Announcement of Classes: Spring 2012

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Reading & Composition: American Song

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sullivan, Khalil
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

DuBois, WEB: Souls of Black Folk; Sandburg, Carl: The American Songbag;

Recommended: Hebdige, Dick: Subculture: the Meaning of Style; Lomax and Lomax, Alan and John: American Ballads and Folk SOngs

Other Readings and Media

The following texts are required of the course but are available for free online:

Carl Sandburg - the American Songbag
Paperback: 528 pages
Publisher: Mariner Books; Rei Sub edition (October 29, 1990)
ISBN-10: 9780156056502
 
WEB DuBois - Souls of Black Folk
Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; annotated edition edition (July 26, 2005)
ISBN-10: 1416500413
 

Description

Course Description:  This course revolves around the popular American Song form from the mid-19th century to the present.  We will approach the American song not just as a historical artifact aided by inventions in technology (sheet music, phonograph, radio, television, film) but as cultural artifacts that circulate and evolve different locales and generations.  It is my hope that we can construct an analytical framework that will account not only for the lyrical content of the songs but the musical genres (or style) as well as the manner in which songs circulate.  Students will be assigned analytical readings from Dick Hebdige’s Subculture: The Meaning of Style, which focuses on the British punk and reggae scenes but provides an excellent starting point for generating theory.  Additionally, we will review songbooks that include lyrics and sheet music, but formal training in music is not required.  Many of the songs can be found in libraries and online audio archives.  Students should be warned that the content of some songs is explicit and includes a number of controversial narratives and images surrounding the black body, the female body, prison, and other marginalized institutions and figures in US American history.  


Reading & Composition: Apocalypse / Now

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Cullen, Ben
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Malthus, T: On the Principle of Population; McCarthy, C.: The Road; Mitchell, D.: Cloud Atlas; Placencia, S.: The People of Paper; Vaughn, B. & P.Y. Guerra: Y: The Last Man (Cycles); Vaughn, B. & P.Y. Guerra: Y: The Last Man (Unmanned); Wells, H.G. : War of the Worlds ;

Recommended: Grahame-Smith , S.: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies; Silverstein, S. : The Giving Tree

Other Readings and Media

A small reader.

We will also be viewing the following films—sometimes in, sometimes out of class: Children of Men, Cloverfield, An Inconvenient Truth. I will do my best to give screenings of all.

Description

The stolen title of this course perfectly captures the two topics this class will explore. The first is "nowness," or what it is to live in our time; the second is the notion of apocalypse—perhaps better understood as the unmaking of nation, of civilization, of humanity, of the world, even of the universe as we know it.  We will be looking for figures, symbols, tropes and technics of apocalyptic imaginings, and while we will primarily focus on apocalypse's influence on various forms of narrative fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries, we will also be looking at real-world discussions of possible dooms. Ultimately, our goals will be to question what it is about humanity's end that so thrills and sparks the West's (if not the globe's) imagination, what we see about society and civilization in meditating its catastrophic destruction, and what consequences (psychological, emotional, political) the notion of an impending real-world apocalypse might have on national/global culture.

You will be responsible for writing four papers, as well as weekly reading responses.  


Reading & Composition: Ideas of the University: School, Work, and the World

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Bronte, C.: Jane Eyre; Hardy, T.: Jude the Obscure

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Anderson, Wes. Rushmore (film)

Description

This seems like a good a time to figure out, and maybe even start to articulate, what we are all doing here. We will read and write around the concepts of education, work and leisure, trying to come to some understanding of how they function and interact in our culture and, most importantly, in our own lives, at our own University. We will engage a few novels, some poetry, essays, films, and other documents, using our readings as an impetus to thinking, discussion, and lots of writing.

At the same time we will work hard on our own writing, on how we construct sentences and paragraphs and develop arguments. Our assignments will lead to increasingly complex applications of these skills in the academic environment. We’ll write a short diagnostic essay at the beginning of the semester, followed by three papers of increasing length. An extensive peer-review process during our longer papers will orient you to your audience, sharpen your critical skills, and improve your writing in the way only heavy revision can.


Reading & Composition: Autobiography

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Ketz, Charity Corine
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Augustine: Confessions; De Quincey, Thomas: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater; Equiano: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, The African, Written By Himself; Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way

Other Readings and Media

a course reader

Description

“I have become a question to myself”

                                           —Augustine, Confessions

“I know that [my accusers] almost made me forget who I was—so persuasively did they speak.”

“But suppose I ask you a question”

                                           —Socrates, Apology

Facing a five hundred-man jury and a death sentence, Socrates is recorded to have defended himself autobiographically: by recollecting his life’s work and mission for an audience and by engaging his accusers in his habitual method of questioning. Roughly 800 years later, Augustine described grieving the death of a beloved friend in his autobiography, saying, “I made myself into my own great question.” In this course we will consider the question of autobiography—what it is formally, how it situates itself with respect to an audience and with respect to time—and we will consider the question posed by autobiography—what autobiography seeks in its presentation of mortality, consciousness, and memory. Sometimes this second question will appear to run after an enigma or to mourn violently. Sometimes it will demand something far more pragmatic (the reevaluation of social practice) or will show itself to be a purely negative (theatrical) power to unsettle conventional feeling. We will read a variety of autobiographies in prose and verse (selections from Plato, Montaigne, Descartes, Rousseau, Benjamin, Wordsworth, and Woolf, along with our major texts), and, beginning about the middle of the semester, will vary our critical with some autobiographical writing.

 


Reading & Composition: Refusal and Resistance in Tragedy

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Moore, Stephanie Anne
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Baillie, Joanna: Orra; Ibsen, Henrik: Hedda Gabler; Shakespeare, William: King Lear; Sophocles: Antigone; Webster, John: The Duchess of Malfi

Description

Tragedy, roughly speaking, is a form of dramatic art that asks whether human suffering can be made to signify. In this class, we will trace a figure who recurs throughout the corpus of tragic plays written in Europe from antiquity to the present: a person, often a woman, who insists on a law higher than reason or social obligation, and who refuses to be moved, even if the alternative is death. Thinking about the changing dimensions of this figure over time will help us think more generally about tragedy itself—as a literary form, as a means of ethical inquiry, and as a type of knowledge, among other things.

The purpose this class is to develop your skills in expository writing and critical analysis, the value of which will stay with you beyond this class and beyond your undergraduate career.


Reading & Composition: The Social Practice of Love

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Weiner, Joshua J
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Constant, Benjamin: Adolphe; Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von: Elective Affinities; Laclos, Pierre Choderlos de: Les Liaisons dangereuses; Plato: Symposium; Sidney, Sir Philip: Astrophil and Stella

Description

De La Rochefoucauld famously wrote that “plenty of people would never fall in love if they had not heard other people talk about it.” Where do we find this “talk about love” that has such suggestive power?  This course will explore some key texts in the long tradition of European love literature that illuminate love as a social practice, which forms certain kinds of subjects. How, through the arts, is love taught and learned as a practice? How do (our) ways of loving, and different amorous subjects, have identifiable histories? How do these social practices of love interface with political bonds, with violence, and with the erotic body? Beginning with canonical texts from the ancient world (Plato) and the Renaissance (Sidney), we will quickly move on to the golden age of love literature that occurred between the late 17th century and Romanticism, exploring central works from France, Britain, and Germany – a trajectory which culminates in de Sade. We will consider contemporary articulations of problems around love as a social practice – for example, queer love, the status of the couple, and polyamory – through short theoretical readings drawn from Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, James Turner, Martha Nussbaum, and Leo Bersani, as well as the films Contempt (Godard), and Shortbus (Mitchell).


Reading & Composition: Communication of Poetic Effects in Shakespeare

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Castillo, Carmen
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 78 Barrows


Book List

Hacker, D: Rules for Writers; Shakespeare, W: Antony and Cleopatra; Shakespeare, W: As You Like it; Shakespeare, W: Macbeth; Shakespeare, W: Othello; Shakespeare, W: The Winter's Tale; Shakespeare, W: Twelfth Night

Description

We use language to express our thoughts and to be understood: to communicate.  In communication we rely on the shared knowledge and the shared assumptions of our audience in order to ensure as effective communication as possible.  In poetic language there is an additional communication--beyond the communication of accessible content--made up of small fragmentary pieces of incidental material that accumulates and constellates in the audience not as shared knowledge and assumptions, but as shared impressions.  Impressions affect us, “impress” upon us a communication that is not so much understood as it is felt.  In this course we will read six Shakespeare plays and track the experience of impressions that the poetic language communicates versus what the content communicates.  To this end, we will analyze what poetic impressions are saying and doing as a way to generate fresh and compelling assertions and arguments about these plays.

The goals of this course are to have fun, to explore, to learn to read closely, to develop increasing skills in clear writing, thesis and paragraph development, and argumentation.  To this end, we will engage deeply with the texts, discuss them feverishly in class, and write a number of short essays, including revisions, toward the general goal of producing well-shaped and polished critical essays.


Reading & Composition: Ghosts of the Past

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Dickens, Charles: A Christmas Carol; Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Remains of the Day

Description

This course will focus on the presence of the past in various literary genres and texts. We will examine how the past is embodied through flashback, memory, and recurrence, and explore the formal means by which the past structures or intrudes upon narratives. The class will also analyze the ways in which the past either grounds the “reality” of a text, or somehow destabilizes it and by extension the reading process.

Students in turn will continuously work on developing their own writing skills toward clear exposition and argumentation. Through classroom attention to issues of grammar, syntax, structure, and style as well as peer editing and extensive revision for three of four required essays (increasing in length from two to five pages), the course should prepare students to articulate their ideas fluently and coherently in writing.

 


Reading & Composition: Writing About Literarary Experience

English R1A

Section: 9
Instructor: Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Chekhov , Anton: The Essential Tales of Chekhov; Dickens, Charles: Oliver Twist; Gibaldi, Joseph: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; Shakespeare, William: Macbeth

Description

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, one play, a good deal of verse, some short stories, some contemporary song lyrics—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great and why we should care about it.

I’ve chosen not to organize this class around a single theme, first, because the course is by definition a writing course and I don’t want to pretend otherwise. I also want us to resist the urge to compartmentalize experience. It is common for people to like different sorts of literature, but uncommon for students and teachers to think about what, for example, the experiences of little poems and big novels have in common. In this class we will try to make connections between seemingly unlike things—not only between the works on the reading list, but between those works and examples of contemporary popular art forms like country music song lyrics, television sitcoms, movies (and so on). The class will push the notion that the history of English literature is in large part the history of popular English literature—a fact that justifies our giving serious consideration to some things that academic-types usually don’t take seriously.


Reading & Composition: Totality Chic

English R1A

Section: 10
Instructor: Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: note new room: 224 Wheeler


Book List

Carpenter, Novella: Farm City; Foer, Jonathan Safran: Eating Animals; Pollan, Michael: The Omnivore's Dilemma

Other Readings and Media

In addition to these books, a PDF course reader will also be provided.

We'll also be watching several films, which might include: Ocean's Thirteen, Fast Food Nation, Off the Grid with Les Stroud, Survivorman, Man vs. Wild, and/or Eat, Pray, Love.

A field trip (TBD) will also be in the works.

Description

Where did the sandwich you ate for lunch come from? Where were the lettuce and tomatoes farmed? Who harvested them? Where did they come from, and why? What river or reservoir contributed the water? How about the electricity used -- how was that generated? And how were all the ingredients transported to the restaurant or cafe where you bought the sandwich? Where did the fuel come from? The truck? The driver? And what about the bread?

This is a familiar line of questioning these days. Similar questions could be asked about the clothes we wear, the screen we’re reading from -- even our college and career choices. In fact, being a responsible consumer or citizen now seems to require a deep understanding not just of our own decisions, but of how everything works together. While these kinds of questions have always been around, answering them has typically been the domain of technocrats and academics. It's somewhat surprising then that, today, it's fashionable to have answers to them.

Although this course will certainly be concerned with where your sandwich came from, it will be even more concerned with some character types that have become closely associated with various models of totality: the foodie, the thief and the activist. Let’s call them “masters of totality.” Our focus will be on the first, but we’ll sharpen our understanding of totality -- and its current cachet  -- with help from the other two. The central question we’ll be exploring, then, is how totality chic contributes to a distinctive genre in literature and film.


Reading & Composition: American Exposures

English R1A

Section: 11
Instructor: Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Barnum, P.T.: The Life of P.T. Barnum, Written by Himself; Fern, Fanny: Ruth Hall; Franklin, Benjamin: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass

Description

Dear reader, this is a course that thinks about Facebook while it is pretending to contemplate American literary history. Perhaps you can identify. This course worries that maintaining a fascinating individual identity comes with far too much baggage. It fears that even private thoughts are traceable to public institutions, but secretly believes that’s only true for other people. It wants to tell you all about itself, but worries about appearing self-serving in front of all these people…Or, to put it another way, this class will examine a series of autobiographical texts in order to frame a brief and incomplete history of social networking in antebellum America, during the historical emergence of modern mass culture. Each of the authors we will read thinks very carefully about the relationship of individual life to social customs, artistic codes, and systems of information. These authors do not merely record their lives, but turn to self-description as a means of deciphering the world and acting within it.

Throughout the semester, you will be working to find and hone your own critical voice. You’ll learn how to pose interesting and productive questions about the works we read – and how to shape those questions into an effective argument.  We will be writing a short diagnostic essay and three progressively longer papers. In addition, students will revise at least two papers.


Reading & Composition: 19th- and 20th-Century Experiment/alisms

English R1A

Section: 13
Instructor: Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: new room: 101 Wheeler


Book List

Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Blithedale Romance; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Thoreau, Henry David: Walden

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader including poetry, criticism, and manifestos.

Description

What does it mean to undertake an experiment? Why might one wish to describe a work of art as “experimental”?  Is there any value in a failed experiment?  Beginning with these questions, this course will explore the hope, euphoria, and despair that attend the life of an experiment in the specific context of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.  We will consider a variety of texts that attempt to describe or produce different kinds of experiments: scientific, utopian, and literary.  In doing so, we will consider the possibilities that subsist as dead-ends and dreams in the history of modernity.   Specific works include Henry David Thoreau's Walden, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Blithedale Romance, Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons, the Dada and Futurist manifestos, and post-WWII works by Fluxus artists.

In this course, you will develop your critical reading and writing skills through frequent, short assignments and longer papers.  Cumulatively, you will produce at least 32 pages of writing, which will include pre-writing, drafts, and revisions.  Significant class time will be devoted to developing analytical, argumentative, and verbal skills.


Reading & Composition: 21st-Century Native American Fiction

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Gillis, Brian
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Hausman, Blake M. : Riding the Trail of Tears; Alexie, Sherman: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian; Cheyfitz (Editor), Eric: The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945; Erdrich, Louise: The Plague of the Doves ; Matthaei; Grutman, Grant; Amiotte, Gay; Jewel; Thomasson : The Ledgerbook of Tomas Blue Eagle ; Porter; Roemer, Joy; Kenneth M. : The Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature; Wong; Muller; Magdaleno (Editors), Hertha D. Sweet; Lauren Stuart; Jana Sequoya: Reckonings: Contemporary Short Fiction by Native American Women

Description

This course will examine a variety of texts written by or about Native Americans in the first decade of the 21st century. Course requirements will include two preliminary essays (3-5 pp), and a final research component (10-15 pp). At the end of the semester you will present one of these essays at an in-class colloquium.

For more information about the class, copies of the syllabus, and an up-to-date book list, please visit the course website at: https://sites.google.com/site/briangillisteaching/home


Reading & Composition: U.S. Autobiography as Ethnography

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Rana, Swati
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 31 Evans


Book List

Du Bois, W. E. B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Kingston, Maxine Hong: The Woman Warrior; Mukerji, Dhan Gopal: Caste and Outcast; Rodriguez, Richard: Hunger of Memory

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

How should we read the “I” under the burden of representation?  What is the relationship between singular life and group consciousness?  How does the act of self-documentation produce a social record?  In this course, we will explore these questions through readings in texts that are both autobiographical and ethnographical.  We will trace the familiar contours of the life story and explore how these works depart from them, incorporating historical, sociological, lyric, or fictive elements.  What are the demands placed upon the representative subject who is responsive to a given social identity or political exigency?  And what formal innovations do these demands produce within the space of the autobiography?  We will focus on the gap between author and persona, biography and its emplotment, the autonomous and constituent subject—and upon the coincidence of these categories as well.  Where relevant, we will investigate controversies surrounding the reception of these texts.  Our challenge will be to take a broad view of autobiography, to understand how it shapes the politics of ethnic representation in the United States.  These texts will provide the occasion to develop critical thinking, writing, and research skills.  The first half of the course will be devoted to exercises in argumentation and exposition, several short writing assignments, as well as self-editing and peer revision.  In the second half of the course, you will propose a question to investigate and develop a research prospectus and annotated bibliography.  Your work will culminate in an oral presentation and a final research paper of approximately ten pages.


Reading & Composition: No Man's Land--Dividing Lines in the Great War

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Jeziorek, Alek M
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Barker, Pat: Regeneration; Ford, Ford Madox: Parade's End; Remarque, Erich Maria: All Quiet on the Western Front; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

A reader containing several English war poets (e.g. Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, etc.), several not-English not-war poets (e.g. W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, etc.), and excerpts from The Last Days of Mankind, by Karl Kraus.

Description

This is the second class in the Reading and Composition series and, as a result, it will focus on the writing process, critical reading, and research, all of which culminate in a research paper due at the end of the semester. This class intends to demystify what appears to be the daunting task of writing a long research-driven paper by focusing on writing as a process with many small steps. To that end, the assignments will consist of essays that work up to the length of a research paper, extensive and repeated revision, peer editing, an annotated bibliography, a presentation of research, and a working outline, among other smaller assignments.

In order to provide a shared framework for our research papers, the reading centers around the Great War and its multiple dividing lines: the representation of the war by soldiers and the representation of the war by civilians; the Western, Eastern, and Home Fronts; and perspectives on the war from the Allied and Central Powers. Far from developing a comprehensive view of all these dichotomies, this class focuses on the difficulty of the dividing line as such. How do English civilians represent a war that they can hear from across the English Channel, but cannot see? How does this historical moment represent the absence of approximately 18,000,000 lives? In trench warfare, No Man’s Land made obsolete clear boundaries of war. How do texts reflect formally this crisis of form represented in the dividing line of war? More abstractly, we’ll think about how the Great War challenges the idea of a dividing line and the clear distinctions created thereby. Beyond these questions, we’ll also explore the interests of the class as they unfold over the semester.


Reading & Composition: Victorian Research

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Terlaak Poot, Luke
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 35 Evans


Book List

Collins, Wilkie: The Moonstone; Dickens, Charles: Sketches by Boz; Doyle, Arthur Conan: The Lost World; Oliphant, Margaret: The Library Window; Stevenson, Robert Louis: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; Stoker, Bram: Dracula

Other Readings and Media

A course reader containing stories, poems, and essays

Description

This course will be about research in two senses: first, we will learn how to perform research on a number of Victorian texts; second, we will discuss the way research itself is represented in these texts. In other words, we’ll be researching Victorian research. The ends and means of research dramatically expanded during the Victorian period, which makes this epoch especially suitable for this kind of attention. Over the course of the semester we will work on developing questions, methods, and goals for our own work, and in the process we will grapple with the many different ways that Victorians thought about, performed, and presented research as a particular kind of work. We’ll follow the figure of the researcher through libraries and laboratories as we read texts that conceive of the activity as detection, exploration, persuasion, entertainment, and more. 


Reading & Composition: Speaking the Unspeakable, Voicing the Unspoken

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Allison, Dorothy: Bastard Out of Carolina; Baldwin, James: Go Tell It On the Mountain; Faulkner, William: Light in August; Morrison, Toni: Beloved

Description

This course, while seeking to build on the basic writing tenants introduced in R1A by essaying longer expository and argumentative pieces with an emphasis on learning and utilizing research skills, will focus on exploring the unspeakable and unspoken with texts that reach beyond the boundaries of the social customs that dictate silence.  Through writing the forbidden— speaking the unspeakable and voicing the unspoken—the writers we will be working with challenge the social structures of racism, sexism, heterosexism, and victimization. 

Students will write and rewrite progressively longer essays as the course progresses, culminating with a 10 page research essay.  This class places a premium on research, writing, revision, peer editing, and student workshopping.

Besides the books indicated above, there will be secondary reading TBA.

 


Reading & Composition: Beyond Islands

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Shelley, Jonathan
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Book List

Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; More, Thomas: Utopia; Shakespeare, William: The Tempest; Swift, Jonathan: The Writings of Jonathan Swift; Wells, H.G.: The Island of Dr. Moreau;

Recommended: Hacker, Diana: Pocket Style Manual

Other Readings and Media

The Island (film), Michael Bay

Description

The meaning behind this class’s title is twofold. While it will use islands—which frequently inhabit a strange, fantastical space—as a guiding theme for its selection of texts and readings, this class encourages thinking beyond that theme to the wide range of topics, issues, and questions that these texts elicit. These might include (but are not limited to) political philosophy, economic theory, empire, colonialism, satire, ethical treatment of humans and animals, ecocritcism, theories of the other, and magic. This class hopes to employ interesting readings in order to engage and discuss multiple lines of inquiry and write about them effectively.

The primary goals of this class are to refine comprehension and analytical skills, improve writing, and learn basic research skills. Students will compose essays of varying length and investigate a topic of their own choosing and design for a final research paper.


Reading & Composition: The Gothic: Revivals and Survivals

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Description

The word “Gothic” still evokes stock images of darkness, decay, and danger, from the mouldering Castle Dracula to the inky bayous of True Blood. The source of these images is ultimately the Gothic novel tradition. From The Castle of Otranto to Dracula and beyond, these novels are filled with images of a dangerous past that threatens the present. Yet for much of the 19th century, the Gothic was also a powerful tool for imagining the transformation both of aesthetics and society. The Gothic Revival in architecture brought back “free” medieval forms as an answer to the rigidity of the classical tradition; it also made powerful arguments for the dignity of labor in answer to the alienation of the industrial revolution. This revaluation of the Gothic was not limited to architecture: in painting, the Pre-Raphaelite movement proclaimed the purity and spirituality of medieval art techniques; the Arts and Crafts movement adopted the medieval guild system as the basis for a revolution in industrial design. This class will consider the Gothic in both of its guises--as a hopeful revival and as a dangerous survival. In doing so, we will consider as well the more fundamental question of modernity's relationship with history; is the past a repository of vital "natural" traditions with which modernity has lost touch? Or is it rather a dangerous force that must be overcome or suppressed? Slideshows and tours of Berkeley's Victorian revival architecture will supplement our readings of major Gothic novels. Students will write three progressively longer papers over the course of the semester, incorporating original research. This class fulfills the second part of the Reading and Composition requirement. 

 

Readings:  Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre.  A course reader, including: Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles; John Ruskin, from Stones of Venice; William Morris, from the SPAB Manifesto; Sigmund Freud, from Civilization and its Discontents and The Uncanny; Michael Lewis, from The Gothic Revival.

Film:  Twilight

 

 


Reading & Composition: Strange Cases

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: Mershon, Ella
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 223 Wheeler


Book List

Doyle, A. C.: Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories; Melville, H.: Billy Budd, Sailor and Selected Tales; Poe, E. A.: Selected Tales; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Stevenson, R. L.: Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Stoker, B.: Dracula

Other Readings and Media

There will be a course reader that will include works by Coleridge, P. B. Shelley, Keats, Byron, Whitman, Hawthorne, Rossetti, Browning, Tennyson, Le Fanu, Tyndal, Huxley, Arnold, Galvani, and Ruskin.

Description

Per the title of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1886 novella, this course will explore a number of “strange cases”—serpent seductresses, mesmerized corpses, duplicitous doppelgangers, spectral monkeys (and other inexplicable apparitions), monstrous bodies, uncanny coincidences, and perverse desires—in an effort to flesh out what made the “strange” such a desirable literary and scientific topic in the 19th century. As we examine these bizarre and ofttimes beautiful cases, we will consider how the strange (strangers, estrangement, strangeness) struggles for articulation in an era that is “betwixt ancient faith and modern incredulity” (to quote an early reviewer of the gothic novel). Hence, we will work to juxtapose the historical construction of strangeness as it embraces new scientific incredulity with the aesthetic allure of the strange within and beyond the domain of the literary.

While these texts will hopefully furnish us with material for rich discussions, the primary goal of this class is to improve your writing. Building upon the praxis of literary analysis stressed in R1A, we will work to develop your fluency in writing longer and more complex papers with specific attention to the cultivation of effective research strategies and evaluative skills. Learning how to evaluate, respond to and incorporate source material into your prose will be the primary focus of this class, over the course of which you will produce 32 pages of written work through a gradual process of outlining, drafting, editing, and revising.

 


Reading & Composition: Recent Memoirs on Loss

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: Fritz, Tracy
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Didion, Joan: The Year of Magical Thinking; Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers; O'Rourke, Meghan: The Long Goodbye; Oates, Joyce Carol: A Widow's Story; Trillin, Calvin: About Alice

Other Readings and Media

There will be a course reader of literary criticism.

Description

In her review of Joyce Carol Oates’ A Widow’s Story (2011), Janet Maslin describes the memoir as a contribution to the growing “loss-of-spouse-market.” Indeed, from Calvin Trillin’s About Alice (2006) to Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking (2007) to Meghan O'Rourke's The Long Goodbye (2011), memoirs about death--spousal and otherwise--seem to be quite popular. While they may offer consolation to the bereaved (and whether or not they do is debatable), these texts also offer new insights into the limits of language. In this class, we will explore the following questions: How does pain—both mental and physical—resist linguistic representation? How does a traumatic event like a death disrupt narrative? Given the lack of modern mourning rituals, how does writing give form to grief?

Students will explore these questions while learning how to read critically, write clearly, and argue persuasively. Emphasizing the development of research skills, this course will teach them how to locate academic sources, evaluate these outside materials, and use them to construct their own positions. Over the course of the semester, students will produce approximately 32 pages of writing. This writing will be broken down into three essays which will increase in length as the term progresses. For the final two papers, they will be required to perform research tasks and reference texts beyond those provided in class.


Reading & Composition: Late Victorians

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Naturale, Lauren
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Eliot, George: The Lifted Veil and Brother Jacob; Hardy, Thomas: The Return of the Native; Rossetti, Christina: Goblin Market and Other Poems; Stoker, Bram: Dracula; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Other Readings and Media

Film: Velvet Goldmine (dir. Todd Haynes)

Description

"I don't believe there is much of a future to speak of. We're in a bit of a decadent spiral, aren't we? Sinking fast. Big brother all the way, baby. Which is why we prefer impressions to ideas. Situations to subjects. Brief flights to sustained ones. Exceptions to types." - - Velvet Goldmine

What does it mean to live outside one's time? What are the possible consequences of having "a face on which time makes but little impression?" From characters who don't age to the actual undead, these texts explore different modes of "belatedness" in the later decades of the nineteenth century. Our primary focus will be on the process of drafting and revising successful essays.


Reading & Composition: Country and City

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Bauer, Mark
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 221 Wheeler


Book List

Dillard, Annie: Pilgrim at Tinker Creek; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Hardy, Thomas: Tess of the D'Urbervilles; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Other Readings and Media

The course bSpace site will include poems by Horace, Hart Crane, Jean Toomer, and Frank O’Hara, and essays by Wallace Stegner, Raymond Williams, and Jane Jacobs, among several others.

