Announcement of Classes: Spring 2012

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


History of the English Language

English 101

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Brinton, L.J. and L.K. Arnovick: The English Language: A Linguistic History, 2nd ed.

Description

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, and up to its different forms in use throughout the world today.  Topics include changes in its core grammatical systems of phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure) and syntax (sentence structure); in vocabulary;  in writing and literary forms; and in the social position of English and its dialects.  


The English Bible as Literature

English C107

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 4 LeConte


Book List

New Oxford Annotated Bible NRSV with Apocrypha [College Edition]; Alter, Robert: Genesis; Browning, WRF: Oxford Dictionary of the Bible (paperback)

Description

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read these texts in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask historical, political, and theoretical questions of a text that is multi-authored, fissured, and historically layered.  Among other topics, we will pay special attention to how authority is established and contested in biblical texts; how biblical authors negotiate the ancient Hebrew prohibition against representing God in images; and how the gospels are socially and historically poised between the Jesus movement that is their source and the institutionalization of the church that follows.  Assignments are likely to include two take-home midterms and a final.

This course is cross-listed with Religious Studies C119.


Shakespeare

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 159 Mulford


Description

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and the three plays that the critics have described as "romances," Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. These are among the most brilliant, corruscating, and magical stories ever imagined into the English language, and some of the most astonishing poetry. Students will be expected to keep up with the reading. The format will be lecture plus some conversation plus some informal staging and a bit of memorization. You'll know, when you're through, the "To be or not to be" speech and the "out, out, brief candle" speech and perhaps a couple of others.


Shakespeare: Selected Plays

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Riverside Shakespeare (2nd ed.);

Recommended: Greenblatt, Stephen: Will in the World; Gurr, Andrew: The Shakespearean Stage (3rd ed.)

Description

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  We'll consider the range of plays he wrote, and why this range was important to him.  We'll also explore how different dramatic genres affect Shakespeare's representation of plot, character, and the literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophical issues he conceptualizes through plot and character.  Finally, we'll think about the range of Shakespeare's plays in relation to the disgust that many of his contemporaries expressed toward the range of social types and classes in his mass audience.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 155 Donner Lab


Book List

Milton, John: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (ed. Kerrigan, Rumrich, and Fallon)

Description

The most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon, rather than the rebel he was. Or he is assumed to be a remote religious poet rather than an independent thinker, who distrusted any passively held faith that was not self-questioning. Therefore, as we follow Milton’s carefully shaped career from the shorter early poems, through some of the controversial prose of the English Civil War era, and at last through the astounding work that emerged in the wake of political defeat (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes), we will discover a very different literary and political figure, known in his time as a statesman as well as a poet, and in both pursuits considered more an iconoclast than an icon. We will come to understand Milton’s writing in relation to the revolutions that he witnessed and took part in, and we will also think about his experiments in poetic form, his ambivalent incorporations, revisions, and expansions of classical literature and biblical texts alike, the function of his unorthodox theology, his writings on love, marriage, and divorce, his long preoccupation with vocation – and more.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Augustan Age: Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

English 119

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 219 Dwinelle


Book List

Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Bunyan, John: Grace Abounding; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; McMillin, Scott (editor): Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy; Pope, Alexander: Poetry and Prose of Alexander Pope; Swift, Jonathan: The Writings of Jonathan Swift

Description

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's  first advice column, its first "women's magazine," and the first periodical to be published daily), the early novel, and the writings of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift. In addition to the texts listed below, there will be a course reader.

Course requirements: two short analyses (1-2 pages), one substantial paper (7-9 pages), and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 155 Donner Lab


Description

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of mind challenged old ways of knowing, of ordering society, and of interacting socially. How did experiments in fiction writing enable new ways of knowing and new ways of acting virtuously in a society in which such things were open for debate? Haunted by fiction’s connection to “lower” forms of writing, writers—many of them women--also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public print market. We shall examine their rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating their writing--appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The European Novel: Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and the English Novel

English 125C

Section: 1
Instructor: Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: new room: 9 Lewis


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Dostoevsky, Fyodor: The Idiot, trans. Constance Garnett; Tolstoy, Leo: Anna Karenina, the Maude translation; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with two English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels respond to one another, resemble one another, and differ from one another, especially in their treatment of love and family, community and society, the representation of consciousness, and the conventions of the novel as a genre. In her famous essay “The Russian Point of View,” Virginia Woolf suggests that whereas the English novelist feels a “constant pressure” to recognize “barriers” and “boundaries,” both ideological and formal, the Russian novelist “cannot restrain himself.” The English novelist is “inclined to satire,” the Russian to “compassion;” the English to “scrutiny of society,” and the Russian to “understanding of individuals themselves.” Is she right? The course begins with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813), proceeds to Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Idiot (1869) and Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (1877), and concludes with Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 132.

Workload: Close reading of assigned texts (up to 200 pages per week), regular attendance, short assignments, midterm, one paper, final exam.  No knowledge of Russian required.  All readings are done in English. Students who know Russian are encouraged to do at least some reading in Russian.

A note one editions and translations: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice  (in the Norton Critical Edition); Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot (in the  Constance Garnett translation); LeoTolstoy, Anna Karenina (in the Maude translation and the Norton Critical Edition); Virginia Woolf,  Mrs. Dalloway, (best use A Harvest Book ed. by MarkHussey). 
 


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into literary texts; and the discovery of a number of forgotten writings which, while often raw, possess a surprising energy and complexity that make them worthy of a study on their own.”  In this class we will consider many of the major authors of this period (Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Emily Dickinson, and others) against the vibrant backdrop of antebellum politics and popular culture.  

This was an age when Andrew Jackson redefined the presidency and James K. Polk expanded the nation’s territory.  This was also a period of violent mobs, Barnum’s freaks, all-seeing mesmerists, polygamous prophets, temperance advocates, revivalist preachers, and resolute feminists. The literature and popular culture of the 1830s, 40s, and 50s bear witness to democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization.  In the midst of this turbulence, an astonishing range of mass cultural forms surfaced, including P.T. Barnum's American Museum, the moving panorama, and an early form of photography called daguerreotype.  Together, we will read as well as discuss and write about a good deal of the major literature of this era, study fascinating examples of the popular culture of the period, and explore the emergent cultural practices that make the antebellum period such a vibrant and significant period in American cultural history.  We will focus on issues of "self" (the search for transcendence and the complexities of relations); the Puritan legacy; the landscape; the democratic experiment; the efforts to reform the American character; and the struggles over the rights and roles of women, African Americans, and Native Americans in the expanding nation.  Depending on the number of students enrolled, two midterms (or essays) and a final examination will be required.


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 289 Cory


Book List

Cather, Willa: My Antonia; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F.: The Great Gatsby; Hemingway, Ernest: The Sun Also Rises; Johnson, James: The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Locke, Alain: New Negro; McCullers, Carson: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Wharton, Edith: The Age of Innocence; Wright, Richard: Native Son

Description

This course will introduce students to American literature of the early to mid-twentieth century. Reading across a range of genres and styles, we will ask how developments in literary form meditate on and respond to the social, technological, intellectual, and political conditions of modernity in the United States. We will pay particular attention to questions of national identity and racial difference; “high” modernism and popular culture; new psychologies of consciousness, emotion, and sexuality; the emergence of new media and the persistence of Jim Crow; and the global contexts of U.S. imperialism.


African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 122 Barrows


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Hughes, Langston: Collected Poems; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Jones, Leroi: Blues People; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Lorde, Audre: Collected Poems; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Toomer, Jean: Cane; Wright, Richard: Black Boy

Description

A survey of major African American writings in the context of social history. There will be two essays plus a midterm and final exam.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Slavery--Theory and Literature

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Butler , Octavia: Kindred; Jones, Edward: The Known World; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Wright, Richard: The Long Dream

Description

This course will explore the differences and similarities between the “theory” of slavery and the “experience” of slavery.  Theoretical explorations of slavery will be chosen from the writings of Aristotle, John Locke, G. W. F. Hegel, and some contemporary views.  The literary texts will be selected from the autobiographies and novels depicting chattel slavery and Jim Crow society in the U.S.  Toward the end of the course we will also examine some aspects of contemporary slavery – wage slavery, debt bondage, human trafficking, penal labor, sexual slavery, etc.  All of the theoretical material will be contained in a class reader (to be posted on bspace).

Literary texts will be chosen from the following:  Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (available online); Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (available online); Henry Bibb, The Life and Adventure of Henry Bibb (available online); Richard Wright, The Long Dream; Alice Walker, The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Octavia Butler, Kindred (and “Bloodchild”); Edward P. Jones, The Known World.

 

 


Contemporary Literature

English 134

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 105 North Gate


Book List

Friel, Brian: Translations; Greene, Graham: The End of the Affair; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Kennedy, A.L.: Night Geometry and the Garscadden Trains; Lessing, Doris: The Golden Notebook; McEwan, Ian: Atonement; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth

Description

This course will survey British and Irish writing since World War II.  We will dig deeply into the texts' formal and generic workings, and think through the cultural and social contexts from which they emerge. Along the way, we'll consider the period of postwar decolonization and retrenchment, the social and cultural shifts of the 1960s, the "Troubles" in Northern Ireland, Thatcherism in the 1980s, the liberal turn in the 1990s and the notion of "Cool Britannia," and issues surrounding race, gender, and nation in the British archipelago in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.  Along with the texts listed above, we will read poems by Dylan Thomas, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Basil Bunting, Ted Hughes, Roy Fisher, Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy, Paul Muldoon, Jackie Kay, Caroline Bergvall, Maggie O'Sullivan, Geoffrey Hill, Grace Nichols, Don Paterson, and Linton Kwesi Johnson.


