Announcement of Classes: Fall 2007


Reading and Composition: Grappling with the Postmodern

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Franklin Melendez
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Don DeLillo,White Noise

Brett Easton Ellis, American Psycho

Bernadette Corporation, Reena Spaulings"

Description

"This course is designed develop and polish college-level writing. By engaging the primary works of the class, we will focus on critical thinking skills, close reading/ analysis, argumentation and organization. We will pursue these objectives through the course topic which introduces the complex problem of Postmodernism.



Despite the frequent deployment of the term �postmodern� its definition remains vague, ranging from the fuzzy to the completely opaque. The central questions driving the course will revolve around competing models for understanding both postmodernity and Postmodernism. These questions include: how do we differentiate the modern from the postmodern? Can we define postmodernity as a clearly demarcated historical period, or are its boundaries more fluid? Can we identify postmodernism as a style, movement or trend in the arts? Can we trace a genealogy for postmodernism? What are its material roots? In particular, what is its relationship to the rise of mass culture, and specific media such as film, television, video and digital technologies? How does postmodernity affect major categories of identity formation such as gender, class and race?



Discussions will focus on the primary texts (film and literary); however, our discussions will also open onto other disciplines with supplementary materials. Some of these materials will include essays, handouts and in-class slide presentations on the visual arts; these will touch upon the influence of the Surrealist and Dada movements, the emergence of Pop Art, and the evolution of �Appropriation Art� in the eighties. We will also engage the role of television and music video. The aim is to obtain a sense of the interdisciplinary nature of the phenomenon, and trace how it emerges in different contexts and media.



The coursework will consist of completing assigned readings/viewings, vigorous discussion participation, in-class exercises, weekly writing assignments, and formal essays. We will also incorporate substantial essay revisions to build upon each student�s work, and address specific issues. "


Reading and Composition: Staging Citizenship in English Renaissance Drama

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Joseph Ring
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Francis Beaumont, The Knight of the Burning Pestle

Thomas Dekker, The Shoemaker�s Holiday

Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair

Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, George Chapman, Eastward Ho!

Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare, Othello

Frederick Crews, The Random House Handbook

A Course Reader. "

Description

"Course Description: This course will focus on representations of citizenship in early modern drama. We will begin with several Elizabethan plays whose central characters are racially or religiously marked as �other,� and hence excluded from citizenship. We will proceed through a series of so-called Jacobean �city� or �citizen� comedies, whose main characters�city-dwellers from the merchant class�often find themselves in shady parts of London, crowded together with marginal figures, such as vagabonds, petty chapmen, criminals, and actors. Among the major questions of the course will be: Who is a citizen? Who is included, excluded, and why? What light does �citizen� as a narrow class marker shed on an emerging political sense of citizenship, and vice versa? While we will pay attention to matters of theme and character, we will also concentrate on dramatic structures and conventions and on the richness of the plays� language. Principal readings will be drawn from Beaumont, Chapman, Dekker, Jonson, Marlowe, and Shakespeare. Secondary readings may be selected to provide historical background, provoke discussion, or illustrate contemporary critical approaches to the plays.



If arguments about the civic dimension of rhetoric have any merit, then perhaps the most important staging of citizenship in the class will happen in students� written work. In any case, this course is primarily designed to teach you how to work with principal modes of academic rhetoric: description, analysis, and argument. You will be required to write, in addition to a diagnostic essay and a number of short writing assignments, at least two formal essays, each of which you will substantially revise. As each student will also workshop these essays with a peer-editing group, you must be prepared to write detailed comments on other students� work. "


Reading and Composition: Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Literature

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Peter Goodwin
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Karel Capek, War With the Newts

Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid�s Tale

Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, The Watchmen

Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Janet Gardner, Writing About Literature"

Description

"War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life�we�ve learned to live with all of it; but a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to the horrors of these regrettably commonplace aspects of life in the twenty-first century. This course will provide a brief tour through this blasted literary landscape. Due to budget constraints, radiation suits will not be provided.



The primary aim of this course is to develop students� expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. Students will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, and organize textual evidence and analysis, and make forceful interpretive arguments. "


Reading and Composition: Shakespeare and Chekov

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Vitaliy Eyber
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"(Please use the specified editions: notes and line numbers are different in different editions of Shakespeare; as for Chekhov, we obviously have to read the same translation.)

Othello , Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004

Twelfth Night , Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004.

Anton Chekhov, Selected Plays (Norton Critical Edition), 2004.