Description

The opposition between city life and country life goes back at least as far as ancient Rome, but today it takes on a new significance as urbanites are asked to respond to a problem that is often felt more sharply in rural areas, whether it’s diminishing habitat for polar bears or famines caused by fluctuating food prices.Investigating the city/country divide will provide insight into the cultural significance and constructedness of each sphere, and also the degree to which they depend on each other, both for their identities and for mutual survival.  In addition to these primary spheres, we’ll also explore the less clearly defined spaces at their margins – suburbs, and, at the other extreme, wilderness – asking both what constitutes them and what they mean to us.  The course will hone students’ ability to write and revise longer, research-based papers, while still focusing on the skills of literary analysis needed to think critically about the course texts.


Reading & Composition: Storytelling

English R1B

Section: 15
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Calvino, Italo: If on a winter's night a traveller; David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen: Writing Analytically; Didion, Joan: Slouching Towards Bethlehem; West, Nathanael: Miss Lonelyhearts and the Day of the Locust

Description

This course will develop your writing and research skills through careful study of works that, to varying degrees, concern the art of storytelling. We will closely read several authors ranging from Herodotus to Italo Calvino, all the while posing a number of questions to come to a collective understanding of the genre in its many forms: What assumptions do certain storytellers make about their audiences and themselves? Why do they arrange events in a certain order? What makes the events recounted worth communicating in the first place? In what sense do characters tell themselves stories, and what happens when they stop believing them? Many of these considerations will apply to the composition of your essays as well, and over the course of the semester we will work to make them part of the writing process.

As this is a writing intensive course, a significant portion of our time will be dedicated to refining your prose. You will be responsible for writing a total of three papers: a two-page diagnostic essay and two longer essays, both of which require substantial revisions. The final paper will incorporate independent research. In addition, there will be a number of shorter assignments designed to hone your skills as critical readers and writers.


Reading & Composition: Victorian Crime

English R1B

Section: 16
Instructor: Baldwin, Ruth
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Ainsworth, William Harrison: Jack Sheppard; Braddon, Mary Elizabeth: Lady Audley's Secret; Collins, Wilkie: The Moonstone; Stevenson, Robert Louis: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Stoker, Bram: Dracula; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray;

Recommended: Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers, 6th Ed.

Description

We like to describe the Victorians the way we think about our great-great aunts—well-meaning and sweet, but also uptight, prudish, and stodgy.  But just because polite Victorian society didn’t talk about sex, drugs, and crime doesn’t mean that they didn’t think or read about them.  Sensation novels (the precursors to our trashy romances) and mystery novels were first invented by the supposedly staid, curmudgeonly pens of Victorian writers.  In this class, we’ll discuss topics of equal interest to the Victorians and to us, including the various imagined sources of criminal behavior, the suppression and punishment of criminality, and problems of race and national identity.  The texts we’ll read approach questions of crime, deviance, detection, and discipline from a variety of viewpoints and will serve as a jumping-off point for your research on crime, criminal law, and justice in the Victorian novel. 

Our time will be structured around a combination of small group and full class discussions, which will help you to develop your skills as a reader, researcher, writer, and critic. We will review essay writing and research strategies at frequent intervals in the class (see syllabus for schedule), along with additional discussions of more technical aspects of the writing process as needed.  Our class time will often take the form of workshops and peer review sessions, so the presence of each student is vital to the success of our meetings.  The primary goal of the class will be to hone your skills as a critical reader, researcher, and writer. 


Reading & Composition: Alternate Narratives

English R1B

Section: 17
Instructor: Menilla, David D.
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Mitchell, David: Cloud Atlas; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Man & Other Poems; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Woolf, Virginia: To The Lighthouse

Description

The texts we will read this semester have generally been read as stories of self-discovery. Through class discussion and close reading analysis, we will uncover the hidden themes and formal structures which complicate how we understand these stories. In fact, the notions of character and narrative will themselves be challenged by characters who are not bound by the conventions of space and time we usually assign to our everyday experiences--they can see the dead, and the future.  In moving beyond our established reading practices and notions of what a character can experience we will be able to discover a different sense of the ‘real.’  How much of this narrative we can dig up, or how successful we are in overthrowing our ideas of what is possible, will help us to see how we become active participants in creating the story.


Reading & Composition: Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

English R1B

Section: 18
Instructor: Gardezi, Nilofar
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Brooks, Gwendolyn: Blacks; Hayden, Robert: Collected Poems: Robert Hayden; Tolson, Melvin B.: "Harlem Gallery" and Other Poems of Melvin B. Tolson;

Recommended: Raimes, Ann: Keys for Writers, 6th edition

Description

In this course, we will examine the “lost years” of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African American poetry focus on two key literary and cultural movements: the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. While these movements were indeed important, I encourage us to investigate and see as equally important what was happening during the “gap years,” particularly the 1940s-1960s. This course will consider what is lost here as well as how and why it matters. 

During and after World War II, African Americans migrated in great numbers from the rural South to the urban North in search of better jobs and opportunities, becoming a new and burgeoning urban population. The recently arrived migrants imagined new black urban selves and created communities in neighborhoods like Chicago’s Bronzeville, Detroit’s Paradise Valley and New York’s Harlem. What were the stories of their lives in the transformed and transforming postwar cities of the North and how were they represented? African American poets Gwendolyn Brooks, Frank Marshall Davis, Robert Hayden, Langston Hughes, Melvin Tolson, Margaret Walker and others wrote about these figures and communities in their innovative postwar poetry. How did they necessarily experiment with the forms of their poetry in order to tell new black urban stories? The years of the 1940s-1960s were also crucial because they witnessed the birth of the Civil Rights Movement. How were the black poets of this period keenly engaging with and responding to the eddying spirit and rising discourse of civil rights and social change in their creative work? These starting questions and others that we discover together will motivate us as we work on critical reading and writing this term.

 


Reading & Composition: Postcolonial China

English R1B

Section: 19
Instructor: Lee, Amy
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Eng, Tan Twan: The Gift of Rain; Ghosh, Amitav: River of Smoke; Li, Yiyun: The Vagrants;

Recommended: Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers

Other Readings and Media

  • Course Reader
  • Films:
    • Wong Kar Wai, Chungking Express
    • Hou Hsiao Hsien, The Puppetmaster

Description

Postcolonialism, as a discourse that analyzes and critiques the legacy of colonialism, has largely been developed to describe the experiences of former Western colonies in the Caribbean, India, and Africa.  This course examines the value and applicability of postcolonial critique to the Chinese context as a way to account for China’s semicolonial past, encounter with Western and Japanese imperialism, and uneven and vexed relationships with Taiwan, Hong Kong, Tibet, and the Global South.  We will query how the case of China adds to and complicates what we know about postcolonialism.  We will consider postcolonial cultural productions from Greater China, including Anglophone and translated works from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora.  Topics we will explore may include the intersections between colonialism, migration, and global capitalism, ethnic and national consciousness, historiography and the postcolonial archive, racial formation and triangulation, language policies, and the poetics and politics of translation. 

In addition to developing our critical thinking and close-reading skills through in-class discussions and exercises, we will spend a significant amount of time honing our research and writing skills. Students will learn how to effectively gather research materials and incorporate secondary sources in their writing to strengthen their argumentative positions.  Assignments include short writing exercises, two research papers (including drafts), and class presentations.


Reading & Composition: Reading California

English R1B

Section: 20
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Gale, Kate and Veronique de Turenne, Eds.: The Devil's Punchbowl: A Cultural and Geographical Map of California Today; Ridge, John Rollin : The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta;

Recommended: Tan, Amy: The Joy Luck Club

Other Readings and Media

Selections by Pico Iyer, Maxine Hong Kingston, Wendy Rose, Greg Sarris, Michael Chabon, and others.

Film: Bladerunner

Description

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by California writers from the Gold Rush to the present.  Our inquiries will engage a range of perspectives, offering students a chance to read widely about California and conduct research about a topic of great personal interest.

English R1B is a writing-intensive course that develops students’ practical fluency with expository and argumentative writing.  This course also builds and refines the skills required for university-level research.  Essay assignments include a short (2-3 page) essay early in the semester, followed by a longer paper (4-6 pages) at midterm and an extensive research paper (8-10 pages) during finals.  These two longer papers will undergo an extensive series of drafts and revisions.  Research projects will enable students to focus on anything related to California.  Students will present their research to the class before submitting the final paper.


Reading & Composition: Shakespearean Tragedy

English R1B

Section: 22
Instructor: Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Aristotle: Aristotle's Poetics; Gibaldi, Joseph: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; Shakespeare, W.: Shakespeare's Tragedies (ed. Bevington); Sophocles: Oedipus Rex

Description

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear. We will read and study these plays in detail, with the aim of coming to some conclusions about why they, in particular, are commonly thought of as some of Shakespeare’s greatest dramatic achievements and as some of the greatest tragedies in English. We will think a lot about the compartment that we label “tragedy”—or the compartment that Aristotle labeled for us. Do these instances of Shakespeare’s tragedies fit into that compartment? Can we usefully compare them to earlier and/or later instances of the genre? Or are Shakespeare’s tragedies—his conception of tragedy within them and the experience of tragedy they push upon their audiences—in certain ways unique?

Note: If you already have individual volumes of the plays, or a single-volume edition of the collected works of Shakespeare, those will probably work in place of the Shakespeare text (Shakespeare's Tragedies, editied by Bevington) that I've ordered.

 

 


Reading & Composition: Laughter and Literature

English R1B

Section: 23
Instructor: Huerta, Javier
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 51 Evans


Book List

Diaz, Tony: The Aztec Love God

Description

In this course we will be taking laughter seriously. “No animal laughs, except man,” Aristotle declares. We will study the different theories that attempt to explain why we laugh. I must warn you, student, that it is not the purpose of this class to make you laugh. As you know (or if you do not already know, you will learn it in class), nothing kills a laugh quicker than to explain a joke. I intend not only to explain all jokes but also to show you the origin of all laughter. If we are successful in our analyses, the proper and logical outcome will be not only that you will not laugh in class but that you will never laugh again. So prepare to focus on the analysis of laughter and the laughter of analysis.

 

As the second half of the University’s “Reading and Composition” requirement, English R1B is a writing-intensive introduction to critical reading, interpretive thinking, and scholarly research. Building from a series of short reading responses, two formal essays, and a continuous process of peer editing and revision, your main task in this course will the be the completion of a 10-page research project.  This project will ask you to explore primary sources as well as secondary accounts in order to offer a new critical and historical perspective on the many ways we experience the surprises of laughter.


Reading & Composition: Reading California

English R1B

Section: 24
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Gale, Kate and Veronique de Turenne, Eds.: The Devil's Punchbowl: A Cultural and Geographical Map of California Today; Ridge, John Rollin: The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta;

Recommended: Tan, Amy: The Joy Luck Club

Other Readings and Media

Selections by Pico Iyer, Maxine Hong Kingston, Wendy Rose, Greg Sarris, Michael Chabon, and others.

Film: Bladerunner

Description

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by California writers from the Gold Rush to the present.  Our inquiries will engage a range of perspectives, offering students a chance to read widely about California and conduct research about a topic of great personal interest.

English R1B is a writing-intensive course that develops students’ practical fluency with expository and argumentative writing.  This course also builds and refines the skills required for university-level research.  Essay assignments include a short (2-3 page) essay early in the semester, followed by a longer paper (4-6 pages) at midterm and an extensive research paper (8-10 pages) during finals.  These two longer papers will undergo an extensive series of drafts and revisions.  Research projects will enable students to focus on anything related to California.  Students will present their research to the class before submitting the final paper.


Reading & Composition: Paranoia

English R1B

Section: 25
Instructor: Ahmed, Adam
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 106 Mulford


Book List

Austen, Jane: Northanger Abbey; Dick, Philip K. : The Philip K. Dick Reader; Kafka, Franz: The Trial; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, including poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Herman Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” selections from Judge Schreber’s journals, selections from Freud’s The Schreber Case, and some stories by Arthur Conan Doyle and Edgar Allan Poe.

Films: The Conversation (1974), Rear Window (1954), Videodrome (1983), and The Ghost Writer (2010)

 

Description

We all recognize its symptoms: feelings of persecution, irrational thinking, fear that others are plotting against you. We see its plots in popular culture -- dystopian fiction, political thrillers, and suspense films all move the story along with a deep-seated feeling that something is not right. We know its delusions, so why do we remain suspicious?  Of course we usually designate delusion from suspicion by the credibility of its proof; but even when it remains unverified, paranoia is grounded in some version of the credible. In this class, we will examine this strange overlap between the delusional and the credible -- from 19th century writing on superstition to 20th century plots in which the protagonist is the center of some great network of forces trying to make him (or her) disappear.

While we read these unverified and imaginative descriptions of the world, the goal of this class will be to make sure your arguments do not suffer the same fate. As an R1B, this course will reinforce students’ grasp of grammar and argument, while introducing them to some of the scholarly and analytical techniques for research writing. Through themed groupings of material and several researched essays, students will learn how analyze outside source material and craft their own original theses.


Reading & Composition: Shakespearean Tragedy

English R1B

Section: 26
Instructor: Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Aristotle: Aristotle's Poetics; Gibaldi, Joseph: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; Shakespeare, W.: Shakespeare's Tragedies (ed. Bevington); Sophocles: Oedipus Rex

Description

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear. We will read and study these plays in detail, with the aim of coming to some conclusions about why they, in particular, are commonly thought of as some of Shakespeare’s greatest dramatic achievements and as some of the greatest tragedies in English. We will think a lot about the compartment that we label “tragedy”—or the compartment that Aristotle labeled for us. Do these instances of Shakespeare’s tragedies fit into that compartment? Can we usefully compare them to earlier and/or later instances of the genre? Or are Shakespeare’s tragedies—his conception of tragedy within them and the experience of tragedy they push upon their audiences—in certain ways unique?