Topics in American Studies: Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: Little Women; Aldrich, Thomas: The Story of a Bad Boy; Alger, Horatio: Ragged Dick; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Twain, Mark: Pudd'nhead Wilson; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Wiggin, Kate : Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Other Readings and Media

I plan to screen a few films of the pre-World War I era.

Description

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This is a period in which ordinary citizens felt that an economic and social revolution was taking place with the rise of industrial capitalism and urban transformations, creating a crisis of major cultural/political/economic rapid change.  Such a historical trauma seemed to demand difficult and painful reconsiderations and redefinitions. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity in the period, there  developed a problem about children and adolescents. Questions about boys and girls might be not only about gender definitions but also about the development of an ethical consciousness, what might be called everyday ethical coping.  Children seemed to represent the last vestige of a world that was being lost.  In the aftermath of the elevation of the importance of children in the Romantic era earlier in the century, in the U.S.,  the narratives of boys and girls gave artists the opportunity to observe, scrutinize, critique, and entertain.  There will be two papers and a final exam.

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E.


Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: Chicano Poetry--Text and Context

English 137T

Section: 1
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Description

We will open with "Yo soy Joaquin"/"I am Joaquin," Rodolfo 'Corky' Gonzalez's stirring political poem of 1968 that inspired a politically based literary output that dominated Chicano poetics for well over a decade and still stands squarely at the center of a great deal of Chicano poetry to the present day.  We will read poetry by Alurista, Ricardo Sanchez, Beatrice Zamora, Ana Castillo, Raul Salinas, Jose Montoya, Gary Soto, Pat Mora, Alfred Arteaga, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Gloria Anzaldua, Jimmy Santiago Baca. And we will also then read this poetry within the much wide context that includes the Beat Poets, the Black Arts Movement, Asian and Native American writers, and other poets of the contemporary American period.

While I haven't decided yet on texts for the class, many of the poems we read may well come directly from internet sources quite simply because so many publications of the Chicano Movement are out of print.  Of course, we will read the significant criticism on Chicano poetry by Juan Bruce Novoa, Tey Diana Rebolledo,  Rafael Perez-Torres, Jose Limon, Alfred Arteaga, Gloria Anzaldua, and other scholars and writers.

 


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Writing Fiction, Drama, and Poetry

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 30 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Hemon, Aleksander: Best European Fiction 2011

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, to be purchased at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Vikram Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 35 Evans


Book List

eds. R. V. Cassil & Joyce Carol Oates: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction (Second Addition)

Description

This limited-enrollment workshop will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of short fiction.  Permission of instructor is required. 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 12-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Bharati Mukherjee's (a.k.a. B. Blaise) mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

course reader

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision.  Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, but with an eye and ear to renovating traditions.  I have no “house style” and only one precept:  you can do anything, if you can do it.  You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss five or so in rotation (I’ll respond to every poem you write).  On alternate days, we’ll discuss recent illustrative poems drawn from our course reader.  If the past is any guarantee, the course will make you a better poet.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to John Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Long Narrative: The Short Novel

English 143C

Section: 1
Instructor: Alarcon, Daniel
Alarcon, Daniel
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Bolaño, R: Distant Star; Brennan, M: The Visitor; Carson, A: Autobiography of Red; Chekhov, A: The Complete Short Novels; Garcia Marquez, G: Chronicle of a Death Foretold; Hammet, D: The Big Knockover; Himes, C: Cotton Comes to Harlem; Kis, D: Garden, Ashes; Le, T: The Gangster We Are All Looking For; Lispector, C: The Hour of the Star; Roth, J: Flight Without End; Roth, P: The Prague Orgy; Torres, J: We the Animals; West, N: The Day of the Locust/Miss Lonely Hearts

Description

In this class, we’ll be reading and discussing various novels under 150 pages from a diverse group of authors. The point is to take a close look at a text of manageable size, paying attention to its structure – how the author manages to tell the story. We’ll analyze pacing, scene selection, point of view, and other aspects of style. In addition, the class will be composing collectively a short novel of our own, using this piece to put into practice the things we’ll learn along the way about plot, tone and character.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Daniel Alarcon's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Danticat, E.: The Best American Essays 2011

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in the assigned anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each) and two new essays (10-20 pages each). 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction, along with an application form, to Georgina Kleege's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction: The Essay

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This will be a course in the essay, and it is designed to help students who are writing an undergraduate thesis-length paper. We will begin by getting acquainted with various kinds of essays—narrative and descriptive, personal and research-based, critical and analytical, etc.—and finding the forms that would best suit the individual students’ projects.  Class time for most of the semester will be devoted to workshops, in which we read and respond to students’ writing as they complete their prospectuses, organizational plans, and various drafts.  Students will learn how to recognize and rectify stylistic, organizational, logical, and rhetorical problems.   Several short exercises will be required during the semester, and a twenty-page paper will be due at its end. 

The only assigned text will be a Class Reader of published essays.      