William Strunk and E.B. White, The Elements of Style (any edition)"

Description

" This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I have chosen two plays by Shakespeare and two by Chekhov. I think I can teach you more about these two playwrights�one, the most often-performed dramatist world-wide, the other, possibly, the second most-performed�by focusing closely on just four plays: Othello, Twelfth Night, Three Sisters, and Uncle Vanya. We�ll look at these plays so as both to enjoy them (at a reasonably leisurely pace) and try to determine what made them so popular with generations of readers and playgoers. In our discussions we�ll try to cover a broad array of subjects, and you will certainly enjoy great latitude in choosing your own topics. I�m not concerned with leaving you by the end of the semester with a jumble of facts that one is supposed to know about Shakespeare or Chekhov. However, in order to facilitate your understanding of the works you�re writing about, their frame of reference, I will from time to time take up various topics of Shakespearean and Chekhovian lore. This course is meant to accomplish a double objective: refining your aesthetic appreciation of literature and enabling you to effectively share this appreciation with your readers.



Consequently, my main concern will be with developing your skills of close analytical reading and finding efficient ways of translating those skills into writing articulate and sophisticated academic prose. Other than the four plays, I will ask you to read several scholarly essays and to see at least one film or television adaptation of each play. You�ll write a short essay every couple of weeks and have a chance to revise some of them. You can expect various assignments aimed at improving the mechanics of your prose, polishing your grammar, improving you vocabulary, etc. We will conduct in-class writing assignments and peer-review exercises regularly. The assignments will insure that by the end of the semester you know what a solid academic essay looks like and can produce one of your own. "


Reading and Composition: War and Literary Form

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Marguerite Nguyen
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun

All Quiet on the Western Front

Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Elizabeth Bishop, selected poems

Assia Djebar, selected works

Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Le Minh Khue, �Tony D.�

Herman Melville, �Benito Cereno�

Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Jarhead

Alfred Lord Tennyson, �Maud�

Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse"

Description

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century texts written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up different expectations for the representation of war, how social and historical conflicts during wartime subvert conventions of literary genre, and how issues of race, gender, and class underpin these formal subversions. Investigating texts ranging from Tennyson�s poem �Maud� (1855) to journalistic representations of 21 st century wars, we will consider how war and literary genre interweave in the texts under study and how genres both assimilate and become assimilated by the imperatives of wartime narration.



Our critical approach to the texts will interlace with our own critical approaches to writing. We will compose essays gradually, beginning with questions that emerge from our initial responses to the texts and working our way toward effective writing and argumentation. A series of in-class workshops will be held to assist students with brainstorming ideas, developing theses, and drafting and revising critical essays. Students will also exchange drafts of their essays in order to offer and receive feedback. (Please note: book list is subject to change.)"


Reading and Composition: Literature and the History of the Senses

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Tracy Auclair
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Hacker, Diana. Rules for Writers (5 th ed.).

Hertel, Ralf. Making Sense: Sense Perception in the British Novel of the 1980s and 1990s. Amsterdam, Neth.: Rodopi, 2005.

Howes, David, ed. Empire of the Senses: The Sensual Culture Reader. Oxford, Eng.: Berg, 2005.

Poems and Short Stories to be distributed in class. "

Description

" Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in the late 1960s, Michael McLuhan and Walter Ong argued that social developments like the introduction of writing, the invention of the printing press, and the increase in literacy shifted Western culture from an aural orientation toward a visual one. Since Ong�s and McLuhan�s pivotal studies on the rise of visualism in the West, historians have written extensively on the social construction of sight, documenting how it has been interpreted and deployed as an organizational principle in the realms of art, architecture, literature, science, economics, and government. Yet, as studies on vision proliferated, the role of the other senses was ignored.



This changed in the 1990s with the �sensuous revolution,� when academics from a range of disciplines began to focus on how senses other than sight mediate experience and produce knowledge. The dominance of vision in the western sensorium was denaturalized by anthropologists who described the alternative sensoriums of non-western societies. Within studies of the west, historians and sociologists traced the cultural construction of hearing, smell, touch, and taste, and revealed the relationships between these previously understudied senses to powerful religious, political, and gender ideologies.



In light of these studies, we will think about the representation of the senses in literature. More specifically, we will consider the following questions: what literary techniques do writers use to maximize readers� access to imaginary sights, sounds, smells, and textures? How do literary works that stimulate these sensory experiences provide a larger thematic and stylistic context that inscribes them with particular meanings? How do writers modify literary genres typically structured by visual experience so that these forms can accommodate an alternative sensorium?



Students will explore these issues while learning how to write clearly, read critically, argue persuasively. Emphasizing the development of these skills, this course will teach students how to evaluate authors� theses, formulate their own positions, and express them in clear sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Over the course of the semester, students will produce approximately 32 pages of writing. This writing will be broken down into three essays which will increase in length as the term progresses. "


Reading and Composition: Irish Literature

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Kea Anderson
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 106 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"*Please attend the first class meeting before purchasing any books or the reader.*

Elizabeth Bowen, The Last September

Maria Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent

James Joyce, from Dubliners

Frank McCourt, Angela�s Ashes

J. M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World

And a course reader including selections by Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats and Samuel Beckett. Students are advised but not required to purchase a writing handbook � Andrea Lunsford�s Everyday Writer is a good one."