Note: If you already have individual volumes of the plays, or a single-volume edition of the collected works of Shakespeare, those will probably work in place of the Shakespeare text (Shakespeare's Tragedies, editied by Bevington) that I've ordered.

 


Reading & Composition: 'They did not wear such hats'; or, Puritans in the New World

English R1B

Section: 27
Instructor: Trocchio, Rachel
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Book List

Bradford, William: Of Plymouth Plantation; Conde, Maryse: I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter; Miller, Arthur: The Crucible; Miller, Perry: The American Puritans: Their Prose and Poetry; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Philbrick, Nathaniel: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War; Rowlandson, Mary: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Vowell, Sarah: The Wordy Shipmates

Other Readings and Media

Photocopies, to be distributed in class and posted on bSpace.

Description

Taking as its focus that group of men and women who came to New England between 1620 and 1640, this course will hone your literary capacities, particularly your expository, argumentative, and research skills. There could be no better subject for spurring us to this task than the Puritans, whose rigorous assessments of self and society offer a phenomenal, albeit neurotic, model for the kind of close reading practice we will develop across the semester. This is to say that we will attend to the Puritan’s style as much as to their content: sin and depravity, mire and salvation, work and labor, the soul and the state. Specifically, we will turn to a number of their writings – journals, personal narratives, histories, sermons (yes, sermons!) – to flesh out our vision of just what New England Puritanism was, and, as our title indicates, what it was not. And because the mythology around the Puritans so powerfully embeds American consciousness, we will also look at 19th- and 20th-century retellings of facets of Puritan experience, most notably, the infamous witchcraft trials.

 


Reading & Composition: Reading California

English R1B

Section: 28
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Gale, Kate and Veronique de Turenne, Eds.: The Devil's Punchbowl: A Cultural and Geographical Map of California Today; Ridge, John Rollin: The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta;

Recommended: Tan, Amy: The Joy Luck Club

Other Readings and Media

 

Selections by Pico Iyer, Maxine Hong Kingston, Wendy Rose, Greg Sarris, Michael Chabon, and others.

Film: Bladerunner

Description

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by California writers from the Gold Rush to the present.  Our inquiries will engage a range of perspectives, offering students a chance to read widely about California and conduct research about a topic of great personal interest.

English R1B is a writing-intensive course that develops students’ practical fluency with expository and argumentative writing.  This course also builds and refines the skills required for university-level research.  Essay assignments include a short (2-3 page) essay early in the semester, followed by a longer paper (4-6 pages) at midterm and an extensive research paper (8-10 pages) during finals.  These two longer papers will undergo an extensive series of drafts and revisions.  Research projects will enable students to focus on anything related to California.  Students will present their research to the class before submitting the final paper.


Reading & Composition: The Essay--Evidence and Idea

English R1B

Section: 29
Instructor: Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Time: MW 9-10:30
Location: Wheeler 305


Book List

Eliot, TS: The Wasteland ; Faulkner, William: Light in August; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass

Description

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forward, sometimes ploddingly, point by point.  The essays you will write in this class are exploratory and persuasive as well as critical and argumentative; they move forward as a form of inquiry, turning on themselves again and again, surprising even the writer as she writes.  Every good essay, we will discover, yearns to be sui generis, unlike any of its predecessors.

But of course, even the most unusual essay has features in common with all the others:  an idea, or, more properly, a network of ideas that shape and bind the many parts of the essay together, whether those parts be stories of experience, stories about written texts, or reflections about images (paintings, movies, tv shows, or sculpted objects); a three-part structure (beginning, middle, ending); a presentation of ideas (relatively) free of surface errors and adhering to college conventions; and, finally, every good essay reveals how the mind writing it actually makes sense of things.  That final element seems now the most fundamental of all.

The essay does not prove, repeat, or reiterate; it is not a static litany of facts.  Instead, the essay in this class, like the idea, develops, changes, and expands as the writer considers both her subject and her readers, both new kinds of evidence and what her audience will need to know about this particular piece of evidence.  When she gets the words right, when she figures out what she has to say and how to say it, the writing becomes compelling, the subject and the idea more interesting, the reader captivated.

Course Materials

  • Course reader
  • Light in August.  William Faulkner, 1932.  [Vintage edition, 1990].
  • Leaves of Grass.  Walt Whitman, Penguin Classics, 2005.
  • The Waste Land and Other Poems.  T. S. Eliot, Signet, 1998.
  • A trusty, fluid pen, and a notebook brought to every class.

Course Requirements

  • Six Essays– You will complete three extended take-home essays (of 4-6 typed pages) and three in-class essays
  • Mid- and End-term Reflective Letters & Conferences– These letters, and the conferences with me, will give you the opportunity to reflect on what you are learning and what you still need/want to learn
  • Attendance, Participation, Passion, Enthusiasm, In-Class Work


Reading & Composition: The Essay--Evidence and Idea

English R1B

Section: 30
Instructor: Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: Wheeler 305


Description

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing, and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forward, sometimes ploddingly, point by point.  The essays you will write in this class are exploratory and persuasive as well as critical and argumentative; they move forward as a form of inquiry, turning on themselves again and again, surprising even the writer as she writes.  Every good essay, we will discover, yearns to be sui generis, unlike any of its predecessors.

But of course, even the most unusual essay has features in common with all the others:  an idea, or, more properly, a network of ideas that shape and bind the many parts of the essay together, whether those parts be stories of experience, stories about written texts, or reflections about images (paintings, movies, tv shows, or sculpted objects); a three-part structure (beginning, middle, ending); the presentation of ideas that is (relatively) free of surface errors; and, finally, every good essay reveals how the mind writing it actually makes sense of things.  That final element seems now the most fundamental of all.

The essay does not prove, repeat, or reiterate; it is not a static litany of facts.  Instead, the essay in this class, like the idea, develops, changes, and expands as the writer considers both her subject and her readers, both new kinds of evidence and what her audience will need to know about this particular piece of evidence.  When she gets the words right, when she figures out what she has to say and how to say it, the writing becomes compelling, the subject and the idea more interesting, the reader captivated.

Course Materials

  • Course reader
  • Light in August.  William Faulkner, 1932.  [Vintage edition, 1990].
  • Leaves of Grass.  Walt Whitman, Penguin Classics, 2005.
  • The Waste Land and Other Poems.  T. S. Eliot, Signet, 1998.
  • A trusty, fluid pen, and a notebook brought to every class.

Course Requirements

  • Six Essays– You will complete three extended take-home essays (of 4-6 typed pages) and three in-class essays
  • Mid- and End-term Reflective Letters & Conferences– These letters, and the conferences with me, will give you the opportunity to reflect on what you are learning and what you still need/want to learn
  • Attendance, Participation, Passion, Enthusiasm, In-Class Work


Freshman Seminar: Bullets Across the Bay--Detective Narratives Set in San Francisco

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time: W 9-10
Location: 203 Wheeler


Book List

Hammett, Dashiell: The Maltese Falcon; Mersereau, John: Murder Loves Company; Muller, Marcia: Dead Midnight

Other Readings and Media

There will be films as required texts.

Description

Why are detective novels set in a place?  San Francisco has provided a favorite setting for the detective story since the work of Dashiell Hammett, especially with the publication of The Maltese Falcon (1930).  Of course, San Francisco is a city, but it is also a city that has been branded in certain ways.  Detective writers take into account this fairly abstract sense of the meaning of San Francisco.  And so we will look at some major detective stories set in San Francisco with its distinctive history and geography.  Novels for the course are The Maltese Falcon, Murder Loves Company, and Dead Midnight.  We will also screen some major films of detective narratives set in San Francisco, like Hitchcock’s Vertigo, Siegel’s Dirty Harry, Wang’s Chan is Missing.  A short paper will be due at the end of the semester: students should pick a narrative and discuss the meaning of San Francisco for that novel or film.

This course coincides with the Bancroft’s display of their collection of detective stories set in San Francisco, “Bullets Across the Bay.”  See the display in the main gallery (the Brown gallery) of Doe Library.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: M 2-3
Location: 14 Haviland


Book List

Thoreau, Henry: Walden

Description

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

English 43A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Pitlor, Heidi: The Best American Short Stories 2011

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, to be purchased from Zee Zee Copy.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction, and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Vikram Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Introduction to the Writing of Verse: Received Forms and Invented Forms

English 43B

Section: 1
Instructor: Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader, available at Copy Central, including poems by Ted Berrigan, Elizabeth Bishop, Heather Christle, Lyn Hejinian, Susan Howe, Kenneth Koch, Bernadette Mayer, Claude McKay, Harryette Mullen, Claudia Rankine, William Shakespeare, and others.

Description

In the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, a number of British poets adapted the Italian sonnet to craft a form that would become central to English literature: fourteen lines of iambic pentameter, with three rhymed quatrains and a closing couplet. Nearly four hundred years later, Bernadette Mayer suggested the following writing experiment: “Take a fourteen-block walk, writing one line per block to create a sonnet.” Mayer defined her sonnet by means of a new formal constraint: geography.

This introduction to the writing of verse takes form as its theme. We’ll read work by a wide variety of poets who approach form in different ways, whether accepting traditional rules, breaking those rules, or inventing new ones. We’ll do some improvisatory writing in class, both alone and in groups, and you will also be expected to devote considerable time to crafting and revising your own work.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Megan Pugh's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Time: MW 11-12, + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 141 McCone


Description

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings think about desire, commerce, liberty, God, power, the environment, subjectivity, empire, justice, death, and science. We will study how a literary text emerges out of the author's reading of his predecessors and in relation to contemporary political, religious, social, and scientific discourses and events.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: MW 1-2, + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 110 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, G.: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Jill Mann (Penguin); Dickson, D.: John Donne's Poetry (Norton edition); Heaney, S.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation (Bilingual Edition); Marlowe, C.: Doctor Faustus, ed. David Scott Kastan (Norton ed.); Milton, J.: Paradise Lost, ed. Gordon Teskey (Norton ed.)

Other Readings and Media

Readings on bSpace.

Description

In this course you will explore some of the great foundational works of English literature, ranging from the very earliest period up to Milton's Paradise Lost. In the process, you will learn to understand--and even speak!--the forms of early English, and to appreciate genres ranging from epic to lyric verse. You will practice the close analysis of language, and will also consider how literature engages with--and shapes--the historical circumstances in which it was produced. Our goal is to understand how and why the texts we will read created the landscape of English literature.


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 10-11, + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 101 Barker


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Equiano, O.: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; Franklin, B.: Autobiography; Melville, H.: Billy Budd and Other Tales; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey; Wordsworth, J.: The Penguin Book of Romantic Poetry

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, available at Metro Publishing, 2440 Bancroft Way (510-644-1999).

 

Description

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, and others) and think about how politics, aesthetics, the everyday, race, gender, and identity all find expression in a number of different literary forms. We'll especially consider the material and symbolic roles played by the idea and practice of revolution in the period.


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: MW 12-1, + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 2 LeConte


Book List

Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko and Other Writings; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Gates, Henry Louis: Classic Slave Narratives; Melville, Herman: Bartleby and Benito Cereno; Poe, Edgar Allan: The Gold-Bug and Other Tales; Rowlandson, Mary: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include: poems by Alexander Pope, William Collins, Thomas Grey, Robert Burns, William Blake, William Wordsworth, and S.T. Coleridge;  short fiction by Walter Scott and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Description

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose narrative and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and then Ireland, the global expansion of an overseas empire, and the revolt of the North American colonies.

Our readings will explore the relations between home and the world in writings preoccupied with journeys outward and back, real and imaginary -- not all of which are undertaken voluntarily.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: MW 10-11, + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Book List

Tentative Book List (please attend the first lecture before purchasing) : ;

Recommended: Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Larsen, Nella: Passing; McEwan, Ian: Saturday; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

A substantial (required) photocopied reader containing short stories, poetry, and critical essays.

Description

This course examines a broad range of British and American texts spanning well over a century, with a primary focus on the emergence and development of early twentieth-century modernism. Topics for discussion will include the role of high art and artists in an era of mass communications and mass culture; the interplay between formal innovation and ideological stance; the rejection of and/or engagement with tradition and history; the implications of expatriatism and multiculturalism for identity; and the politics of canon formation: which authors and literary texts are regularly read, how they are read, and by whom.

Written work for the course will consist of three 5-7 page essays; a midterm and/or quizzes given in lecture; and a final exam. Regular attendance at lecture and vigorous participation in section are also required. Individual sections may also require short assignments.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 60 Evans


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Ellmann, O'Clair, and Ramazani, eds.: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, Volume I: Modern Poetry; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Tales; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world.  We will concentrate on the era’s efforts in poetry and fiction, attending to the ways in which texts both incorporate and shape the formal effects of modernity at large.


Sophomore Seminar: Woody Allen

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Allen, W.: The Insanity Defense: The Complete Prose

Description

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology.  The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Archive.

This 2-unit-course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.
 


History of the English Language

English 101

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Brinton, L.J. and L.K. Arnovick: The English Language: A Linguistic History, 2nd ed.

Description

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, and up to its different forms in use throughout the world today.  Topics include changes in its core grammatical systems of phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure) and syntax (sentence structure); in vocabulary;  in writing and literary forms; and in the social position of English and its dialects.  


