Announcement of Classes: Fall 2007


English Drama to 1603

English 114A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 101 Wurster


Other Readings and Media

For more information on this course, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

Description

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Reading and Composition: Grappling with the Postmodern

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Franklin Melendez
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Don DeLillo,White Noise

Brett Easton Ellis, American Psycho

Bernadette Corporation, Reena Spaulings"

Description

"This course is designed develop and polish college-level writing. By engaging the primary works of the class, we will focus on critical thinking skills, close reading/ analysis, argumentation and organization. We will pursue these objectives through the course topic which introduces the complex problem of Postmodernism.



Despite the frequent deployment of the term �postmodern� its definition remains vague, ranging from the fuzzy to the completely opaque. The central questions driving the course will revolve around competing models for understanding both postmodernity and Postmodernism. These questions include: how do we differentiate the modern from the postmodern? Can we define postmodernity as a clearly demarcated historical period, or are its boundaries more fluid? Can we identify postmodernism as a style, movement or trend in the arts? Can we trace a genealogy for postmodernism? What are its material roots? In particular, what is its relationship to the rise of mass culture, and specific media such as film, television, video and digital technologies? How does postmodernity affect major categories of identity formation such as gender, class and race?



Discussions will focus on the primary texts (film and literary); however, our discussions will also open onto other disciplines with supplementary materials. Some of these materials will include essays, handouts and in-class slide presentations on the visual arts; these will touch upon the influence of the Surrealist and Dada movements, the emergence of Pop Art, and the evolution of �Appropriation Art� in the eighties. We will also engage the role of television and music video. The aim is to obtain a sense of the interdisciplinary nature of the phenomenon, and trace how it emerges in different contexts and media.



The coursework will consist of completing assigned readings/viewings, vigorous discussion participation, in-class exercises, weekly writing assignments, and formal essays. We will also incorporate substantial essay revisions to build upon each student�s work, and address specific issues. "


Reading and Composition: Staging Citizenship in English Renaissance Drama

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Joseph Ring
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Francis Beaumont, The Knight of the Burning Pestle

Thomas Dekker, The Shoemaker�s Holiday

Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair

Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, George Chapman, Eastward Ho!

Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare, Othello

Frederick Crews, The Random House Handbook

A Course Reader. "

Description

"Course Description: This course will focus on representations of citizenship in early modern drama. We will begin with several Elizabethan plays whose central characters are racially or religiously marked as �other,� and hence excluded from citizenship. We will proceed through a series of so-called Jacobean �city� or �citizen� comedies, whose main characters�city-dwellers from the merchant class�often find themselves in shady parts of London, crowded together with marginal figures, such as vagabonds, petty chapmen, criminals, and actors. Among the major questions of the course will be: Who is a citizen? Who is included, excluded, and why? What light does �citizen� as a narrow class marker shed on an emerging political sense of citizenship, and vice versa? While we will pay attention to matters of theme and character, we will also concentrate on dramatic structures and conventions and on the richness of the plays� language. Principal readings will be drawn from Beaumont, Chapman, Dekker, Jonson, Marlowe, and Shakespeare. Secondary readings may be selected to provide historical background, provoke discussion, or illustrate contemporary critical approaches to the plays.



If arguments about the civic dimension of rhetoric have any merit, then perhaps the most important staging of citizenship in the class will happen in students� written work. In any case, this course is primarily designed to teach you how to work with principal modes of academic rhetoric: description, analysis, and argument. You will be required to write, in addition to a diagnostic essay and a number of short writing assignments, at least two formal essays, each of which you will substantially revise. As each student will also workshop these essays with a peer-editing group, you must be prepared to write detailed comments on other students� work. "


Reading and Composition: Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Literature

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Peter Goodwin
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Karel Capek, War With the Newts

Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid�s Tale

Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, The Watchmen

Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Janet Gardner, Writing About Literature"

Description

"War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life�we�ve learned to live with all of it; but a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to the horrors of these regrettably commonplace aspects of life in the twenty-first century. This course will provide a brief tour through this blasted literary landscape. Due to budget constraints, radiation suits will not be provided.



The primary aim of this course is to develop students� expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. Students will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, and organize textual evidence and analysis, and make forceful interpretive arguments. "


Reading and Composition: Shakespeare and Chekov

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Vitaliy Eyber
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"(Please use the specified editions: notes and line numbers are different in different editions of Shakespeare; as for Chekhov, we obviously have to read the same translation.)

Othello , Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004

Twelfth Night , Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004.

Anton Chekhov, Selected Plays (Norton Critical Edition), 2004.

William Strunk and E.B. White, The Elements of Style (any edition)"

Description

" This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I have chosen two plays by Shakespeare and two by Chekhov. I think I can teach you more about these two playwrights�one, the most often-performed dramatist world-wide, the other, possibly, the second most-performed�by focusing closely on just four plays: Othello, Twelfth Night, Three Sisters, and Uncle Vanya. We�ll look at these plays so as both to enjoy them (at a reasonably leisurely pace) and try to determine what made them so popular with generations of readers and playgoers. In our discussions we�ll try to cover a broad array of subjects, and you will certainly enjoy great latitude in choosing your own topics. I�m not concerned with leaving you by the end of the semester with a jumble of facts that one is supposed to know about Shakespeare or Chekhov. However, in order to facilitate your understanding of the works you�re writing about, their frame of reference, I will from time to time take up various topics of Shakespearean and Chekhovian lore. This course is meant to accomplish a double objective: refining your aesthetic appreciation of literature and enabling you to effectively share this appreciation with your readers.



Consequently, my main concern will be with developing your skills of close analytical reading and finding efficient ways of translating those skills into writing articulate and sophisticated academic prose. Other than the four plays, I will ask you to read several scholarly essays and to see at least one film or television adaptation of each play. You�ll write a short essay every couple of weeks and have a chance to revise some of them. You can expect various assignments aimed at improving the mechanics of your prose, polishing your grammar, improving you vocabulary, etc. We will conduct in-class writing assignments and peer-review exercises regularly. The assignments will insure that by the end of the semester you know what a solid academic essay looks like and can produce one of your own. "


Reading and Composition: War and Literary Form

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Marguerite Nguyen
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun

All Quiet on the Western Front

Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Elizabeth Bishop, selected poems

Assia Djebar, selected works

Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Le Minh Khue, �Tony D.�

Herman Melville, �Benito Cereno�

Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Jarhead

Alfred Lord Tennyson, �Maud�

Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse"

Description

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century texts written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up different expectations for the representation of war, how social and historical conflicts during wartime subvert conventions of literary genre, and how issues of race, gender, and class underpin these formal subversions. Investigating texts ranging from Tennyson�s poem �Maud� (1855) to journalistic representations of 21 st century wars, we will consider how war and literary genre interweave in the texts under study and how genres both assimilate and become assimilated by the imperatives of wartime narration.



Our critical approach to the texts will interlace with our own critical approaches to writing. We will compose essays gradually, beginning with questions that emerge from our initial responses to the texts and working our way toward effective writing and argumentation. A series of in-class workshops will be held to assist students with brainstorming ideas, developing theses, and drafting and revising critical essays. Students will also exchange drafts of their essays in order to offer and receive feedback. (Please note: book list is subject to change.)"


Reading and Composition: Literature and the History of the Senses

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Tracy Auclair
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Hacker, Diana. Rules for Writers (5 th ed.).

Hertel, Ralf. Making Sense: Sense Perception in the British Novel of the 1980s and 1990s. Amsterdam, Neth.: Rodopi, 2005.

Howes, David, ed. Empire of the Senses: The Sensual Culture Reader. Oxford, Eng.: Berg, 2005.

Poems and Short Stories to be distributed in class. "

Description

" Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in the late 1960s, Michael McLuhan and Walter Ong argued that social developments like the introduction of writing, the invention of the printing press, and the increase in literacy shifted Western culture from an aural orientation toward a visual one. Since Ong�s and McLuhan�s pivotal studies on the rise of visualism in the West, historians have written extensively on the social construction of sight, documenting how it has been interpreted and deployed as an organizational principle in the realms of art, architecture, literature, science, economics, and government. Yet, as studies on vision proliferated, the role of the other senses was ignored.



This changed in the 1990s with the �sensuous revolution,� when academics from a range of disciplines began to focus on how senses other than sight mediate experience and produce knowledge. The dominance of vision in the western sensorium was denaturalized by anthropologists who described the alternative sensoriums of non-western societies. Within studies of the west, historians and sociologists traced the cultural construction of hearing, smell, touch, and taste, and revealed the relationships between these previously understudied senses to powerful religious, political, and gender ideologies.



In light of these studies, we will think about the representation of the senses in literature. More specifically, we will consider the following questions: what literary techniques do writers use to maximize readers� access to imaginary sights, sounds, smells, and textures? How do literary works that stimulate these sensory experiences provide a larger thematic and stylistic context that inscribes them with particular meanings? How do writers modify literary genres typically structured by visual experience so that these forms can accommodate an alternative sensorium?



Students will explore these issues while learning how to write clearly, read critically, argue persuasively. Emphasizing the development of these skills, this course will teach students how to evaluate authors� theses, formulate their own positions, and express them in clear sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Over the course of the semester, students will produce approximately 32 pages of writing. This writing will be broken down into three essays which will increase in length as the term progresses. "


Reading and Composition: Irish Literature

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Kea Anderson
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 106 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"*Please attend the first class meeting before purchasing any books or the reader.*

Elizabeth Bowen, The Last September

Maria Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent

James Joyce, from Dubliners

Frank McCourt, Angela�s Ashes

J. M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World

And a course reader including selections by Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats and Samuel Beckett. Students are advised but not required to purchase a writing handbook � Andrea Lunsford�s Everyday Writer is a good one."

Description

" Have you ever noticed that some of the most interesting �British� writers of the last two centuries are actually Irish or, at least, have a significant connection to Ireland? What is it about this place that gives these authors the itch to write about it? Students in this course will reflect on this question while gaining an introductory overview of Irish literature and culture from 1800 to the present. For the purposes of this class, �Irish literature� includes literature written by Irish people as well as about them, before and after Ireland gained independence from Britain in 1922. Most of our readings were originally written in English; a small portion have been translated from Irish into English.



Good news! You do not have to risk life and limb, as some were willing to do for independence, to see �revolutionary� advances in your reading and writing skills in this class; you will merely have to work very hard and have patience. We will break down the seemingly mystical talents involved in successful literary analysis and argumentative writing into a number of specific skills that you can actually practice � identifying and selecting textual evidence, incorporating it effectively into your work, crafting thesis statements, developing logically-progressing arguments, even honing that ineffable flair called style. A range of in-class and take-home writing assignments will aid you in drafting the five short papers (2-4 pages each) you will produce for this class. To emphasize the importance of revision, the class also features peer-review workshops guaranteed to bring out every student�s secret love of group work. "


Reading and Composition: Bad Managements

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Jami Bartlett
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"William Makepeace Thackeray, Barry Lyndon (1844)

Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)

Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence (1920)

Graham Greene, The End of the Affair (1951)

John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces (1978)

Martin Scorsese, The Age of Innocence (1993)

Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, The Office (2001-03)

Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer (2005)

Course reader from University Copy (2425 Channing Way; 510-549-2335)"

Description

" This course begins your training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your critical attention and argumentation skills through short expository papers, in-class essays, and informal close readings. You will be responsible for writing and revising 3 papers (5-6 pages in length), two essay exams, three rounds of peer editing, and weekly responses to required reading.



