Announcement of Classes: Fall 2007


English Drama to 1603

English 114A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 101 Wurster


Other Readings and Media

For more information on this course, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

Description

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Junior Seminar: The Novel and Its Theory/Theory and Its Novels

English 100

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Emma; Bakhtin, M.: The Dialogical Imagination; Balzac, H.: P?re Goriot; Barthes, R.: S/Z; Bourdieu, P.: The Rules of Art; Dostoevsky, F.: Crime and Punishment; Flaubert, G.: Sentimental Education; Forster, E.M.: Aspects of the Novel; Luk?cs, G.: Theory of the Novel; Miller, D.A.: Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style

Description

The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bakhtin, and Austen/Miller. These accounts will also help us reflect on two ostensibly universal understandings of the novel, by Luk�cs and Forster, and vice versa.


Junior Seminar: The Harlem Renaissance

English 100

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Cullen, C., ed.: Caroling Dusk; DuBois, W.E.B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Hughes, L.: The Langston Hughes Reader; Hughes, L.: The Big Sea; Hurston, Z.: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Johnson, J.: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Larsen, N.: Passing; Lewis, D., ed: The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader; Locke, A., ed.: The New Negro; McKay, C.: Home to Harlem; Toomer, J.: Cane. In addition to these texts, a required reader will be available at Copy Central on Bancroft.

Description

This seminar will examine significant works of the extraordinary cultural unfolding that has come to be known as the Harlem Renaissance. Though we will concentrate on literary works, we will also examine some of the music and visual works from the period. As we attempt to understand the broader implications and contexts of this key moment in American cultural history, we will also consider its long trajectory and its lasting influence on American artistic invention. Topics for discussion will include questions pertaining to aesthetic identity (and aesthetic anxiety); race and nation; cultural forms, formations, and deformations; artistic thought and double-consciousness.


Junior Seminar: Introduction to Narrative Theory

English 100

Section: 3
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Aristotle: Poetics; Bakhtin, M.: The Dialogic Imagination; Barthes, R.: S/Z; Propp, V.: The Morphology of the Folktale; Sophocles I.: Three Tragedies

In addition to the booklist above, there is a class reader (Copy Central). "

Description

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, and so we shall have to read the narratives of the theorists along with the theories. We shall strive to listen to stories, to see or imagine how plots are composed, organized.

There will be a number of exercises, many of them ungraded but required. And I project that there will be required about five papers that will be graded."


Junior Seminar: Literature of the Americas

English 100

Section: 4
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Todorov, T.: The Conquest of America : The Question of the Other;Women's Indian Captivity Narratives; Conrad, J.: Nostromo ; Whitman, W.: Leaves of Grass ; Enrique, J.: Rod� Ariel ; Dreiser, T.: Sister Carrie ; Galeano, E.: Memory of Fire: Genesis

Description

This course takes a comparative look at the literature of North and South America , focusing on the construction of racial and regional identities in a comparative context. We shall also explore the question of method, through an examination of critical writings on the relation between historiography and literature. The story of the New World is often represented as discontinuous, fragmented�beginning with the histories of its indigenous people, interrupted by the multiple histories of conquest, pacification and migration. In our examination of literature and critical work which examines the historical events of conquest, slavery and modernization we shall address these questions: How does the way we narrate history influence our perception of past events? What role does fiction play in the construction of national or regional historical identities? What modes of emplotment are used to narrate history in the Americas : tragedy, comedy or romance, narratives of conquest, apocalypse or degeneration?


