Announcement of Classes: Spring 2007

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Improper Love in the Renaissance

MWF 10-11

"A story of forbidden love can compel a reader through both sympathy and repulsion. We hope the frustrated lovers can somehow overcome the unjust exigencies preventing their happy union. We fear they will not demonstrate self-control if consummating t...(read more) Alan Drosdick

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Facing West from California?s Shores?

MWF 1-2

In this course we will explore the poetic representations of California?s wilderness. From the photography of A.P. Hill and Ansel Adams, to the letters, reports, and journal entries of Clarence King and John Muir, we will examine how an environmental ...(read more) Jeremy S. Ecke

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
The Contemporary Nomad

MWF 3-4

"A nomad is typically understood as a wanderer, rootless and given to vagrancy. However, as suburbanization and over-inflated housing markets continue to override interests in creating and maintaining public spaces, it might be more fitting to conside...(read more) Becky Hsu

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Hamlet, Lear, Macbeth - Writing about Shakespearean Tragedy

T-Th 8-9:30

"This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I decided on one I am interested in and which, I hope, will be of interest to you: Shakespeare. I ...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Monstrosities

Tuesday and Thursday, 8:00-9:30 a.m.

"Who are our monsters, and why? This course will examine the idea of the monstrous in literature and culture, from the Romantic era to the present day. Through a variety of texts and other media, we will explore a wide range of issues: how the monstro...(read more) Arcadia Falcone

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Secrets and Sexuality in the Modern Novel

TTh 9:30-11:00 a.m.

"Throughout this course, we will consider a broad range of aesthetic responses to the problem of representing sexuality in literature, with a particular focus on the role that secrets play in literary constructions of non-normative sexual desire. Begi...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Culture and Politics of Food and Eating

TTh 11:00 ? 12:30

"What we eat and how we eat it says a lot about our culture?our history, our politics, our religious beliefs, and our ways of relating to each other. Why are some foods distasteful, or even taboo? How can choosing what to have for lunch be a political...(read more) Peter Goodwin

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Time Bandits

TTh 12:30-2

"The blurb on the back of Robert Coover?s 1977 novel The Public Burning claims that the novel was the ?first major work of contemporary fiction ever to use living historical figures as characters.? But Coover?s novel certainly doesn?t read like histor...(read more) Ted Martin

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Metamorphosis and Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"This course examines why metamorphosis has been such an enduring motif in literature and how its meanings change over time. Starting with classical myths and working through more modern fairy tales, poems, novels, and psychological case studies, we w...(read more) Erin E. Edwards

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Fact and Fantasy

TTH 3:30 ? 5:00

"In this course, you will focus on the craft of writing college essays?a vast process that includes everything from refining grammar and style to developing theses, engaging critical thinking, and structuring your arguments in logical and dynamic ways...(read more) Slavica Naumovska

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Literary Utopias: Nonsense and Sensibility

MWF 9-10

"The point of this class is to help you become better writers and critical thinkers, and we?ll approach that goal by discussing and writing about an enduring literary topic -- utopia. In its strictest sense ?utopia? doesn?t mean ?good place,? but simp...(read more) Blaine Greteman

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Trade-offs and Sacrifices

MWF 10-11

"This course continues your R1A training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your fluency through longer expository papers, and the incorporation of research into argumentation. You will be responsible for wri...(read more) Jami Bartlett

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Asian Hordes - Modernities and Postmodernities

MWF 11-12

"This class will examine how the figure of the Asian horde functions in cultural texts about modernity and postmodernity. What historical contexts have given rise to particular ways of representing Asians as hordes? How have cultural exchanges across ...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
What is Realism?

MWF 12-1

"In this class, we will be interested in the question ?what is realism?? and, specifically, in figuring out what makes a novel or a short story a ?realist text,? as opposed to something else (like a fable, romance, myth, or tale). We will focus our in...(read more) D. Rae Greiner

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Contemporary African American and Asian American Experimental Poetry

MWF 1-2

"Within the traditions of contemporary African American and Asian American poetry, a category of self-identified ?experimental? writing has emerged recently. What is minority ?experimental? poetry? One of the primary aims of this course is to familiar...(read more) Chris Chen

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The History of Trauma; The Trauma of History

MWF 2-3

Trauma, in its essence, is paradoxical. On the one hand, it yearns to be inscribed, even broadcast; on the other, it often stubbornly refuses inscription. This course will examine how literature has grappled with this paradox of trauma. Why do trauma ...(read more) Popkin, Suzanne