The courses that comprise Berkeley�s reading and composition sequence have been designed to create a community of writers across the university curriculum: students read interdisciplinary texts, interact with colleagues from other departments, and write for many different audiences. To this end, �Bad Managements� will introduce you to many different kinds of writing, from student essays to game theory, business school literature on �the heart of leadership,� psychoanalytic approaches to trauma and self-management, and film and literary criticism. My hope is that a topic like this, with its stress on the forms that we use to contain and express ourselves, will bring us closer to the compromises of and in our own writing.



What is course is about:



I enjoy seeing the lengths to which bad managements go to preserve what they call their independence�which really just means their jobs.

-Donald Trump, The Art of the Deal (1987)



To cast in my lot with Jekyll was to die to those appetites which I had long secretly indulged and had of late begun to pamper. To cast it in with Hyde was to die to a thousand interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow and for ever, despised and friendless.

-Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)



One of the most striking absences in my Stevenson epigraph is the identity of its �I,� for as even a casual familiarity with the story tells us, Jekyll and Hyde are the same person. In order to cast in my lot with one or the other I�d have to transcend them both, making the decision as pointless as the novel would be without its drama. This course will begin with the assumption that stories about self-management (including the stories we tell to and about ourselves) are driven by this kind of foreclosure, a friction that develops after we already know what we are. Donald Trump, no stranger to the kinds of management-speak that means �jobs� when it says �independence,� wouldn�t be wrong to think of Jekyll and Hyde as a kind of corporation, a body with bodies inside. For just as euphemisms do two kinds of work�syntactically using words like �independence� to stand in for a group of correlated interests while pragmatically clueing us into the vulnerable �jobs� beneath them�the logic of incorporation puts its bodies to work in unequal and often unrewarding roles. If the choice of becoming-Jekyll or becoming-Hyde requires incompatible costs, we know they aren�t equivalent, and that it�s only after one incorporates the other that it becomes impossible to be both.



Each of the novels we�ll be reading this semester dramatizes the negotiation that takes place once its roles have been assigned, and looks for new ways to maintain them: Thackeray�s con artist misrecognizes himself, Wharton�s Newland struggles with submission, and Stevenson and Toole work to contain their characters� disgusting�and disgustingly literal�leakiness. These are perspectives with real costs: the ethics of personal and social relationships, identities, and obligations are clearly at stake, so while we will never see the successful transgression that the illusion of �I� (or its �independence�) promises, we will always feel its corporate weight. A closer look at these �bad managements� will reveal all the friction there is in a done deal, giving us cause to review the knotty organization of our own self-expression, and the energy to be found in a foreclosed place. "


Reading and Composition: Beautiful Objections

English R1A

Section: 9
Instructor: Katharine Wright
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

Charles Dickens, Hard Times

Carolyn Forche (editor), Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness"

Description

"There are some gems of cultural critque in the English language. We will consider just a few and see what we can find out about how they accomplish both beauty and critique. We'll read Jamaica Kincaid's smoldering A Small Place for a look at colonialization and Virginia Woolf's reasonable and angry A Room of One's Own, on the place of women. How does Charles Dickens manage to be both funny and cutting as he looks at a Victorian education in his Hard Times? Can political poetry be art? Can striving for beauty ever undermine a writer's political purpose? We'll probably have to devise a definition for ""beauty."" There's lots to talk about and write about here.



You will, through frequent writing exercises and short essays, challenge or support the authors. In the process, you will isolate some of your own concerns and develop your own arguments. Class time will include discussion of each others' work."


Reading and Composition: Perspectivisms

English R1A

Section: 10
Instructor: Chris Eagle
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Descartes, Rene. Meditations on First Philosophy

Kant, Immanuel. �On a Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns�

Kurosawa, Ikira. Rashomon

Lakoff, George. Metaphors We Live By

Linklater, Richard. Waking Life

Plato. The Republic

Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver�s Travels

Wilde, O. The Importance of Being Earnest, �The Decay of Lying�

Woolf, V. To the Lighthouse"

Description

" This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth and Reality, and applying those debates to works of literature and to films. We will spend the first few weeks familiarizing ourselves with some of these debates through brief selected readings in the history of philosophy by Plato, Descartes, and Nietzsche. There are two guiding questions to this course. The first is whether Truth is an objective viewpoint on our world or a set of subjective interpretations. The second is the role that �lying� plays in society, socially, politically, and artistically. We will discuss these ideas in relation to works by Oscar Wilde, Plato, Nietzsche, and Virginia Woolf. In the case of Plato and Wilde, I anticipate that we will explore what it means for Wilde (vs. what it means for Plato) to write in the form of dialogues, a conversational form which embraces a multiplicity of perspectives. Likewise, I expect that we will come to appreciate the �philosophy� behind different writing styles and literary techniques. In the last few weeks of the semester, we will take up these same issues in films, focusing on films that deal with issues of perspective such as Kurosawa�s Rashomon.



Our method throughout will be in-class close analyses of the novels, dialogues, and films. We will focus on developing your close-reading skills and improving your writing through weekly short essays, as well as a revision process of all longer papers. A portion of in-class time will also be spent �workshopping� each other�s writing. While 1A is primarily designed to improve your writing, it is also a seminar, and so I anticipate lively discussion in which all members take an equal part in the conversation. "


Reading and Composition: The Once and Future King

English R1A

Section: 11
Instructor: Andrea Lankin
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Selections from Geoffrey of Monmouth, History of the Kings of Britain. Ca. 1134. Ed., trans. Lewis Thorpe. London: Penguin Books, 1966. Repr. 1977.

Selections from Malory, Thomas. Le Morte D�Arthur: The Winchester Manuscript. Ed., abridged by Helen Cooper. Oxford World�s Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Mark Twain. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur�s Court. 1889. Ed. Bernard L. Stein. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1979.

T. H. White. The Sword in the Stone. In The Once and Future King. 1958. Ace, 1987.

Selections from Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon. 1982. Del Rey. Repr. 2001.

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. Sixth edition. New York : Modern Language Association of America , 2003. "

Description

" Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur is one of these. This class will begin with two of the most influential medieval and early modern Arthurian texts, Geoffrey of Monmouth�s twelfth-century History of the Kings of Britain and Thomas Malory�s fifteenth-century Le Morte D�Arthur. We will move to nineteenth- and twentieth-century portrayals of Arthur and his kingdom. We will consider the following questions, among others: How are individual treatments of the Arthurian narrative in dialogue with each other? How does each variant respond to cultural stresses from the time and place in which it was produced? What is it that makes Arthur and his kingdom so compelling?



We will be asking and answering these questions in a series of short (2-4 page) essays that you will write and edit over the course of this class. As this is a reading and composition class, the project of writing is central. During the semester, you will gain skills in close reading, argumentation, writing and supporting thesis statements, structuring papers, and revision. "


Reading and Composition: Marrying the Master

English R1A

Section: 12
Instructor: Natalia Cecire
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 255 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

"Bront�, Jane Eyre

Brown, Clotel

Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Richardson, Pamela

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers (6th ed.)

Joseph Williams, Style: Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace (7th ed.)

A course reader "

Description

Marriage has historically been seen as women�s primary source of socioeconomic mobility; whereas male ascendancy is narrated explicitly in terms of material wealth and status, the woman�s acquisition of socioeconomic status is narrated in affective terms. In this course, we will examine narratives of heterosexual romantic love that explicitly mark class and status differentials, often extreme ones. In addition to teasing out the socioeconomic structure of romantic love narratives, we will develop strategies for reading well, thinking carefully, and writing clear analytical prose. Texts studied will include versions of �Cinderella,� Pamela, Clotel, Jane Eyre, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, selected writings by Hannah Cullwick, and selected criticism and theory.


Reading and Composition: Writing about Reading and Reading about Writing

English R1A

Section: 13
Instructor: Karen Leibowitz
Time: TTh 3:30-5:00
Location: Wheeler 221


Other Readings and Media

"Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography

Frederick Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

Virginia Woolf, A Room of One�s Own

Italo Calvino, If on a Winter�s Night a Traveller

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers



Course Reader containing texts by John Keats, John Styart Mill, Henry Adams, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bishop, and other readers and writers"

Description

"In this course, students will not only practice reading and writing but also reflect on the meaning of reading and writing in autobiography, fiction, and poetry. We�ll discuss how societies have restricted reading and writing, what �good� reading and writing are (and who decides), and the pleasures of reading and writing. While we consider the potential uses and abuses of reading and writing, students will also reflect on their own experiences working and playing with words.



Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion and write in-class responses to the readings. Each student will write a short (2-page) essay, then three 5-page essays, each of which will be revised. We�ll treat writing as a process�working from thesis-formation, to outlines, and through multiple drafts. Students will respond to each others� work in both written and oral comments. "


Reading and Composition: Grimmer Than Grimm

English R1A

Section: 14
Instructor: Katharine Wright
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Maria Tatar (editor), Classic Fairy Tales

Donna Jo Napoli, The Magic Circle

Robert Coover, Briar Rose

Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber"

Description

"Let's take an adult look at six classic folktales (and their variations) often relegated to the children's room. What are they really about? Why is their cultural influence so persistent? Folklorists, psychoanalysts, feminists, poets-- all have something to say about these tales. We'll read and react to some of them. Then we'll look at how some modern writers rework these stories to great effect. Robert Coover takes on Sleeping Beauty; Donna Jo Napoli, the witch in the sugary house. Angela Carter throws herself sensuously into her remade world, and Anne Sexton domesticates the tales in ways very different from Disney.



You will be writing a number of essays and response papers on the readings, and in the process you will experiment with several critical stances.. Then you will revise your own writings as you figure out more and more what it is you want to say. There will be an option to revise a tale yourself, and write an analysis of your own work. Class time will include discussion of each others' papers, as well as of the readings."


Reading and Composition: Immigrant Form

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Swati Rana
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Dictee

Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy

Ram�n P�rez, Diary of an Undocumented Immigrant

Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers, 5th edition

Required Course Reader "

Description

Immigrant form will serve as our forum for developing research and investigative skills. We will read a set of texts by and about immigrants in the United States in the context of post-1965 immigration, ultimately focusing on immigrant form in the post-9/11 era. Texts will consist of a variety of different genres, including poetry, fiction, short stories, histories, critical analysis, as well as newspaper and other media accounts. Our work will be organized around the following questions: How can we define the parameters of immigrant form? What form does the figure of the immigrant take across different genres? What do interracial or interethnic comparisons of immigrant form reveal? What work does immigrant form do in a given textual or historical context? How can we understand immigrant form in relation to other formations, particularly nationalism, nativism, and the war on terror? This course is designed to enable you to develop writing and critical thinking skills learned in the R1A course. There will be an additional focus on developing a research project, organizing and conducting research, reading and understanding sources, and writing a research paper. The first half of the semester will be devoted to exercises in argumentation and exposition, several short writing assignments, as well as self-editing and peer revision. In the second half of the semester, you will propose a question to investigate and develop a research prospectus and annotated bibliography. Your work will culminate in an oral presentation and a final essay of approximately ten pages.


Reading and Composition: Writing From Memory

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Marisa Libbon
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Charlotte Bront�, Jane Eyre

Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America

Bob Dylan, Chronicles, Volume 1

Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping

Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Sixth ed.)

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers (Fifth ed.)

Course Reader



Required Viewing (to be shown in class):

Martin Scorsese (dir.), No Direction Home: Bob Dylan "

Description

"At the beginning of Trout Fishing in America, Richard Brautigan frets over accurately remembering and recording his own memories, saying, �I�d like to get it right.� What does this mean? �Getting it right� may not always mean reporting it the way it happened, or trying to tell an objective truth. In this course, we�ll read a variety of �autobiographical� writing in order to explore how an author (or a fictional character acting as an author) makes and manages his or her own memories. We�ll also consider how texts make a collective memory via what and how their makers choose to remember and record. As we read throughout the semester, it will be important for us to keep in mind that everything in the texts before us was a choice: what a writer chooses to leave out is just as, if not more, important than what he or she chooses to put into the text. Crucial semester-long inquiries will include the choices writers make and how writers manage their texts.



The goal of this course is to improve critical reading, thinking, researching, and writing. There will be weekly writing assignments and exercises, as well as two research papers, to be written and revised over the semester. The first, shorter paper will involve close work with primary sources. The second, longer paper will build on the work of the first paper, but will involve at least three secondary sources. In consultation with me, you will choose your own paper topics. We�ll develop methods of approaching texts, posing useful questions, and constructing clear and convincing arguments. We�ll also constantly work on your writing skills, from grammar to argumentation, ideally to write papers that you think are interesting, provocative, and useful. "


Reading and Composition: Postcolonial Gothic

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Sarah Townsend
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Banks, The Wasp Factory

Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Hacker, Rules for Writers

McCabe, The Butcher Boy

Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea

Shakespeare, The Tempest

Film screening of Jane Eyre

And a course reader containing shorter selections of fiction and nonfiction. "

Description

"In recent years, literary scholars have taken an interest in the sub-genre �Postcolonial Gothic,� examining how and why colonial and postcolonial writers employ elements of the Gothic genre in their portrayals of racial difference and of power. This course asks similar questions in a different way, stepping outside the standard understandings of Gothic literature and of postcolonial writing to investigate the long-standing affinity between the two. This semester we will set aside traditional generic historical frames (the Gothic as a primarily 18th- and 19th- century phenomenon, postcolonial writing as a 20th-century product) and instead propose the Postcolonial Gothic as a mode of cultural imagination, born of early imperial encounters with the racial Other and circulated increasingly during the European colonial expansions of the 17th through 19th centuries. The Gothic novel and, much later, postcolonial concerns certainly shaped this racial Gothic imagination into predictable and recognizable forms; but Gothic writing about race pre-dated what literary scholars recognize as the birth of the Gothic genre and continues to develop today in the writings of recently decolonized parts of the world, as well as in more popular arenas such as the language of American politics on the subject of terrorism.



We begin in 1611 with Shakespeare�s The Tempest (performed over a century before Horace Walpole, the �Father of Gothic Literature,� was even born!) and finish in 1992 with Patrick McCabe�s The Butcher Boy, set in a 1960s Ireland preoccupied with television, John Wayne westerns, comic books, and Cold War politics�in other words, an Ireland that has seemingly forgotten all about its colonial past. The course argues that both works, however, are profoundly Gothic and profoundly postcolonial. In sum, this semester we will test and develop the hypothesis that Gothic literature has always been a little (post)colonially minded, and that (post)colonial writing has always been�and always will be�a little Gothic.



English R1B will situate these readings and interrogations around a series of writing assignments. The primary goals of this course are to develop your ability to read and write about literature, and to strengthen your research skills. You will be required to complete frequent reading responses, short essays on literary analysis, and a longer research essay. You will also be required to revise everything you write and to peer-edit the work of your classmates."


Reading and Composition: Literature and the Environment

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: Jhoanna Infante
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Wordsworth, W. and Coleridge, S.T.: Lyrical Ballads

Blake, W.: Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Hardy, T.: The Return of the Native

Course Reader "

Description

"Industrialization transformed the landscape of nineteenth century Britain. Poets and novelists of this period often expressed, to use Thomas Hardy�s words, the �ache of modernism�: they longed for a simpler time in which human beings lived according to the rhythms of nature. In this course, we will investigate whether or not these authors should be thought of as early environmentalists. We will consider the following questions: How did they imagine, remember, or reconstruct the past? Did their sense of themselves as �belated,� or �beyond history,� limit the transformative potential of their works? Is a fearful and antagonistic relationship to nature a basic and ineradicable part of the Western psyche and its literature? Does eco-criticism, which attempts to recover the ecological consciousness of this period, provide convincing readings of these texts, or are these texts too deeply implicated in the project of dominating and exploiting nature? Reading includes poetry by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Blake, and Hardy; prose by Wordsworth and Shelley; one novel by Hardy; and literary criticism, including excerpts from Keith Thomas� Man and the Natural World, Jonathan Bate�s Romantic Ecology and Song of the Earth, and Don Gifford�s The Farther Shore. During the latter weeks of the class, students will be required to identify a research topic and seek out other relevant primary and/or critical texts.



In this course, students will develop skills in composition, argumentation, and scholarly research. The writing requirement includes two essays, each eight or more pages in length, as well as multiple revisions and, in the case of the second essay, written evidence of research, including an annotated bibliography and footnotes. The curriculum emphasizes a multi-stage writing process that includes close reading, discussion, pre-writing, drafting, workshops, panel presentations, and revision. "


Reading and Composition: TBA

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Melissa Fabros
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 206 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

No course description is available at this time.

Description

No course description is available at this time.


Reading and Composition: In and Out of Realism

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Paul Kerschen
Time: TTh 8:00-9:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis

Juan Rulfo, Pedro P�ramo

Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior

Denis Johnson, Jesus' Son

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers

A course reader containing stories, poems, and essays."

Description

"How is literature to represent human experience? A prevalent strategy in English literature since the eighteenth century has been that of the realist novel, which presents a rich and detailed account of ordinary life�or some near approximation. But a countercurrent has also flourished of writing which diverges in various ways from our familiar reality. Such writing has gone by various names over the decades: allegory, surrealism, magical realism, science fiction, horror. In this course we will examine these and other genres, asking questions such as: What kind of logic binds these works to our world? Are they an escape from reality or a comment upon it? And might they tell us things that their authors never intended? We will also keep the idea of the realist novel in the background, since one effect of these works should be to make us stop and ask what realism actually is.



In addition to reading these works critically�and of course enjoying them, as they were meant to be enjoyed�we will also work hard on skillful writing about literature. Students will extend their prior skills to produce more complex and extended arguments, and will carry out a substantial amount of independent research on topics of their own choosing. Two shorter papers will lead into a final research project of 8-10 pages, involving a good deal of critique and revision over the semester. "


Reading and Composition: Mariners, Renegades and Castaways

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Cody Marrs
Time: TTh 9:30-11:00
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (An Inside Narrative) , Benito Cereno, Selected Poems

Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Richard Henry Dana, Jr., Two Years Before the Mast

Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom

Diane Hacker, Rules for Writers (5 th edition)

A course reader including selections from the following: Venture Smith, A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa; Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic; Edgar Allan Poe, �MS Found in a Bottle�; Cotton Mather, Instructions to the Living, from the Condition of the Dead; Walt Whitman, �Passage to India�; Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History; Thomas Farber, On Water"

Description

"This course, designed to train you in the practice of critical reading and writing, will focus on literature about sailors and slaves in the era of Atlantic revolution. We will examine sea-chronicles, novels, ballads, and slave-narratives in order to ask: How have conceptions of liberty and servitude taken shape from the eighteenth century onwards? How has the sea functioned as a political metaphor to negotiate anxieties about race, gender, and the nature and origins of government? And how has the idea of America � always changing, always potent � been mobilized through the imagery and experiences of workers on the sea � �mariners, renegades, and castaways,� as Melville dubs them in Moby-Dick? In and via these motley texts, we will investigate the various forms of freedom and unfreedom � from indentured servitude to wage-labor and outright slavery � upon which the modern Atlantic world has been, and continues to be, based.



Since this class is meant to help you develop your writing skills, considerable emphasis will be placed on learning the methods and techniques of argumentative exposition. In the first half of the semester students will compose a series of short essays (3-4 pages) which will be shared with the class. After this groundwork is completed, each student will compose a research prospectus, and, at the end of the semester, produce a final essay of approximately 10 pages. "


Reading and Composition: Highway 61

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Alia Yap Pan
Time: TTh 11-12.30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God

Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon"

Description

" In his song �Highway 61� Bob Dylan suggests we can solve all of our problems by taking to the road. The song also expresses the American love affair with mobility. Through twentieth-century American novels, we will examine the circumstances that give rise to movement as well as the physical and social structures that facilitate leaving home. The characters in these works set out to fight wars, find work, escape relationships, evade the law and search for answers. We will explore how race, class and gender factor into how and why one becomes a wanderer. Towards the end of the term, we will consider how these travel narratives help to define what it means to be American.



The aim of this course is to refine the critical reading and writing skills gained in English R1A and prepare them to produce a research paper. Good writing comes from good reading and in this class we will closely read and discuss the required texts. We will also work on how to develop a thesis, utilize an outline, organize an argument and use secondary sources. Writing requires rewriting and in this class students will revise their work based on comments they receive in office hours and from peer editing. Students will also be expected to use secondary sources in their essays and we will learn how to do research on literary texts. "


Reading and Composition: The Power of Theater: Tracking the Social Role of Dramatic Texts

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: Matthew Sergi
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 20 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Rules for Writers, 5 th Ed. (Diana Hacker)

Prometheus Bound (Aeschylus)

Hamlet (William Shakespeare)

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (Tom Stoppard)

Corpus Christi (Terence McNally)

A course reader



Film screenings:

Waiting for Guffman

The Passion of the Christ"

Description

"How powerful is theater�and in what way is it powerful? Does it have a point, a purpose? Should it? What role does it play in the culture that produces it? What role does it play in the culture that it produces? And how has this role changed over time? Does theater with a social agenda necessarily fail because it preaches to the converted? Or does it succeed for exactly that reason?



This R1B course is built to refine your expository and argumentative writing, and to develop your research skills: the social role of dramatic texts will act as a central discussion point for student discussion, argument, and inquiry. Your first two assignments will be an ungraded diagnostic exercise and a 4-5 page essay, using materials provided by the instructor. Subsequent assignments, while the length requirements won�t change much, will give you more and more responsibility for your own research: a group research project, a solo research essay, and an analysis/critique of one live theatrical production of your choice. Assignments will go through a drafting and rewriting process, in peer workshops and one-on-one meetings with the instructor, which will support and guide you as a writer and researcher.



Course reading in this R1B is organized around four storylines: the myth of Prometheus, the tragedy of Hamlet, and the Bible chapters on Isaac�s sacrifice and Jesus� crucifixion. We�ll track various retellings of these in dramatic adaptation and re-adaptation, examining multiple formats (most of them relatively quick reads, plus two required film screenings). Each has its own sense of social purpose (or resistance to social purpose): Athenian tragedy, closet drama, activist theater, existential farce, avant-garde drama, Broadway comedy, Hollywood spectacle, operatic score, medieval civic pageant, and a particularly bad case of community theater in Blaine, Missouri (courtesy of Christopher Guest). We will encounter plays-within-plays four times; we will encounter Mel Gibson at least twice. "


Reading and Composition: Getting Real: Exploring Passing and Authenticity

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: D. Bednarska
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Passing by Nella Larsen

Tar Baby by Toni Morrison

Exile and Pride by Eli Clare

A Writer�s Reference by Diane Hacker

Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

A course reader location TBD "

Description

"This course will examine imperatives and anxieties about authenticity in relation to race, ethnicity, gender and disability. Concern about who is and is not a part of these social categories is not simply a contemporary phenomenon, but also a major theme within literary texts. We will investigate passing through posing such questions as what causes the pressure to pass as a particular ethnicity, race, gender or ability? How do these texts represent people passing or failing to pass? How do we as readers decide and what are the consequences? What do we mean when we talk about authenticity in relation to social identities? How does the meaning of authenticity change in relation to different texts and authors? What implications does authenticity have for notions of belonging? The goal of posing these questions will not be to arrive at one predetermined answer, but rather complicate and deepen our understanding of what it means when questions of authenticity are at stake. Through the assigned readings we will come to understand passing as a varied and context-dependent social practice. We will also interrogate the concept of authentic identity and look at formulations from the nineteenth century into the present day.



While exploring these themes of authenticity and passing you will also be developing as a writer and researcher. RIB is intended to build upon the writing and argumentation skills developed in RIA, while integrating effective research skills. You will be writing several short assignments based on the weekly reading that will lead to the development of a larger research project that you design. We will address thesis construction, developing and sustaining an argument, dealing with counterevidence, and organization as well as grammar, syntax and style. You will be asked to develop and apply these skills both to your own work and the work of others. "


Reading and Composition: Hybrid Writing

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Talissa Ford
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Dick, P.K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Equiano, O.: An Interesting Narrative

Grossman, A. Soon I Will Be Invincible

Shelley, M.: Frankenstein

Spiegelman, A.: Maus

Lunsford, A.: Easy Writer

Course Reader "

Description

"An ex-slave, a super-villain, a monster, an android, and a Jewish mouse are among the starring figures in the books we�ll be reading. Their experiences are vastly different, but what they share is a particular response to their exclusion from the majority: all of them form hybrid identities to bridge the gap. Taken together, their stories call attention to how categories of �human� and �inhuman� get constructed, and what coping strategies are left to those who wind up on the wrong side of that divide.



Hybridity is the method as well as the theme of this course. Just as the figures in these texts build imperfect, hybrid identities to make themselves legible to the world, we will treat writing as a Frankensteinian project: putting things back together once we�ve taken them apart, and building out of all those pieces (the leftover ones that look like they don�t belong anywhere) some coherent whole.



Writing Requirements: three essays, substantial revisions, research presentations, peer-review workshops "


Reading and Composition: The Historical Novel

English R1B

Section: 13
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Zach Gordon
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Don DeLillo, Libra

Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle

Walter Scott, Waverley

Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor�s Tale (volumes I and II)

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers 5 th edition

Course reader "

Description

"This class is intended to develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of the historical novel. Over the course of the semester we will examine this genre (which, very generally, is defined by the centrality of historical events for the course of the narrative) in four distinct forms, all the while enriching our readings of these works and our in-class discussion with a few key theoretical texts. Beginning with Waverley, which will serve as our model for the historical novel, we will be asking how history and fiction can be defined in relation to each other, and how their various modes of coexistence within our texts conform to, and complicate, such definitions.



This is a writing intensive course and, as such, a significant portion of the class will be dedicated to refining your expository skills. A total of 3 papers will be required: a 3-page diagnostic essay and two longer essays, the last of which will incorporate independent research."


Reading and Composition: Eating Meat

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Charles Legere
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Giorgio Agamben, The Open: Man and Animal

Michel de Montaigne, Essays

Michael Pollan, The Omnivore�s Dilemma

Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind

A course reader with works and excerpts from works by Wendell Berry, Pierre Bourdieu, Jacques Derrida, Emily Dickinson, Ralph Ellison, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Hass, Sir Albert Howard, Claude Levi-Strauss, Herman Melville, Peter Singer, Henry David Thoreau, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman. "

Description

A course on the literature of carnivory. In this class, we�ll look at essays, novels, and poems about culture and diet. We�ll explore concepts like taste, hunger, food chains, trophic levels, nutrition, predation, and domestication. You�ll write a close reading of a poem about the carbon cycle, a critical analysis of a work in prose, and, a research paper on the ethics of consumption. Ultimately, we�ll address the diner�s responsibility to the dined upon; and, at the end of the semester, we�ll hold a conference to present our findings to each other. This course is open, of course, to meat-eaters and vegetarians alike.


Freshman Seminar: Visual Culture and Autobiography

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha
Time: Tues. 5-8
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Momaday, N.S.: The Way to Rainy Mountain; Speigelman, A.: Maus I and II

Description

Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post)?modern tendency to picture or visualize experience??what W.J.T. Mitchell calls ?the pictorial turn.? Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that convey postmodern individual identities in multicultural, often urban, social landscapes, they experiment with visual/verbal forms of self-representation and self-narration: story quilts, family photo albums, letters, comic books (co-mix), artists' books, photo-biographies, video and film, performance art, home pages, ?zines,? and more. Course requirements include attendance, participation, completion of in-class activities, and a short course journal.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: M 4-5
Location: 175 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Thoreau, H.D.: Walden

Description

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only heard about it, realize. We will also try to work some with online versions of the book, using the wordsearch command to identify words such as ""woodchuck"" or ""root"" that reappear frequently, in order to speculate on patterns Thoreau is trying to establish. Regular attendance and participation, along with a loose five-page essay at the end, are required."


Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Sonnets

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Time: W 12-1
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Wells, Stanley , ed.: Shakespeare�s Sonnets and a Lover�s Complaint

Description

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, we will read all 154 sonnets, at the rate of approximately ten per week. All students will be expected to participate actively in seminar discussions, and present both informal and formal oral reports.


Freshman Seminar: Gary Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg : The U.S. and the Civil War Era

English 24

Section: 4
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: F 12-1
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Wills, G.: Lincoln at Gettysburg

Description

I would like to read Wills' book slowly and carefully with students. I plan to offer some other materials about the culture of the mid-19th-century U.S. , perhaps some of the Ken Burns documentary on the Civil War, letters and other speeches by Lincoln . I would like students who are interested in American history: politics, culture, literature. This seminar is part of the Food for Thought Seminar Series and part of the On the Same Page initiative: http://onthesamepage.berkeley.edu. Food for Thought dining arrangements will be discussed in class.


Freshman Seminar: Contemporary Irish Theater: The Plays of Brian Friel

English 24

Section: 5
Instructor: Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Time: M 3-5
Location: Room L20 Unit II


Other Readings and Media

Friel, B.: Selected Plays of Brian Friel

Description

Brian Friel (b. 1928) is the most prominent playwright of the contemporary Irish theater, best known for Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa. In a series of innovative plays, he has examined some of the stories the Irish tell themselves about their past and present. He uses the theater to examine issues of role-playing, story-telling, and self-delusion, that is, the nature of theatricality. While he explores Ireland's national and personal myths, Friel is saying something about us all and the parts we cast ourselves in when rehearsing our own dramas. This is a seminar, not a lecture course, so I will expect you all to contribute to discussions. Students will also be paired to lead discussions. I'm hoping for students who like literature and are interested in thinking about drama not just as texts but also as performance. We will sometimes read scenes to suggest how different voices affect perception of what is happening. Brien Friel is a playwright from the North of Ireland, so that his work often reflects certain tensions from that society, so I'm hoping for students who will discuss social and moral issues facing the dramatic characters.


Freshman Seminar: Three Novels by Jane Austen

English 24

Section: 6
Instructor: Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Time: Thurs. 1-2
Location: 300 Wheeler


Description

We will read three of Jane Austen's novels very slowly to learn why they are among the world's most enduringly popular and the most technically innovative. The novels are Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. For additional insights, we will turn to recent film adaptations of all three. I hope to teach students who not only love to read but also feel curiosity about why they love to read. The students should want to learn more about the aspects of writing that attract them to certain authors and kinds of narratives.


Literature In English: Introduction to the Study of Poetry

English 26

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Ellman, R.: The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, second ed.; Course Reader (supplemental essays and poetry for the course)

Description

The lectures, class discussions, and readings for this course are intended to develop students� ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate poetry, while they gain greater self-confidence and authority in writing about poems. Special attention will be paid to the essential poetic aspects of idea, image, and music. The course will mainly focus on modern poetry, but will begin with Walt Whitman and continue through the post-modern work of Charles Olson. We may look at some contemporary work if time allows. Attendance and active participation is essential. Expect to write two papers, take a final, and additionally, to write ten short papers as part of your participation.


Literature In English: Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

English 43A

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Burroway, J.: Writing Fiction; Reader available at Copy Central

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of short fiction - to explore the elements that make up the genre, and to enable students to talk critically about short stories and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write two short stories, along with various exercises, and critiques of their peers? work. The course will be organized as a workshop. All student stories will be edited and critiqued by the instructor and by other students in the class.


Literature In English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Time: MW 10-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week F10-11
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Chaucer, G.: Canterbury Tales; Spenser, E.: The Faerie Queen; Milton, J.: Paradise Lost; Donne, J.: John Donne's Poetry

Description

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions for considering issues of linguistic and cultural change, and of literary language, form, and innovation.


Literature In English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: MW 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 12-1)
Location: 3 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Norton Anthology of English Literature: Medieval; Norton Anthology of English Literature: Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries; Shakespeare, W.: Hamlet

Description

"We will study the changing nature of creative writing ""through"" Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. This will not be a strict chronological ""survey"" but more a sampling of key themes, as they are constructed in different genres and in different periods across a thousand years of turbulent history. What makes a hero or heroine (epic)? what makes us fall in love (desire and the lyric)? what makes us laugh (satire and comedy)? The syllabus will highlight important episodes from Paradise Lost, The Faerie Queene, The Canterbury Tales and Beowulf, often difficult, but short enough that all students can keep up with the reading; interpretation will be focused by selected passages from Shakespeare's Hamlet and Sidney 's Defense of Poetry. Though this is a lecture course your attendance and participation as a live audience is required; there is no substitute for hearing the work read out loud. Occasionally, instead of the lecture I will schedule a close reading exercise. Two quizzes, two papers (one from prompts, one free-choice), and a final exam. "


Literature In English: Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: MW 1-2, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)
Location: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Pride and Prejudice; Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights; Douglass, F.: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Franklin, B.: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Goldsmith, O.: The Vicar of Wakefield; Hawthorne, N.: The Scarlet Letter; Irving, W.: The Sketch-Book; Pope, A.: Essay on Man and Other Poems; Rowlandson, M.: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Swift, J.: Gulliver's Travels; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto; Wordsworth, W.: The Five-Book Prelude

Description

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are major intellectual and literary transformations taking place in the course of this century and a half, and we will follow a few of them.


Literature In English: Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Norton Anthology of English Literature , Volume C; Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. D; Austen, J.: Pride and Prejudice (Broadview); Brown, C.: Wieland (Penguin); Franklin, B.: Autobiography (Penguin); Melville, H.: Benito Cereno: A Cultural Edition ( Bedford ); Shelley, M.: Frankenstein (Broadview)

Description

Our course begins at sea, with the �violent storm� and shipwreck of Gulliver�s Travels, and ends at sea in Benito Cereno, with a tragic convergence of Europe , America , and Africa , just off �a small, desert, uninhabited island toward the southern extremity of the long coast of Chili .� These scenes of dislocation correspond to the rise of modernity that forms our topic. Eighteenth- and nineteenth- century modernity involves a variety of new or accelerating instabilities: epistemological uncertainty; cultural relativism in newly imagined global contexts; the transformation of economic value from land to (liquid) capital; linguistic self-consciousness in a rapidly expanding print culture; and altered forms of subjectivity navigating the new political rhetoric of republicanism, freedom, and individualism. The subtitle of Wieland sums up our course in a word: �The Transformation.� Throughout, we will ask what literary anxieties and opportunities such �transformation� entails, at a time when everything solid�self, world, and society�turns fluid, as if at sea.


Literature In English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: MW 11-12, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Ramazani, J., Ellmann, R., O�Clair, R. (editors): The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry (vol. 1 only); Beckett, S.: Waiting for Godot; Faulkner: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Z.: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Joyce, J.: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse

Description

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the late-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modernity as we closely investigate a selection of the major texts from this sprawling period. At times the lectures will zoom in on particular features of texts, and at other times they will zoom out to cultural conditions and aesthetic drifts. There will be two essays, a final exam, and (perhaps) a mid-term.


Literature In English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)
Location: 3 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Benson, S., et al.: The Grand Piano Part 3; Stein, G.: Three Lives and Q.E.D; James, H.: Turn of the Screw; Williams, W. C.: Imaginations; Woolf, V.: Mrs. Dalloway; Mullen, H.: Sleeping with the Dictionary; Ngugi Wa Thiong�o: The River Between; Locke, A., ed.: The New Negro. In addition to these texts, a required reader will be available at Copy Central on Bancroft.

Description

Intended as a general survey of imaginative responses to the not always positive progress of modernity, this course will examine works produced by an array of prominent figures and representative of some of the principal Modernist and Postmodern movements, and / or events. We will begin with the rise of Realism in the mid-19 th century and finish the course with works in experimental modes of the almost immediate present. The Armory Show, Imagism, Russian Formalism, Surrealism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Movement, the Black Arts Movement, and Language Writing are among the cultural moments we will experience along the way.


Lower Division Coursework: Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary
Time: TTh 12:30-2, plus one and a half hours of discussion section per week
Location: 100 GPB


Other Readings and Media

Cunningham and Cunningham: Principles of Environmental Science; Gilbar, S, ed.: Natural State ; Leopold, A.: A Sand County Almanac; Snyder, G.: No Nature; Williams, T. T.: Refuge; also a course reader

Description

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental thought in American poetry, fiction, and the nature writing tradition. One instructor is a scientist specializing in the behavior of soils and ecosystems (Garrison Sposito); the other is a poet (Robert Hass). The aim of the course is to examine the ways in which the common tools of scientific and literary analysis, of scientific method and imaginative thinking, can clarify what is at stake in environmental issues and environmental citizenship.


Sophomore Seminar: High Culture/Low Culture

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: Thurs. 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Lahiri, J.: The Interpreter of Maladies; Palmer, R. B.: Joel and Ethan Coen; Water, S.: The Night Watch

Description

We will discuss a novel and a collection of stories, view the films of the Coen brothers, and attend some Cal Performances events in order to analyze the role and affect of cultural productions.


Sophomore Seminar: Socrates as a Cultural Icon

English 84

Section: 2
Instructor: Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Time: T 2-4
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Four Texts on Socrates

Description

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. We will read Aristophanes? comic send-up of Socrates in Clouds and the Platonic dialogues purporting to tell the story of Socrates? trial and death, Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, Crito, and selections from Phaedo attempting to trace the construction of the Socratic icon and assess its relevance to issues in our contemporary ?culture wars,? e.g.: identity, freedom of speech, elitism, science and religion, ?know thyself?, the aims of education, authority, male chauvinism, virtue, anti-intellectualism, academic freedom, family, civil disobedience, ?spin,? body and soul, self-esteem, anomie, patriarchy, individualism, relativism, reductionism, self-ownership, conscience, reason etc. Links to Wikipedia and other on-line resources on these topics are provided in the syllabus. To get discussion going, each meeting (after the second) will begin with a brief (5-10 minute) individual or panel presentation on one or another such issue, assigned on a volunteer basis at the conclusion of the previous meeting and prepared in office-hour consultation with the instructor.


Junior Seminar: The Novel and Its Theory/Theory and Its Novels

English 100

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Emma; Bakhtin, M.: The Dialogical Imagination; Balzac, H.: P?re Goriot; Barthes, R.: S/Z; Bourdieu, P.: The Rules of Art; Dostoevsky, F.: Crime and Punishment; Flaubert, G.: Sentimental Education; Forster, E.M.: Aspects of the Novel; Luk?cs, G.: Theory of the Novel; Miller, D.A.: Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style

Description

The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bakhtin, and Austen/Miller. These accounts will also help us reflect on two ostensibly universal understandings of the novel, by Luk�cs and Forster, and vice versa.


Junior Seminar: The Harlem Renaissance

English 100

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Cullen, C., ed.: Caroling Dusk; DuBois, W.E.B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Hughes, L.: The Langston Hughes Reader; Hughes, L.: The Big Sea; Hurston, Z.: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Johnson, J.: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Larsen, N.: Passing; Lewis, D., ed: The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader; Locke, A., ed.: The New Negro; McKay, C.: Home to Harlem; Toomer, J.: Cane. In addition to these texts, a required reader will be available at Copy Central on Bancroft.

Description

This seminar will examine significant works of the extraordinary cultural unfolding that has come to be known as the Harlem Renaissance. Though we will concentrate on literary works, we will also examine some of the music and visual works from the period. As we attempt to understand the broader implications and contexts of this key moment in American cultural history, we will also consider its long trajectory and its lasting influence on American artistic invention. Topics for discussion will include questions pertaining to aesthetic identity (and aesthetic anxiety); race and nation; cultural forms, formations, and deformations; artistic thought and double-consciousness.


Junior Seminar: Introduction to Narrative Theory

English 100

Section: 3
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

"Aristotle: Poetics; Bakhtin, M.: The Dialogic Imagination; Barthes, R.: S/Z; Propp, V.: The Morphology of the Folktale; Sophocles I.: Three Tragedies

In addition to the booklist above, there is a class reader (Copy Central). "

Description

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, and so we shall have to read the narratives of the theorists along with the theories. We shall strive to listen to stories, to see or imagine how plots are composed, organized.

There will be a number of exercises, many of them ungraded but required. And I project that there will be required about five papers that will be graded."


Junior Seminar: Literature of the Americas

English 100

Section: 4
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Todorov, T.: The Conquest of America : The Question of the Other;Women's Indian Captivity Narratives; Conrad, J.: Nostromo ; Whitman, W.: Leaves of Grass ; Enrique, J.: Rod� Ariel ; Dreiser, T.: Sister Carrie ; Galeano, E.: Memory of Fire: Genesis

Description

This course takes a comparative look at the literature of North and South America , focusing on the construction of racial and regional identities in a comparative context. We shall also explore the question of method, through an examination of critical writings on the relation between historiography and literature. The story of the New World is often represented as discontinuous, fragmented�beginning with the histories of its indigenous people, interrupted by the multiple histories of conquest, pacification and migration. In our examination of literature and critical work which examines the historical events of conquest, slavery and modernization we shall address these questions: How does the way we narrate history influence our perception of past events? What role does fiction play in the construction of national or regional historical identities? What modes of emplotment are used to narrate history in the Americas : tragedy, comedy or romance, narratives of conquest, apocalypse or degeneration?


Junior Seminar: Prison Literature

English 100

Section: 5
Instructor: Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Vidocq, F.E.: Memoirs of Vidocq: Master of Crime ; Berkman., A.: Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist ; Black, J.: You Can�t Win ; Himes, C.: Yesterday Will Make You Cry ; Braly, M.: On the Yard ; Bunker, E.: Animal Factory ; Carr, J.: Bad ; Foucault, M.: Discipline and Punish ; Lopez, E.: They Call Me Mad Dog ; Course Reader: consisting of short stories, poetry, critical articles and other, shorter texts

Description

"Because the percentage of the American population that has experienced incarceration is at an historical high and growing, particularly within the African American community, a study of the literature of incarceration has never been more timely. In this course we will lay both a critical and literary framework for what may be considered the long overlooked counterpart to more popular and studied memoirs of crime, novels of detection and police procedurals. While much critical attention has already been paid to these latter genres, we will explore this underside, or locked away consequence of the clash of crime and law through the study of some seminal, some overlooked, and some contemporary representations of life behind bars. Beginning with the trial and execution of Socrates, we will trace our way through two pioneering European and American works, before narrowing our focus to a number of twentieth-century American exemplars.



Complementing our study of these autobiographical novels--interesting, personal responses to brutally conformist institutions--we will use Michel Foucault�s Discipline and Punish , along with a number of articles in a course reader, as a critical foundation for understanding the themes raised by an aesthetics of confinement. Among other questions, we will consider the ways in which confinement might inform the private reading experience, or even the modern, subjugated condition in which everyone might be figured as prisoners in a police state assigning crimes, guilt and cells within a state-wide military industrial facility. Conversely, the escapist power of literature will also be considered insofar as these texts address the liberating potential, and in some cases ultimate failure, of literature as a means of transcending or otherwise transforming the modern police state�s imperative to discipline and punish.



We will also supplement our study through the analysis of some prison poetry and films, through which we will examine Hollywood �s fascination with, even glorification of, prison life. "


Junior Seminar: Women, Nationality, and Modernism

English 100

Section: 7
Instructor: Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Sylvia Ashton Warner: Spinster; Bowen, E.: The Last September and The Heat of the Day; Butts, M.: The Taverner Novels; Mansfield, K.: Stories; Rhys, J.: Voyage in the Dark, Good Morning, Midnight , and Wide Sargasso Sea ; Sylvia Townsend Warner: Lolly Willowes; White, A.: Frost in May; Woolf, V.: Three Guineas

Description

In Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf�s critique of patriarchy and war, she claims: �As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.� In this seminar, we will read women�s modernist fiction�from both English and colonial writers�that addresses questions of British national identity and gender through modernist literary experimentation. At least half of these writers are colonial subjects ( Anglo-Irish , New Zealand , and Dominica ), allowing us to situate their articulation of hybrid national identity against the native English writers. The novels we read in this seminar focus on childhood, schooling, sexuality, maternity, and aging as sites for the inscription of identity. Although such themes would seem to situate these novels as �women�s domestic realism� (and certainly many of them have been marginalized from accounts of canonical modernist fiction), we will find that their use of modernist style resists the compartmentalization of genre. Modernist style elucidates the fissures in the domestic: it marks the place of resistance within the domestic to the interpellation of identity by cultural and national discourses.


Junior Seminar: Herman Melville

English 100

Section: 8
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Melville, H.: Typee; Melville, H.: Redburn; Melville, H.: Moby-Dick; Melville, H.: Billy Budd and Other Stories; Melville, H.: Selected Poems; Melville, H.: Pierre

Description

A close reading of several of Melville�s works, emphasizing his recursiveness, the manner in which his writing returns repeatedly to several fundamental issues in order to explore more deeply the contradictions that launched his writing. Attendance and participation in discussion are required, along with two ten-page essays.


Junior Seminar: Daniel Defoe

English 100

Section: 9
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Landa (ed.): Journal of the Plague Year; Starr (ed.): Moll Flanders; Richetti (ed.): Robinson Crusoe; Blewett (ed.): Roxana; Furbank & Owens (ed.): True-Born Englishman & Other Writings (obtainable through ABEbooks). Other texts will be available electronically or photocopied.

Description

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe�s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and religious as well as literary. Writings with less obvious claims on our attention than the prose fiction will figure prominently, although proportions can be adjusted as the course unfolds.


Junior Seminar: Narratives of Biographical Detection

English 100

Section: 12
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Symons, A.J.A.: The Quest for Corvo; Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom; Ambler, E.: A Coffin for Dimitrios; Welles, O.: Citizen Kane (film to be viewed in a special class session); Wolf, C.: The Quest for Christa T.; Byatt, A.S.: Possession; Roth, P.: American Pastoral

Description

Something about someone dead catches the attention of someone living. The person still living knows enough about the dead person to come to feel an urgent interest in the dead person�s story, but not enough to know why the story is so urgent. So the living person becomes an investigator, sifting through musty archives, anonymous legends and imperfect memories. The story of the investigator is as important as the story of the investigated: whence the interest? how does the investigation determine its own outcome? what does the investigation have to do with broader histories? Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation.


Junior Seminar: Literature and Media Theory

English 100

Section: 15
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 259 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Beckett, S.: Krapp's Last Tape; Danielewski, M.: House of Leaves; Goethe, W.: The Sorrows of Young Werther; Mann, E.:, Four Plays; Johnson, R.: Radi Os; Phillips, Tom: A Humument; Stoker, B.: Dracula; Williams, W.C.: Paterson. Secondary reading: Bolter and Grusin: Remediations; Kittler, F.: Gramophone Film Typewriter; McLuhan, M.: Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man

Description

"This course will treat literature�its various genres, including novel, drama, poetry�from the point of view of media theory. Our particular interest will be in the status of the ""document��an historically real or ostensibly real document that is somehow presented, represented, or mediated by the art form (or �platform�) in question. Using Marshall McLuhan�s dictum that ""the content of one medium is always another medium"" as a guiding concept, we will address two central issues. First: by comparing ""documents"" as they are mediated in both 19th- and 20th-century literary forms, we will try to assess the impact of other media, especially photography, film, and recorded sound, on literature�s ""documentary"" evidence. One question that may emerge, as we consider the history of mediation from Dracula to Danielewski�s House of Leaves and the CD Haunted (by Danielewski�s sister, Poe) is why mediation is so often registered an occult or gothic phenomenon. Second: by focusing on the different issues of mediation that emerge when the ""document"" in question is already literary (Johnson�s RADI OS corrosively rewrites paRADIse lOSt), we will attempt to theorize the kind of testimony, the kind of historical document, that literature is, especially for the so-called �new media.�"


Junior Seminar: Film Noir

English 100

Section: 19
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: TTh 5:30-7 P.M., plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Telotte, J.: Voices in the Dark; Kaplan, E.: Women in Film Noir; Silver & Ursini, eds.: Film Noir Reader 4; Turner, G.: Film as Social Practice

Description

We will examine film noir�s relationship to �classical� Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and masculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.


: Topics in the English Language

English 102

Section: 1
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 385 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Radford, A.: Transformational Grammar: A First Course

Description

An introduction to syntactic theory with a focus on English syntax.


: Anglo-Saxon England

English 105

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English People; Campbell, J., ed.: The Anglo-Saxons; Crossley-Holland, K., ed.: The Anglo-Saxon World; Donoghue, D., ed. and Heaney, S., trans.: Beowulf: A Verse Translation; Howe, N., ed. and Donaldson, E., trans.: Beowulf: A Prose Translation; Keynes, S. and Lapidge, M., eds.: Alfred the Great; Webb, J. F. and Farmer, D. H., eds.: The Age of Bede

Description

In this course we will read a wide variety of writing ranging across the entire Anglo Saxon period, from chronicles to histories to saints� lives to poetry, riddles, and charms. Our focus will be on the intersections among history, culture, art, and writing. We will ask ourselves how � England � came into being as a cultural and political idea, and how notions of �Englishness� affected the kinds of writing that people were likely to produce. We will explore the artwork of various groups, including burial artifacts, coins, manuscripts and other visual artifacts, and ask ourselves what such materials have to do with the development of a literary tradition. We will talk about cultural contact, colonization, and imperialism, especially in the context of pagan and Christian ideas about conversion and social change. You will have the opportunity to experiment with Anglo-Saxon modes of cultural production, particularly alliterative poetry, but also other forms of writing and art. Students need not have any prior knowledge of Old English or of Anglo-Saxon history; all texts will be in translation.


: The English Renaissance (17th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 123 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: The Rover; Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Donne, J.: Complete English Poems; Etherege, G.: The Man of Mode; Maclean, H.: Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets; Milton, J.: Samson Agonistes; Webster, J.: The Duchess of Malfi. There will also be a course reader, containing mostly poetry.

Description

A survey of England�s �century of revolution,� focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics in the period.


: Shakespeare

English 117A

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 390 Hearst Mining


Other Readings and Media

Marlowe, C.: The Jew of Malta; Shakespeare, W.: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This class studies the first half of Shakespeare's career, including his best-known comedies and history plays as well as his non-dramatic poetry. (Later plays�the major tragedies, the tragicomic romances�will be covered in depth in 117B next semester, and in survey in 117S). We will meet as a lecture, although we will look for opportunities to converse ensemble and in smaller project-centered groups. Our focus will be on Shakespeare's stunningly rapid development of his drama as an art form through his continual experimentation with the forms of theatrical genre.


: Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Bevington, D., ed.: The Complete Works (of William Shakespeare)

Description

In this course, we will attempt to read as many Shakespeare plays as can be got through conveniently in fifteen weeks. In general we will try to cover one play per week, but along the way we will devote a week to an introduction of the author, his times, his poems, his plays, and his language; a week to the Sonnets; and we will take extra time for longer and more complex plays like Hamlet. So we will manage about a dozen plays, trying also to cover a range of genres including comedy, history, tragedy, and so-called romance. We will be thinking of plot, character, and action, but above all of dramatic poetry. Information will be posted before the class begins, and throughout the semester, on the instructor's website (see below). Students should anticipate writing three short papers, a midterm and a final exam, and possible quizzes. Students should also anticipate attending lecture regularly, reading the assignments carefully and in advance of lecture, and indeed participating fully in the work of the class.


: Shakespeare in the Theater

English 117T

Section: 1
Instructor: Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Time: TTh 3:30-5, plus rehearsals TTh 5-6:30
Location: 20 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: Macbeth, ed Braunmuller (Pelican Shakespeare)

Description

Most of the energy in this course will go into producing a modest but strenuously rehearsed staging of Macbeth. The performances will probably be in mid-November (depending on the availability of a suitable indoor playing space). The course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 6:30, but students�particularly cast members and most particularly cast members with large parts�can expect to be asked for several hours of additional rehearsal time every week That�s as precise as I can be so many months in advance.


: Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week
Location: 101 Morgan


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J.: Complete Poems and Major Prose (ed. Merritt Y. Hughes). There will probably also be a small Course Reader at a copy shop tba.

Description

" The later poet William Blake imagined Milton �descending . . . clothed in black, severe and silent,� and too often that is the image that has descended upon us as well. This course will offer a very different poet and political figure. As we read Milton�s major poetry (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and shorter verse) and selections from his controversial prose, we will study the Milton who witnessed and participated in two revolutions (one political, the other scientific), the radical polemicist who wrote a tract justifying regicide plus several pamphlets justifying divorce and a famously vehement argument against government licensing of the press, and of course the magisterial poet who composed great epic, lyric, and dramatic verse. We will also think about Milton�s ambivalent stances toward classical myth and Renaissance literature, the place of his unorthodox theology in relation to his political and his proto-psychological theory, his writings on love, his prescient �media theory,� and his long preoccupation with vocation.



Course requirements will probably include two essays, a midterm, and final; they will certainly involve vigilant attendance of both lecture and section, combined with careful, timely preparation of the reading assignments. "


: The English Novel (Defoe Through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Haywood, E: Love in Excess; Defoe, D.: Roxana; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H.: Shamela and Joseph Andrews; Lennox , C.: The Female Quixote; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto; Austen, J.: Northanger Abbey; Scott, W.: The Bride of Lammermoor

Description

" As we read a variety of novels from the period credited with the �rise of the novel,� we shall consider what it was that might have been new about this form of writing. We shall be especially interested in tracking what it was that some found quite dangerous about it. Like surfing the internet, novel reading wasn�t something you wanted the �impressionable�� from teenagers to women�to do alone, or maybe at all. Might the perceived threat have had something to do with early novels� connection to romance and the erotic and then with what one critic calls the �narrative transvestitism� of the early novel�in which men write books featuring female heroines who will describe, in an innovative, frank prose style, how a woman really feels? Highly conscious of these debates, eighteenth-century writers responded to them in their texts, while an emerging set of women writers also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public market. Some of these texts suggest rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating novel writing, appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.



Requirements include willingness to engage in discussion, reading quizzes, a mid-term, two long papers. "


: The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 60 Evans


Other Readings and Media

Dreiser, T.: Sister Carrie ; Woolf, V.: The Waves ; Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom! ; Mann, T.: Doctor Faustus ; Tutuola, A.: My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics, history, modernism and empire. Some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel?; how have modernist aesthetic experimentations re-shaped the very form of the novel?; and lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope and influence of fictive milieu?


: The Contemporary Novel

English 125E

Section: 1
Instructor: Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 105 North Gate


Other Readings and Media

Carter, A.: The Bloody Chamber; Beckett, S.: Watt; DeLillo, D.: Libra; McCarthy, C.: The Road; Nabokov, V.: Pale Fire; Pynchon, T.: Against the Day; Silko, L.: Ceremony

Description

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them published since 1960. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to understand these writers on their own terms and to discover among them commonly shared concerns and practices. There will be two shorter papers, a midterm, and a final exam.


: Modern Poetry

English 127

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, Dan
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 4 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Auden, W.: Selected Poems; Eliot, T.: Four Quartets,Selected Poems; Moore , M.: Collected Poems; Pound, E.: A Draft of XXX Cantos; Silkin, J. (ed.): The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry; Stein, G.: Tender Buttons; Stevens, W.: Collected Poems; Williams, W.: Paterson; Yeats, W.: Collected Poems

Description

A survey of the modernist turn in poetry. This course will explore some of the more remarkable (and occasionally notorious) formal experiments of the twentieth century�s turbulent first half. We will contend with work from Britain , Ireland , and the United States , seeking to devise strategies with which to read texts that often seem impervious to reading and striving to account for the historical pressures that made such experiments seem necessary in the first place.


: American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 30 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Peter C. Mancall (ed.): Envisioning America; William Bradford: Of Plymouth Plantation; Mary Rowlandson: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative; Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia; Hector St. John de Crevecoeur; Letters from an American Farmer; Charles Brockden Brown: Wieland, or The Transformation; Hannah Webster Foster: The Coquette

Description

This course will survey the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the triumphs of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-shocks of the American Revolution. Although our focus is on Anglophone texts, we will consider colonial America as a place of encounter � a place where diversity was a given, negotiation was a necessity, and transformation was inescapable. Cultures took shape through a dramatic series of contests, crises and consolidations, reflected in a literary record of h Lectures will explore the role of writing in contact and settlement; in captivity and slavery; in religious and social formations; in business and in justice; in approaching the natural world; in gauging the stakes of revolution; and in imagining a new republic. Throughout, we will pay special attention to how writing operated to forge new models of the self that could withstand and absorb the tumult of colonial life. Authors will include Bradford, Rowlandson, Franklin, Equiano, Jefferson, and the early American novelists Charles Brockden Brown and Hannah Webster Foster.


: American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

"Readings for the course will include many, but not all, of the following (please wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your books):



Cahan, A.: The Rise of David Levinsky; Cather, W.: My Antonia; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F.S.: The Great Gatsby; Hughes, L: The Ways of White Folks; Johnson, J. W.: The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Larsen, N: Quicksand and Passing; Loos, A: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Wharton, E.: The House of Mirth; West, N: The Day of the Locust or Miss Lonelyhearts; plus a photocopied reader including shorter writings by many of the following: Mary Antin, Willa Cather, Countee Cullen, John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, W.E.B. DuBois, Finley Peter Dunne, T.S. Eliot, Jessie Fauset, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jacob Riis, Frank Norris, Jack London, Gertrude Stein, Sui Sin Far, Jean Toomer, Anzia Yezierska "

Description

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as The New Negro, the New Woman, and the New Immigrant. We will focus on issues of social, economic, and geographic mobility during the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression, as it affected a wide array of American authors and fictional characters, including those who immigrated to the U.S., those who moved from one region to another or between country and city, and those who took up residence abroad. We will explore the plot trajectories and narrative stances that these authors deployed to map their own cultural identities, as well as those of their fictional creations, in the new American century.


: African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Wright, Richard: Native Son; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Jones, Gayl: Corregidora; various: hip-hop lyrics re death (reader); screening of film: Thug Angel: Life of an Outlaw

Description

An examination of some of the major 20 th-century African American novels.


Literature of American Cultures: Race, Ethnicity, and Disability in American Cultures

English 135AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saxton, Marsha
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 2040 Valley LSB


Other Readings and Media

Adams, M et al.: Readings for Diversity and Social Justice; Lai, H. et al.: Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island; Craft, W. and E.: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom; Cable, G.W.: The Grandissimes; Morrison, T.: Sula; Dreger, A.: One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal; Dorris, M.: The Broken Cord; Fadiman, A.: The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down; Moraga, C.: Heroes and Saints and Other Plays

Description

"This course will analyze the categories of �disability,� �race� and �ethnicity� critically. �Disability� as an identity category is always raced, whether we attend to that intersection or not, and people defined in racial terms are also always placed on axes of disability and ability, well and ill, normal and abnormal, malformed and well-formed. Much work on that ambiguous umbrella term �disability� treats disabled people as ungendered (that is, male), unraced (that is, white), without nationality (that is, native-born American but barely a citizen), and unsexualized (that is, heterosexual, but only in default). My aim in this course is to set up situations in which you can think about several of these categories simultaneously in the context of American cultures present and past.



To this end, we will take four historical examples as case studies. Each illustrates how racism and ableism have intertwined in American (dis)ability cultures. First we will examine immigration history (with some emphasis on Angel Island and Chinese immigration). Second, we will focus on how American writers have remembered two women of color who performed in freak shows and on how race, disability and gender issues intersect on the freak show (or today the talk show) stage. In the third unit, on slavery, we will begin to unearth a history of disability in American slavery and in the Jim Crow South. In the fourth module, we will discuss eugenics and the tight connections between race and disability in eugenic models of degeneration. The final section of the course will move into the present, first giving you some exposure to contemporary activist history that counters and undoes the dynamics we have been exploring, and then ending with three particular texts to anchor our analysis of the politics of representation of disability, gender, sexuality, class, race and ethnicity: Native American novelist Michael Dorris�s controversial memoir of raising his son who had Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, The Broken Cord, Anne Fadiman�s The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, and Chicana writer Cherrie Moraga�s play about farmworkers�organizing and the health effects of pesticides, Heroes and Saints.



A variety of guest speakers, including performance artists and disability movement activists, will visit us. We�ll view a series of films, including the silent eugenics film The Black Stork, or Are You Fit to Marry, a U.S. public health film on immigration from the 1930s, and several contemporary documentaries on subjects ranging from the medical separation of conjoined twins to contemporary disabled womens� global organizing. Written requirements: two midterms, informal journal writing, and a final project that students can tailor to their own interests. "


Topics in American Studies: The Border

English 136C

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Co-taught by Gonzalez, Marcial and Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Ng, F. M.: Bone; Okada, J.: No-No Boy; Paredes, A.: George Washington G�mez; Viramontes, H.M.: Under the Feet of Jesus; Yamashita, K.: Tropic of Orange. A course reader consisting of contextual articles will also be assigned.

Description

"Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: The Woman Warrior; Ng, F. M.: Bone; Okada, J.: No-No Boy; Paredes, A.: George Washington G�mez; Viramontes, H.M.: Under the Feet of Jesus; Yamashita, K.: Tropic of Orange. A course reader consisting of contextual articles will also be assigned.



Course Description: Moving beyond the black-white binary that has long framed racial discourse in the U.S. , this course examines how the experiences of Latinos and Asians intersect in the formation of the United States. We will begin by exploring the political and economic processes that have racialized Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos as �illegal aliens� and security threats, and by looking at the historical contexts that transnationalized the U.S. labor market. What kinds of border cultures resulted from these processes? What kinds of national or non-national identities? What kinds of political consciousness? To answer these questions, the course will focus on literature written by Asians and Chicana/os, with a particular interest in the social perspective uniquely afforded by the novel form. "


Modes of Writing: Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a.: Chandra, M.J.)
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Albee, E.: The American Dream and Zoo Story; Reader available at Copy Central

Description

"This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing � fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.



(No application is required for this course, but most, if not all, of the spaces in the class will need to be reserved for English majors.) "


Modes of Writing: Race, (Creative) Writing, and Difference

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below. The book list is tentative; students should come to class before buying books.

Description

"This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts. We�ll read Toni Morrison�s Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination, and we�ll read some of the books she discusses: Twain�s Huckleberry Finn, Cather�s Sapphira and the Slave Girl, Hemingway�s To Have and Have Not. We�ll also read Douglass� Narrative, Octavia Butler�s Kindred, and short works by Baldwin, Tess Slesinger, Richard Ford, and others.



Writing assignments will be broad; that is, they will allow for a variety of responses. "


: Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

TBA

Description

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend. Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction. Class attendance is mandatory. Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life. The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.


: Verse

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Texts may include Best American Poetry 2007, Michael Ondaatje�s Collected Works of Billy the Kid, Gwendolyn Brooks� Selected Poems. This list is tentative. Students should come to class before buying books.

Description

"The question is whether or not poetry can be more than a series of successful gestures, as F. Scott Fitzgerald put it rather long ago, or arrive at something other than the statement or restatement of an emotional truth or idea. Can poetry intervene? What�s the relationship of poetry to public iconography, to issues of the public representation of race and class and gender?



Can poetry challenge the way we look at culture and language? The argument of this course is that it can and must. (And who is this �we�?)



Workshop. Discussions. Weekly writing assignments. All students will participate in a public, out-of-class poetry as intervention project; the nature and scope of this project will depend on individual interests. "


: Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing done under extreme formal constraints. In addition, there�ll be regular commentary on other students� work and an informal review of a poetry reading.


: Visual Autobiography

English C143V

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha
Time: TTh 9:30-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Momaday, N. S.: The Way to Rainy Mountain; Spiegelman, A.: Maus: Parts I and II; Reader (available from Copy Central).

Description

Visual autobiography encompasses a wide range of self-representations and self-narrations: conventional books in which images are integral to the whole, rather than mere supplementation or illustration; pictographic (picture-writing) ledgerbooks; photo-biographies; artists' books (individually handmade textual art objects); narrative quilts; comic books; electronic personal narratives; and other visual forms. This course emphasizes practice. Student work will be presented and discussed regularly in in-class critiques; these will be supplemented with written assignments and exercises. Students will read a variety of primary and secondary materials; participate in class discussions, exercises, and critiques; keep a visual/verbal journal; produce three visual/verbal projects and a major final project. At the end of the semester, there will be a public showing/reading/performing of student work.


: Prose Non-fiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a.: Blaise, B.)
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Atwan, R., ed.: The Best American Essays, 4 th edition

Description

This workshop course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write 45 pages of non-fictional narrative.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


History of Literary Criticism: Critical Realism

English 202

Section: 1
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Time: W 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Adorno, T. and M. Horkheimer: The Dialectic of Enlightenment; Auerbach, E.: Mimesis; Buzard, J.: The Autoethnographic Work of Nineteenth-Century British Novels; Clark, T.J.: The Painting of Modern Life; Jameson, F.: The Political Unconscious,Marxism and Form; Krishnan, S.: Reading the Global; Lukacs, G.: History and Class Consciousness, The Historical Novel; Mufti, A.: Enlightenment in the Colony; Schwarz, R.: A Master on the Periphery of Capitalism; Williams, R.: The Country and the City; there will be also be a course packet containing selections from Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Louis Althusser, John Frow, Paul Ricoeur, Jason Read, Edward Said, Margaret Cohen, Sharon Marcus, Marjorie Levinson, Rob Kaufman, and others.

Description

This course in the �History of Literary Criticism� will be an intensively focused and partial survey of the dialectic of formalism and historicism in the history of literary (and aesthetic) criticism. A core focus of the course will be the theoretical resources afforded by critical realism, understood in an expansive sense as an aesthetic mode of cognition or form of epistemology�generated in particular by situations of crisis, transition, and unevenness. To this extent, we will also be interested in the legacies of critical realism for postcolonial literary criticism�attempts to grasp the marvelous or misplaced realities of the periphery, attempts to draw a transnational cognitive map of metropolitan subjectivity. We will begin by taking stock of our contemporary critical context by examining characterizations of our �new formalist� turn in literary studies and critiques of ideological reading, before returning to a longer view of historicist and formalist impulses within the discipline. This course should be useful to students seeking an acquaintance with Marxist literary criticism in general and/or those interested in developing interdisciplinary or worldly dissertation projects.


Graduate Readings: Disability in Theory

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 204 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

Disability Studies as it has emerged in the academy in the last decade is a multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, interdisciplinary field. For complex historical reasons themselves worth exploring, in the United States that field has had particularly strong anchoring in the arts and humanities. This course will explore the meanings of �disability,� of �theory,� of �art� and of �the humanities� by considering each term in its relation to each others. Our conversations and readings will be determined to a significant extent by students� own research interests (but that doesn�t mean I presuppose any knowledge of disability issues), and also by the current interests of some of the foundational shapers of the field from across the country who will join us as guests. They will include a number of literary critics, scholars in deaf studies and performance studies, historians, legal scholars, and artists and photographers.


Graduate Readings: Virginia Woolf

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Woolf, V.: Between the Acts, Jacob�s Room, Moments of Being, Orlando, Mrs. Dalloway, A Room of One�s Own, Three Guineas, To the Lighthouse, The Voyage Out, The Waves, A Writer�s Diary, The Years; Lee, H: Virginia Woolf

Description

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf�s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that movement through a literary oeuvre that has been cherry picked to illustrate a particular turn within it. As we map the trajectory from Woolf�s apprenticeship works in the teens through the experimental narratives of the twenties to the politically pressured projects of the late thirties, we will explore the textual strategies through which these turns were achieved and the cultural crosscurrents in which they were embedded. We will read Woolf�s critical essays to situate her narrative practice within her commentary on it (as well as within narrative theory generally); we will take advantage of the recently published holograph manuscripts to read published texts in the context of their revisions; we will exploit the proliferation of Woolf biographies to revisit her ambivalence about biography; and we will put pressure on her appropriation and revision by various critical schools and contemporary writers. Two approximately 12-page papers will be required, in addition to seminar presentations that will expand our frames of cultural and critical reference.


Graduate Readings: American Transcendentalism and American Pragmatism

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Jonathan Edwards, A Jonathan Edwards Reader (Yale); Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography (Penguin); Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia (Penguin); Ralph Waldo Emerson, Selected Essays (Penguin); Henry David Thoreau, Walden and Civil Disobedience (Penguin); Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (Penguin); William James, The Writings of William James. (University of Chicago Press)

Description

We will study the (mostly) productive tension between consolidating and dispersing impulses in American philosophical literature. Most of the discussion time will be spent on close reading, but members of the class will on occasion present secondary critical materials they have found instructive. Two ten-page essays will be required, one about halfway through, the other at the end.


Graduate Readings: English Fiction to 1800

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Haywood, E.: Fantomina; Defoe, D.: Roxana; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H.: Shamela, Joseph Andrews; Smollett, T.: Roderick Random; Lennox , C.: The Female Quixote; Radcliffe, A.: Mysteries of Udolpho

Description

As we read a variety of works of eighteenth-century fiction we shall consider a series of revisionist (especially feminist) histories and theories of the early novel. The eighteenth-century British texts we have retroactively named novels often argued with each other about the status of this new form. In these debates the novels deployed and actively intervened in contemporary theories of sexuality, gender and class (all of which some saw as dangerously unstable in the period), and we shall have these debates in mind as we study these texts. Also increasingly important in the legitimating narratives around the novel was the novel�s status as a British form, and we shall think about the novels of this period in relation to national and transnational developments. Although we shall approach the readings through these specific foci, I do intend the course as a broad-based introduction to these eighteenth-century texts and some of the critical issues they have raised. Written work will reflect that introductory tone; in several 5-6-page papers you will engage these issues on an exploratory basis rather than a thorough and conclusive one.


Graduate Readings: Modernism in Poetry

English 203

Section: 5
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

T.J. Clark: Farewell to an Idea ; Tim Armstrong: Modernism ; Charles Altieri: The Art of Modernist American Poetry; John Ashbery: Selected Poems ; Wallace Stevens: Collected Poems and Prose ; W.C. Williams: Spring and All ; also a course reader

Description

"I am concerned with what the new historical work in modernism puts at risk�the possibility that it has continuing vitality for engaged imaginations because it still does significant affective and intellectual work. I think much of this work derives not so much from what writers ""say"" as the arenas they construct for making visible complex systems of mutual interrelations that can only be shown and not ""said."" What can be the power of such showings? To begin answering these questions this course will begin with brief readings on relationality (Nietzsche and baby Hegel), then two weeks on Cezanne, Picasso, and non-iconic abstraction, then mostly prose and highly selected poems from Pound and Eliot as well as short stories by Wyndham Lewis. The extended case study will be Wallace Stevens for four weeks as we think about what he can use in modernism and how he feels he must modify his heritage. Finally we will spend one week on Pollock and Johns for figures of how relationality gets literalized separates visuality from various contextual backgrounds. We will close with how Ashbery at once culminates the sense of relationality and proves so amazingly fertile for younger writers."


Graduate Readings: The Novel and Romanticism

English 203

Section: 6
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 289 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Northanger Abbey, Persuasion; Edgeworth, M.: Castle Rackrent and Ennui; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Hogg, J.: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Radcliffe, A.: The Romance of the Forest; Scott, W.: Waverley, The Antiquary; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Smith, C.: Desmond; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto

Description

We will read major works of Gothic, Jacobin, domestic, regional, national and historical fiction, published in Great Britain between 1764 and 1824, in relation to the literary and historical contexts of British Romanticism. Critical readings will be assigned. Course requirements will include a short (3-page) paper plus two 8-10 page papers and one or two in-class presentations.


: Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

King, Stephen & Heidi Pitlor, eds.: The Best American Short Stories, 2007; Nabokov, Vladimir : Lectures on Literature

Description

"A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We�ll also read published fiction and essays about writing from various sources. Students will produce at least 40 pages of fiction over the course of the semester.



Undergraduates are welcome to apply. Please note that the class will assume prior experience with workshops, and familiarity with the basic elements of fiction and the critical vocabulary used by writers to analyze narrative. Class attendance is mandatory."


Graduate Pro-seminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

English 246F

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: M 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Boswell, J.: The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides; Johnson, S.: Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland; Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey; Burney, F.: Evelina; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto; Burke, E.: A Philosophical Inquiry, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Smith, A.: Theory of Moral Sentiments; Hume, D.: Treatise of Human Nature; Blake, W.: Songs of Innocence and Experience; Wordsworth W. and Coleridge, S. T.: Lyrical Ballads; Williams, H.M.: Letters Written from France; Williams, R.: Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society . In addition, the following works will be either in a course reader or available on-line: selected poems of William Collins, Thomas Gray, Oliver Goldsmith, George Crabbe, William Cowper (The Task), Christopher Smart (Jubilitate Agno), Anna Barbauld, and Charlotte Smith; further prose works by Samuel Johnson (e.g., �Preface� to the Dictionary and to Shakespeare) and Edward Young (�Conjectures on Original Composition�); also an array of critical essays on the period.

Description

This course offers a survey of the period from 1740 to 1800, or from Hume�s new �science of man� to Wordsworth�s account of poetry as the �history or science of feelings.� The many different titles that have affixed themselves to these years (Pre-Romantic, Post-Augustan, the Age of Johnson, the Culture of Sensibility) might testify to its excitements and eccentricities, its metamorphic riot of genres and authors. We will try to do justice to its heterogeneity, sampling all genres of poetry and prose, although�since there is a course on the eighteenth-century novel offered concurrently in the department�we can devote relatively more time to poetry and non-fictional prose. Threads that will receive particular attention include: the emergence of aesthetics as a new science; sensibility and inequity; skirmishes over the �common tongue� and the constitution of �the people�; changing definitions of literature (printed matter or creative writing?) and authorial identity (the author as producer, as �nobody,� as genius); residual and simulated oral culture in an age of print; the Scottish Enlightenment and the romance of the Highlands; Britain in international space and nostalgia for home; gothic and Revolution; likely and unlikely versions of pastoral. To some extent our concerns will be methodological as well: what sorts of critical approaches have shaped and reshaped this shifting field�and what kinds of study seem productive for its future?


Graduate Pro-seminar: American Literature to 1855

English 246I

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Sam
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 123 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.: Sense and Sensibility; Brown, C. B.: Wieland; Cooper, J. F.: The Prairie; Dickens, C.: Bleak House; Douglass, F.: My Bondage and My Freedom; Equiano, O.: Interesting Narrative; Fern, F.: Ruth Hall; Franklin, B.: Autobiography; Fuller, M.: Woman in the Nineteenth Century; Irving, I.: The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon; Lewis, M.: The Monk; Melville, H.: Great Short Works; Scott, W.: Rob Roy; Sterne, L.: Sentimental Journey; Webb, F. J.: The Garies and Their Friends; Wollstonecraft, M.: Mary and The Wrongs of Woman; photocopied Course Reader

Description

We will consider American prose literature from the late-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century in a transatlantic context. We will analyze literary influence as it travels, in some familiar and some surprising ways, between North America and England , Scotland , and Ireland . As we do, we will take stock of recent work in transatlantic studies (Giles, Gilroy , Linebaugh and Rediker, Tamarkin, Tennenhouse, and others). Course requirements include two 8-10 page essays and one or two oral presentations.


Research Seminar: Form and Style from Chaucer to Spenser

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Pearsall, D. and D. Wu: Poetry from Chaucer to Spenser; Hirsh, J.: Medieval Lyric

Description

In this course, we will explore the lyric tradition in English, beginning with Chaucerian lyrics and ending with Spenser�s sonnets. Along the way, we will read poems from figures like Gower, Hoccleve, Lydgate, Charles d�Orleans, Hawes, Barclay, Audelay, Henryson, Douglas , Dunbar , Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey , and a raft of anonymous poets. We will focus on the development of style in Middle English and Renaissance poetry, asking if some form of continuity can be discerned between the 14 th and the 16 th centuries, or if a radical break occurred in the 16 th century that manifested itself formally and stylistically in poetry. We will pay special attention to the manuscript and print contexts for poems, examining works in compilations and anthologies and considering what vision of poetry such an examination yields.


Research Seminar: Compassion and Representation in Early Modern England

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 2525 Tolman


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, King Lear; Milton, J: Paradise Lost ; Kyd, T.: The Spanish Tragedy. A (very heavy) course reader will include a wide range of early modern materials (tracts about slavery, an obscure play about a slave revolt, speeches in the House of Commons, tracts about the poor, sermons, and poems by Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Crashaw, Herbert, Layner and others) and selections from theoretical and philosophical texts by Aristotle, Agamben, Zizek, Boltanski, Berlant, Ricoeur, Garber, Girard, and Nussbaum.

Description

How did early modern subjects represent and conceptualize compassion, pity, and sympathy? We will be especially interested in compassion as a complex point of intersection among literary, political, theological, and devotional discourses and practices. Put another way, we will ask how fictions, the poor, and Christ, to take a few examples, were distinguished�or conflated�as objects of compassion. We will also juxtapose the ways in which early modern theories of compassion and other cultural logics�sacrifice, political representation, revenge�construct identity and the relationship between self and other. The importance of imagination, fiction, and fictionalizing to the development of compassion as a social, moral, and political category will be a persistent concern. If Hamlet�s astonishment over the player�s capacity to shed tears for Hecuba seems to instantiate the problem of compassionating fictions, many Renaissance authors suggest that it is easier to feel compassion for fictions or persons so distant from us that they have the status of fictions. We will also think about compassion as ideology, the relation between regarding others and self-fashioning, and what is at stake in making distinctions among compassion, sympathy, and pity. The reading list will take us all the way from Elizabethan sonneteers to the early 18 th century, when compassion emerged as one of the central terms in British culture.


Research Seminar: Proust

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 204 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below

Description

A reading of Proust�s Recherche (in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation) alongside�and as�a reflection on traditional novel form.


Research Seminar: A Small Place �Irish Fictions, 1890-2005

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 201 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Gregory, A.: selected plays; Joyce, J.: Dubliners and Ulysses; Beckett, S.: First Love and selected other works TBA; Synge, J.M.: The Aran Islands; Yeats, W.B.: selected poems and prose TBA; O�Brien, F.: The Third Policeman and selections from The Best of Myles TBA; Bowen, E.: The Last September; McGahern, J.: Amongst Women; O�Neill, J.: At Swim Two Boys; a required course reader, with selections of critical essays, plays, poems and short stories

Description

This course is a survey of Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Revival (1890-1930) to the Celtic Tiger (1990s-present). The Celtic Revival was an upsurge of nationalist sentiment that resulted in the creation of an Irish Republic in defiance of Great Britain . The Celtic Tiger was a surge of transnational capital investment that transformed Ireland from one of the poorest to one of the richest of European countries: once marked by emigration and decline, now by prosperity, population growth, and an influx of immigrants from Eastern Europe , Africa , and Asia . Such reversals of fortune and the relative recentness of their manifestation make Ireland a unique locus of study for the experimental application of postcolonial theory, world-systems theory, and theories of nationalism, race and ethnicity. In Irish Studies the debate between postcolonialists (and nationalists) on the one hand and historical revisionists on the other is lively and occasionally brutal. Then there is the literature, which Pascale Casanova has described as itself a kind of �Irish miracle.� Looking at well-known modernists like Gregory, Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O�Brien, and Bowen, we�ll study the connections between the cultural revival, formations of national literature, and modernist formal innovation, following closely on recent theories of modernism that relocate its genesis from the metropole to the periphery. From there we�ll look at what�s happened since: fictions dealing with the partition of Ireland (the Belfast poets, The Field Day Theatre Company); fictions dealing, in the midst of the new prosperity, with the traumas of famine, emigration, civil war, stagnation, state censorship and isolation (The Field, The Butcher Boy, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, Korea, At Swim Two Boys); and finally fictions of the Celtic Tiger (�Riverdance,� Aqua, Intermission, The Snapper, etc.). The course is designed to appeal to anyone interested in Irish Studies, modernism, postcolonial theory, and sociological theories of literature (Bourdieu, Casanova et al.). We�ll also be screening a few films in the class, though the theory of film won�t be rigorously covered. Required are one or two in-class presentations (depending on enrollment), a project proposal for the final paper, and one final 20-30 page research paper of publishable quality.


: Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Description

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.



The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.



In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.



Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors. "