Description

" Have you ever noticed that some of the most interesting �British� writers of the last two centuries are actually Irish or, at least, have a significant connection to Ireland? What is it about this place that gives these authors the itch to write about it? Students in this course will reflect on this question while gaining an introductory overview of Irish literature and culture from 1800 to the present. For the purposes of this class, �Irish literature� includes literature written by Irish people as well as about them, before and after Ireland gained independence from Britain in 1922. Most of our readings were originally written in English; a small portion have been translated from Irish into English.



Good news! You do not have to risk life and limb, as some were willing to do for independence, to see �revolutionary� advances in your reading and writing skills in this class; you will merely have to work very hard and have patience. We will break down the seemingly mystical talents involved in successful literary analysis and argumentative writing into a number of specific skills that you can actually practice � identifying and selecting textual evidence, incorporating it effectively into your work, crafting thesis statements, developing logically-progressing arguments, even honing that ineffable flair called style. A range of in-class and take-home writing assignments will aid you in drafting the five short papers (2-4 pages each) you will produce for this class. To emphasize the importance of revision, the class also features peer-review workshops guaranteed to bring out every student�s secret love of group work. "


Reading and Composition: Bad Managements

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Jami Bartlett
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"William Makepeace Thackeray, Barry Lyndon (1844)

Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)

Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence (1920)

Graham Greene, The End of the Affair (1951)

John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces (1978)

Martin Scorsese, The Age of Innocence (1993)

Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, The Office (2001-03)

Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer (2005)

Course reader from University Copy (2425 Channing Way; 510-549-2335)"

Description

" This course begins your training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your critical attention and argumentation skills through short expository papers, in-class essays, and informal close readings. You will be responsible for writing and revising 3 papers (5-6 pages in length), two essay exams, three rounds of peer editing, and weekly responses to required reading.



The courses that comprise Berkeley�s reading and composition sequence have been designed to create a community of writers across the university curriculum: students read interdisciplinary texts, interact with colleagues from other departments, and write for many different audiences. To this end, �Bad Managements� will introduce you to many different kinds of writing, from student essays to game theory, business school literature on �the heart of leadership,� psychoanalytic approaches to trauma and self-management, and film and literary criticism. My hope is that a topic like this, with its stress on the forms that we use to contain and express ourselves, will bring us closer to the compromises of and in our own writing.



What is course is about:



I enjoy seeing the lengths to which bad managements go to preserve what they call their independence�which really just means their jobs.

-Donald Trump, The Art of the Deal (1987)



To cast in my lot with Jekyll was to die to those appetites which I had long secretly indulged and had of late begun to pamper. To cast it in with Hyde was to die to a thousand interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow and for ever, despised and friendless.

-Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)



One of the most striking absences in my Stevenson epigraph is the identity of its �I,� for as even a casual familiarity with the story tells us, Jekyll and Hyde are the same person. In order to cast in my lot with one or the other I�d have to transcend them both, making the decision as pointless as the novel would be without its drama. This course will begin with the assumption that stories about self-management (including the stories we tell to and about ourselves) are driven by this kind of foreclosure, a friction that develops after we already know what we are. Donald Trump, no stranger to the kinds of management-speak that means �jobs� when it says �independence,� wouldn�t be wrong to think of Jekyll and Hyde as a kind of corporation, a body with bodies inside. For just as euphemisms do two kinds of work�syntactically using words like �independence� to stand in for a group of correlated interests while pragmatically clueing us into the vulnerable �jobs� beneath them�the logic of incorporation puts its bodies to work in unequal and often unrewarding roles. If the choice of becoming-Jekyll or becoming-Hyde requires incompatible costs, we know they aren�t equivalent, and that it�s only after one incorporates the other that it becomes impossible to be both.



Each of the novels we�ll be reading this semester dramatizes the negotiation that takes place once its roles have been assigned, and looks for new ways to maintain them: Thackeray�s con artist misrecognizes himself, Wharton�s Newland struggles with submission, and Stevenson and Toole work to contain their characters� disgusting�and disgustingly literal�leakiness. These are perspectives with real costs: the ethics of personal and social relationships, identities, and obligations are clearly at stake, so while we will never see the successful transgression that the illusion of �I� (or its �independence�) promises, we will always feel its corporate weight. A closer look at these �bad managements� will reveal all the friction there is in a done deal, giving us cause to review the knotty organization of our own self-expression, and the energy to be found in a foreclosed place. "


Reading and Composition: Beautiful Objections

English R1A

Section: 9
Instructor: Katharine Wright
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

Charles Dickens, Hard Times

Carolyn Forche (editor), Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness"

Description

"There are some gems of cultural critque in the English language. We will consider just a few and see what we can find out about how they accomplish both beauty and critique. We'll read Jamaica Kincaid's smoldering A Small Place for a look at colonialization and Virginia Woolf's reasonable and angry A Room of One's Own, on the place of women. How does Charles Dickens manage to be both funny and cutting as he looks at a Victorian education in his Hard Times? Can political poetry be art? Can striving for beauty ever undermine a writer's political purpose? We'll probably have to devise a definition for ""beauty."" There's lots to talk about and write about here.



You will, through frequent writing exercises and short essays, challenge or support the authors. In the process, you will isolate some of your own concerns and develop your own arguments. Class time will include discussion of each others' work."


Reading and Composition: Perspectivisms

English R1A

Section: 10
Instructor: Chris Eagle
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Descartes, Rene. Meditations on First Philosophy

Kant, Immanuel. �On a Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns�

Kurosawa, Ikira. Rashomon

Lakoff, George. Metaphors We Live By

Linklater, Richard. Waking Life

Plato. The Republic

Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver�s Travels

Wilde, O. The Importance of Being Earnest, �The Decay of Lying�

Woolf, V. To the Lighthouse"

Description

" This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth and Reality, and applying those debates to works of literature and to films. We will spend the first few weeks familiarizing ourselves with some of these debates through brief selected readings in the history of philosophy by Plato, Descartes, and Nietzsche. There are two guiding questions to this course. The first is whether Truth is an objective viewpoint on our world or a set of subjective interpretations. The second is the role that �lying� plays in society, socially, politically, and artistically. We will discuss these ideas in relation to works by Oscar Wilde, Plato, Nietzsche, and Virginia Woolf. In the case of Plato and Wilde, I anticipate that we will explore what it means for Wilde (vs. what it means for Plato) to write in the form of dialogues, a conversational form which embraces a multiplicity of perspectives. Likewise, I expect that we will come to appreciate the �philosophy� behind different writing styles and literary techniques. In the last few weeks of the semester, we will take up these same issues in films, focusing on films that deal with issues of perspective such as Kurosawa�s Rashomon.



Our method throughout will be in-class close analyses of the novels, dialogues, and films. We will focus on developing your close-reading skills and improving your writing through weekly short essays, as well as a revision process of all longer papers. A portion of in-class time will also be spent �workshopping� each other�s writing. While 1A is primarily designed to improve your writing, it is also a seminar, and so I anticipate lively discussion in which all members take an equal part in the conversation. "


Reading and Composition: The Once and Future King

English R1A

Section: 11
Instructor: Andrea Lankin
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Selections from Geoffrey of Monmouth, History of the Kings of Britain. Ca. 1134. Ed., trans. Lewis Thorpe. London: Penguin Books, 1966. Repr. 1977.

Selections from Malory, Thomas. Le Morte D�Arthur: The Winchester Manuscript. Ed., abridged by Helen Cooper. Oxford World�s Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Mark Twain. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur�s Court. 1889. Ed. Bernard L. Stein. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1979.

T. H. White. The Sword in the Stone. In The Once and Future King. 1958. Ace, 1987.

Selections from Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon. 1982. Del Rey. Repr. 2001.

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. Sixth edition. New York : Modern Language Association of America , 2003. "

Description

" Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur is one of these. This class will begin with two of the most influential medieval and early modern Arthurian texts, Geoffrey of Monmouth�s twelfth-century History of the Kings of Britain and Thomas Malory�s fifteenth-century Le Morte D�Arthur. We will move to nineteenth- and twentieth-century portrayals of Arthur and his kingdom. We will consider the following questions, among others: How are individual treatments of the Arthurian narrative in dialogue with each other? How does each variant respond to cultural stresses from the time and place in which it was produced? What is it that makes Arthur and his kingdom so compelling?



We will be asking and answering these questions in a series of short (2-4 page) essays that you will write and edit over the course of this class. As this is a reading and composition class, the project of writing is central. During the semester, you will gain skills in close reading, argumentation, writing and supporting thesis statements, structuring papers, and revision. "


Reading and Composition: Marrying the Master

English R1A

Section: 12
Instructor: Natalia Cecire
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 255 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

"Bront�, Jane Eyre

Brown, Clotel

Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Richardson, Pamela

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers (6th ed.)

Joseph Williams, Style: Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace (7th ed.)

A course reader "

Description

Marriage has historically been seen as women�s primary source of socioeconomic mobility; whereas male ascendancy is narrated explicitly in terms of material wealth and status, the woman�s acquisition of socioeconomic status is narrated in affective terms. In this course, we will examine narratives of heterosexual romantic love that explicitly mark class and status differentials, often extreme ones. In addition to teasing out the socioeconomic structure of romantic love narratives, we will develop strategies for reading well, thinking carefully, and writing clear analytical prose. Texts studied will include versions of �Cinderella,� Pamela, Clotel, Jane Eyre, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, selected writings by Hannah Cullwick, and selected criticism and theory.


Reading and Composition: Writing about Reading and Reading about Writing

English R1A

Section: 13
Instructor: Karen Leibowitz
Time: TTh 3:30-5:00
Location: Wheeler 221


Other Readings and Media

"Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography

Frederick Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

Virginia Woolf, A Room of One�s Own

Italo Calvino, If on a Winter�s Night a Traveller

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers



Course Reader containing texts by John Keats, John Styart Mill, Henry Adams, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bishop, and other readers and writers"

Description

"In this course, students will not only practice reading and writing but also reflect on the meaning of reading and writing in autobiography, fiction, and poetry. We�ll discuss how societies have restricted reading and writing, what �good� reading and writing are (and who decides), and the pleasures of reading and writing. While we consider the potential uses and abuses of reading and writing, students will also reflect on their own experiences working and playing with words.



Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion and write in-class responses to the readings. Each student will write a short (2-page) essay, then three 5-page essays, each of which will be revised. We�ll treat writing as a process�working from thesis-formation, to outlines, and through multiple drafts. Students will respond to each others� work in both written and oral comments. "


Reading and Composition: Grimmer Than Grimm

English R1A

Section: 14
Instructor: Katharine Wright
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Maria Tatar (editor), Classic Fairy Tales

Donna Jo Napoli, The Magic Circle

Robert Coover, Briar Rose

Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber"

Description

"Let's take an adult look at six classic folktales (and their variations) often relegated to the children's room. What are they really about? Why is their cultural influence so persistent? Folklorists, psychoanalysts, feminists, poets-- all have something to say about these tales. We'll read and react to some of them. Then we'll look at how some modern writers rework these stories to great effect. Robert Coover takes on Sleeping Beauty; Donna Jo Napoli, the witch in the sugary house. Angela Carter throws herself sensuously into her remade world, and Anne Sexton domesticates the tales in ways very different from Disney.



You will be writing a number of essays and response papers on the readings, and in the process you will experiment with several critical stances.. Then you will revise your own writings as you figure out more and more what it is you want to say. There will be an option to revise a tale yourself, and write an analysis of your own work. Class time will include discussion of each others' papers, as well as of the readings."


Reading and Composition: Immigrant Form

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Swati Rana
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Dictee

Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy

Ram�n P�rez, Diary of an Undocumented Immigrant

Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers, 5th edition

Required Course Reader "

Description

Immigrant form will serve as our forum for developing research and investigative skills. We will read a set of texts by and about immigrants in the United States in the context of post-1965 immigration, ultimately focusing on immigrant form in the post-9/11 era. Texts will consist of a variety of different genres, including poetry, fiction, short stories, histories, critical analysis, as well as newspaper and other media accounts. Our work will be organized around the following questions: How can we define the parameters of immigrant form? What form does the figure of the immigrant take across different genres? What do interracial or interethnic comparisons of immigrant form reveal? What work does immigrant form do in a given textual or historical context? How can we understand immigrant form in relation to other formations, particularly nationalism, nativism, and the war on terror? This course is designed to enable you to develop writing and critical thinking skills learned in the R1A course. There will be an additional focus on developing a research project, organizing and conducting research, reading and understanding sources, and writing a research paper. The first half of the semester will be devoted to exercises in argumentation and exposition, several short writing assignments, as well as self-editing and peer revision. In the second half of the semester, you will propose a question to investigate and develop a research prospectus and annotated bibliography. Your work will culminate in an oral presentation and a final essay of approximately ten pages.


Reading and Composition: Writing From Memory

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Marisa Libbon
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Charlotte Bront�, Jane Eyre

Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America

Bob Dylan, Chronicles, Volume 1

Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping

Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Sixth ed.)

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers (Fifth ed.)

Course Reader



Required Viewing (to be shown in class):

Martin Scorsese (dir.), No Direction Home: Bob Dylan "

Description

"At the beginning of Trout Fishing in America, Richard Brautigan frets over accurately remembering and recording his own memories, saying, �I�d like to get it right.� What does this mean? �Getting it right� may not always mean reporting it the way it happened, or trying to tell an objective truth. In this course, we�ll read a variety of �autobiographical� writing in order to explore how an author (or a fictional character acting as an author) makes and manages his or her own memories. We�ll also consider how texts make a collective memory via what and how their makers choose to remember and record. As we read throughout the semester, it will be important for us to keep in mind that everything in the texts before us was a choice: what a writer chooses to leave out is just as, if not more, important than what he or she chooses to put into the text. Crucial semester-long inquiries will include the choices writers make and how writers manage their texts.