The English Bible as Literature

English C107

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 4 LeConte


Book List

New Oxford Annotated Bible NRSV with Apocrypha [College Edition]; Alter, Robert: Genesis; Browning, WRF: Oxford Dictionary of the Bible (paperback)

Description

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read these texts in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask historical, political, and theoretical questions of a text that is multi-authored, fissured, and historically layered.  Among other topics, we will pay special attention to how authority is established and contested in biblical texts; how biblical authors negotiate the ancient Hebrew prohibition against representing God in images; and how the gospels are socially and historically poised between the Jesus movement that is their source and the institutionalization of the church that follows.  Assignments are likely to include two take-home midterms and a final.

This course is cross-listed with Religious Studies C119.


Shakespeare

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 159 Mulford


Description

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and the three plays that the critics have described as "romances," Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. These are among the most brilliant, corruscating, and magical stories ever imagined into the English language, and some of the most astonishing poetry. Students will be expected to keep up with the reading. The format will be lecture plus some conversation plus some informal staging and a bit of memorization. You'll know, when you're through, the "To be or not to be" speech and the "out, out, brief candle" speech and perhaps a couple of others.


Shakespeare: Selected Plays

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Riverside Shakespeare (2nd ed.);

Recommended: Greenblatt, Stephen: Will in the World; Gurr, Andrew: The Shakespearean Stage (3rd ed.)

Description

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  We'll consider the range of plays he wrote, and why this range was important to him.  We'll also explore how different dramatic genres affect Shakespeare's representation of plot, character, and the literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophical issues he conceptualizes through plot and character.  Finally, we'll think about the range of Shakespeare's plays in relation to the disgust that many of his contemporaries expressed toward the range of social types and classes in his mass audience.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 155 Donner Lab


Book List

Milton, John: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (ed. Kerrigan, Rumrich, and Fallon)

Description

The most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon, rather than the rebel he was. Or he is assumed to be a remote religious poet rather than an independent thinker, who distrusted any passively held faith that was not self-questioning. Therefore, as we follow Milton’s carefully shaped career from the shorter early poems, through some of the controversial prose of the English Civil War era, and at last through the astounding work that emerged in the wake of political defeat (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes), we will discover a very different literary and political figure, known in his time as a statesman as well as a poet, and in both pursuits considered more an iconoclast than an icon. We will come to understand Milton’s writing in relation to the revolutions that he witnessed and took part in, and we will also think about his experiments in poetic form, his ambivalent incorporations, revisions, and expansions of classical literature and biblical texts alike, the function of his unorthodox theology, his writings on love, marriage, and divorce, his long preoccupation with vocation – and more.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Augustan Age: Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

English 119

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 219 Dwinelle


Book List

Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Bunyan, John: Grace Abounding; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; McMillin, Scott (editor): Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy; Pope, Alexander: Poetry and Prose of Alexander Pope; Swift, Jonathan: The Writings of Jonathan Swift

Description

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's  first advice column, its first "women's magazine," and the first periodical to be published daily), the early novel, and the writings of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift. In addition to the texts listed below, there will be a course reader.

Course requirements: two short analyses (1-2 pages), one substantial paper (7-9 pages), and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 155 Donner Lab


Description

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of mind challenged old ways of knowing, of ordering society, and of interacting socially. How did experiments in fiction writing enable new ways of knowing and new ways of acting virtuously in a society in which such things were open for debate? Haunted by fiction’s connection to “lower” forms of writing, writers—many of them women--also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public print market. We shall examine their rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating their writing--appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The European Novel: Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and the English Novel

English 125C

Section: 1
Instructor: Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: new room: 9 Lewis


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Dostoevsky, Fyodor: The Idiot, trans. Constance Garnett; Tolstoy, Leo: Anna Karenina, the Maude translation; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with two English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels respond to one another, resemble one another, and differ from one another, especially in their treatment of love and family, community and society, the representation of consciousness, and the conventions of the novel as a genre. In her famous essay “The Russian Point of View,” Virginia Woolf suggests that whereas the English novelist feels a “constant pressure” to recognize “barriers” and “boundaries,” both ideological and formal, the Russian novelist “cannot restrain himself.” The English novelist is “inclined to satire,” the Russian to “compassion;” the English to “scrutiny of society,” and the Russian to “understanding of individuals themselves.” Is she right? The course begins with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813), proceeds to Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Idiot (1869) and Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (1877), and concludes with Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 132.

Workload: Close reading of assigned texts (up to 200 pages per week), regular attendance, short assignments, midterm, one paper, final exam.  No knowledge of Russian required.  All readings are done in English. Students who know Russian are encouraged to do at least some reading in Russian.

A note one editions and translations: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice  (in the Norton Critical Edition); Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot (in the  Constance Garnett translation); LeoTolstoy, Anna Karenina (in the Maude translation and the Norton Critical Edition); Virginia Woolf,  Mrs. Dalloway, (best use A Harvest Book ed. by MarkHussey). 
 


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into literary texts; and the discovery of a number of forgotten writings which, while often raw, possess a surprising energy and complexity that make them worthy of a study on their own.”  In this class we will consider many of the major authors of this period (Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Emily Dickinson, and others) against the vibrant backdrop of antebellum politics and popular culture.  

This was an age when Andrew Jackson redefined the presidency and James K. Polk expanded the nation’s territory.  This was also a period of violent mobs, Barnum’s freaks, all-seeing mesmerists, polygamous prophets, temperance advocates, revivalist preachers, and resolute feminists. The literature and popular culture of the 1830s, 40s, and 50s bear witness to democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization.  In the midst of this turbulence, an astonishing range of mass cultural forms surfaced, including P.T. Barnum's American Museum, the moving panorama, and an early form of photography called daguerreotype.  Together, we will read as well as discuss and write about a good deal of the major literature of this era, study fascinating examples of the popular culture of the period, and explore the emergent cultural practices that make the antebellum period such a vibrant and significant period in American cultural history.  We will focus on issues of "self" (the search for transcendence and the complexities of relations); the Puritan legacy; the landscape; the democratic experiment; the efforts to reform the American character; and the struggles over the rights and roles of women, African Americans, and Native Americans in the expanding nation.  Depending on the number of students enrolled, two midterms (or essays) and a final examination will be required.


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 289 Cory


Book List

Cather, Willa: My Antonia; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F.: The Great Gatsby; Hemingway, Ernest: The Sun Also Rises; Johnson, James: The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Locke, Alain: New Negro; McCullers, Carson: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Wharton, Edith: The Age of Innocence; Wright, Richard: Native Son

Description

This course will introduce students to American literature of the early to mid-twentieth century. Reading across a range of genres and styles, we will ask how developments in literary form meditate on and respond to the social, technological, intellectual, and political conditions of modernity in the United States. We will pay particular attention to questions of national identity and racial difference; “high” modernism and popular culture; new psychologies of consciousness, emotion, and sexuality; the emergence of new media and the persistence of Jim Crow; and the global contexts of U.S. imperialism.


African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 122 Barrows


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Hughes, Langston: Collected Poems; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Jones, Leroi: Blues People; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Lorde, Audre: Collected Poems; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Toomer, Jean: Cane; Wright, Richard: Black Boy

Description

A survey of major African American writings in the context of social history. There will be two essays plus a midterm and final exam.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Slavery--Theory and Literature

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Butler , Octavia: Kindred; Jones, Edward: The Known World; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Wright, Richard: The Long Dream

Description

This course will explore the differences and similarities between the “theory” of slavery and the “experience” of slavery.  Theoretical explorations of slavery will be chosen from the writings of Aristotle, John Locke, G. W. F. Hegel, and some contemporary views.  The literary texts will be selected from the autobiographies and novels depicting chattel slavery and Jim Crow society in the U.S.  Toward the end of the course we will also examine some aspects of contemporary slavery – wage slavery, debt bondage, human trafficking, penal labor, sexual slavery, etc.  All of the theoretical material will be contained in a class reader (to be posted on bspace).

Literary texts will be chosen from the following:  Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (available online); Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (available online); Henry Bibb, The Life and Adventure of Henry Bibb (available online); Richard Wright, The Long Dream; Alice Walker, The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Octavia Butler, Kindred (and “Bloodchild”); Edward P. Jones, The Known World.

 

 


Contemporary Literature

English 134

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 105 North Gate


Book List

Friel, Brian: Translations; Greene, Graham: The End of the Affair; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Kennedy, A.L.: Night Geometry and the Garscadden Trains; Lessing, Doris: The Golden Notebook; McEwan, Ian: Atonement; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth

Description

This course will survey British and Irish writing since World War II.  We will dig deeply into the texts' formal and generic workings, and think through the cultural and social contexts from which they emerge. Along the way, we'll consider the period of postwar decolonization and retrenchment, the social and cultural shifts of the 1960s, the "Troubles" in Northern Ireland, Thatcherism in the 1980s, the liberal turn in the 1990s and the notion of "Cool Britannia," and issues surrounding race, gender, and nation in the British archipelago in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.  Along with the texts listed above, we will read poems by Dylan Thomas, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Basil Bunting, Ted Hughes, Roy Fisher, Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy, Paul Muldoon, Jackie Kay, Caroline Bergvall, Maggie O'Sullivan, Geoffrey Hill, Grace Nichols, Don Paterson, and Linton Kwesi Johnson.


Topics in American Studies: Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: Little Women; Aldrich, Thomas: The Story of a Bad Boy; Alger, Horatio: Ragged Dick; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Twain, Mark: Pudd'nhead Wilson; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Wiggin, Kate : Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Other Readings and Media

I plan to screen a few films of the pre-World War I era.

Description

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This is a period in which ordinary citizens felt that an economic and social revolution was taking place with the rise of industrial capitalism and urban transformations, creating a crisis of major cultural/political/economic rapid change.  Such a historical trauma seemed to demand difficult and painful reconsiderations and redefinitions. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity in the period, there  developed a problem about children and adolescents. Questions about boys and girls might be not only about gender definitions but also about the development of an ethical consciousness, what might be called everyday ethical coping.  Children seemed to represent the last vestige of a world that was being lost.  In the aftermath of the elevation of the importance of children in the Romantic era earlier in the century, in the U.S.,  the narratives of boys and girls gave artists the opportunity to observe, scrutinize, critique, and entertain.  There will be two papers and a final exam.

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E.


Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: Chicano Poetry--Text and Context

English 137T

Section: 1
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Description

We will open with "Yo soy Joaquin"/"I am Joaquin," Rodolfo 'Corky' Gonzalez's stirring political poem of 1968 that inspired a politically based literary output that dominated Chicano poetics for well over a decade and still stands squarely at the center of a great deal of Chicano poetry to the present day.  We will read poetry by Alurista, Ricardo Sanchez, Beatrice Zamora, Ana Castillo, Raul Salinas, Jose Montoya, Gary Soto, Pat Mora, Alfred Arteaga, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Gloria Anzaldua, Jimmy Santiago Baca. And we will also then read this poetry within the much wide context that includes the Beat Poets, the Black Arts Movement, Asian and Native American writers, and other poets of the contemporary American period.

While I haven't decided yet on texts for the class, many of the poems we read may well come directly from internet sources quite simply because so many publications of the Chicano Movement are out of print.  Of course, we will read the significant criticism on Chicano poetry by Juan Bruce Novoa, Tey Diana Rebolledo,  Rafael Perez-Torres, Jose Limon, Alfred Arteaga, Gloria Anzaldua, and other scholars and writers.

 


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Writing Fiction, Drama, and Poetry

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 30 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Hemon, Aleksander: Best European Fiction 2011

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, to be purchased at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Vikram Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 35 Evans


Book List

eds. R. V. Cassil & Joyce Carol Oates: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction (Second Addition)

Description

This limited-enrollment workshop will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of short fiction.  Permission of instructor is required. 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 12-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Bharati Mukherjee's (a.k.a. B. Blaise) mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

course reader

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision.  Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, but with an eye and ear to renovating traditions.  I have no “house style” and only one precept:  you can do anything, if you can do it.  You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss five or so in rotation (I’ll respond to every poem you write).  On alternate days, we’ll discuss recent illustrative poems drawn from our course reader.  If the past is any guarantee, the course will make you a better poet.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to John Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Long Narrative: The Short Novel

English 143C

Section: 1
Instructor: Alarcon, Daniel
Alarcon, Daniel
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Bolaño, R: Distant Star; Brennan, M: The Visitor; Carson, A: Autobiography of Red; Chekhov, A: The Complete Short Novels; Garcia Marquez, G: Chronicle of a Death Foretold; Hammet, D: The Big Knockover; Himes, C: Cotton Comes to Harlem; Kis, D: Garden, Ashes; Le, T: The Gangster We Are All Looking For; Lispector, C: The Hour of the Star; Roth, J: Flight Without End; Roth, P: The Prague Orgy; Torres, J: We the Animals; West, N: The Day of the Locust/Miss Lonely Hearts

Description

In this class, we’ll be reading and discussing various novels under 150 pages from a diverse group of authors. The point is to take a close look at a text of manageable size, paying attention to its structure – how the author manages to tell the story. We’ll analyze pacing, scene selection, point of view, and other aspects of style. In addition, the class will be composing collectively a short novel of our own, using this piece to put into practice the things we’ll learn along the way about plot, tone and character.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Daniel Alarcon's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Danticat, E.: The Best American Essays 2011

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in the assigned anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each) and two new essays (10-20 pages each). 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction, along with an application form, to Georgina Kleege's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction: The Essay

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This will be a course in the essay, and it is designed to help students who are writing an undergraduate thesis-length paper. We will begin by getting acquainted with various kinds of essays—narrative and descriptive, personal and research-based, critical and analytical, etc.—and finding the forms that would best suit the individual students’ projects.  Class time for most of the semester will be devoted to workshops, in which we read and respond to students’ writing as they complete their prospectuses, organizational plans, and various drafts.  Students will learn how to recognize and rectify stylistic, organizational, logical, and rhetorical problems.   Several short exercises will be required during the semester, and a twenty-page paper will be due at its end. 

