

This course will introduce students to American literature of the early to mid-twentieth century. Reading across a range of genres and styles, we will ask how developments in literary form meditate on and respond to the social, technological, intelle...(read more) Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd

133B/1

African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of major African American writings in the context of social history. There will be two essays plus a midterm and final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Slavery--Theory and Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This course will explore the differences and similarities between the “theory” of slavery and the “experience” of slavery.  Theoretical explorations of slavery will be chosen from the writings of Aristotle, John Locke, G. W. F. Hegel, and some contem...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

134/1

Contemporary Literature

MWF 11-12

This course will survey British and Irish writing since World War II.  We will dig deeply into the texts' formal and generic workings, and think through the cultural and social contexts from which they emerge. Along the way, we'll consider the period...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This ...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicano Poetry--Text and Context

MWF 1-2

We will open with "Yo soy Joaquin"/"I am Joaquin," Rodolfo 'Corky' Gonzalez's stirring political poem of 1968 that inspired a politically based literary output that dominated Chicano poetics for well over a decade and still stands squarely at the cen...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Writing Fiction, Drama, and Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will w...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are requir...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This limited-enrollment workshop will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of short fiction.  Permission of instructor is required.  To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 12-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along wi...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

143B/1

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; ima...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143C/1

Long Narrative:
The Short Novel

W 3-6

In this class, we’ll be reading and discussing various novels under 150 pages from a diverse group of authors. The point is to take a close look at a text of manageable size, paying attention to its structure – how the author manages to tell the stor...(read more) Alarcon, Daniel
Alarcon, Daniel

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

TTh 11-12:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in the assigned anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
The Essay

TTh 12:30-2

This will be a course in the essay, and it is designed to help students who are writing an undergraduate thesis-length paper. We will begin by getting acquainted with various kinds of essays—narrative and descriptive, personal and research-based, cri...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

143N/3

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing

TTh 2-3:30

Book List: Students should come to class before buying books. The list will likely include some of the following: Basho’s Back Roads to Far Towns (translated by Cid Corman); Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; Tete-Michel Kpomassie’s An African in Gre...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143T/1

Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 2-3:30

This is a workshop course in the translation of poetry. Participants need to be at least moderately competent in some language other than English. All of the work will involve translating from other languages into English. Participants will be expect...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, practices, and inspiration from other academic disciplines.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical schools:...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

165/1

Special Topics:
The Pisan and Later Cantos of Ezra Pound

MW 1:30-3

This course will look at one of the most influential and controversial poets of the 20th century, Ezra Pound. Beginning with the Pisan, we'll study the rest of the Cantos of Ezra Pound during the course of a single semester. That means a lot of diffi...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John

165/2

Special Topics:
Race, Literature, and the Archive

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will read works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writing that engage with what we might call extra-literary modes of documenting racial difference. Drawing on insights from comparative media studies and critical race th...(read more) Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd

165/4

Special Topics:
Self Creation--Confession, Memoir, Autobiography

M 3-6

In confession we create the self. Confession is premised on truth - ultimate truth, the truth that exposes everyday truth as pretense, pose and mendacity. To create a confession is to create a new self: a self cleansed, reborn, redeemed. To create a ...(read more) Danner, Mark
Danner, Mark

166/1

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

This section of English 166 has been canceled....(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia

166/2

Special Topics:
Narrating the Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Performance

MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4

                  "Race is not only real, but also illusory. Not only is it common sense; it is also common nonsense. Not only does it establish our identity; it also denies us our identity."  — Howard Winant "Each society demands of its members a ce...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Sex & Race in Postcolonial London

This course has been canceled....(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Promised Land--Representations of Confidence, Trust, Belief, and Faith in Nineteenth Century American Literature, Religion, and Patent Medicine Advertising

TTh 9:30-11

In the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), Ralph Waldo Emerson observed that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .”  In the August 1849 issue of The Literary World, Evert Duyc...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 2-3:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these te...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180E/1

The Epic

MWF 2-3

This course will be team-taught by Professors Altieri and Nolan. Our primary concern is to read carefully and discuss intensely most of the major epics in Western European literature. We love these texts and we are convinced that students will find t...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MWF 12-1

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While sci...(read more) Jones, Donna V.

190/1

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled....(read more) Tanemura, Janice
Tanemura, Janice

190/2

Research Seminar:
Yeats, Joyce, & Beckett

MW 4-5:30

This course will focus on the major writings by this trio of Irish modernists.  We will think about the ways in which these writers fit into and challenge international canons of modernist literature, about the Irish attachments and conditions inscri...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

190/3

Research Seminar:
Nonsense

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore the relationship between two characteristics of these classic works of nonsense literature for children. One is their foregrounding of linguistic form, shared with language games and of obvious special interest to children le...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

190/4

Research Seminar:
American Gothic

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will study the Gothic tradition in American literature from the aftermath of the Revolution to the cusp of the Civil War.  We will explore how and why the dark energies of the Gothic imagination haunted our national literature, and...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

190/5

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

A survey of the historical novel.  This course covers a selection of major examples of the genre, focusing on its development in the nineteenth century in Great Britain, France, and Russia, and concluding with a contemporary American representative. ...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach

190/6

Research Seminar:
Moby-Dick

TTh 11-12:30

Baroque, intense, and demanding, Moby-Dick richly rewards all the attention a reader can muster. We will delve in as slowly as we can in order to cultivate the intellectual receptivity that Melville hoped for in his readers, becoming attuned to the s...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/7

Research Seminar:
Literature of Racial Passing

TTh 11-12:30

A passing narrative is an account—fiction or nonfiction—of a person (or group) claiming a racial or ethnic identity that she does not (or they do not) “possess.”  Such narratives speak—directly, indirectly, and very uneasily—to the authenticity, the ...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

190/8

Research Seminar:
Medieval English Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

The poetry of medieval England, often witty, sometimes moving, occasionally shocking, and frequently creative in form, style and use of language, has inspired poets including Seamus Heaney, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. We will be explorin...(read more) Lankin, Andrea

190/9

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 12:30-2

This is an intensive reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson.  We will also read poems and essays by her contemporaries (e.g., Emerson, Longfellow, Helen Hunt).  Topics include early poems and prosody, love and gender, definition and riddle, ...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

190/10

Research Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain's most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he ...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert

190/11

Research Seminar:
Mass Entertainment in 1930s Hollywood

TTh 3:30-5

Hollywood movies have always been treated as examples of mass entertainment, but rarely as analyses of the phenomenon.  We'll be exploring a wide range of 1930s Hollywood film -- from gangster pictures to cartoons, musicals, comedies, melodramas, and...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

190/12

Research Seminar:
Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

We will read novels, shorter fiction, and essays written by Henry James across his career and also analyses of James’s work, and we will consider how James has become a central figure for rethinking literary criticism, especially for those interested...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel

190/14

Research Seminar:
Cultures of Realism in Postwar Britain

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course traces transformations in British literary culture in the two decades following the Second World War.  Toward that end we'll read a diverse set of writings, emphasizing prose narrative in genres including documentary, social comedy,  scie...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

190/15

Research Seminar:
Literature of California & the West Since WWI

Thurs. 6-9 P.M.

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cal...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

190/16

Research Seminar:
Film Noir

MW 5:30-7 P.M., + films W 7-10 P. M.

We will examine film noir’s influence on neo-noir and its relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area.  The course will also be concerned wit...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by D. A. Miller in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Miller will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

H195B/2

Honors Course

MW 12-1:30

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Joanna Picciotto in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor PIcciotto will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Literature & the Science of the Feelings, 1740-1819

M 3-6

William Wordsworth’s 1800 declaration that poetry “is the history or science of feelings” cuts many ways, as such genitive constructions often do.  His phrase alludes both to the contemporary human and life sciences that made the feelings their objec...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Struggling With Consolation--Reading Boethius in Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 9:30-11

This course has a double aim: to explore the reception of Boethius’s De consolatione Philosophiae in Anglo-Saxon England and to do so by engaging one of the remarkable achievements of Anglo-Saxon translation, the Old English version of Boethius’s gre...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Politics of Death, Cultural Regenerations

W 3-6

This course will be jointly taught by Abdul JanMohamed (English) and Stefania Pandolfo (Anthropology), and it is cross-listed with Anthropology 250X section 6. This seminar is a two-voice reflection on violence, death, subjugation, and the problem of...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul\n& Pandolfo, Stefania

203/4

Graduate Readings:
British Novel--1800-1900

W 3-6

Reading and discussion of a selection of major nineteenth-century British novels.  We will bring large questions to bear on one another, concerning: the worlds and communities the novel aims to represent and to address (region or province; nation; em...(read more) Duncan, Ian

211/1

Chaucer:
Early Poetry and the Troilus and Criseyde

MW 10:30-12

This course studies all Chaucer's majors works before the Canterbury Tales. About the first third of the semester will use the earlier works--the Book of the Duchess and the Parliament of Fowls especially--to introduce Middle English "philology," in ...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

212/1

Readings in Middle English:
The Auchinleck Manuscript

W 3-6

This course will consider a wide range of Middle English writing through examination of a single manuscript book surviving to us from the early fourteenth-century:  Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates' MS 19.2.1, now known as 'The Auch...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop:
Like & Love

M 3-6

A graduate creative nonfiction writing workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three 10-20 page literary nonfiction pieces...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

250/1

Research Seminar:
Marxist Literary Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism.  "It does not seem to make much sense," he wrote, ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

250/2

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Things

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the intellectual historian Jacob Burckhardt argued that the Renaissance marked the beginning of modern culture—an emergence which he defined as the disruption of medieval systems that had discouraged the diffe...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

250/3

Research Seminar:
Everyday Postcoloniality

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

One of the defining preoccupations of literary realism is the precise, penetrating depiction of everyday life. This course will consider how this ambition is pursued in the context of postcolonial writing. Our primary reading will be a series of fict...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, you can log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B are posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall).

CHERNIN MENTORING PROGRAM:Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join the Chernin Mentoring Program!

The Chernin Mentoring Program fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Chernin groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for the Chernin Program, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one credit for an independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43A, 43B, 143A, 143B, 143C, 143N, 143T, AND 243N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43A or 43B. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143C, 143N, or 143T. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243N. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 3. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 3, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2011 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2012 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 27 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center , Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center , during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.