The goal of this course is to improve critical reading, thinking, researching, and writing. There will be weekly writing assignments and exercises, as well as two research papers, to be written and revised over the semester. The first, shorter paper will involve close work with primary sources. The second, longer paper will build on the work of the first paper, but will involve at least three secondary sources. In consultation with me, you will choose your own paper topics. We�ll develop methods of approaching texts, posing useful questions, and constructing clear and convincing arguments. We�ll also constantly work on your writing skills, from grammar to argumentation, ideally to write papers that you think are interesting, provocative, and useful. "


Reading and Composition: Postcolonial Gothic

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Sarah Townsend
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Banks, The Wasp Factory

Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Hacker, Rules for Writers

McCabe, The Butcher Boy

Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea

Shakespeare, The Tempest

Film screening of Jane Eyre

And a course reader containing shorter selections of fiction and nonfiction. "

Description

"In recent years, literary scholars have taken an interest in the sub-genre �Postcolonial Gothic,� examining how and why colonial and postcolonial writers employ elements of the Gothic genre in their portrayals of racial difference and of power. This course asks similar questions in a different way, stepping outside the standard understandings of Gothic literature and of postcolonial writing to investigate the long-standing affinity between the two. This semester we will set aside traditional generic historical frames (the Gothic as a primarily 18th- and 19th- century phenomenon, postcolonial writing as a 20th-century product) and instead propose the Postcolonial Gothic as a mode of cultural imagination, born of early imperial encounters with the racial Other and circulated increasingly during the European colonial expansions of the 17th through 19th centuries. The Gothic novel and, much later, postcolonial concerns certainly shaped this racial Gothic imagination into predictable and recognizable forms; but Gothic writing about race pre-dated what literary scholars recognize as the birth of the Gothic genre and continues to develop today in the writings of recently decolonized parts of the world, as well as in more popular arenas such as the language of American politics on the subject of terrorism.



We begin in 1611 with Shakespeare�s The Tempest (performed over a century before Horace Walpole, the �Father of Gothic Literature,� was even born!) and finish in 1992 with Patrick McCabe�s The Butcher Boy, set in a 1960s Ireland preoccupied with television, John Wayne westerns, comic books, and Cold War politics�in other words, an Ireland that has seemingly forgotten all about its colonial past. The course argues that both works, however, are profoundly Gothic and profoundly postcolonial. In sum, this semester we will test and develop the hypothesis that Gothic literature has always been a little (post)colonially minded, and that (post)colonial writing has always been�and always will be�a little Gothic.



English R1B will situate these readings and interrogations around a series of writing assignments. The primary goals of this course are to develop your ability to read and write about literature, and to strengthen your research skills. You will be required to complete frequent reading responses, short essays on literary analysis, and a longer research essay. You will also be required to revise everything you write and to peer-edit the work of your classmates."


Reading and Composition: Literature and the Environment

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: Jhoanna Infante
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Wordsworth, W. and Coleridge, S.T.: Lyrical Ballads

Blake, W.: Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Hardy, T.: The Return of the Native

Course Reader "

Description

"Industrialization transformed the landscape of nineteenth century Britain. Poets and novelists of this period often expressed, to use Thomas Hardy�s words, the �ache of modernism�: they longed for a simpler time in which human beings lived according to the rhythms of nature. In this course, we will investigate whether or not these authors should be thought of as early environmentalists. We will consider the following questions: How did they imagine, remember, or reconstruct the past? Did their sense of themselves as �belated,� or �beyond history,� limit the transformative potential of their works? Is a fearful and antagonistic relationship to nature a basic and ineradicable part of the Western psyche and its literature? Does eco-criticism, which attempts to recover the ecological consciousness of this period, provide convincing readings of these texts, or are these texts too deeply implicated in the project of dominating and exploiting nature? Reading includes poetry by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Blake, and Hardy; prose by Wordsworth and Shelley; one novel by Hardy; and literary criticism, including excerpts from Keith Thomas� Man and the Natural World, Jonathan Bate�s Romantic Ecology and Song of the Earth, and Don Gifford�s The Farther Shore. During the latter weeks of the class, students will be required to identify a research topic and seek out other relevant primary and/or critical texts.



In this course, students will develop skills in composition, argumentation, and scholarly research. The writing requirement includes two essays, each eight or more pages in length, as well as multiple revisions and, in the case of the second essay, written evidence of research, including an annotated bibliography and footnotes. The curriculum emphasizes a multi-stage writing process that includes close reading, discussion, pre-writing, drafting, workshops, panel presentations, and revision. "


Reading and Composition: TBA

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Melissa Fabros
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 206 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

No course description is available at this time.

Description

No course description is available at this time.


Reading and Composition: In and Out of Realism

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Paul Kerschen
Time: TTh 8:00-9:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis

Juan Rulfo, Pedro P�ramo

Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior

Denis Johnson, Jesus' Son

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers

A course reader containing stories, poems, and essays."

Description

"How is literature to represent human experience? A prevalent strategy in English literature since the eighteenth century has been that of the realist novel, which presents a rich and detailed account of ordinary life�or some near approximation. But a countercurrent has also flourished of writing which diverges in various ways from our familiar reality. Such writing has gone by various names over the decades: allegory, surrealism, magical realism, science fiction, horror. In this course we will examine these and other genres, asking questions such as: What kind of logic binds these works to our world? Are they an escape from reality or a comment upon it? And might they tell us things that their authors never intended? We will also keep the idea of the realist novel in the background, since one effect of these works should be to make us stop and ask what realism actually is.



In addition to reading these works critically�and of course enjoying them, as they were meant to be enjoyed�we will also work hard on skillful writing about literature. Students will extend their prior skills to produce more complex and extended arguments, and will carry out a substantial amount of independent research on topics of their own choosing. Two shorter papers will lead into a final research project of 8-10 pages, involving a good deal of critique and revision over the semester. "


Reading and Composition: Mariners, Renegades and Castaways

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Cody Marrs
Time: TTh 9:30-11:00
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (An Inside Narrative) , Benito Cereno, Selected Poems

Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Richard Henry Dana, Jr., Two Years Before the Mast

Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom

Diane Hacker, Rules for Writers (5 th edition)

A course reader including selections from the following: Venture Smith, A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa; Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic; Edgar Allan Poe, �MS Found in a Bottle�; Cotton Mather, Instructions to the Living, from the Condition of the Dead; Walt Whitman, �Passage to India�; Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History; Thomas Farber, On Water"

Description

"This course, designed to train you in the practice of critical reading and writing, will focus on literature about sailors and slaves in the era of Atlantic revolution. We will examine sea-chronicles, novels, ballads, and slave-narratives in order to ask: How have conceptions of liberty and servitude taken shape from the eighteenth century onwards? How has the sea functioned as a political metaphor to negotiate anxieties about race, gender, and the nature and origins of government? And how has the idea of America � always changing, always potent � been mobilized through the imagery and experiences of workers on the sea � �mariners, renegades, and castaways,� as Melville dubs them in Moby-Dick? In and via these motley texts, we will investigate the various forms of freedom and unfreedom � from indentured servitude to wage-labor and outright slavery � upon which the modern Atlantic world has been, and continues to be, based.



Since this class is meant to help you develop your writing skills, considerable emphasis will be placed on learning the methods and techniques of argumentative exposition. In the first half of the semester students will compose a series of short essays (3-4 pages) which will be shared with the class. After this groundwork is completed, each student will compose a research prospectus, and, at the end of the semester, produce a final essay of approximately 10 pages. "


Reading and Composition: Highway 61

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Alia Yap Pan
Time: TTh 11-12.30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God

Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon"

Description

" In his song �Highway 61� Bob Dylan suggests we can solve all of our problems by taking to the road. The song also expresses the American love affair with mobility. Through twentieth-century American novels, we will examine the circumstances that give rise to movement as well as the physical and social structures that facilitate leaving home. The characters in these works set out to fight wars, find work, escape relationships, evade the law and search for answers. We will explore how race, class and gender factor into how and why one becomes a wanderer. Towards the end of the term, we will consider how these travel narratives help to define what it means to be American.



The aim of this course is to refine the critical reading and writing skills gained in English R1A and prepare them to produce a research paper. Good writing comes from good reading and in this class we will closely read and discuss the required texts. We will also work on how to develop a thesis, utilize an outline, organize an argument and use secondary sources. Writing requires rewriting and in this class students will revise their work based on comments they receive in office hours and from peer editing. Students will also be expected to use secondary sources in their essays and we will learn how to do research on literary texts. "


Reading and Composition: The Power of Theater: Tracking the Social Role of Dramatic Texts

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: Matthew Sergi
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 20 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Rules for Writers, 5 th Ed. (Diana Hacker)

Prometheus Bound (Aeschylus)

Hamlet (William Shakespeare)

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (Tom Stoppard)

Corpus Christi (Terence McNally)

A course reader



Film screenings:

Waiting for Guffman

The Passion of the Christ"

Description

"How powerful is theater�and in what way is it powerful? Does it have a point, a purpose? Should it? What role does it play in the culture that produces it? What role does it play in the culture that it produces? And how has this role changed over time? Does theater with a social agenda necessarily fail because it preaches to the converted? Or does it succeed for exactly that reason?



This R1B course is built to refine your expository and argumentative writing, and to develop your research skills: the social role of dramatic texts will act as a central discussion point for student discussion, argument, and inquiry. Your first two assignments will be an ungraded diagnostic exercise and a 4-5 page essay, using materials provided by the instructor. Subsequent assignments, while the length requirements won�t change much, will give you more and more responsibility for your own research: a group research project, a solo research essay, and an analysis/critique of one live theatrical production of your choice. Assignments will go through a drafting and rewriting process, in peer workshops and one-on-one meetings with the instructor, which will support and guide you as a writer and researcher.



Course reading in this R1B is organized around four storylines: the myth of Prometheus, the tragedy of Hamlet, and the Bible chapters on Isaac�s sacrifice and Jesus� crucifixion. We�ll track various retellings of these in dramatic adaptation and re-adaptation, examining multiple formats (most of them relatively quick reads, plus two required film screenings). Each has its own sense of social purpose (or resistance to social purpose): Athenian tragedy, closet drama, activist theater, existential farce, avant-garde drama, Broadway comedy, Hollywood spectacle, operatic score, medieval civic pageant, and a particularly bad case of community theater in Blaine, Missouri (courtesy of Christopher Guest). We will encounter plays-within-plays four times; we will encounter Mel Gibson at least twice. "


Reading and Composition: Getting Real: Exploring Passing and Authenticity

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: D. Bednarska
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Passing by Nella Larsen

Tar Baby by Toni Morrison

Exile and Pride by Eli Clare

A Writer�s Reference by Diane Hacker

Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

A course reader location TBD "

Description

"This course will examine imperatives and anxieties about authenticity in relation to race, ethnicity, gender and disability. Concern about who is and is not a part of these social categories is not simply a contemporary phenomenon, but also a major theme within literary texts. We will investigate passing through posing such questions as what causes the pressure to pass as a particular ethnicity, race, gender or ability? How do these texts represent people passing or failing to pass? How do we as readers decide and what are the consequences? What do we mean when we talk about authenticity in relation to social identities? How does the meaning of authenticity change in relation to different texts and authors? What implications does authenticity have for notions of belonging? The goal of posing these questions will not be to arrive at one predetermined answer, but rather complicate and deepen our understanding of what it means when questions of authenticity are at stake. Through the assigned readings we will come to understand passing as a varied and context-dependent social practice. We will also interrogate the concept of authentic identity and look at formulations from the nineteenth century into the present day.



While exploring these themes of authenticity and passing you will also be developing as a writer and researcher. RIB is intended to build upon the writing and argumentation skills developed in RIA, while integrating effective research skills. You will be writing several short assignments based on the weekly reading that will lead to the development of a larger research project that you design. We will address thesis construction, developing and sustaining an argument, dealing with counterevidence, and organization as well as grammar, syntax and style. You will be asked to develop and apply these skills both to your own work and the work of others. "


Reading and Composition: Hybrid Writing

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Talissa Ford
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Dick, P.K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Equiano, O.: An Interesting Narrative

Grossman, A. Soon I Will Be Invincible

Shelley, M.: Frankenstein

Spiegelman, A.: Maus

Lunsford, A.: Easy Writer

Course Reader "

Description

"An ex-slave, a super-villain, a monster, an android, and a Jewish mouse are among the starring figures in the books we�ll be reading. Their experiences are vastly different, but what they share is a particular response to their exclusion from the majority: all of them form hybrid identities to bridge the gap. Taken together, their stories call attention to how categories of �human� and �inhuman� get constructed, and what coping strategies are left to those who wind up on the wrong side of that divide.



Hybridity is the method as well as the theme of this course. Just as the figures in these texts build imperfect, hybrid identities to make themselves legible to the world, we will treat writing as a Frankensteinian project: putting things back together once we�ve taken them apart, and building out of all those pieces (the leftover ones that look like they don�t belong anywhere) some coherent whole.



Writing Requirements: three essays, substantial revisions, research presentations, peer-review workshops "


Reading and Composition: The Historical Novel

English R1B

Section: 13
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Zach Gordon
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Don DeLillo, Libra

Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle

Walter Scott, Waverley

Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor�s Tale (volumes I and II)

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers 5 th edition

Course reader "

Description

"This class is intended to develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of the historical novel. Over the course of the semester we will examine this genre (which, very generally, is defined by the centrality of historical events for the course of the narrative) in four distinct forms, all the while enriching our readings of these works and our in-class discussion with a few key theoretical texts. Beginning with Waverley, which will serve as our model for the historical novel, we will be asking how history and fiction can be defined in relation to each other, and how their various modes of coexistence within our texts conform to, and complicate, such definitions.



This is a writing intensive course and, as such, a significant portion of the class will be dedicated to refining your expository skills. A total of 3 papers will be required: a 3-page diagnostic essay and two longer essays, the last of which will incorporate independent research."


Reading and Composition: Eating Meat

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Charles Legere
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Giorgio Agamben, The Open: Man and Animal

Michel de Montaigne, Essays

Michael Pollan, The Omnivore�s Dilemma

Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind

A course reader with works and excerpts from works by Wendell Berry, Pierre Bourdieu, Jacques Derrida, Emily Dickinson, Ralph Ellison, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Hass, Sir Albert Howard, Claude Levi-Strauss, Herman Melville, Peter Singer, Henry David Thoreau, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman. "

Description

A course on the literature of carnivory. In this class, we�ll look at essays, novels, and poems about culture and diet. We�ll explore concepts like taste, hunger, food chains, trophic levels, nutrition, predation, and domestication. You�ll write a close reading of a poem about the carbon cycle, a critical analysis of a work in prose, and, a research paper on the ethics of consumption. Ultimately, we�ll address the diner�s responsibility to the dined upon; and, at the end of the semester, we�ll hold a conference to present our findings to each other. This course is open, of course, to meat-eaters and vegetarians alike.