The only assigned text will be a Class Reader of published essays.      

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your original nonfiction, along with an application form, to Catherine Gallagher's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction: Traveling, Thinking, Writing

English 143N

Section: 3
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 35 Evans


Description

Book List: Students should come to class before buying books. The list will likely include some of the following: Basho’s Back Roads to Far Towns (translated by Cid Corman); Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; Tete-Michel Kpomassie’s An African in Greenland; Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing; Robert Michael Pyle’s Where Bigfoot Walks. We’ll also read excerpts from Travel Writing: 1700-1830 (Ian Duncan and Elizabeth Bohls); Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing (Farrah Griffin and Cheryl Fish); and items from the popular press.

Course Description: Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adventures in Europe and Africa; Canadian writer Gladys Hindmarch takes on Melville with her Watery Part of the World and Zora Neale Hurston travels to Haiti in Tell My Horse and through the American south in Mules and Men. 

The point of this course is multiple and full of inquiry.

The 
familiar question, “Is this trip necessary?”, is joined to “What makes this trip important enough to 
celebrate?” 

Another field is the role of Americans and/ or Westerners as travelers in the world. (I’d note that the world is both within and beyond our national boundaries.) What things are we heir to? What are our responsibilities and blindnesses? What’s the relation between the imperial West and our current situation? The point in this—and any writing—is to write consciously and to be mindful of the political import of our writing. 

A third field is the defining of the relation between travel and place (and imagination).



Workshop.  Discussions.  Reading.  Writing assignments.  Field trips.  The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay (with some forays outward into hybrid prose/ poetry forms).

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction, along with an application form, to Cecil Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Poetry Translation Workshop

English 143T

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a workshop course in the translation of poetry. Participants need to be at least moderately competent in some language other than English. All of the work will involve translating from other languages into English. Participants will be expected to submit some work each week--an original text, a word-for-word translation, and their work in literary translation. Then the class proceeds like a creative writing workshop. Participants present their work, talk a bit about difficulties they've had with getting something over from one language into another, and give each other feedback. There will be a reader with examples of translation practice and theory, and enough reading to give participants some sense of the history of lyric poetry from the beginnings of writing to the present.

Admission will be by permission of the instructor, based on (1) five to eight pages of your own translations of poems into English, as well as the corresponding pages in the original language or original poems or a combination of the two, as well as a brief statement (no more than a sentence or two) describing the translation project you hope to work on, (2) a one-paragraph statement of your interest in translation, and (3) an application form; all of the above is to be submitted to Professor Hass's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 35 Evans


Description

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, practices, and inspiration from other academic disciplines.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical schools: formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, identity politics, and post-colonialism.  We will examine the differences in value and method that define these approaches and also consider the ways critical traditions retool themselves in response to internal or external debate and critique.  Our abiding concern will be to ask what counts as “the literary” for each theorist and what is the role and function of literature in each argument.  Sometimes the literary will be defined explicitly, other times it will be represented by the exemplary literary texts each school enlists in its theoretical enterprise.

To develop skills as close readers of theory, students will write two short papers (7-8 pages each).  Students will also complete a take-home final, which will give the opportunity for synthetic thinking.

This course is open to senior English majors only.


Special Topics: The Pisan and Later Cantos of Ezra Pound

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Pound, Ezra: The Cantos of Ezra Pound

Other Readings and Media

Additionally, there will be class handouts, online text, audio, and video works, etc.

Description

This course will look at one of the most influential and controversial poets of the 20th century, Ezra Pound. Beginning with the Pisan, we'll study the rest of the Cantos of Ezra Pound during the course of a single semester. That means a lot of difficult reading and some serious writing. To prepare for this effort, each student is encouraged to read the earlier Cantos before attending class.

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate the great work of this ur-force in modern poetry and culture. We’ll look at his ideogrammic technique and how this presentation helped register his wide ranging ideas about language, knowledge, myth and religion, economics, history, politics, society, and ecology. Since his work was informed by so many sources, contexts, and difficulties, it necessarily opens this course up to many diverse areas of consideration and student orientation.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Race, Literature, and the Archive

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 35 Evans


Book List

Chesnutt , Charles: Conjure Woman & Other Stories of the Color Line; Hopkins, Pauline: Of One Blood: Or, the Hidden Self: ; Wright, Richard: 12 Million Black Voices

Description

In this course we will read works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writing that engage with what we might call extra-literary modes of documenting racial difference. Drawing on insights from comparative media studies and critical race theory, we will ask how literature “archives” race in communication with developments in both the social sciences (anthropology, sociology, and musicology) and media technology (sound recording, photography, and film). From the earliest transcriptions of African American spirituals to ethnographies and novels of the colonial periphery, our readings explore how archives actually construct what they preserve—simultaneously documenting and producing social and cultural difference along lines of race.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Self Creation--Confession, Memoir, Autobiography

English 165

Section: 4
Instructor: Danner, Mark
Danner, Mark
Time: M 3-6
Location: 300 Wheeler


Description

In confession we create the self. Confession is premised on truth - ultimate truth, the truth that exposes everyday truth as pretense, pose and mendacity. To create a confession is to create a new self: a self cleansed, reborn, redeemed. To create a portrait built entirely on the pretense of ultimate truth demands an entirely other category of lie. The "true life" confession - generally a tale of dysfunction, alcoholic, chemical, sexual - and the ancillary pursuit of exposing its accompanying falsehoods, is arguably our most popular form of contemporary literature. These constructions, from confession to memoir to autobiography, have their own traditions and we will seek to analyze and trace them in this seminar, while now and then trying our hand at a bit of self creation. Readings will be drawn from, among others, Augustine, Rousseau, Franklin, Newman, Mill, DeQuincey, Adams, Stein, Lawrence, Kafka, Levi, Nabokov, Harrison, Malcolm, Eggers, Karr and Richards. Along with the reading there will be some constructing of confessions, truthful, mendacious and fanciful.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Specters of the Atlantic

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Book List

Austen: Mansfield Park; Brathwaite: The Arrivants; Brodber, Erna: Myal; Bronte: Jane Eyre; Hartman, Saidiya: Lose Your Mother; Mackey, Nathaniel: Bedouin Hornbook; McCraney, Tarrell Alvin: The Brother/Sister Plays; Morrison: Beloved; Philip, M. Nourbese: Zong; Rhys, Jean: Wide Sargasso Sea

Description

This section of English 166 has been canceled.


Special Topics: Narrating the Nation

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 210 Wheeler


Book List

Coetzee, J: Disgrace; Danticat, E: The Dew Breaker; Diaz, J: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Fitzgerald, F. S.: The Great Gatsby; Flaubert, G: Madame Bovary; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Mukherjee, B: Jasmine; Rushdie, S: Shame; Smith, Z: White Teeth

Description

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Performance

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 159 Mulford


Description

                "Race is not only real, but also illusory. Not only is it common sense; it is also common nonsense. Not only does it establish our identity; it also denies us our identity."

 — Howard Winant

"Each society demands of its members a certain amount of acting. 

The ability to present, represent, and act what one actually is."

— Hannah Arendt

This course is two courses wrapped up in one. First, it offers a selected history of major innovations in American popular culture of the last hundred years — from the origins of the American culture industries in blackface minstrelsy, ragtime, and jazz to the development of the Hollywood studio system, rock 'n' roll, soul music, and the "New Hollywood."

Second, it tells that first very large story through America's unique history of crossracial and crossethnic interplay. Why, we might ask, is the story of the US so often told through stories of interracial dependency or conflict, whether it's the story of American colonists dressing up as Indians at the Boston Tea Party, Little Eva blessing Uncle Tom, or Elvis or Eminem borrowing from the 'other side of the tracks'? Following this line of inquiry, we will trace America's history through the development of structures of inequity and opportunity that define our social history, and through the development of complicated race-inflected stories of camaraderie, rivalry, beset virtue, and desire that often define our national fantasy life.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature and Sexual Identity: Sex & Race in Postcolonial London

English 171

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Book List

Hollinghurst, Alan: The Swimming-Pool Library; MacInnes, Colin: City of Spades; Salkey, Andrew: Escape to an Autumn Pavement; Selvon, Sam: The Lonely Londoners; Shelagh, Delaney: The Taste of Honey; Waters, Sarah: The Night Watch;

Recommended: Hollinghurst, Alan: The Line of Beauty; Kureishi, Hanif: The Buddha of Suburbia

Description

This course has been canceled.


Literature and Popular Culture: The Promised Land--Representations of Confidence, Trust, Belief, and Faith in Nineteenth Century American Literature, Religion, and Patent Medicine Advertising

English 176

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 210 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A Course Reader

Description

In the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), Ralph Waldo Emerson observed that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .”  In the August 1849 issue of The Literary World, Evert Duyckinck, a prominent American biographer and publisher, argued that “It is not the worst thing that can be said of a country that it gives birth to a confidence man. . . .  It is a good thing, and speaks well for human nature, that . . . men can be swindled.”  We will explore research questions that emerge from studying the appearance — and the appeal — of various versions of “the confidence man” in the literature and popular culture of pre- and post-Civil War America.  At once a celebrant of shared belief and faith as well as an agent for exploiting assurance and trust, the confidence man trades on the ambiguities of self-representation and imaginative authority in the cultural transaction of making audiences believe.

We will consider expressions of what I call the “promissory tradition” in American literature and culture from, especially as it is expressed in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, and the pragmatism of William James.  We will also spend considerable time reading and discussing Edgar Allen Poe’s fascination with hoaxes and the art of “diddling,” as well as grappling with issues of identity and duplicity in Herman Melville’s complex and disquieting novel, The Confidence Man, in which Melville discovers that “the great art of telling truth” may well best be practiced by telling lies.  We will also examine expressions of this tradition in the popular culture of the period, ranging from the celebrated humbugs of P. T. Barnum to the ubiquitous appeals of evangelical religion and patent medicine advertising.

This course is open to English majors only.


Autobiography: Disability Memoir

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Chaney, T.: Manic: A Memoir; Danqua, Meri Nana-Ama: Willow Weep for Me; Galloway, T.: Mean Little Deaf Queer; Grandin, T.: Thinking in Pictures; Grealy, L.: Autobiography of a Face; Hathaway, K.: The Little Locksmith; Hockenberry, J.: Moving Violations; Keller, H.: The World I Live In; Kingsley & Levitz, J. & M.: Count Us In; Laborit, E.: The Cry of the Gull

Description

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these texts because they tend to reinforce the notion that disability is a personal tragedy that must be overcome through superhuman effort, rather than a set of cultural conditions that could be changed to accommodate a wide range of individuals with similar impairments.  Are these texts agents for social change or merely another form of freak show?  In this course, we will examine a diverse selection of disability memoirs and consider both what they reveal about cultural attitudes toward disability and what they have in common with other forms of autobiography. 


The Epic

English 180E

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 126 Barrows


Book List

Ciardi, J: Dante's Inferno; Fagles, R: Aeneid; Fagles, R: Iliad; Fagles, R: Odyssey; Hollander, R: Dante's Paradiso; Joyce, J: Ulysses; Milton, John: Paradise Lost

Description

This course will be team-taught by Professors Altieri and Nolan. Our primary concern is to read carefully and discuss intensely most of the major epics in Western European literature. We love these texts and we are convinced that students will find the substantial reading well worthwhile. We love each text as its own encounter with history. And we love how epics use their predecessors to understand the historical tasks that face them. In the epic, some of the finest minds in our culture engage each other in highly concrete, imaginatively interesting ways. These adventures are worth pursuing because they produce intense and rich human situations, and because—after centuries have passed—they still challenge readers in profoundly complex ways. The epic demands that we find languages for what it accomplishes, a task that calls on all of our mental and psychological resources. Anything that presents Western culture at its best, and gives a chance for professors and students to be at their best, promises to be a unique and possibly mind-blowing experience.  We will read the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, the Inferno and the Paradiso, Paradise Lost, and about ½ of Ulysses.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 

 


Science Fiction: Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

English 180Z

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Capek, Karol: R.U.R; Dick, Philip: Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep; Hoffman, E.T.A.: The Tales of Hoffman; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Mieville, China: Perdido Street Station; Wells, , H.G.: The Island of Doctor Moreau

Other Readings and Media

Children of Men; Gattaca; The Matrix; Pumzi

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature’s encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation stand the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of ‘being’, a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. 


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Tanemura, Janice
Tanemura, Janice
Time:
Location:


Book List

Hayslip, Le Ly: When Heaven and Earth Changed Places; Abbey, Edward: The Monkey Wrench Gang; Bambara, Toni Cade : The Salt Eaters; Coetzee, J. M. : The Lives of Animals; Leopold, Aldo: A Sand County Almanac; Ozeki, Ruth : All Over Creation; Santos Perez, Craig: From Unincorporated Territory; Viramontes, Helena Maria : Under the Feet of Jesus

Description

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Yeats, Joyce, & Beckett

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Krapp's Last Tape and Other Dramatic Pieces; Beckett, Samuel: Nohow On: Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, Worstward Ho; Beckett, Samuel: Watt; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Yeats, W.B.: The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats

Other Readings and Media

A handful of critical essays will be available online and/or in a small course reader.

Description

This course will focus on the major writings by this trio of Irish modernists.  We will think about the ways in which these writers fit into and challenge international canons of modernist literature, about the Irish attachments and conditions inscribed in their works, and about the significant formal and generic innovations that each undertook.  We’ll start with Yeats’ poetry, spend much of the middle part of the semester on Joyce’s Ulysses (with a few glances at Finnegans Wake), turn back to Yeats’ late poetry, and finally work through several of Beckett’s key texts.  I will assume familiarity with Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, so please be sure to read them before the course begins.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Nonsense

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Carroll, L.: The Annotated Alice; Lear, E.: The Complete Nonsense; Seuss, Dr.: Horton Hatches the Egg; Seuss, Dr.: Your Favorite Seuss

Description

This course will explore the relationship between two characteristics of these classic works of nonsense literature for children. One is their foregrounding of linguistic form, shared with language games and of obvious special interest to children learning language.  The other is their backgrounding of conventional linguistic meaning, allowing not only overt creation of imagined worlds but also covert critique of real ones, including educational practices, class distinctions, imperialism, capitalism and even philology.  