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your original nonfiction, along with an application form, to Catherine Gallagher's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction: Traveling, Thinking, Writing

English 143N

Section: 3
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 35 Evans


Description

Book List: Students should come to class before buying books. The list will likely include some of the following: Basho’s Back Roads to Far Towns (translated by Cid Corman); Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; Tete-Michel Kpomassie’s An African in Greenland; Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing; Robert Michael Pyle’s Where Bigfoot Walks. We’ll also read excerpts from Travel Writing: 1700-1830 (Ian Duncan and Elizabeth Bohls); Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing (Farrah Griffin and Cheryl Fish); and items from the popular press.

Course Description: Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adventures in Europe and Africa; Canadian writer Gladys Hindmarch takes on Melville with her Watery Part of the World and Zora Neale Hurston travels to Haiti in Tell My Horse and through the American south in Mules and Men. 

The point of this course is multiple and full of inquiry.

The 
familiar question, “Is this trip necessary?”, is joined to “What makes this trip important enough to 
celebrate?” 

Another field is the role of Americans and/ or Westerners as travelers in the world. (I’d note that the world is both within and beyond our national boundaries.) What things are we heir to? What are our responsibilities and blindnesses? What’s the relation between the imperial West and our current situation? The point in this—and any writing—is to write consciously and to be mindful of the political import of our writing. 

A third field is the defining of the relation between travel and place (and imagination).



Workshop.  Discussions.  Reading.  Writing assignments.  Field trips.  The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay (with some forays outward into hybrid prose/ poetry forms).

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction, along with an application form, to Cecil Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Poetry Translation Workshop

English 143T

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a workshop course in the translation of poetry. Participants need to be at least moderately competent in some language other than English. All of the work will involve translating from other languages into English. Participants will be expected to submit some work each week--an original text, a word-for-word translation, and their work in literary translation. Then the class proceeds like a creative writing workshop. Participants present their work, talk a bit about difficulties they've had with getting something over from one language into another, and give each other feedback. There will be a reader with examples of translation practice and theory, and enough reading to give participants some sense of the history of lyric poetry from the beginnings of writing to the present.

Admission will be by permission of the instructor, based on (1) five to eight pages of your own translations of poems into English, as well as the corresponding pages in the original language or original poems or a combination of the two, as well as a brief statement (no more than a sentence or two) describing the translation project you hope to work on, (2) a one-paragraph statement of your interest in translation, and (3) an application form; all of the above is to be submitted to Professor Hass's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 35 Evans


Description

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, practices, and inspiration from other academic disciplines.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical schools: formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, identity politics, and post-colonialism.  We will examine the differences in value and method that define these approaches and also consider the ways critical traditions retool themselves in response to internal or external debate and critique.  Our abiding concern will be to ask what counts as “the literary” for each theorist and what is the role and function of literature in each argument.  Sometimes the literary will be defined explicitly, other times it will be represented by the exemplary literary texts each school enlists in its theoretical enterprise.

To develop skills as close readers of theory, students will write two short papers (7-8 pages each).  Students will also complete a take-home final, which will give the opportunity for synthetic thinking.

This course is open to senior English majors only.


Special Topics: The Pisan and Later Cantos of Ezra Pound

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Pound, Ezra: The Cantos of Ezra Pound

Other Readings and Media

Additionally, there will be class handouts, online text, audio, and video works, etc.

Description

This course will look at one of the most influential and controversial poets of the 20th century, Ezra Pound. Beginning with the Pisan, we'll study the rest of the Cantos of Ezra Pound during the course of a single semester. That means a lot of difficult reading and some serious writing. To prepare for this effort, each student is encouraged to read the earlier Cantos before attending class.

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate the great work of this ur-force in modern poetry and culture. We’ll look at his ideogrammic technique and how this presentation helped register his wide ranging ideas about language, knowledge, myth and religion, economics, history, politics, society, and ecology. Since his work was informed by so many sources, contexts, and difficulties, it necessarily opens this course up to many diverse areas of consideration and student orientation.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Race, Literature, and the Archive

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 35 Evans


Book List

Chesnutt , Charles: Conjure Woman & Other Stories of the Color Line; Hopkins, Pauline: Of One Blood: Or, the Hidden Self: ; Wright, Richard: 12 Million Black Voices

Description

In this course we will read works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writing that engage with what we might call extra-literary modes of documenting racial difference. Drawing on insights from comparative media studies and critical race theory, we will ask how literature “archives” race in communication with developments in both the social sciences (anthropology, sociology, and musicology) and media technology (sound recording, photography, and film). From the earliest transcriptions of African American spirituals to ethnographies and novels of the colonial periphery, our readings explore how archives actually construct what they preserve—simultaneously documenting and producing social and cultural difference along lines of race.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Self Creation--Confession, Memoir, Autobiography

English 165

Section: 4
Instructor: Danner, Mark
Danner, Mark
Time: M 3-6
Location: 300 Wheeler


Description

In confession we create the self. Confession is premised on truth - ultimate truth, the truth that exposes everyday truth as pretense, pose and mendacity. To create a confession is to create a new self: a self cleansed, reborn, redeemed. To create a portrait built entirely on the pretense of ultimate truth demands an entirely other category of lie. The "true life" confession - generally a tale of dysfunction, alcoholic, chemical, sexual - and the ancillary pursuit of exposing its accompanying falsehoods, is arguably our most popular form of contemporary literature. These constructions, from confession to memoir to autobiography, have their own traditions and we will seek to analyze and trace them in this seminar, while now and then trying our hand at a bit of self creation. Readings will be drawn from, among others, Augustine, Rousseau, Franklin, Newman, Mill, DeQuincey, Adams, Stein, Lawrence, Kafka, Levi, Nabokov, Harrison, Malcolm, Eggers, Karr and Richards. Along with the reading there will be some constructing of confessions, truthful, mendacious and fanciful.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Specters of the Atlantic

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Book List

Austen: Mansfield Park; Brathwaite: The Arrivants; Brodber, Erna: Myal; Bronte: Jane Eyre; Hartman, Saidiya: Lose Your Mother; Mackey, Nathaniel: Bedouin Hornbook; McCraney, Tarrell Alvin: The Brother/Sister Plays; Morrison: Beloved; Philip, M. Nourbese: Zong; Rhys, Jean: Wide Sargasso Sea

Description

This section of English 166 has been canceled.


Special Topics: Narrating the Nation

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 210 Wheeler


Book List

Coetzee, J: Disgrace; Danticat, E: The Dew Breaker; Diaz, J: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Fitzgerald, F. S.: The Great Gatsby; Flaubert, G: Madame Bovary; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Mukherjee, B: Jasmine; Rushdie, S: Shame; Smith, Z: White Teeth

Description

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Performance

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 159 Mulford


Description

                "Race is not only real, but also illusory. Not only is it common sense; it is also common nonsense. Not only does it establish our identity; it also denies us our identity."

 — Howard Winant

"Each society demands of its members a certain amount of acting. 

The ability to present, represent, and act what one actually is."

— Hannah Arendt

This course is two courses wrapped up in one. First, it offers a selected history of major innovations in American popular culture of the last hundred years — from the origins of the American culture industries in blackface minstrelsy, ragtime, and jazz to the development of the Hollywood studio system, rock 'n' roll, soul music, and the "New Hollywood."

Second, it tells that first very large story through America's unique history of crossracial and crossethnic interplay. Why, we might ask, is the story of the US so often told through stories of interracial dependency or conflict, whether it's the story of American colonists dressing up as Indians at the Boston Tea Party, Little Eva blessing Uncle Tom, or Elvis or Eminem borrowing from the 'other side of the tracks'? Following this line of inquiry, we will trace America's history through the development of structures of inequity and opportunity that define our social history, and through the development of complicated race-inflected stories of camaraderie, rivalry, beset virtue, and desire that often define our national fantasy life.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature and Sexual Identity: Sex & Race in Postcolonial London

English 171

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Book List

Hollinghurst, Alan: The Swimming-Pool Library; MacInnes, Colin: City of Spades; Salkey, Andrew: Escape to an Autumn Pavement; Selvon, Sam: The Lonely Londoners; Shelagh, Delaney: The Taste of Honey; Waters, Sarah: The Night Watch;

Recommended: Hollinghurst, Alan: The Line of Beauty; Kureishi, Hanif: The Buddha of Suburbia

Description

This course has been canceled.


Literature and Popular Culture: The Promised Land--Representations of Confidence, Trust, Belief, and Faith in Nineteenth Century American Literature, Religion, and Patent Medicine Advertising

English 176

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 210 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A Course Reader

Description

In the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), Ralph Waldo Emerson observed that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .”  In the August 1849 issue of The Literary World, Evert Duyckinck, a prominent American biographer and publisher, argued that “It is not the worst thing that can be said of a country that it gives birth to a confidence man. . . .  It is a good thing, and speaks well for human nature, that . . . men can be swindled.”  We will explore research questions that emerge from studying the appearance — and the appeal — of various versions of “the confidence man” in the literature and popular culture of pre- and post-Civil War America.  At once a celebrant of shared belief and faith as well as an agent for exploiting assurance and trust, the confidence man trades on the ambiguities of self-representation and imaginative authority in the cultural transaction of making audiences believe.

We will consider expressions of what I call the “promissory tradition” in American literature and culture from, especially as it is expressed in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, and the pragmatism of William James.  We will also spend considerable time reading and discussing Edgar Allen Poe’s fascination with hoaxes and the art of “diddling,” as well as grappling with issues of identity and duplicity in Herman Melville’s complex and disquieting novel, The Confidence Man, in which Melville discovers that “the great art of telling truth” may well best be practiced by telling lies.  We will also examine expressions of this tradition in the popular culture of the period, ranging from the celebrated humbugs of P. T. Barnum to the ubiquitous appeals of evangelical religion and patent medicine advertising.

This course is open to English majors only.


Autobiography: Disability Memoir

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Chaney, T.: Manic: A Memoir; Danqua, Meri Nana-Ama: Willow Weep for Me; Galloway, T.: Mean Little Deaf Queer; Grandin, T.: Thinking in Pictures; Grealy, L.: Autobiography of a Face; Hathaway, K.: The Little Locksmith; Hockenberry, J.: Moving Violations; Keller, H.: The World I Live In; Kingsley & Levitz, J. & M.: Count Us In; Laborit, E.: The Cry of the Gull

Description

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these texts because they tend to reinforce the notion that disability is a personal tragedy that must be overcome through superhuman effort, rather than a set of cultural conditions that could be changed to accommodate a wide range of individuals with similar impairments.  Are these texts agents for social change or merely another form of freak show?  In this course, we will examine a diverse selection of disability memoirs and consider both what they reveal about cultural attitudes toward disability and what they have in common with other forms of autobiography. 


The Epic

English 180E

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 126 Barrows


Book List

Ciardi, J: Dante's Inferno; Fagles, R: Aeneid; Fagles, R: Iliad; Fagles, R: Odyssey; Hollander, R: Dante's Paradiso; Joyce, J: Ulysses; Milton, John: Paradise Lost

Description

This course will be team-taught by Professors Altieri and Nolan. Our primary concern is to read carefully and discuss intensely most of the major epics in Western European literature. We love these texts and we are convinced that students will find the substantial reading well worthwhile. We love each text as its own encounter with history. And we love how epics use their predecessors to understand the historical tasks that face them. In the epic, some of the finest minds in our culture engage each other in highly concrete, imaginatively interesting ways. These adventures are worth pursuing because they produce intense and rich human situations, and because—after centuries have passed—they still challenge readers in profoundly complex ways. The epic demands that we find languages for what it accomplishes, a task that calls on all of our mental and psychological resources. Anything that presents Western culture at its best, and gives a chance for professors and students to be at their best, promises to be a unique and possibly mind-blowing experience.  We will read the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, the Inferno and the Paradiso, Paradise Lost, and about ½ of Ulysses.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 

 


Science Fiction: Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

English 180Z

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Capek, Karol: R.U.R; Dick, Philip: Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep; Hoffman, E.T.A.: The Tales of Hoffman; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Mieville, China: Perdido Street Station; Wells, , H.G.: The Island of Doctor Moreau

Other Readings and Media

Children of Men; Gattaca; The Matrix; Pumzi

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature’s encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation stand the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of ‘being’, a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. 


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Tanemura, Janice
Tanemura, Janice
Time:
Location:


Book List

Hayslip, Le Ly: When Heaven and Earth Changed Places; Abbey, Edward: The Monkey Wrench Gang; Bambara, Toni Cade : The Salt Eaters; Coetzee, J. M. : The Lives of Animals; Leopold, Aldo: A Sand County Almanac; Ozeki, Ruth : All Over Creation; Santos Perez, Craig: From Unincorporated Territory; Viramontes, Helena Maria : Under the Feet of Jesus

Description

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Yeats, Joyce, & Beckett

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Krapp's Last Tape and Other Dramatic Pieces; Beckett, Samuel: Nohow On: Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, Worstward Ho; Beckett, Samuel: Watt; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Yeats, W.B.: The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats

Other Readings and Media

A handful of critical essays will be available online and/or in a small course reader.

Description

This course will focus on the major writings by this trio of Irish modernists.  We will think about the ways in which these writers fit into and challenge international canons of modernist literature, about the Irish attachments and conditions inscribed in their works, and about the significant formal and generic innovations that each undertook.  We’ll start with Yeats’ poetry, spend much of the middle part of the semester on Joyce’s Ulysses (with a few glances at Finnegans Wake), turn back to Yeats’ late poetry, and finally work through several of Beckett’s key texts.  I will assume familiarity with Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, so please be sure to read them before the course begins.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Nonsense

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Carroll, L.: The Annotated Alice; Lear, E.: The Complete Nonsense; Seuss, Dr.: Horton Hatches the Egg; Seuss, Dr.: Your Favorite Seuss

Description

This course will explore the relationship between two characteristics of these classic works of nonsense literature for children. One is their foregrounding of linguistic form, shared with language games and of obvious special interest to children learning language.  The other is their backgrounding of conventional linguistic meaning, allowing not only overt creation of imagined worlds but also covert critique of real ones, including educational practices, class distinctions, imperialism, capitalism and even philology.  

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: American Gothic

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 203 Wheeler


Book List

Brown, C.B.: Weiland; Crevecoeur, H.: Letters from an American Farmer; Hawthorne, N.: Young Goodman Brown and Other Short Stories; Melville, H.: Bartelby and Benito Cereno; Morrison, T.: Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination; Poe, E. A.: The Goldbug and Other Stories; Poe, E.A.: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym; Sansay, L.: The Secret History, of the Horrors of St. Domingue

Description

In this course, we will study the Gothic tradition in American literature from the aftermath of the Revolution to the cusp of the Civil War.  We will explore how and why the dark energies of the Gothic imagination haunted our national literature, and what was particularly American about the genre's form and the shadows it cast.  We will trace the historical connections between Gothic fiction and nationalism, religion, gender, race, slavery, and historical memory, as well as theoretical issues concerning the disjuctive self, the uncanny, possession and dispossession, and fragmented subjectivity.  Students will practice critical writing and research methodologies throughout the semester, and will produce a 20 page research paper at the semester's end. Authors will include Crevecoeur, Brown, Sansay, Irving, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and Poe.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Historical Novel

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Flaubert, Gustave: A Sentimental Education; Pynchon, Thomas: Mason & Dixon; Scott, Walter: Waverley, or ‘Tis Sixty Years Since; Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace

Description

A survey of the historical novel.  This course covers a selection of major examples of the genre, focusing on its development in the nineteenth century in Great Britain, France, and Russia, and concluding with a contemporary American representative.  Over the semester we will interrogate these texts from a number of angles: How are individuals situated within the sweep of history?  How do the fictional and historical elements function in relation to one other?  What kinds of authority does each mode possess?  To what extent is anachronism present, and is it ever a virtue?  Students will be expected to read up to 200 pages per week and to write a 20-page research paper.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Clases for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Moby-Dick

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick

Description

Baroque, intense, and demanding, Moby-Dick richly rewards all the attention a reader can muster. We will delve in as slowly as we can in order to cultivate the intellectual receptivity that Melville hoped for in his readers, becoming attuned to the subtle implications that he used to build his fictional universe. We will emphasize how the book’s form is caught up in the philosophical, political, and spiritual issues that moved Melville to write, but class discussion will be open to any pertinent issue. Two ten page essays and regular attendance and participation will be required.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of Racial Passing

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 51 Evans


Description

A passing narrative is an account—fiction or nonfiction—of a person (or group) claiming a racial or ethnic identity that she does not (or they do not) “possess.”  Such narratives speak—directly, indirectly, and very uneasily—to the authenticity, the ambiguity, and the performance of personal identity; they also speak to issues of official and traditional categorization.  The passing 
narrative—the narrative that accounts for making the “different” claim—necessarily unsettles notions of belonging and ownership and underscores that race can be viewed as a construction or a series of conventions.

The course will investigate the public nature of race by examining narratives—published and unpublished stories, novels, memoirs, and films—that call the absoluteness of its boundaries into question.  We’ll look as well at texts that treat racial and sexual imitation—minstrelsy, “yellow-face,” drag, etc.  All said, we’ll be looking rather closely at books and movies that reveal, document, question, and celebrate ambiguous spaces in an imposing structure, one often assumed to be “natural.”

We’ll likely read Karen Brodkin’s How Jews Became White Folks, James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Nella Larsen’s Passing, Philip Roth’s The Human Stain, Gene Yang’s American-Born Chinese, Kenji Yoshino’s Covering, essays by Gloria Anzaldua, Noel Ignatiev, Henry Louis Gates, etc.  Films will probably include Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil, Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Alien: Resurrection, Louis King’s Charlie Chan in Egypt, Alan Crosland’s The Jazz Singer, etc.

Position papers, discussions led by class members, possible midterm, final 12-15 page writing project involving research.  Hybrid projects are welcome and encouraged.

The book list is tentative.  Students should come to class before buying books.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Medieval English Poetry

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Lankin, Andrea
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 54 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Course reader containing Malcolm Andrew and Ronald Waldron. ed., Pearl, Bella Millet, ed., Harley Lyrics, Rosemary Allen, ed., King Horn, David Burnley and Allison Wiggins, ed., Sir Orfeo and The King of Tars, selections from Thomas Wright, Political Poems and Songs from Edward III to Richard II, selections from other Middle English and multilingual English lyric collections, assorted influential and recent medieval verse criticism

Description

The poetry of medieval England, often witty, sometimes moving, occasionally shocking, and frequently creative in form, style and use of language, has inspired poets including Seamus Heaney, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. We will be exploring the form, style and content of Middle English poetry and multilingual poems of medieval England. Comparing the layout of medieval poems on their original manuscript pages to their modern editions, we will consider what kind of layout best suits the poems and what we may learn from manuscript structures. In a translation project, all students will have the opportunity to bring the features of medieval poetry which they value in Middle English into modern English. There will also be regular reading responses and a final research paper.

We will read most texts in the original Middle English. Some poems of medieval England are written in Latin, French, or even a combination of Latin, French and English; poetry in languages other than Middle English will always be printed alongside extensive glossing or translation. Previous enrollment in English 45a or in another Middle English literature class is welcome, but not required; no prior knowledge of Middle English is necessary for this class.

A course reader containing printed copies of all of the class readings will be available. We will also be using online scholarly editions, so students should plan to use campus computer labs or personal computers, netbooks or tablets in order to prepare for class.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Emily Dickinson

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Dickinson, Emily: Selected Letters; Dickinson, Emily: The Poems of Emily Dickinson

Other Readings and Media

course reader

Description

This is an intensive reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson.  We will also read poems and essays by her contemporaries (e.g., Emerson, Longfellow, Helen Hunt).  Topics include early poems and prosody, love and gender, definition and riddle, poetics, nature, religion, death and dying, poems in manuscript packets and in letters; suspense, horror, loneliness; pain and despair; self in society and by itself, war, abolition, gender, poetics; late poems and letters.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mark Twain

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 479 Bancroft Library


Description

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain's most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he left unpublished). The class will have ready access to the Mark Twain Papers, whose extensive primary and secondary resources students are encouraged to take advantage of for their research. One brief oral report (as the basis for class discussion) and one research paper, due at the end of the term.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mass Entertainment in 1930s Hollywood

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: new room: 237 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Most of the movies for the course will be available for rent or purchase from iTunes or Amazon Instant Video.  You will be able to view all of them for free at the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.

Texts for discussion will be posted on bSpace whenever possible; for texts that cannot be posted, there will be a Course Reader.

Description

Hollywood movies have always been treated as examples of mass entertainment, but rarely as analyses of the phenomenon.  We'll be exploring a wide range of 1930s Hollywood film -- from gangster pictures to cartoons, musicals, comedies, melodramas, and westerns -- to see how these movies represent mass culture and their own place within it.  We'll also compare the movies to contemporaneous accounts of mass entertainment and mass culture by such theorists as Walter Benjamin, Clement Greenberg, Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, and Edward Bernays.  And finally, we'll consider film in relation to other contemporaneous forms of mass entertainment such as the newspaper, radio, and (in its infancy) television.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Henry James

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Freedman, J.: The Cambridge Companion to Henry James; James, H.: Hawthorne; James, H.: What Maisie Knew; James, H. : Tales of Henry James; James, H. : The Ambassadors; James, H. : The Portrait of a Lady; James, H. : The Spoils of Poynton; James, H. : The Turn of the Screw

Description

We will read novels, shorter fiction, and essays written by Henry James across his career and also analyses of James’s work, and we will consider how James has become a central figure for rethinking literary criticism, especially for those interested in aesthetics, ethics, and the fates of historicism and of close reading.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Cultures of Realism in Postwar Britain

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Ballard, J: High Rise; Berger, J: A Painter of Our Time; Delaney, S: A Taste of Honey; Dunn, N: Up the Junction; Greene, G: The End of the Affair; Lessing, D: In Pursuit of the English; Naipul, V: The Mimic Men; Orwell, G: The Road to Wigan Pier; Peake, M: Titus Groan; Selvon, S: The Lonely Londoners; Waugh, E: The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold; Wilson, A: Anglo-Saxon Attitudes

Description

This course traces transformations in British literary culture in the two decades following the Second World War.  Toward that end we'll read a diverse set of writings, emphasizing prose narrative in genres including documentary, social comedy,  science fiction, and the novel of ideas. The thread connecting this disparate body of texts is their shared preoccupation with realism -- albeit with attitudes ranging  from an earnest embrace of its progressive aspirations to a caustic debunking of such pretensions. We'll use this as a framework to examine a set of linked issues: literary explorations of the rise of the welfare state and the new social dynamics it provokes; reckonings with the political and aesthetic legacies of the interwar years; and the emergence of a new body of postcolonial writing. Your work in the course will culminate in a research paper on a topic of your own devising.

The announced booklist for the course is tentative and subject to change. It will be supplemented by a course reader on bSpace, featuring readings in poetry, criticism, social commentary, and reportage. I also hope to schedule at least two screenings: the landmark television docudrama Cathy Come Home (dir. Ken Loach, 1966) and a 2004 episode of the TV "dramedy" Shameless.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of California & the West Since WWI

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: Thurs. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Chandler, R: The Big Sleep; Dick, P: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J: Slouching Toward Bethlehem; Stegner, W: The Angle of Repose; Steinbeck, J: The Long Valley; Steinbeck, J: The Pastures of Heaven; West, N: The Day of the Locust

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books listed, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. poetry by R. Jeffers, W. Everson, J. Spicer, T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Film Noir

English 190

Section: 16
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M., + films W 7-10 P. M.
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Kaplan, E. : Women in Film Noir ; Martin, R.: Mean Streets and Raging Bulls ; Naremore, J.: More than Night: Film Noir in its Contexts; Silver & Ursini, editors: Film Noir Reader 4

Description

We will examine film noir’s influence on neo-noir and its relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area.  The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and masculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by D. A. Miller in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Miller will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Joanna Picciotto in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor PIcciotto will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.