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the Environment

MWF 3-4

"For many generations of authors, writing about the Earth and our human impact upon it has been an intriguing artistic challenge. In this course, we will explore the challenges of representing our natural environment and its human stewardship by consi...(read more) Nicole Asaro

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Writerly Texts

MWF 3-4

"The texts we will read in this course will challenge us to think about how a story is constructed. We will enter the mind of a child who believes his dead mother is a fish, and a mentally unstable woman who sees another woman hiding in a wallpaper. W...(read more) David Menilla

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Ghostly Women

TuTh 8:00-9:30

"In ?The Philosophy of Composition,? Edgar Allan Poe writes, ?the death . . . of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.? A recurring focus of interest in Anglophone literature is the dead woman?literally dead, imag...(read more) Natalia Cecire

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
If it had been a movie, I wouldn't have believed it: Representation Of and After 9/11

TTh 8-9:30 am

"Responses to the events of September 11th, 2001 made surprisingly frequent reference to narrative: unable to describe the attacks any other way, we either noted their similarity to film or TV, or we described our shock by saying, as the title of this...(read more) Annie McClanahan

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Global Modernisms

TTh 9:30-11:00

"Literary movements described as ?modernist? are typically associated with the social phenomena of ?modernity?: urbanization, industrialization, and secularization, to name a few. But these social developments occurred at very different times, and in ...(read more) Joel Nickels

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Elegiac Modes - Authenticity and Mourning in Lyric, Monument, and Popular Culture

TTh 9.30-11.00am

"What do we expect from a work of art that takes death as its subject? How do we expect it to make us feel? Do we read it differently than, say, a love poem, or a comedy ? and what happens when love, comedy, and death intermix? What can the disappoint...(read more) Penelope Anderson

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Proof

TTh 11-12:30

"What constitutes evidence? Epistemology is the study of the origin, nature, and methods of human knowledge, and in this course we will address in our reading, writing, and discussion such questions as: When should one trust one?s intuition? When and ...(read more) Fiona Murphy

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

TTh 11-12:30

"In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature ? a novel, verse, a couple short stories, and one play in two different translations ? with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great litera...(read more) Joseph Patrick Jordan

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 12:30-2:00

No course description is available at this time...(read more) Melissa Fabros

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Cognitive Poetics

TTh 12:30-2:00

"In this class, we will learn about a new and exciting approach to the study of literature called cognitive poetics. Cognitive poetics is not a homogeneous school of criticism, but a constellation of diverse assumptions about and practical techniques ...(read more) Tracy Auclair

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Social Reform in Literature

TTh 2-3:30 PM

"What is social reform? What are the thought processes involved in defining a social problem? And how does this definition affect the manner and methods used to solve it? This course seeks to better understand the impulse to want to solve a problem pe...(read more) Kelvin C. Black

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Globalization

TTh 3:30-5:00

Often mentioned but rarely explained, the term ?globalization? provides one way of thinking about the economic, social, and cultural processes of recent years. For some, globalization promises a world at our fingertips, an exciting world free of bound...(read more) Ben Graves

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Race, Violence, and Paranoia

TTh 3:30-5:00 pm

"As the title suggests, this course will consider the relationship between race, violence, and paranoia. Often when narratives (whether novels or films) explore racial difference, depictions of violence are not far removed. The texts I?ve assembled fo...(read more) Jesse Costantino

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Approaches to 21st Century Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

"There are several varieties of contemporary poetry: Lyric, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Post-Lang, ?mainstream?, slam, and flarf poets, as well as others who can?t or won?t be categorized. Major publishers, university presses, and dozens of small presses publish...(read more) Charles Legere
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley

W 11-12

The goal of this course is to help students to feel confident in talking about the arts and to take pleasure in that confidence, as well as to feel at home in the various venues that exhibit art and performance at Berkeley. We will discuss how best to...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 4-5

"Course Description: We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or thos...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

43B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 12:30-2

This workshop will teach various approaches toward the writing of verse. In addition to weekly writing assignments, students will read a range of poetry and essays, and will be encouraged to attend local poetry readings....(read more) Fisher, Jessica
Fisher, Jessica

45A/1

Literature In English:
Through Milton

MW 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these works...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

45A/2

Literature In English:
Through Milton

MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: the Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, and Paradise Lost. Each of these texts reflects differen...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