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: American Gothic

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 203 Wheeler


Book List

Brown, C.B.: Weiland; Crevecoeur, H.: Letters from an American Farmer; Hawthorne, N.: Young Goodman Brown and Other Short Stories; Melville, H.: Bartelby and Benito Cereno; Morrison, T.: Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination; Poe, E. A.: The Goldbug and Other Stories; Poe, E.A.: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym; Sansay, L.: The Secret History, of the Horrors of St. Domingue

Description

In this course, we will study the Gothic tradition in American literature from the aftermath of the Revolution to the cusp of the Civil War.  We will explore how and why the dark energies of the Gothic imagination haunted our national literature, and what was particularly American about the genre's form and the shadows it cast.  We will trace the historical connections between Gothic fiction and nationalism, religion, gender, race, slavery, and historical memory, as well as theoretical issues concerning the disjuctive self, the uncanny, possession and dispossession, and fragmented subjectivity.  Students will practice critical writing and research methodologies throughout the semester, and will produce a 20 page research paper at the semester's end. Authors will include Crevecoeur, Brown, Sansay, Irving, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and Poe.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Historical Novel

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Flaubert, Gustave: A Sentimental Education; Pynchon, Thomas: Mason & Dixon; Scott, Walter: Waverley, or ‘Tis Sixty Years Since; Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace

Description

A survey of the historical novel.  This course covers a selection of major examples of the genre, focusing on its development in the nineteenth century in Great Britain, France, and Russia, and concluding with a contemporary American representative.  Over the semester we will interrogate these texts from a number of angles: How are individuals situated within the sweep of history?  How do the fictional and historical elements function in relation to one other?  What kinds of authority does each mode possess?  To what extent is anachronism present, and is it ever a virtue?  Students will be expected to read up to 200 pages per week and to write a 20-page research paper.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Clases for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Moby-Dick

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick

Description

Baroque, intense, and demanding, Moby-Dick richly rewards all the attention a reader can muster. We will delve in as slowly as we can in order to cultivate the intellectual receptivity that Melville hoped for in his readers, becoming attuned to the subtle implications that he used to build his fictional universe. We will emphasize how the book’s form is caught up in the philosophical, political, and spiritual issues that moved Melville to write, but class discussion will be open to any pertinent issue. Two ten page essays and regular attendance and participation will be required.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of Racial Passing

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 51 Evans


Description

A passing narrative is an account—fiction or nonfiction—of a person (or group) claiming a racial or ethnic identity that she does not (or they do not) “possess.”  Such narratives speak—directly, indirectly, and very uneasily—to the authenticity, the ambiguity, and the performance of personal identity; they also speak to issues of official and traditional categorization.  The passing 
narrative—the narrative that accounts for making the “different” claim—necessarily unsettles notions of belonging and ownership and underscores that race can be viewed as a construction or a series of conventions.

The course will investigate the public nature of race by examining narratives—published and unpublished stories, novels, memoirs, and films—that call the absoluteness of its boundaries into question.  We’ll look as well at texts that treat racial and sexual imitation—minstrelsy, “yellow-face,” drag, etc.  All said, we’ll be looking rather closely at books and movies that reveal, document, question, and celebrate ambiguous spaces in an imposing structure, one often assumed to be “natural.”

We’ll likely read Karen Brodkin’s How Jews Became White Folks, James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Nella Larsen’s Passing, Philip Roth’s The Human Stain, Gene Yang’s American-Born Chinese, Kenji Yoshino’s Covering, essays by Gloria Anzaldua, Noel Ignatiev, Henry Louis Gates, etc.  Films will probably include Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil, Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Alien: Resurrection, Louis King’s Charlie Chan in Egypt, Alan Crosland’s The Jazz Singer, etc.

Position papers, discussions led by class members, possible midterm, final 12-15 page writing project involving research.  Hybrid projects are welcome and encouraged.

The book list is tentative.  Students should come to class before buying books.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Medieval English Poetry

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Lankin, Andrea
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 54 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Course reader containing Malcolm Andrew and Ronald Waldron. ed., Pearl, Bella Millet, ed., Harley Lyrics, Rosemary Allen, ed., King Horn, David Burnley and Allison Wiggins, ed., Sir Orfeo and The King of Tars, selections from Thomas Wright, Political Poems and Songs from Edward III to Richard II, selections from other Middle English and multilingual English lyric collections, assorted influential and recent medieval verse criticism

Description

The poetry of medieval England, often witty, sometimes moving, occasionally shocking, and frequently creative in form, style and use of language, has inspired poets including Seamus Heaney, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. We will be exploring the form, style and content of Middle English poetry and multilingual poems of medieval England. Comparing the layout of medieval poems on their original manuscript pages to their modern editions, we will consider what kind of layout best suits the poems and what we may learn from manuscript structures. In a translation project, all students will have the opportunity to bring the features of medieval poetry which they value in Middle English into modern English. There will also be regular reading responses and a final research paper.

We will read most texts in the original Middle English. Some poems of medieval England are written in Latin, French, or even a combination of Latin, French and English; poetry in languages other than Middle English will always be printed alongside extensive glossing or translation. Previous enrollment in English 45a or in another Middle English literature class is welcome, but not required; no prior knowledge of Middle English is necessary for this class.

A course reader containing printed copies of all of the class readings will be available. We will also be using online scholarly editions, so students should plan to use campus computer labs or personal computers, netbooks or tablets in order to prepare for class.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Emily Dickinson

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Dickinson, Emily: Selected Letters; Dickinson, Emily: The Poems of Emily Dickinson

Other Readings and Media

course reader

Description

This is an intensive reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson.  We will also read poems and essays by her contemporaries (e.g., Emerson, Longfellow, Helen Hunt).  Topics include early poems and prosody, love and gender, definition and riddle, poetics, nature, religion, death and dying, poems in manuscript packets and in letters; suspense, horror, loneliness; pain and despair; self in society and by itself, war, abolition, gender, poetics; late poems and letters.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mark Twain

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 479 Bancroft Library


Description

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain's most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he left unpublished). The class will have ready access to the Mark Twain Papers, whose extensive primary and secondary resources students are encouraged to take advantage of for their research. One brief oral report (as the basis for class discussion) and one research paper, due at the end of the term.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mass Entertainment in 1930s Hollywood

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: new room: 237 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Most of the movies for the course will be available for rent or purchase from iTunes or Amazon Instant Video.  You will be able to view all of them for free at the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.

Texts for discussion will be posted on bSpace whenever possible; for texts that cannot be posted, there will be a Course Reader.

Description

Hollywood movies have always been treated as examples of mass entertainment, but rarely as analyses of the phenomenon.  We'll be exploring a wide range of 1930s Hollywood film -- from gangster pictures to cartoons, musicals, comedies, melodramas, and westerns -- to see how these movies represent mass culture and their own place within it.  We'll also compare the movies to contemporaneous accounts of mass entertainment and mass culture by such theorists as Walter Benjamin, Clement Greenberg, Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, and Edward Bernays.  And finally, we'll consider film in relation to other contemporaneous forms of mass entertainment such as the newspaper, radio, and (in its infancy) television.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Henry James

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Freedman, J.: The Cambridge Companion to Henry James; James, H.: Hawthorne; James, H.: What Maisie Knew; James, H. : Tales of Henry James; James, H. : The Ambassadors; James, H. : The Portrait of a Lady; James, H. : The Spoils of Poynton; James, H. : The Turn of the Screw

Description

We will read novels, shorter fiction, and essays written by Henry James across his career and also analyses of James’s work, and we will consider how James has become a central figure for rethinking literary criticism, especially for those interested in aesthetics, ethics, and the fates of historicism and of close reading.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Cultures of Realism in Postwar Britain

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Ballard, J: High Rise; Berger, J: A Painter of Our Time; Delaney, S: A Taste of Honey; Dunn, N: Up the Junction; Greene, G: The End of the Affair; Lessing, D: In Pursuit of the English; Naipul, V: The Mimic Men; Orwell, G: The Road to Wigan Pier; Peake, M: Titus Groan; Selvon, S: The Lonely Londoners; Waugh, E: The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold; Wilson, A: Anglo-Saxon Attitudes

Description

This course traces transformations in British literary culture in the two decades following the Second World War.  Toward that end we'll read a diverse set of writings, emphasizing prose narrative in genres including documentary, social comedy,  science fiction, and the novel of ideas. The thread connecting this disparate body of texts is their shared preoccupation with realism -- albeit with attitudes ranging  from an earnest embrace of its progressive aspirations to a caustic debunking of such pretensions. We'll use this as a framework to examine a set of linked issues: literary explorations of the rise of the welfare state and the new social dynamics it provokes; reckonings with the political and aesthetic legacies of the interwar years; and the emergence of a new body of postcolonial writing. Your work in the course will culminate in a research paper on a topic of your own devising.

The announced booklist for the course is tentative and subject to change. It will be supplemented by a course reader on bSpace, featuring readings in poetry, criticism, social commentary, and reportage. I also hope to schedule at least two screenings: the landmark television docudrama Cathy Come Home (dir. Ken Loach, 1966) and a 2004 episode of the TV "dramedy" Shameless.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of California & the West Since WWI

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: Thurs. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Chandler, R: The Big Sleep; Dick, P: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J: Slouching Toward Bethlehem; Stegner, W: The Angle of Repose; Steinbeck, J: The Long Valley; Steinbeck, J: The Pastures of Heaven; West, N: The Day of the Locust

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books listed, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. poetry by R. Jeffers, W. Everson, J. Spicer, T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Film Noir

English 190

Section: 16
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M., + films W 7-10 P. M.
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Kaplan, E. : Women in Film Noir ; Martin, R.: Mean Streets and Raging Bulls ; Naremore, J.: More than Night: Film Noir in its Contexts; Silver & Ursini, editors: Film Noir Reader 4

Description

We will examine film noir’s influence on neo-noir and its relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area.  The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and masculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by D. A. Miller in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Miller will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Joanna Picciotto in Fall 2011. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor PIcciotto will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Graduate Readings: Literature & the Science of the Feelings, 1740-1819

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: M 3-6
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Burke, Edmund: Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (Oxford World's Classics); Coleridge, S. T.: Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The Major Works (Oxford World Classics); Darwin, Erasmus: The Temple of Nature; Hume, David: A Treatise of Human Nature (Oxford Philosophical Texts); Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein (Norton Critical Editions); Smith, Adam: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence); Smith, Charlotte: The Poems of Charlotte Smith (ed. Curran); Williams, Raymond: Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society; Wordsworth and Coleridge (ed Gamer and Porter): Lyrical Ballads, 1798 and 1800 (Broadview Edition)

Other Readings and Media

A Course Reader (probably two volumes).  Many of our texts are uncollected or appear in collections of which they are too small a part for me to ask you to purchase them.

Description

William Wordsworth’s 1800 declaration that poetry “is the history or science of feelings” cuts many ways, as such genitive constructions often do.  His phrase alludes both to the contemporary human and life sciences that made the feelings their object of study and to the peculiar “science” or epistemology that the feelings may possess. It also promises a historical account of sensation and emotion, and it points to the feelings as a site of historical experience.  This course will take up each of these angles by studying the variously oppositional and appositional relations between literature (primarily but not exclusively poetry) and several sciences during the later eighteenth century and Romantic periods in Britain, as pressures from global expansion, the revolution in France, and other aspects of modernity conspired to release feelings in excess of individual agency, personal identity, and available modes of cognition.  Weekly topics will include, among other concerns: sympathy and the vagrancy of the passions, association psychology and materialism, empiricist aesthetic theory, chemistry and revolution, literature as experiment, geology and memory, physician-poets and poetic physicians.

We will read – selected, combined, and juxtaposed – texts by the following writers: Anna Barbauld, Charles Bell, Edmund Burke, S.T. Coleridge, William Cullen, Erasmus Darwin, David Hartley, David Hume, James Hutton, John Keats, Joseph Priestley, Adam Smith, Percy and Mary Shelley, Charlotte Smith, and William Wordsworth.  Within the constraints of time, we will also take the measure of developments in the study of literature and science, as well as in the history of emotions, including work by Michel Foucault, Bruno Latour, Alan Bewell, Maureen McLane, Noel Jackson, and others.


Graduate Readings: Struggling With Consolation--Reading Boethius in Anglo-Saxon England

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Boethius: The Theological Tractates; The Consolation of Phlosophy. With an English translation by H. F. Stewart, E. K. Rand, and S. J. Tester;

Recommended: Clark Hall, J. R. : A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary

Other Readings and Media

PDF of Sedgefield's edition available at:

http://ia600201.us.archive.org/17/items/kingalfreds00boetuoft/kingalfreds00boetuoft.pdf

Other materials will be available on b-Space and through the library's electronic resources.

Description

This course has a double aim: to explore the reception of Boethius’s De consolatione Philosophiae in Anglo-Saxon England and to do so by engaging one of the remarkable achievements of Anglo-Saxon translation, the Old English version of Boethius’s great work. One of the interests of the course will be the active ways in which the Old English translation modifies and rewrites Boethius’s text, incorporating Anglo-Saxon ways of knowing into the sixth-century text. And it will also attend to how the text has been ‘made,’ from the two surviving medieval manuscripts, to Junius’s proto-edition, and the succession of printed editions since. In thinking about the commentary tradition, we will explore what glosses may tell us about the reception of the text. Our work with the manuscripts, glosses, and early printed texts will also attend to the visual dimensions of meaning. Students should  read the Consolation of Philosophy as a preliminary to the class. Pre-requisite: completion of Introduction to Old English OR Medieval Latin OR permission of the instructor.

Requirements:  daily engagement with the text, one or two class presentations, a short experimental paper (aimed at trying out the idea for the final paper), a final paper of 15-20 pages. Topics will be chosen in consultation with the professor.


Graduate Readings: Politics of Death, Cultural Regenerations

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul\n& Pandolfo, Stefania
Time: W 3-6
Location: 258 Dwinelle


Book List

Butler, Octavia: Kindred; Jones, Gayl: Corregidora; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland

Description

This course will be jointly taught by Abdul JanMohamed (English) and Stefania Pandolfo (Anthropology), and it is cross-listed with Anthropology 250X section 6.

This seminar is a two-voice reflection on violence, death, subjugation, and the problem of emancipation and cultural regeneration. It is conceived as a dialogue between two archives––two historical, philosophical and experiential sites where we see these questions as urgently formulated. On one side the history of slavery and the racialization of violence in the US, with the transmission of a “death-bound” subjectivity and the burning question of how to think the possibility of regeneration in the midst of the reproduction of death; on the other the experiences and vocabularies of subjectivity, trauma, oppression, death, violence and regeneration in Islam and in the contemporary Middle East.  In our bi-focal intervention we will draw on readings from Marxian, psychoanalytic, phenomenological, anthropological, and political-theological theoretical approaches, critical theories of melancholy and memory, as well as from anthropological accounts of life, death, destruction and the afterlife emerging from Arab and Islamic tradition, attempting to find a ground for the re-thinking of the relationship of catastrophic loss, subjectivity, transmission, and the regeneration of culture.

1. We will focus on the effects of racialized violence, and in particular the threat of death (periodically buttressed by actual lynchings) on the formation of black subjectivity.  In the aftermath of JanMohamed’s Death-Bound-Subject, we will be concentrating on the effects of such threats on the processes of biological and cultural reproduction.  How does death-bound-subjectivity reproduce its own formation from one generation to the next, how does it permeate the formation of young children from the beginning of their lives, and what can the parents do to resist such reproduction?  How does hegemony ensure the reproduction of received relations of violence and death, and what kind of resistance is efficacious against hegemony’s attempt to reproduce itself?  Such questions will be taken up via close examination of four black feminist novels that explore the topic in fascinating ways. 

2. We will pursue these questions through select literary and ethnographic works addressing the problem of traumatic transmission, violence, and melancholy in colonial and decolonial Maghreb.  Against this background we will examine documents from the recent revolutionary events in the Maghreb and Middle East, with particular reference to the adjoining place of the risk of death and cultural regeneration--acts situated at the ambiguous and morally troubled border of struggle, suicide and testimony, and that are received and mourned in their communities and across the region as gestures opening onto a space of the gift, in the collective struggle for the reclaiming of life. Finally, through the examination of religious sources in the Islamic ethical and eschatological tradition of thinking and practicing on death (al-Ghazali), as well as modernist theological engagements with the problem of subjugation, falsification of a tradition, and witnessing/martyrdom, we will outline the elements of a reflection on destruction, death, imagination and regeneration in counterpoint.

Primary readings will include: Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Alice Walker’s Third Life of Grange Copeland, Gayl Jones’ Corregidor, and Octavia Butler’s Kindred and her short story, “Bloodchild,”  Kateb Yacine’s Nedjma, J. Lacan The Ethics of Psychoanalysis (selected chapters), A. Feldman, Formations of Violence,Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, The Remembrance of Death and the Afterlife, Ali Shariati, “Jihad and Shahadat”.  We will also use an archive of documents about the current uprisings in the Middle East, and selections from A. JanMohamed’s The Death-Bound-Subject and S. Pandolfo’s Knot of the Soul.

Additional readings will include selections from:  N. Abraham and M. Torok, Jessica Benjamin, Walter Block, Judith Butler, Patricia Hill Collins, V. Crapanzano, V. Das, J. Derrida, Frantz Fanon, Lisa Guenther, W.G.F Hegel, M. Heidegger, A. Kojeve, J. Lacan, John Locke, A. Mbembe, Jennifer Morgan, David Marriot, Darieck Scott, Dorothy Roberts, Hortense Spiller, and others.


Graduate Readings: British Novel--1800-1900

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: W 3-6
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Bronte, Charlotte: Shirley; Collins, Wilkie: The Moonstone; Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Edgeworth, Maria: Castle Rackrent and Ennui; Eliot, George: Daniel Deronda; Gaskell, Elizabeth: North and South; Hardy, Thomas: The Mayor of Casterbridge; Hogg, James: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner ; Scott, Walter: Old Mortality

Description

Reading and discussion of a selection of major nineteenth-century British novels.  We will bring large questions to bear on one another, concerning: the worlds and communities the novel aims to represent and to address (region or province; nation; empire; the world; “the condition of England”); different scales of history (personal and family histories; local, national and world histories; natural history / the history of the race or species); developing technologies and sites of narration (first-person memoir, chronicle, confession; third-person modes of free indirect style and omniscient narration; narration from below or outside, by servants, criminals, women, ethnic and religious outsiders); the sub-genres of the novel (regional, domestic, historical, industrial, sensation fiction, etc.) and the novel’s incorporation of, and self-positioning in relation to, other genres, styles and formats (romance, history, allegory, drama, lyric, periodicals). We will attend to social and material histories of book production and reading, as well as to representative criticism.

Works will include:  Edgeworth, Maria: Castle Rackrent and Ennui; Scott, Walter: Old Mortality; Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Hogg, James: The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Bronte, Charlotte: Shirley; Gaskell, Elizabeth: North and South; Collins, Wilkie: The Moonstone; Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Eliot, George: Daniel Deronda; Hardy, Thomas: The Mayor of Casterbridge


Chaucer: Early Poetry and the Troilus and Criseyde

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Benson, Larry D. : The Riverside Chaucer; Chaucer, Geoffrey: Troilus and Criseyde

Description

This course studies all Chaucer's majors works before the Canterbury Tales. About the first third of the semester will use the earlier works--the Book of the Duchess and the Parliament of Fowls especially--to introduce Middle English "philology," in the old, broad sense of that word: the texture and logic of the language and its textual settings, the literary possibilities available within those, and the forms of convention and innovation, and the tools for studying all these things. It will also, inevitably, spend some time thinking about literary history. The remaining weeks will give detailed study to the Troilus and Criseyde, Chaucer's greatest and most important work, and to the stages by which he developed the idea for the Canterbury Tales.


Readings in Middle English: The Auchinleck Manuscript

English 212

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: W 3-6
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All the material for this course is available online at the National Library of Scotland's Auchinleck Manuscript website (http://auchinleck.nls.uk/).  Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the website before the course begins.

Description

This course will consider a wide range of Middle English writing through examination of a single manuscript book surviving to us from the early fourteenth-century:  Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates' MS 19.2.1, now known as 'The Auchinleck Manuscript', first brought to public attention in 1804 when Sir Walter Scott published an edition of one of its texts.  The manuscript, produced by a number of scribes working in tandem and by design, is central to our construction of a Middle English literary corpus, containing as it does the earliest surviving versions of many Middle English texts and, in many cases, the only surviving versions.  Growing out of the multilingual book-world of the previous century (in which Latin, Anglo-Norman French and English share space on the page and throughout the book, implying readers comfortable with code-switching and reading across multiple native vernaculars), the Auchinleck Manuscript is especially remarkable in its monolingualism (it is virtually English-only), a monolingualism reiterated in the disciplinary divides of our national language departments.  Where did this book come from? for whom was it produced? what does it aim to accomplish or project?  The course will provide introductory access to Middle English literature while wrestling with the larger theoretical and cultural issues implicated by the Auchinleck Manuscript's peculiar features.  Medievalists are, of course, welcome, but a particular invitation is extended to those working in Romantic and post-Romantic medievalisms, in post-colonialism and emerging nationalisms, in the history of the language or the relation of language to ethnicity, and to those interested in the dialogue of text and image--since the Auchinleck Manuscript deviates from its predecessors, too, in supplying images (some of them now excised or erased--a trace of Protestant iconoclasm?) to accompany the works it anthologizes.  The course will, I hope, become a forum for mutually enlivening and enlightening discussion across our various fields of interest and expertise.


Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop: Like & Love

English 243N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas
Time: M 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

A graduate creative nonfiction writing workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three 10-20 page literary nonfiction pieces. Each will take as point of departure the words and emotions like or love. What’s liked or loved (or not) may include people, places, things. Each week, students will also turn in one-page critiques of the two or three student pieces being work-shopped as well as a 3-page journal entry on prompts assigned (these entries may be used as part of the longer pieces). Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques: 70-80. Class attendance: mandatory.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction, along with an application form, to Thomas Farber's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Research Seminar: Marxist Literary Theory

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 202 Wheeler


Book List

Adorno, T., et. al.: Aesthetics and Politics: The Key Texts of the Classic Debate Within German Marxism; Eagleton T. and Milne D., eds.: Marxist Literary Theory: A Reader; Jameson, F.: Marxism and Form: Twentieth-century Dialectical Theories of Literature; Sartre, J-P.: Search for a Method

Other Readings and Media

Course reader.

Description

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism.  "It does not seem to make much sense," he wrote, "to talk about the bankruptcy of Marxism, when Marxism is very precisely the science and the study of just that capitalism whose global triumph is affirmed in talk of Marxism's demise."  What we can infer from Jameson's comments is the idea that historically Marxism has been useful not only for the critique of social systems, but for the study of literature and culture, as well.  Two decades later—and with the political, economic and environmental contradictions of the "new world order" now in plain sight—critics might benefit once again from reassessing the appropriateness of Marxism for the study of literature and culture.  This course will provide the opportunity for such a reassessment by focusing on the ways that Marxist social thought in the past century has contributed to theories of literature and culture.  We will attempt to understand and theorize the relation between the material conditions of social life and aesthetic forms.  The goal of the course is to provide a broad introduction to the range of Marxist analysis and critique in contemporary literary and cultural studies.  In the first part of the course, we will read several classic works of Marxist cultural theory to ground our study historically.  In the second part of the course, driven partly by student concerns and interests, we will analyze the compatibility of Marxist literary theory with feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Research Seminar: Renaissance Things

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: new room: 50 Barrows


Book List

Brown, Bill, ed.: Things; Jonson, Ben: Alchemist and Other Plays; Latour, Bruno: We Have Never Been Modern; Marx, Karl: Capital, Volume I; Middleton, Thomas, et al.: The Roaring Girl; Nashe, Thomas: The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works; Shakespeare, William: Othello; Shakespeare, William: The Taming of the Shrew; Spenser, Edmund: The Faerie Queene

Other Readings and Media

The balance of the readings will be posted as .pdf to the class bSpace site.

Description

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the intellectual historian Jacob Burckhardt argued that the Renaissance marked the beginning of modern culture—an emergence which he defined as the disruption of medieval systems that had discouraged the differentiation of individuals from the social world by a new, dialectical relationship between the self-contained "subject" and a world perceived as a collection of "objects." This seminar will look directly at the long orthodoxy of subject-object relations as the modern-ness of early modernity, as well as at recent criticism of "material culture" that seeks to complicate or supplant that orthodoxy with different accounts of how the individual, the social, and the material impinged upon one another in the period. We'll be looking at a range of Tudor and Stuart texts that pay particular attention to things and stuffs, and seeing what extra-objective categories might emerge from them for expressing the material in discourse: "ekphrasis," for example, or "fetish." The biggest question I have in mind is what this engagement of materiality has to do with the theory of history—why should the narrative of modernity depend on the progress of the object from a material category into an epistemological axiom, objectivity? How might counterpoising "thing" to "object," and "Renaissance" to "early modern," help us to attend to historical problems of progress, periodization, and periodicity?


Research Seminar: Everyday Postcoloniality

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

Armah, A: The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born; Chaudhuri, A: Freedom Song; Chowdhury, S: Patna Roughcut; Cole, T: Open City; Danticat, E: The Dew Breaker; Dasgupta, R: Solo; Djebar, A: Women of Algiers in Their Apartments; Ekwensi, C: People of the City; Mpe, P: Welcome to Our Hillbrow; Munif, A: Cities of Salt; Tyrewala, A: No God in Sight

Description

One of the defining preoccupations of literary realism is the precise, penetrating depiction of everyday life. This course will consider how this ambition is pursued in the context of postcolonial writing. Our primary reading will be a series of fictional texts by African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern, and South Asian writers, with an emphasis upon very recent work. These will be supplemented by extensive readings in criticism, cultural and social theory, and reportage. We will examine the emergence of the everyday as a distinct conceptual category, highlighting its mobilization in prominent twentieth-century critiques of modernity. We will consider its status as an aesthetic object, identifying formal strategies for the representation of everyday life. Throughout we will consider the specific stakes of the everyday for postcolonial writers and in postcolonial societies. In the process, the everyday will offer us a crucial analytical vantage point for tracing the vicissitudes of postcolonial modernity itself.

The announced booklist for the course is tentative and subject to change. The bSpace reader for the course will feature work by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Susan Buck-Morss, Partha Chatterjee, Teju Cole, E. Valentine Daniel, Veena Das, Guy Debord, Mahasweta Devi, Frantz Fanon, Amitav Ghosh, Stuart Hall, Peter Hitchcock, Ranjana Khanna, Arun Kolatkar, Henri Lefebvre, Achille Mbembe, Gyanendra Pandey, Ato Quayson, and others.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: TBA
Location: TBA


Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 10. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.