Junior Seminar: Prison Literature

English 100

Section: 5
Instructor: Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Vidocq, F.E.: Memoirs of Vidocq: Master of Crime ; Berkman., A.: Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist ; Black, J.: You Can�t Win ; Himes, C.: Yesterday Will Make You Cry ; Braly, M.: On the Yard ; Bunker, E.: Animal Factory ; Carr, J.: Bad ; Foucault, M.: Discipline and Punish ; Lopez, E.: They Call Me Mad Dog ; Course Reader: consisting of short stories, poetry, critical articles and other, shorter texts

Description

"Because the percentage of the American population that has experienced incarceration is at an historical high and growing, particularly within the African American community, a study of the literature of incarceration has never been more timely. In this course we will lay both a critical and literary framework for what may be considered the long overlooked counterpart to more popular and studied memoirs of crime, novels of detection and police procedurals. While much critical attention has already been paid to these latter genres, we will explore this underside, or locked away consequence of the clash of crime and law through the study of some seminal, some overlooked, and some contemporary representations of life behind bars. Beginning with the trial and execution of Socrates, we will trace our way through two pioneering European and American works, before narrowing our focus to a number of twentieth-century American exemplars.



Complementing our study of these autobiographical novels--interesting, personal responses to brutally conformist institutions--we will use Michel Foucault�s Discipline and Punish , along with a number of articles in a course reader, as a critical foundation for understanding the themes raised by an aesthetics of confinement. Among other questions, we will consider the ways in which confinement might inform the private reading experience, or even the modern, subjugated condition in which everyone might be figured as prisoners in a police state assigning crimes, guilt and cells within a state-wide military industrial facility. Conversely, the escapist power of literature will also be considered insofar as these texts address the liberating potential, and in some cases ultimate failure, of literature as a means of transcending or otherwise transforming the modern police state�s imperative to discipline and punish.



We will also supplement our study through the analysis of some prison poetry and films, through which we will examine Hollywood �s fascination with, even glorification of, prison life. "


Junior Seminar: Women, Nationality, and Modernism

English 100

Section: 7
Instructor: Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Sylvia Ashton Warner: Spinster; Bowen, E.: The Last September and The Heat of the Day; Butts, M.: The Taverner Novels; Mansfield, K.: Stories; Rhys, J.: Voyage in the Dark, Good Morning, Midnight , and Wide Sargasso Sea ; Sylvia Townsend Warner: Lolly Willowes; White, A.: Frost in May; Woolf, V.: Three Guineas

Description

In Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf�s critique of patriarchy and war, she claims: �As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.� In this seminar, we will read women�s modernist fiction�from both English and colonial writers�that addresses questions of British national identity and gender through modernist literary experimentation. At least half of these writers are colonial subjects ( Anglo-Irish , New Zealand , and Dominica ), allowing us to situate their articulation of hybrid national identity against the native English writers. The novels we read in this seminar focus on childhood, schooling, sexuality, maternity, and aging as sites for the inscription of identity. Although such themes would seem to situate these novels as �women�s domestic realism� (and certainly many of them have been marginalized from accounts of canonical modernist fiction), we will find that their use of modernist style resists the compartmentalization of genre. Modernist style elucidates the fissures in the domestic: it marks the place of resistance within the domestic to the interpellation of identity by cultural and national discourses.


Junior Seminar: Herman Melville

English 100

Section: 8
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Melville, H.: Typee; Melville, H.: Redburn; Melville, H.: Moby-Dick; Melville, H.: Billy Budd and Other Stories; Melville, H.: Selected Poems; Melville, H.: Pierre

Description

A close reading of several of Melville�s works, emphasizing his recursiveness, the manner in which his writing returns repeatedly to several fundamental issues in order to explore more deeply the contradictions that launched his writing. Attendance and participation in discussion are required, along with two ten-page essays.


Junior Seminar: Daniel Defoe

English 100

Section: 9
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Landa (ed.): Journal of the Plague Year; Starr (ed.): Moll Flanders; Richetti (ed.): Robinson Crusoe; Blewett (ed.): Roxana; Furbank & Owens (ed.): True-Born Englishman & Other Writings (obtainable through ABEbooks). Other texts will be available electronically or photocopied.

Description

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe�s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and religious as well as literary. Writings with less obvious claims on our attention than the prose fiction will figure prominently, although proportions can be adjusted as the course unfolds.


Junior Seminar: Narratives of Biographical Detection

English 100

Section: 12
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Symons, A.J.A.: The Quest for Corvo; Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom; Ambler, E.: A Coffin for Dimitrios; Welles, O.: Citizen Kane (film to be viewed in a special class session); Wolf, C.: The Quest for Christa T.; Byatt, A.S.: Possession; Roth, P.: American Pastoral

Description

Something about someone dead catches the attention of someone living. The person still living knows enough about the dead person to come to feel an urgent interest in the dead person�s story, but not enough to know why the story is so urgent. So the living person becomes an investigator, sifting through musty archives, anonymous legends and imperfect memories. The story of the investigator is as important as the story of the investigated: whence the interest? how does the investigation determine its own outcome? what does the investigation have to do with broader histories? Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation.


Junior Seminar: Literature and Media Theory

English 100

Section: 15
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 259 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Beckett, S.: Krapp's Last Tape; Danielewski, M.: House of Leaves; Goethe, W.: The Sorrows of Young Werther; Mann, E.:, Four Plays; Johnson, R.: Radi Os; Phillips, Tom: A Humument; Stoker, B.: Dracula; Williams, W.C.: Paterson. Secondary reading: Bolter and Grusin: Remediations; Kittler, F.: Gramophone Film Typewriter; McLuhan, M.: Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man

Description

"This course will treat literature�its various genres, including novel, drama, poetry�from the point of view of media theory. Our particular interest will be in the status of the ""document��an historically real or ostensibly real document that is somehow presented, represented, or mediated by the art form (or �platform�) in question. Using Marshall McLuhan�s dictum that ""the content of one medium is always another medium"" as a guiding concept, we will address two central issues. First: by comparing ""documents"" as they are mediated in both 19th- and 20th-century literary forms, we will try to assess the impact of other media, especially photography, film, and recorded sound, on literature�s ""documentary"" evidence. One question that may emerge, as we consider the history of mediation from Dracula to Danielewski�s House of Leaves and the CD Haunted (by Danielewski�s sister, Poe) is why mediation is so often registered an occult or gothic phenomenon. Second: by focusing on the different issues of mediation that emerge when the ""document"" in question is already literary (Johnson�s RADI OS corrosively rewrites paRADIse lOSt), we will attempt to theorize the kind of testimony, the kind of historical document, that literature is, especially for the so-called �new media.�"


Junior Seminar: Film Noir

English 100

Section: 19
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: TTh 5:30-7 P.M., plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Telotte, J.: Voices in the Dark; Kaplan, E.: Women in Film Noir; Silver & Ursini, eds.: Film Noir Reader 4; Turner, G.: Film as Social Practice

Description

We will examine film noir�s relationship to �classical� Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and masculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.


: Topics in the English Language

English 102

Section: 1
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 385 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Radford, A.: Transformational Grammar: A First Course

Description

An introduction to syntactic theory with a focus on English syntax.


: Anglo-Saxon England

English 105

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English People; Campbell, J., ed.: The Anglo-Saxons; Crossley-Holland, K., ed.: The Anglo-Saxon World; Donoghue, D., ed. and Heaney, S., trans.: Beowulf: A Verse Translation; Howe, N., ed. and Donaldson, E., trans.: Beowulf: A Prose Translation; Keynes, S. and Lapidge, M., eds.: Alfred the Great; Webb, J. F. and Farmer, D. H., eds.: The Age of Bede

Description

In this course we will read a wide variety of writing ranging across the entire Anglo Saxon period, from chronicles to histories to saints� lives to poetry, riddles, and charms. Our focus will be on the intersections among history, culture, art, and writing. We will ask ourselves how � England � came into being as a cultural and political idea, and how notions of �Englishness� affected the kinds of writing that people were likely to produce. We will explore the artwork of various groups, including burial artifacts, coins, manuscripts and other visual artifacts, and ask ourselves what such materials have to do with the development of a literary tradition. We will talk about cultural contact, colonization, and imperialism, especially in the context of pagan and Christian ideas about conversion and social change. You will have the opportunity to experiment with Anglo-Saxon modes of cultural production, particularly alliterative poetry, but also other forms of writing and art. Students need not have any prior knowledge of Old English or of Anglo-Saxon history; all texts will be in translation.


: The English Renaissance (17th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 123 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: The Rover; Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Donne, J.: Complete English Poems; Etherege, G.: The Man of Mode; Maclean, H.: Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets; Milton, J.: Samson Agonistes; Webster, J.: The Duchess of Malfi. There will also be a course reader, containing mostly poetry.

Description

A survey of England�s �century of revolution,� focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics in the period.


: Shakespeare

English 117A

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 390 Hearst Mining


Other Readings and Media

Marlowe, C.: The Jew of Malta; Shakespeare, W.: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This class studies the first half of Shakespeare's career, including his best-known comedies and history plays as well as his non-dramatic poetry. (Later plays�the major tragedies, the tragicomic romances�will be covered in depth in 117B next semester, and in survey in 117S). We will meet as a lecture, although we will look for opportunities to converse ensemble and in smaller project-centered groups. Our focus will be on Shakespeare's stunningly rapid development of his drama as an art form through his continual experimentation with the forms of theatrical genre.


: Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Bevington, D., ed.: The Complete Works (of William Shakespeare)

Description

In this course, we will attempt to read as many Shakespeare plays as can be got through conveniently in fifteen weeks. In general we will try to cover one play per week, but along the way we will devote a week to an introduction of the author, his times, his poems, his plays, and his language; a week to the Sonnets; and we will take extra time for longer and more complex plays like Hamlet. So we will manage about a dozen plays, trying also to cover a range of genres including comedy, history, tragedy, and so-called romance. We will be thinking of plot, character, and action, but above all of dramatic poetry. Information will be posted before the class begins, and throughout the semester, on the instructor's website (see below). Students should anticipate writing three short papers, a midterm and a final exam, and possible quizzes. Students should also anticipate attending lecture regularly, reading the assignments carefully and in advance of lecture, and indeed participating fully in the work of the class.


: Shakespeare in the Theater

English 117T

Section: 1
Instructor: Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Time: TTh 3:30-5, plus rehearsals TTh 5-6:30
Location: 20 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: Macbeth, ed Braunmuller (Pelican Shakespeare)

Description

Most of the energy in this course will go into producing a modest but strenuously rehearsed staging of Macbeth. The performances will probably be in mid-November (depending on the availability of a suitable indoor playing space). The course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 6:30, but students�particularly cast members and most particularly cast members with large parts�can expect to be asked for several hours of additional rehearsal time every week That�s as precise as I can be so many months in advance.


: Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week
Location: 101 Morgan


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J.: Complete Poems and Major Prose (ed. Merritt Y. Hughes). There will probably also be a small Course Reader at a copy shop tba.

Description

" The later poet William Blake imagined Milton �descending . . . clothed in black, severe and silent,� and too often that is the image that has descended upon us as well. This course will offer a very different poet and political figure. As we read Milton�s major poetry (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and shorter verse) and selections from his controversial prose, we will study the Milton who witnessed and participated in two revolutions (one political, the other scientific), the radical polemicist who wrote a tract justifying regicide plus several pamphlets justifying divorce and a famously vehement argument against government licensing of the press, and of course the magisterial poet who composed great epic, lyric, and dramatic verse. We will also think about Milton�s ambivalent stances toward classical myth and Renaissance literature, the place of his unorthodox theology in relation to his political and his proto-psychological theory, his writings on love, his prescient �media theory,� and his long preoccupation with vocation.



Course requirements will probably include two essays, a midterm, and final; they will certainly involve vigilant attendance of both lecture and section, combined with careful, timely preparation of the reading assignments. "


: The English Novel (Defoe Through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Haywood, E: Love in Excess; Defoe, D.: Roxana; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H.: Shamela and Joseph Andrews; Lennox , C.: The Female Quixote; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto; Austen, J.: Northanger Abbey; Scott, W.: The Bride of Lammermoor

Description

" As we read a variety of novels from the period credited with the �rise of the novel,� we shall consider what it was that might have been new about this form of writing. We shall be especially interested in tracking what it was that some found quite dangerous about it. Like surfing the internet, novel reading wasn�t something you wanted the �impressionable�� from teenagers to women�to do alone, or maybe at all. Might the perceived threat have had something to do with early novels� connection to romance and the erotic and then with what one critic calls the �narrative transvestitism� of the early novel�in which men write books featuring female heroines who will describe, in an innovative, frank prose style, how a woman really feels? Highly conscious of these debates, eighteenth-century writers responded to them in their texts, while an emerging set of women writers also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public market. Some of these texts suggest rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating novel writing, appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.



Requirements include willingness to engage in discussion, reading quizzes, a mid-term, two long papers. "


: The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 60 Evans


Other Readings and Media

Dreiser, T.: Sister Carrie ; Woolf, V.: The Waves ; Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom! ; Mann, T.: Doctor Faustus ; Tutuola, A.: My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics, history, modernism and empire. Some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel?; how have modernist aesthetic experimentations re-shaped the very form of the novel?; and lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope and influence of fictive milieu?


: The Contemporary Novel

English 125E

Section: 1
Instructor: Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 105 North Gate


Other Readings and Media

Carter, A.: The Bloody Chamber; Beckett, S.: Watt; DeLillo, D.: Libra; McCarthy, C.: The Road; Nabokov, V.: Pale Fire; Pynchon, T.: Against the Day; Silko, L.: Ceremony

Description

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them published since 1960. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to understand these writers on their own terms and to discover among them commonly shared concerns and practices. There will be two shorter papers, a midterm, and a final exam.


: Modern Poetry

English 127

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, Dan
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 4 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Auden, W.: Selected Poems; Eliot, T.: Four Quartets,Selected Poems; Moore , M.: Collected Poems; Pound, E.: A Draft of XXX Cantos; Silkin, J. (ed.): The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry; Stein, G.: Tender Buttons; Stevens, W.: Collected Poems; Williams, W.: Paterson; Yeats, W.: Collected Poems

Description

A survey of the modernist turn in poetry. This course will explore some of the more remarkable (and occasionally notorious) formal experiments of the twentieth century�s turbulent first half. We will contend with work from Britain , Ireland , and the United States , seeking to devise strategies with which to read texts that often seem impervious to reading and striving to account for the historical pressures that made such experiments seem necessary in the first place.


: American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 30 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Peter C. Mancall (ed.): Envisioning America; William Bradford: Of Plymouth Plantation; Mary Rowlandson: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative; Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia; Hector St. John de Crevecoeur; Letters from an American Farmer; Charles Brockden Brown: Wieland, or The Transformation; Hannah Webster Foster: The Coquette

Description

This course will survey the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the triumphs of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-shocks of the American Revolution. Although our focus is on Anglophone texts, we will consider colonial America as a place of encounter � a place where diversity was a given, negotiation was a necessity, and transformation was inescapable. Cultures took shape through a dramatic series of contests, crises and consolidations, reflected in a literary record of h Lectures will explore the role of writing in contact and settlement; in captivity and slavery; in religious and social formations; in business and in justice; in approaching the natural world; in gauging the stakes of revolution; and in imagining a new republic. Throughout, we will pay special attention to how writing operated to forge new models of the self that could withstand and absorb the tumult of colonial life. Authors will include Bradford, Rowlandson, Franklin, Equiano, Jefferson, and the early American novelists Charles Brockden Brown and Hannah Webster Foster.


: American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

"Readings for the course will include many, but not all, of the following (please wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your books):



Cahan, A.: The Rise of David Levinsky; Cather, W.: My Antonia; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F.S.: The Great Gatsby; Hughes, L: The Ways of White Folks; Johnson, J. W.: The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Larsen, N: Quicksand and Passing; Loos, A: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Wharton, E.: The House of Mirth; West, N: The Day of the Locust or Miss Lonelyhearts; plus a photocopied reader including shorter writings by many of the following: Mary Antin, Willa Cather, Countee Cullen, John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, W.E.B. DuBois, Finley Peter Dunne, T.S. Eliot, Jessie Fauset, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jacob Riis, Frank Norris, Jack London, Gertrude Stein, Sui Sin Far, Jean Toomer, Anzia Yezierska "

Description

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as The New Negro, the New Woman, and the New Immigrant. We will focus on issues of social, economic, and geographic mobility during the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression, as it affected a wide array of American authors and fictional characters, including those who immigrated to the U.S., those who moved from one region to another or between country and city, and those who took up residence abroad. We will explore the plot trajectories and narrative stances that these authors deployed to map their own cultural identities, as well as those of their fictional creations, in the new American century.


: African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Wright, Richard: Native Son; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Jones, Gayl: Corregidora; various: hip-hop lyrics re death (reader); screening of film: Thug Angel: Life of an Outlaw

Description

An examination of some of the major 20 th-century African American novels.


Literature of American Cultures: Race, Ethnicity, and Disability in American Cultures

English 135AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saxton, Marsha
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 2040 Valley LSB


Other Readings and Media

Adams, M et al.: Readings for Diversity and Social Justice; Lai, H. et al.: Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island; Craft, W. and E.: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom; Cable, G.W.: The Grandissimes; Morrison, T.: Sula; Dreger, A.: One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal; Dorris, M.: The Broken Cord; Fadiman, A.: The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down; Moraga, C.: Heroes and Saints and Other Plays

Description

"This course will analyze the categories of �disability,� �race� and �ethnicity� critically. �Disability� as an identity category is always raced, whether we attend to that intersection or not, and people defined in racial terms are also always placed on axes of disability and ability, well and ill, normal and abnormal, malformed and well-formed. Much work on that ambiguous umbrella term �disability� treats disabled people as ungendered (that is, male), unraced (that is, white), without nationality (that is, native-born American but barely a citizen), and unsexualized (that is, heterosexual, but only in default). My aim in this course is to set up situations in which you can think about several of these categories simultaneously in the context of American cultures present and past.



To this end, we will take four historical examples as case studies. Each illustrates how racism and ableism have intertwined in American (dis)ability cultures. First we will examine immigration history (with some emphasis on Angel Island and Chinese immigration). Second, we will focus on how American writers have remembered two women of color who performed in freak shows and on how race, disability and gender issues intersect on the freak show (or today the talk show) stage. In the third unit, on slavery, we will begin to unearth a history of disability in American slavery and in the Jim Crow South. In the fourth module, we will discuss eugenics and the tight connections between race and disability in eugenic models of degeneration. The final section of the course will move into the present, first giving you some exposure to contemporary activist history that counters and undoes the dynamics we have been exploring, and then ending with three particular texts to anchor our analysis of the politics of representation of disability, gender, sexuality, class, race and ethnicity: Native American novelist Michael Dorris�s controversial memoir of raising his son who had Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, The Broken Cord, Anne Fadiman�s The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, and Chicana writer Cherrie Moraga�s play about farmworkers�organizing and the health effects of pesticides, Heroes and Saints.



A variety of guest speakers, including performance artists and disability movement activists, will visit us. We�ll view a series of films, including the silent eugenics film The Black Stork, or Are You Fit to Marry, a U.S. public health film on immigration from the 1930s, and several contemporary documentaries on subjects ranging from the medical separation of conjoined twins to contemporary disabled womens� global organizing. Written requirements: two midterms, informal journal writing, and a final project that students can tailor to their own interests. "


Topics in American Studies: The Border

English 136C

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Co-taught by Gonzalez, Marcial and Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Ng, F. M.: Bone; Okada, J.: No-No Boy; Paredes, A.: George Washington G�mez; Viramontes, H.M.: Under the Feet of Jesus; Yamashita, K.: Tropic of Orange. A course reader consisting of contextual articles will also be assigned.

Description

"Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Ng, F. M.: Bone; Okada, J.: No-No Boy; Paredes, A.: George Washington G�mez; Viramontes, H.M.: Under the Feet of Jesus; Yamashita, K.: Tropic of Orange. A course reader consisting of contextual articles will also be assigned.



Course Description: Moving beyond the black-white binary that has long framed racial discourse in the U.S. , this course examines how the experiences of Latinos and Asians intersect in the formation of the United States. We will begin by exploring the political and economic processes that have racialized Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos as �illegal aliens� and security threats, and by looking at the historical contexts that transnationalized the U.S. labor market. What kinds of border cultures resulted from these processes? What kinds of national or non-national identities? What kinds of political consciousness? To answer these questions, the course will focus on literature written by Asians and Chicana/os, with a particular interest in the social perspective uniquely afforded by the novel form. "


Modes of Writing: Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a.: Chandra, M.J.)
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Albee, E.: The American Dream and Zoo Story; Reader available at Copy Central

Description

"This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing � fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.



(No application is required for this course, but most, if not all, of the spaces in the class will need to be reserved for English majors.) "


Modes of Writing: Race, (Creative) Writing, and Difference

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below. The book list is tentative; students should come to class before buying books.

Description

"This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts. We�ll read Toni Morrison�s Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination, and we�ll read some of the books she discusses: Twain�s Huckleberry Finn, Cather�s Sapphira and the Slave Girl, Hemingway�s To Have and Have Not. We�ll also read Douglass� Narrative, Octavia Butler�s Kindred, and short works by Baldwin, Tess Slesinger, Richard Ford, and others.



Writing assignments will be broad; that is, they will allow for a variety of responses. "


: Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

TBA

Description

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend. Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction. Class attendance is mandatory. Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life. The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.


: Verse

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Texts may include Best American Poetry 2007, Michael Ondaatje�s Collected Works of Billy the Kid, Gwendolyn Brooks� Selected Poems. This list is tentative. Students should come to class before buying books.

Description

"The question is whether or not poetry can be more than a series of successful gestures, as F. Scott Fitzgerald put it rather long ago, or arrive at something other than the statement or restatement of an emotional truth or idea. Can poetry intervene? What�s the relationship of poetry to public iconography, to issues of the public representation of race and class and gender?



Can poetry challenge the way we look at culture and language? The argument of this course is that it can and must. (And who is this �we�?)



Workshop. Discussions. Weekly writing assignments. All students will participate in a public, out-of-class poetry as intervention project; the nature and scope of this project will depend on individual interests. "


: Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing done under extreme formal constraints. In addition, there�ll be regular commentary on other students� work and an informal review of a poetry reading.


: Visual Autobiography

English C143V

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha
Time: TTh 9:30-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Momaday, N. S.: The Way to Rainy Mountain; Spiegelman, A.: Maus: Parts I and II; Reader (available from Copy Central).

Description

Visual autobiography encompasses a wide range of self-representations and self-narrations: conventional books in which images are integral to the whole, rather than mere supplementation or illustration; pictographic (picture-writing) ledgerbooks; photo-biographies; artists' books (individually handmade textual art objects); narrative quilts; comic books; electronic personal narratives; and other visual forms. This course emphasizes practice. Student work will be presented and discussed regularly in in-class critiques; these will be supplemented with written assignments and exercises. Students will read a variety of primary and secondary materials; participate in class discussions, exercises, and critiques; keep a visual/verbal journal; produce three visual/verbal projects and a major final project. At the end of the semester, there will be a public showing/reading/performing of student work.


: Prose Non-fiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a.: Blaise, B.)
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Atwan, R., ed.: The Best American Essays, 4 th edition

Description

This workshop course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write 45 pages of non-fictional narrative.