45B/1

Literature In English:
Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

Lectures MW 10-11, plus one hour of discussion section per week

On the face of it, English 45B seems like a ?neither/nor? course; neither a course in the great English authors (Chaucer, Spenser, Milton) nor a course in ?modern? literature. It represents neither the supposed ?origin? nor the putative ?end? of liter...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

45B/2

Literature In English:
Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

MW 11-12, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

An introduction to literature in English from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries, including works by Pope, Franklin, Wordsworth, Emily Bronte, Douglass, Hawthorne, Dickens, Browning, and Whitman. (It is strongly recommended that you t...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

45C/1

Literature In English:
Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

This course will provide a survey of major works and stylistic experiments that have come to characterize modernism in Anglo-American literature. We will try to understand the pressures to which the writers were responding and we will explore how thei...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

45C/2

Literature In English:
Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

"A survey of English and American literature from the late-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century, with attention given both to conceptions of literature intrinsically claimed by the texts assigned and to the historical and cultural grounds out ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Writing America

MWF 11-12

"The American historian Frederick Jackson Turner argued in 1893 that the United States was essentially born on the frontier, that it had forged its unique national, legislative, social, and intellectual identity upon the ?hither edge of free land.? To...(read more) Fujie, Kristin

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Love and Money

TTh 2-3:30

"This course topic is meant to refigure, in more pedestrian terms, the intersection of sexual desire and socioeconomic status in the literary domain. In familiarizing those academic terms, we will chart the difference, if any, between ?love? and ?sexu...(read more) Hurh, Paul

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture

Thurs. 2-5

The course will focus on analyzing the films of the Coen brothers and earlier noir classics, and the stories of Carver in relation to issues of representation, genre and gender. We will make use of University Art Museum exhibits, Cal Performances and ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

95/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one our of discussion section per week (W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Close Reading?Theory, Practice, Ideology, Pleasure

MW 10-11:30

"It may be argued that close reading is literary criticism. Certainly, it is its only technique and its most widely shared belief. If close reading is central to literary criticism, however, it has been made marginal almost everywhere else, with excep...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Why Do We Cry? The Literature of Sorrow, Sympathy, and Indifference

MW 4-5:30

?Why do we cry?? asks the philosopher, Jerome Neu. ?My short answer is: because we think.? Neu belongs with those who believe emotions manifest intelligence rather than physiology. In this class, we will test Neu?s proposition, first by considering th...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Representing Elizabeth I?Feminine Sovereignty in Poetry and Painting

MW 4-5:30

At the crossing of historiography, poetry, and the visual arts in sixteenth-century England stands the enigmatic and paradoxical figure of Elizabeth Tudor, the sovereign Queen of a patriarchal society. Elizabeth crafted her power through a complex and...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Satire

MW 4-5:30

"We will explore England?s ""age of satire"" and the secondary literature on its generative tropes: discovery, exposure, magnification, correction. In the final two weeks of the semester, we?ll investigate contemporary experiments in satire. Students ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

100/9

Junior Seminar:
The Bloomsbury Group and British Modernism

TTh 11-12:30

"This course places Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group in context with larger developments in British modernism. Bloomsbury is a neighborhood in London that includes Russell Square, the British Museum, and University College London. But Bloomsbur...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 12:30-2

Close readings of Twain?s major works, emphasizing the development of his career. I am particularly interested in the interplay of humor and bitterness in Twain?s social and political thought, but class discussion will be open for any aspect of Twain?...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

TTh 2-3:30

Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ?regional? terms?emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural lan...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Wordsworth Circle

TTh 3:30-5

This class presents an intensive study of a group of writers and circle of friends: William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas de Quincey. As we read these writers? poetry, journals, letters, essays, and memoirs, we wi...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

TTh 3:30-5

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common? For one, both are usually about two or more of the following: sex, death, love, hate, work, jealousy, obsession, parents, children, anxiety, and loss. Seemingly made for each other, literature and ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Women?s Films of the ?40s and ?50s

TTh 5:30-7, plus films Thurs. 7-10 P.M

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre ?the woman?s film? of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various ?female? problems and fantasies...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

101/1

Junior Coursework:
History of the English Language

TTh 5-6:30

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, to its different forms in use throughout the world today. Topics include changes in the core grammatical systems of...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

C107/1

Junior Coursework:
The Bible as Literature

MWF 1-2

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them as anything but divine revelation. We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask hist...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

111/1

Junior Coursework:
Chaucer

MWF 1-2

For more information on this course, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

115B/1

Junior Coursework:
The English Renaissance: Literature of the 17th Century

TTh 2-3:30

"Although I am putting a history book (A Century of Revolution by Christopher Hill) on the recommended list sent to the bookstores, this will be a course on works written in the first three quarters of the seventeenth century, not a course on the cent...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117B/1

Junior Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will read all the plays conventionally attributed to the second half of Shakespeare?s career, beginning with Hamlet and ending with The Tempest. This period includes all the so-called great tragedies (Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macb...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

117S/1

Junior Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will attempt to read as many Shakespeare plays as can be got through conveniently in fifteen weeks. In general we will try to cover one play per week, but along the way we will devote a week to an introduction of the author, his tim...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

118/1

Junior Coursework:
Milton

TTh 11-12:30

An introduction to the poetry and prose of one of the greatest writers in English literature. Sexual radical, political revolutionary, and literary genius, Milton is a one-man introduction to the cultural ferment of the English Renaissance, the Reform...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria

125C/1

Junior Coursework:
European Novel: History and the Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian traditions, this course examines how the genre of the novel approaches and appropriates historical material as well as reflects its own particular historical contexts. We will consider four major...(read more) Golburt, Lyubov

125D/1

Junior Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

130A/1

Junior Coursework:
American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 9:30-11

I will lecture on the struggle to alter traditional modes of cultural understanding to account for the extraordinary circumstances of New World life as it is reflected and expressed in these books, together with the gradual emergence of novel social a...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

130B/1

Junior Coursework:
American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 11-12:30

"Reading Poe, Longfellow, Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Jacobs, Fern, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson, we will pay particular attention to literary form and technique, to social and political context, and to the ideological formations and transformatio...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel

130C/1

Junior Coursework:
American Literature: 1865-1900

MW 3-4:30

A survey in United States literature from the Civil War to the beginning of the twentieth century. The course pays special attention to matters of violence, urban life, and social reform as they were refracted within an increasingly stratified public ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

131/1

Junior Coursework:
American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

This is a lecture course that surveys American poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to the present. There will be some attention to modernism, Poets of the 1930?s, postwar poetry, and to very recent developments. ...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

133T/1

Junior Coursework:
Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Toni Morrison

TTh 2-3:30

An examination of the development of various themes in Toni Morrison's fiction and the aesthetic rendition of these themes. ...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

135AC/1

Junior Coursework:
Literature of American Cultures: Race, Ethnicity, and Disability in American Cultures

MWF 1-2

"This course will analyze the categories of ?disability,? ?race? and ?ethnicity? critically. ?Disability? as an identity category is always raced, whether we attend to that intersection or not, and people defined in racial terms are also always placed...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

C136/1

Junior Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The Era of the Child--The U.S. 1865-1900

TTh 9:30-11

"Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the ""era of the child."" Children became the heroes of popular culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

137T/1

Junior Coursework:
Topics in Latina/o Literature and Culture: The Trans-American Novel? Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Morrison, and Cisneros

MWF 1-2

"A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Sandra Cisneros, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the New South and the Global South. Topics include the significance o...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

138/1

Junior Coursework:
Studies in World Literature in English: Empire and Global English Literature

TTh 9:30-11

The texts in this course bear a troubled relationship to the language, English, in which and about which they write. Questions of cultural, ethnic, gendered and national identity suffuse both their content and their form. We?ll be trying to understand...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

141/1

Junior Coursework:
Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

MW 4-5:30

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing?fiction, poetry, drama, and memoir. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students wil...(read more) Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)

143A/1

Junior Coursework:
Short Fiction

MW 1:30-3

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction?to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them. Students will write two sho...(read more) Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)

143A/2

Junior Coursework:
Short Fiction

W 3-6

"A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, generally 10-20 pages in length. Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of each of the three student stories being works...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143B/1

Junior Coursework:
Verse

MW 10-11:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today?aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems; ...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Junior Coursework:
Verse

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing d...(read more) O?Brien, Geoffrey

143N/1

Junior Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Rooms and Lives: a creative nonfiction workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have workshopped in class three 10-20 page pieces. Each will t...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143N/2

Junior Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay. We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate?s anthology, as well as students? exercises and essays. Writing assignments will include 3 shor...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Wallace Stevens

MW 4-5:30

We will go through Wallace Stevens? career in an effort to interpret his poems as fully as possible and to appreciate his changes in thought and style. Some attention will be paid to related modernist writing and painting that best put his work in con...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Troy Ancient to Modern

MW 4-5:30

This seminar focuses on one of the most enduring historical legends in human history, the story of Troy and its fall. We will begin with Homer?s Iliad and move on to Virgil?s Aeneid, exploring the epic representations of cities and their destruction t...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 9:30-11

This seminar will be devoted to an intensive and extensive reading of Virginia Woolf?s literary career, focusing on her fiction, but also taking into account her essays, diaries, and letters. We will trace the evolution of Woolf?s narrative strategies...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Sexuality and Antebellum Women?s Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look at a wide variety of materials and topics with an emphasis on nineteenth-century American women?s literary and political treatments of chastity, autoeroticism, marriage, interracial sex, sexual identity, and ?romantic friendship....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Lewis Carroll?s Alice Books and Industry

TTh 11-12:30

The central aim of this course is to understand the Alice books as a cultural phenomenon rather than as isolate texts themselves. Thus, we will begin by surveying a number of seminal critical responses to Carroll?s tales, including competing Freudian ...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Alternate Histories - Counterfacts and Fictions

TTh 12:30-2

This course aims to increase awareness of a widespread intellectual trend?the popularity of alternate history in numerous fields?while also learning to discern its variations across the cultural landscape. We will intensively explore the logic, formal...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Postcolonial Writing

TTh 12:30-2

"A major aspect of this survey will be to question the category of the ""postcolonial"" through readings of the novels and films, and through a critical/theoretical reader that will accompany the readings. We will want to articulate, along with these ...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

150/11

Senior Seminar:
The Modern Novel of Consciousness

TTh 2-3:30

" The representation of consciousness is as old as the novel itself?but new beliefs about the nature of the mind convinced many twentieth-century writers that the novel as a genre required reinvention. In this senior seminar, we will ask why for moder...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain?s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he l...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert

150/13

Senior Seminar:
American Realism

TTh 2-3:30

"The term ""realism"" refers to a certain historical period and a certain practice (or theory) of fiction writing. A number of American writers, led by James and Howells, participated in this general movement (which included British and European write...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Democracy and Rebellion in American Literature

TTh 2-3:30

From the enlightenment through modernism and beyond, American literature is replete with scenarios of class antagonism and rebellion. But consider the bad ends to which the vast majority of American rebels?Lily Bart, Jay Gatsby, Thomas Sutpen, Bigger ...(read more) Skinfill, Mauri

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Utopianism

TTh 3:30-5

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

150/16

Senior Seminar:
Books and Blogs: 20th- Century Print Culture

TTh 3:30-5

" We are living in a time of technological revolution that may be changing the way we read. Digital media?blogs, magazines, hypertext fiction, e-books?place the continued existence of the paper-based book into question, generating debates and jeremiad...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine

150/17

Senior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

MW 5:30-7, plus film screenings Mondays 7-10

We will focus on a range of film melodramas from early silents to contemporary examples, analyzing melodrama?s relationship to the body, the family, gender roles, excess and spectacle. We will be interested in melodrama and modernity, and in the genre...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

161/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 12:30-2

This course will serve as an introduction to literary and cultural theory. We will read closely a number of important (and difficult) theoretical texts while thinking about what relations exist between the different intellectual projects that we call ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

165/1

Special Topics:
Hollywood Talkies to World War II

MW 2-3:30, plus film screenings Mondays 3:30-6:30

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in 1930?s Hollywood. The films we will watch include: The Jazz Singer, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Public Enemy, Footlight Parade, Lady Killer, Baby Face, The Lady Eve, City Westerne...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

166/1

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on each author?s representation or invention of foundational national myths. Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati

166/2

Special Topics:
Hitchcock's Skin (or, A Theory of the Thriller)

MW 12:30-2, plus film screenings Tuesdays 6-9 P.M

"She really got under your skin, didn?t she???said to the protagonist of North by Northwest



The corpus: This course is divided in its attention between an auteur and a genre. In one sense, the division is a superficial one, since there ...(read more)
Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Disability

MWF 10-11

For more information on this course, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

179/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Linguistics

TTh 3:30-5

This course will examine the linguistic features which mark a specifically ?poetic? or ?literary? use of language from those uses of language which are not literary. The topics covered will include meter, rhyme, repetitions, or grammatical patterns as...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

180L/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Lyric Verse

TTh 9:30-11

We will begin the semester with a brief history of lyric poetry as an act, a genre, and a form. We will then go on to examine the ways in which poetry, and lyric poetry specifically, was constructed and framed within mid- and late-20 th century critic...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

H195B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by A. JanMohamed in Fall 2006. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor JanMohamed will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

H195B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MW 8-9:30

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by C. Langan in Fall 2006. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Langan will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

H195B/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MWF 10-11

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by S. Schweik in Fall 2006. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Schweik will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

201A/1

Graduate Course:
Topics in the Structure of the English Language: Syntax and the Language Arts

TTh 11-12:30

This course will explore the relations between syntax and literary form. We will begin by acquainting ourselves with grammatical theory and argumentation and then consider hypotheses about the language of literature that they seem to open up, beginnin...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

203/1

Graduate Readings:
British Novel, 1800-1900

M 3-6

A selection of major nineteenth-century British novels. We will bring some large questions to bear on one another: questions about the world, locality or society the novel aims to represent (region or province; nation; empire / ?the globe?; ?the condi...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

203/3

Graduate Readings:
History and the Postcolonial

TTh 9:30-11

This class will examine the question of history and the conceptualization of the modern in postcolonial literature and theory. It is only at death, when the possibility of future action for an individual is foreclosed, that we are able to begin to giv...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Edmund Spenser

TTh 11-12:30

Perhaps this course should be sub-titled Spenserian Recoveries and Explorations, or Wandering in the Spenserian Landscape. I take enormous pleasure in reading The Faerie Queene, but I think it?s hard for people to find that pleasure when it is crammed...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

TTh 12:30-2

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a specific theory of meter rooted in generative linguistics. Taking the strict iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets,...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers

Thurs. 2-5

This course offers the opportunity to read a wide selection of fiction, essays, and poetry written by women prior to and during the Civil War. We will examine the history of recovery of nineteenth-century American women writers and the key debates aro...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

203/7

Graduate Readings:
Chekhov, the Conventions of Realism, and the Depiction of Reality

Tues. 6-9 P.M

This is a team-taught course, cross-listed with the Department of Journalism. The instructors are Robert Hass from the English Department and Mark Danner from Journalism. Danner is a staff writer for the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books, wh...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Danner, Mark
Hass, Robert and Danner, Mark

212/1

Graduate Course:
Readings in Middle English

TTh 9:30-11

"The course aims to introduce students to the Middle English, as a period both of the language and of literary history. There will be three main ""movements"" to the course. The first three weeks will introduce Middle English itself, offering a broad ...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

218/1

Graduate Course:
Milton

Thurs. 2-5

An intensive study of Milton?s major works. ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

243A/1

Graduate Course:
Fiction Writing Workshop

Tues. 2-5

This limited-enrollment workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction. Undergraduate students are welcome to apply for admission to this graduate workshop....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati

246C/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Renaissance?16th Century

TTh 5-6:30

"My chief concern as a student of literature is aesthetic. This therefore is probably not a serviceable course for students swatting up answers for doctor?s orals. This will be a survey course, but a highly selective one. Although I plan to look at th...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

246K/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Literature in English, 1900-1945

TTh 12:30-2

We will read widely in British and American literature of the first half of the twentieth century with an eye to the intersections between modernism and modernity. While attending closely to aesthetic and formal concerns, our discussions may also rang...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

250/1

Research Seminar:
Black Reconstruction

M 11-2

Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,? the historian Eric Foner has written. And ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

250/3

Research Seminar:
Melville and Aesthetics

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"What do literary critics mean by an ?aesthetic turn? or a ?return to form?? (Have we ever left? If we are ?returning? to form, where have we been?) Are these reactionary moves, conjuring the specter of the New Criticism? The latest swing in the pendu...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel

250/4

Research Seminar:
Class and Race in U.S. Ethnic Literature

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

What would happen if we placed class at the center of U.S. ethnic literary studies? Is class analysis obsolete? Does the study of class in literature necessarily preclude the importance of theorizing the specificity of race and racism? How can we crit...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

250/5

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

F 11-2

"This course will explore Joyce's later work?focusing in its first nine or ten weeks on Ulysses, and then moving into an initiatory probe of Finnegans Wake. Though particular topics explored in the seminar will be determined by the research interests ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

310/1

Graduate Course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff