Announcement of Classes: Fall 2007

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 2-3:30

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

100/1

Junior Seminar:
The Novel and Its Theory/Theory and Its Novels

MW 11-12:30

The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bakhtin...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

100/2

Junior Seminar:
The Harlem Renaissance

MW 12-1:30

This seminar will examine significant works of the extraordinary cultural unfolding that has come to be known as the Harlem Renaissance. Though we will concentrate on literary works, we will also examine some of the music and visual works from the per...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

MW 4-5:30

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses,...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Literature of the Americas

MW 4-5:30

This course takes a comparative look at the literature of North and South America , focusing on the construction of racial and regional identities in a comparative context. We shall also explore the question of method, through an examination of critic...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Prison Literature

MW 5-6:30

"Because the percentage of the American population that has experienced incarceration is at an historical high and growing, particularly within the African American community, a study of the literature of incarceration has never been more timely. In t...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Women, Nationality, and Modernism

TTh 9:30-11

In Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf�s critique of patriarchy and war, she claims: �As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.� In this seminar, we will read women�s modernist fiction�from both...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Herman Melville

TTh 11-12:30

A close reading of several of Melville�s works, emphasizing his recursiveness, the manner in which his writing returns repeatedly to several fundamental issues in order to explore more deeply the contradictions that launched his writing. Attendance an...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Daniel Defoe

TTh 11-12:30

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe�s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and relig...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Narratives of Biographical Detection

TTh 2-3:30

Something about someone dead catches the attention of someone living. The person still living knows enough about the dead person to come to feel an urgent interest in the dead person�s story, but not enough to know why the story is so urgent. So the l...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will treat literature�its various genres, including novel, drama, poetry�from the point of view of media theory. Our particular interest will be in the status of the ""document��an historically real or ostensibly real document that is som...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

100/19

Junior Seminar:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 P.M., plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.

We will examine film noir�s relationship to �classical� Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural backgr...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

102/1

:
Topics in the English Language

MWF 11-12

An introduction to syntactic theory with a focus on English syntax. ...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

105/1

:
Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will read a wide variety of writing ranging across the entire Anglo Saxon period, from chronicles to histories to saints� lives to poetry, riddles, and charms. Our focus will be on the intersections among history, culture, art, and w...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

115A/1

:
The English Renaissance (17th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of England�s �century of revolution,� focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics in the period....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

117A/1

:
Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

This class studies the first half of Shakespeare's career, including his best-known comedies and history plays as well as his non-dramatic poetry. (Later plays�the major tragedies, the tragicomic romances�will be covered in depth in 117B next semester...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

117S/1

:
Shakespeare

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will attempt to read as many Shakespeare plays as can be got through conveniently in fifteen weeks. In general we will try to cover one play per week, but along the way we will devote a week to an introduction of the author, his tim...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

117T/1

:
Shakespeare in the Theater

TTh 3:30-5, plus rehearsals TTh 5-6:30

Most of the energy in this course will go into producing a modest but strenuously rehearsed staging of Macbeth. The performances will probably be in mid-November (depending on the availability of a suitable indoor playing space). The course will meet ...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

118/1

:
Milton

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week

" The later poet William Blake imagined Milton �descending . . . clothed in black, severe and silent,� and too often that is the image that has descended upon us as well. This course will offer a very different poet and political figure. As we read Mi...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

125A/1

:
The English Novel (Defoe Through Scott)

MWF 10-11

" As we read a variety of novels from the period credited with the �rise of the novel,� we shall consider what it was that might have been new about this form of writing. We shall be especially interested in tracking what it was that some found quite ...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

125D/1

:
The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 1-2

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these thr...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

125E/1

:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 2-3:30

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them published since 1960. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to understand these writers on their ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

127/1

:
Modern Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

A survey of the modernist turn in poetry. This course will explore some of the more remarkable (and occasionally notorious) formal experiments of the twentieth century�s turbulent first half. We will contend with work from Britain , Ireland , and the ...(read more) Blanton, Dan

130A/1

:
American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 12-1

This course will survey the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the triumphs of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-shocks of the American Revolution. Although our focus is on Anglophone texts, we will ...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

130D/1

:
American Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 12-1

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

133B/1

:
African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

TTh 9:30-11

An examination of some of the major 20 th-century African American novels. ...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Race, Ethnicity, and Disability in American Cultures

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will analyze the categories of �disability,� �race� and �ethnicity� critically. �Disability� as an identity category is always raced, whether we attend to that intersection or not, and people defined in racial terms are also always placed...(read more) Saxton, Marsha

136C/2

Topics in American Studies:
The Border

TTh 11-12:30

"Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: T...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Co-taught by Gonzalez, Marcial and Lye, Colleen

141/1

Modes of Writing:
Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

MWF 11-12

"This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing � fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will wri...(read more) Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a.: Chandra, M.J.)

141/2

Modes of Writing:
Race, (Creative) Writing, and Difference

TTh 11-12:30

"This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts. We�ll read Toni Morrison�s Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination, and we�ll read some of the books she discusses: Twain�s Huckleberry Finn, Cat...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143A/1

:
Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required t...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

:
Verse

TTh 3:30-5

"The question is whether or not poetry can be more than a series of successful gestures, as F. Scott Fitzgerald put it rather long ago, or arrive at something other than the statement or restatement of an emotional truth or idea. Can poetry intervene...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143B/3

:
Verse

W 3-6

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing d...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

C143V/1

:
Visual Autobiography

TTh 9:30-12:30

Visual autobiography encompasses a wide range of self-representations and self-narrations: conventional books in which images are integral to the whole, rather than mere supplementation or illustration; pictographic (picture-writing) ledgerbooks; phot...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha

143N/1

:
Prose Non-fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write 45 pages of non-fictional narrative. ...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a.: Blaise, B.)
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Grappling with the Postmodern

MWF 9-10

"This course is designed develop and polish college-level writing. By engaging the primary works of the class, we will focus on critical thinking skills, close reading/ analysis, argumentation and organization. We will pursue these objectives through ...(read more) Franklin Melendez

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Staging Citizenship in English Renaissance Drama

MWF 11-12

"Course Description: This course will focus on representations of citizenship in early modern drama. We will begin with several Elizabethan plays whose central characters are racially or religiously marked as �other,� and hence excluded from citizensh...(read more) Joseph Ring

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Literature

MWF 12-1

"War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life�we�ve learned to live with all of it; but a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to the ...(read more) Peter Goodwin

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare and Chekov

MWF 1-2

" This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I have chosen two plays by Shakespeare and two by Chekhov. I think I can teach you more about the...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
War and Literary Form

MWF 3-4

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century texts written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up diffe...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the History of the Senses

TTh 8-9:30

" Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in th...(read more) Tracy Auclair

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Irish Literature

TTh 9:30-11

" Have you ever noticed that some of the most interesting �British� writers of the last two centuries are actually Irish or, at least, have a significant connection to Ireland? What is it about this place that gives these authors the itch to write abo...(read more) Kea Anderson

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Bad Managements

TTh 11-12:30

" This course begins your training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your critical attention and argumentation skills through short expository papers, in-class essays, and informal close readings. You will b...(read more) Jami Bartlett

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Beautiful Objections

TTh 11-12:30

"There are some gems of cultural critque in the English language. We will consider just a few and see what we can find out about how they accomplish both beauty and critique. We'll read Jamaica Kincaid's smoldering A Small Place for a look at colonial...(read more) Katharine Wright

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Perspectivisms

TTh 12:30-2

" This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth and Reality, and applying those debates to works of literature and to films. We will spend the firs...(read more) Chris Eagle

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
The Once and Future King

TTh 12:30-2

" Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur is one of these. This class will begin with two of the most influent...(read more) Andrea Lankin

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
Marrying the Master

TTh 2-3:30

Marriage has historically been seen as women�s primary source of socioeconomic mobility; whereas male ascendancy is narrated explicitly in terms of material wealth and status, the woman�s acquisition of socioeconomic status is narrated in affective te...(read more) Natalia Cecire

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Reading and Reading about Writing

TTh 3:30-5:00

"In this course, students will not only practice reading and writing but also reflect on the meaning of reading and writing in autobiography, fiction, and poetry. We�ll discuss how societies have restricted reading and writing, what �good� reading and...(read more) Karen Leibowitz

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
Grimmer Than Grimm

TTh 3:30-5

"Let's take an adult look at six classic folktales (and their variations) often relegated to the children's room. What are they really about? Why is their cultural influence so persistent? Folklorists, psychoanalysts, feminists, poets-- all have somet...(read more) Katharine Wright

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Immigrant Form

MWF 10-11

Immigrant form will serve as our forum for developing research and investigative skills. We will read a set of texts by and about immigrants in the United States in the context of post-1965 immigration, ultimately focusing on immigrant form in the pos...(read more) Swati Rana

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Writing From Memory

MWF 11-12

"At the beginning of Trout Fishing in America, Richard Brautigan frets over accurately remembering and recording his own memories, saying, �I�d like to get it right.� What does this mean? �Getting it right� may not always mean reporting it the way it ...(read more) Marisa Libbon

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Postcolonial Gothic

MWF 12-1

"In recent years, literary scholars have taken an interest in the sub-genre �Postcolonial Gothic,� examining how and why colonial and postcolonial writers employ elements of the Gothic genre in their portrayals of racial difference and of power. This ...(read more) Sarah Townsend

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the Environment

MWF 1-2

"Industrialization transformed the landscape of nineteenth century Britain. Poets and novelists of this period often expressed, to use Thomas Hardy�s words, the �ache of modernism�: they longed for a simpler time in which human beings lived according ...(read more) Jhoanna Infante

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Melissa Fabros

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
In and Out of Realism

TTh 8:00-9:30

"How is literature to represent human experience? A prevalent strategy in English literature since the eighteenth century has been that of the realist novel, which presents a rich and detailed account of ordinary life�or some near approximation. But a...(read more) Paul Kerschen

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Mariners, Renegades and Castaways

TTh 9:30-11:00

"This course, designed to train you in the practice of critical reading and writing, will focus on literature about sailors and slaves in the era of Atlantic revolution. We will examine sea-chronicles, novels, ballads, and slave-narratives in order to...(read more) Cody Marrs

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Highway 61

TTh 11-12.30

" In his song �Highway 61� Bob Dylan suggests we can solve all of our problems by taking to the road. The song also expresses the American love affair with mobility. Through twentieth-century American novels, we will examine the circumstances that giv...(read more) Alia Yap Pan

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Power of Theater: Tracking the Social Role of Dramatic Texts

TTh 12:30-2

"How powerful is theater�and in what way is it powerful? Does it have a point, a purpose? Should it? What role does it play in the culture that produces it? What role does it play in the culture that it produces? And how has this role changed over tim...(read more) Matthew Sergi

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Getting Real: Exploring Passing and Authenticity

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will examine imperatives and anxieties about authenticity in relation to race, ethnicity, gender and disability. Concern about who is and is not a part of these social categories is not simply a contemporary phenomenon, but also a major t...(read more) D. Bednarska

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Hybrid Writing

TTh 3:30-5

"An ex-slave, a super-villain, a monster, an android, and a Jewish mouse are among the starring figures in the books we�ll be reading. Their experiences are vastly different, but what they share is a particular response to their exclusion from the maj...(read more) Talissa Ford

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
The Historical Novel

MWF 9-10

"This class is intended to develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of the historical novel. Over the course of the semester we will examine this genre (which, very generally, is defined by the centrality of historical events for ...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Zach Gordon

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Eating Meat

TTh 12:30-2

A course on the literature of carnivory. In this class, we�ll look at essays, novels, and poems about culture and diet. We�ll explore concepts like taste, hunger, food chains, trophic levels, nutrition, predation, and domestication. You�ll write a clo...(read more) Charles Legere
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

Tues. 5-8

Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post)?modern tendency to picture or visualize experience??what W.J.T. Mitchell calls ?the pictorial turn.? Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that convey pos...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 4-5

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the seme...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Gary Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg : The U.S. and the Civil War Era

F 12-1

I would like to read Wills' book slowly and carefully with students. I plan to offer some other materials about the culture of the mid-19th-century U.S. , perhaps some of the Ken Burns documentary on the Civil War, letters and other speeches by Lincol...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Contemporary Irish Theater: The Plays of Brian Friel

M 3-5

Brian Friel (b. 1928) is the most prominent playwright of the contemporary Irish theater, best known for Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa. In a series of innovative plays, he has examined some of the stories the Irish tell themselves about their p...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Three Novels by Jane Austen

Thurs. 1-2

We will read three of Jane Austen's novels very slowly to learn why they are among the world's most enduringly popular and the most technically innovative. The novels are Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. For additional insights, w...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

26/1

Literature In English:
Introduction to the Study of Poetry

TTh 2-3:30

The lectures, class discussions, and readings for this course are intended to develop students� ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate poetry, while they gain greater self-confidence and authority in writing about poems. Special attention will b...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John

43A/1

Literature In English:
Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

MW 3-4:30

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of short fiction - to explore the elements that make up the genre, and to enable students to talk critically about short stories and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own wr...(read more) Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)

45A/1

Literature In English:
Through Milton

MW 10-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week F10-11

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions f...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature In English:
Through Milton

MW 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 12-1)

"We will study the changing nature of creative writing ""through"" Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. This will not be a strict chronological ""survey"" but more a sampling ...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

45B/1

Literature In English:
Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

MW 1-2, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are major...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

45B/2

Literature In English:
Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

Our course begins at sea, with the �violent storm� and shipwreck of Gulliver�s Travels, and ends at sea in Benito Cereno, with a tragic convergence of Europe , America , and Africa , just off �a small, desert, uninhabited island toward the southern ex...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

45C/1

Literature In English:
Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the late-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modern...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

45C/2

Literature In English:
Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

Intended as a general survey of imaginative responses to the not always positive progress of modernity, this course will examine works produced by an array of prominent figures and representative of some of the principal Modernist and Postmodern movem...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2, plus one and a half hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture/Low Culture

Thurs. 2-5

We will discuss a novel and a collection of stories, view the films of the Coen brothers, and attend some Cal Performances events in order to analyze the role and affect of cultural productions. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Socrates as a Cultural Icon

T 2-4

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. We will read Aristophanes? comic send-up of Socrates in Clouds and the Pl...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

202/1

History of Literary Criticism:
Critical Realism

W 3:30-6:30

This course in the �History of Literary Criticism� will be an intensively focused and partial survey of the dialectic of formalism and historicism in the history of literary (and aesthetic) criticism. A core focus of the course will be the theoretical...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Disability in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

Disability Studies as it has emerged in the academy in the last decade is a multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, interdisciplinary field. For complex historical reasons themselves worth exploring, in the United States that field has had particularly...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf�s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that moveme...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/3

Graduate Readings:
American Transcendentalism and American Pragmatism

MW 12:30-2

We will study the (mostly) productive tension between consolidating and dispersing impulses in American philosophical literature. Most of the discussion time will be spent on close reading, but members of the class will on occasion present secondary c...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

203/4

Graduate Readings:
English Fiction to 1800

TTh 9:30-11

As we read a variety of works of eighteenth-century fiction we shall consider a series of revisionist (especially feminist) histories and theories of the early novel. The eighteenth-century British texts we have retroactively named novels often argued...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Modernism in Poetry

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"I am concerned with what the new historical work in modernism puts at risk�the possibility that it has continuing vitality for engaged imaginations because it still does significant affective and intellectual work. I think much of this work derives ...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

203/6

Graduate Readings:
The Novel and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

We will read major works of Gothic, Jacobin, domestic, regional, national and historical fiction, published in Great Britain between 1764 and 1824, in relation to the literary and historical contexts of British Romanticism. Critical readings will be a...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

243A/1

:
Fiction Writing Workshop

MW 10:30-12

"A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We�ll also read published fiction and essays about writing f...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

246F/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Later-Eighteenth Century

M 3:30-6:30

This course offers a survey of the period from 1740 to 1800, or from Hume�s new �science of man� to Wordsworth�s account of poetry as the �history or science of feelings.� The many different titles that have affixed themselves to these years (Pre-Roma...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

246I/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature to 1855

TTh 12:30-2

We will consider American prose literature from the late-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century in a transatlantic context. We will analyze literary influence as it travels, in some familiar and some surprising ways, between North America and Englan...(read more) Otter, Sam

250/1

Research Seminar:
Form and Style from Chaucer to Spenser

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will explore the lyric tradition in English, beginning with Chaucerian lyrics and ending with Spenser�s sonnets. Along the way, we will read poems from figures like Gower, Hoccleve, Lydgate, Charles d�Orleans, Hawes, Barclay, Audela...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

250/2

Research Seminar:
Compassion and Representation in Early Modern England

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

How did early modern subjects represent and conceptualize compassion, pity, and sympathy? We will be especially interested in compassion as a complex point of intersection among literary, political, theological, and devotional discourses and practices...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

250/3

Research Seminar:
Proust

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A reading of Proust�s Recherche (in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation) alongside�and as�a reflection on traditional novel form. ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

250/4

Research Seminar:
A Small Place �Irish Fictions, 1890-2005

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is a survey of Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Revival (1890-1930) to the Celtic Tiger (1990s-present). The Celtic Revival was an upsurge of nationalist sentiment that resulted in the creation of an Irish Republic in defiance...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

310/1

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Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff