Announcement of Classes: Fall 2006

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text: Visual Readings

MWF 10-11

"This course will introduce students to the process and practice of critical reading and writing, through examining a selection of twentieth century literary texts, examples of visual art, and works that combine elements of both textual and visual art...(read more) Sophia Wang

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Fact and Fantasy

MWF 12-1

"In this course, you will focus on the craft of writing college essays�a vast process that includes everything from refining grammar and style to developing theses, engaging critical thinking, and structuring your arguments in logical and dynamic ways...(read more) Slavica Naumovska

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Imagining History

MWF 1-2

"What is history? What effect does it have on our projects in the present? And on our future projects? This course is interested in exploring what role the way in which we imagine past events has in shaping our understanding of what�s possible and imp...(read more) Kelvin Black

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Acts of Interpretation

MWF 3-4

"This course is an introduction to the mechanics and pleasures of critical reading and writing. If you�re not sure how critical reading and writing differ from other kinds of reading and writing, don�t despair! That�s precisely what we�re here to figu...(read more) Kristin Fujie

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
No course description is available at this time.

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Novel Experiences: The Social Imaginary of Private Reading

TTh 8-9:30

"In 1913, the social philosopher George Mead declared, �It is fair to say that the modern western world has lately done much of its thinking in the form of the novel.� For Mead, it seems, novels had not only begun to test and represent developments in...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Metamorphosis and Literature

TTh 9:30-11

"This course examines why human metamorphosis has been such an enduring motif in literature and how the meanings of literary metamorphoses have themselves changed over time. Starting with classical myth and working through more modern fairy tales, poe...(read more) Erin E. Edwards

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
�Self as Art, Self as History: The Western Tradition of Autobiography�

TTh 9:30-11

"In the fifth century, Augustine of Hippo wrote his Confessions, arguably the most significant and foundational autobiography in the Western tradition. In this work, he represents the act of making an autobiography as a quest for self and a quest for ...(read more) Eleanor Johnson

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
�Self as Art, Self as History: The Western Tradition of Autobiography�

TTh 9:30-11

"In the fifth century, Augustine of Hippo wrote his Confessions, arguably the most significant and foundational autobiography in the Western tradition. In this work, he represents the act of making an autobiography as a quest for self and a quest for ...(read more) Eleanor Johnson

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Character and Psychopathology

TTh 11-12:30

"For this course, we will consider the relationship between modern understandings of character (in film and literature) and the development of psychopathology in the 19 th and 20 th centuries. While we will borrow some terms and ideas from psychoanaly...(read more) Jesse Costantino

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Asian Hordes

TTh 12:30-2

"This class will examine representations of the Asian masses in selected works of literature and film. What historical contexts have given rise to particular ways of representing Asians as masses or hordes? How can we think about the Asian masses as b...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
�Reason is but choosing�: Ethical Dilemmas and Literary Form

TTh 2-3.30

"John Milton, arguing against the governmental oversight of book printing in Areopagitica, tells us that �reason is but choosing.� He also tells us, famously, of another choice: that �from out the rind of one apple tasted, . . . the knowledge of good ...(read more) Penelope Anderson

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

( -) 2-3:30

"In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature � a novel, verse, a couple short stories, and one play in two different translations � with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great litera...(read more) Joseph Jordan

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Bad Managements

TTh 3:30-5

"""I enjoy seeing the lengths to which bad managements go to preserve what they call their independence�which really just means their jobs."" Donald Trump, The Art of the Deal (1987)""To cast in my lot with Jekyll was to die to those appetites which I...(read more) Jami Bartlett

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Madwomen in the Attic: Literature and Female Insanity

MWF 10-11

"How have mad women been represented in literature? This course will explore a variety of overlapping approaches (including Gothic, medical, psychoanalytic, and autobiographical) appearing in literary representations of female insanity. Through severa...(read more) Arcadia Falcone

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Rhetoric, Repetition and Rhyme

MWF 11-12

"Roman Jakobson argues that babies first begin to make meaning when they begin to repeat phonemes: ba-ba, da-da, etc. Like Chomsky�s notion of Universal Grammar, repetition is embedded in the structure of language and has aesthetic, rhetorical, perfor...(read more) Tanya Brolaski

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
�Crises of Faith�

MWF 1-2

"The topic of this course examines literary portrayals of faith and doubt. By looking at texts which explore both the human need for belief without proof and the tendency of reason toward skepticism, we will chart a literary history of personal religi...(read more) Paul Hurh

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MWF 3-4

"This course looks at what was happening in culture at large from the mid- twentieth century until the end of the Cold War. We will immerse ourselves in the popular and political culture of the time�literature, poetry, film, television, advertising, a...(read more) Melissa Fabros

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
�If it had been a movie, I wouldn�t have believed it�: Culture, Politics & Narrative After 9/11

TTh 8-9:30

"Individual responses to the events of September 11th, 2001 made surprisingly frequent reference to film and narrative: unable to describe the attacks any other way, we either noted their similarity to particular films, or we described our shock by sa...(read more) Annie McClanahan

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Magic Realism and National Allegory

TTh 9:30-11

"The term �magic realism� can be used to describe any work of fiction that combines fantastic or otherworldly forms of narrative with those that belong to more traditional realist methods. But the aesthetic and social significance of magic realist dev...(read more) Joel Nickels

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Googleable

TTh 11-12:30

"George Orwell�s 1984 envisions a world where language, thought, and information are controlled by the ruling Party. Reading 1984 as a primer of media and information control, this class will examine the new challenges that mass media and the internet...(read more) Jeremy S. Ecke

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
English Renaissance Drama (1588-1640): Text and Performance

TTh 12:30-2

We will hone the skills of composition, argumentation, and research as we journey through the glory days of the early English stage. The �stage� here not only refers to the plays that we have come to accept as masterpieces of the English literary cann...(read more) Brendan Prawdzik

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
L.A. Fictions

TTh 2-3:30

"The inspiration for this course came first from the sprawling geography of Los Angeles and the popularly accepted notion that L.A. has no center. Often viewed as a contemporary wasteland, the idea that L.A. has no center has also led people to consid...(read more) Becky Hsu

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Once and Future King

TTh 3:30-5

"Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur has been enormously popular for at least eight hundred years, if not ...(read more) Andrea Lankin

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 3:30-5

"In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of �life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.� In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1980s, we�ll follow stories of death, captivity, and pursuit by misery. Julia...(read more) Peter Goodwin
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Growing Up Chicano/a with Gary Soto and Sandra Cisneros

W 4-5

We will read a small group of narratives about growing up Chicano/Latino. I believe that this is a particularly difficult time for all children as they face sexual pressure, violence, discouraging schools. By focusing on Chicano youth we will glimpse ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
The Essays of Virginia Woolf

W 2-3

In addition to the novels for which she is most famous, Virginia Woolf produced a voluminous body of short prose, with more than 500 essays and reviews on a dazzling array of topics, including, but far from limited to, peace and war, consciousness and...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Joyce�s Dubliners in Joyce�s Dubliners

M 3:30-5:30

James Joyce�s Dubliners (1914) is a collection of short stories about the inhabitants of his native city. Joyce helps invent the modern short story as he tries to evoke the mood or atmosphere of Dublin as it manifests itself in the behavior of Dublin ...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen

Tues. 3:30-5:30

"This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We�ll read and discuss two novels: Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey. We�ll approach the novels from a number of different pers...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth Night

Tues. 9:00-11:00

Our seminar will concentrate on one of Shakespeare's best and most beloved comedies, Twelfth Night. We will read every word of the play as a group, and do trial readings and enactments of various scenes. Members of the seminar will give at least two o...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

43B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 3:30-5

This is a seminar in writing poetry, conducted as a workshop and intended for lower-division students. ...(read more) Gravendyk-Burrill, Hillary

45A/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 10-11 plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 10-11)

This course is an introduction to major works by Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, and Milton, with supplemental poetry from a class reader. In each case I will ask you to consider both the strangeness and the odd familiarity of these works, so far away from...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

45A/2

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 1-2 plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions ...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

45B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

MW 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 12-1)

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17 th century through the first half of the 19 th century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are some...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

45B/2

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Late-17th Through the Mid-19th Century

MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, and othe...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

45C/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

This course is an introduction to literature written in English mainly between the late 19 th century and the late 20 th century. There will be two kinds of emphases running through the course�one paid to the formal innovations credited to the signifi...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

45C/2

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

Intended as a general survey of imaginative responses to the not always positive progress of modernity, this course will examine works produced by an array of prominent figures and representative of some of the principal Modernist and Postmodern movem...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture/Low Culture

Thurs. 2-5

The course will focus on films of the Coen Brothers and other contemporary directors (Lynch, Kieslovski, Wong Kar-Wai) and the stories of Lakiri in order to observe how cinematic/literary representations function. We will make use of UAM exhibits, Cal...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Socrates as Cultural Icon

Tues. 2-4

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. We will read the principal contemporary representations of Socrates�Arist...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Asian American Literature

MW 1:30-3

It is by now commonplace to describe Asian American identity as impossibly heterogeneous and hybrid. Can there be a textual basis for Asian American identity? In particular, is there such a thing as an Asian American novel, and if so, what are its ide...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Post-War American Detective Fiction

MW 4-5:30

"In this survey of post-war American detective fiction we will examine one of the most popular, long-lasting and diverse literary genres of the modern canon. Beginning in the years immediately following the end of World War II, we will explore the hig...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

100/5

Junior Seminar:
The Metaphysicals

MW 4-5:30

The term �the metaphysicals� originated in an insult: John Dryden faulted John Donne and the poets who fell under his influence for �affecting the metaphysics�; intent on perplexing their readers with �nice philosophical speculations,� they failed to ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Northern Irish Literature and �The Troubles�

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore contemporary Northern Irish literature and its relationship to the political strife, social turmoil, and sectarian violencethat have characterized life in Northern Ireland since the late 1960�s, euphemistically known as �The T...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Literature of the African Diaspora�Black Atlantic Culture and Modernity

TTh 9:30-11

"In this course we will take a comparative look at the literature and cultural history of the African Diaspora, focusing on the area known as the Black Atlantic�North America, the Caribbean, and West Africa. This area comprises great cultural diversit...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers�Women and Style

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on gender and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves�in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists in the literary marketplace, how they en...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

100/11

Junior Seminar:
The Fictionalization of the American Sixties and Seventies

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will examine a number of fictionalized representations of the tumultuous liberal revolutions of the American sixties and the conservative counterrevolutions which brought them full circle by the 1980s. In comparing the ways in which ...(read more) Richards, Diane

100/13

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

While concentrating on the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson, we will consider the full sweep of nineteenth-century American poetry. We will read poets better known for their prose�Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, and Melville�poets popular in their time�Longfell...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Herman Melville

TTh 2-3:30

I will emphasize the developments and contradictions that occur over the course of Melville�s career, with special attention to his struggle with political and religious authority. But class discussion will be open to whatever is of interest to the me...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Arthurian Legends

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we will read, discuss, and write about the medieval Arthurian tradition, starting with its origins in Latin accounts of English history and continuing through the fifteenth century. We will also examine contemporary representations of ...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

100/16

Junior Seminar:
Langston Hughes

TTh 2-3:30

This course offers the opportunity to spend an entire semester reading Langston Hughes, one of the most prolific and consistently exciting black writers of the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the poetry, and especially on its relation to its v...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

100/17

Junior Seminar:
The Holocaust and the Postmodern

TTh 3:30-5

This course focuses on the deep interconnections between the Holocaust and Western culture and thought. Postmodernism begins as a response to the Holocaust, not rejecting rationality but acknowledging its limits, basing humanism on a sense of fundamen...(read more) Liu, Sarah

100/18

Junior Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Mondays 7-10 P.M.

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will co...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

110/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Medieval Literature: Love in the Middle Ages

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on the literature of love in the medieval period, beginning with St. Paul �s Letters to the Corinthians and culminating in Chaucer�s Troilus and Criseyde. In between, we will address a wide variety of questions about love and se...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

112/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Middle English Literature

TTh 12:30-2

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

114B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
English Drama from 1603 to 1700

TTh 3:30-5

The English theater was the first mass medium, an avowedly commercial, hyper-competitive, fad-driven industry of sound and spectacle, which both catered to and ruthlessly parodied the sophisticated, novelty-craving consumerism of the seventeenth centu...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

117B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

MWF 11-12

Close study of several of Shakespeare�s earlier works....(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

117J/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30 P.M.

"I expect the course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey and also to have seminar-like intellectual crossfire. I will take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but I will not take them up systematically. I find that presen...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

This course will foreground what we have always known--that Shakespeare�s plays were written to be performed, not simply read--so we�ll approach them with their performative aspects always in sight. This will make attention to the literary text more i...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

118/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Milton

TTh 2-3:30

This survey will cover John Milton�s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

125E/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 3:30-5

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them written in the second half of the twentieth century. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to und...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

130C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Literature: 1865-1900

TTh 11-12:30

A survey of U.S. literature from 1865 to the beginning of the twentieth century. We�ll begin with the texts listed above; then together we�ll choose the reading and design the syllabus for the last weeks of the course. Two midterms and a final project...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

132/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Novel

TTh 12:30-2

A course on five �great American novels.� One mid-term, one paper, one final. Much reading....(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

133A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of major black writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath. There will be weekly writing, a midterm, one essay, and a final exam. ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

134/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Contemporary Literature

MWF 11-12

In this course we will sketch the field of contemporary British literature, closely reading some of the key post-1945 texts from Britain, the Commonwealth, and Ireland. In addition to paying careful attention to issues of poetic form and narrative sty...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

135AC/1

Upper Division Coursework:
"Repression and Resistance

Gonzalez, Marcial"

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

This course will focus on representations of repression and resistance in the fiction of three cultural groups: Chicanos, African Americans, and European Americans. We will examine various forms of repression (social, physical, and psychological) repr...(read more) 105 North Gate

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

MWF 10-11

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a �transitional� period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late 19 th century an...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

139/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Cultures of English: Culture of the Great War�Art in the Age of Decline

TTh 12:30-2

"The Great War set loose on the world an heretofore unimaginable scale of violence and destruction. In this five-year conflict 8.5 million people were killed and 20 million wounded�making a mockery of the now jejune anxieties of social degeneration an...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

143A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This is a course on the form, theory and practice of short fiction. It will be conducted as a workshop. Students are required to fulfill assignments on specific aspects of craft, to analyze aesthetic strategies in selected short stories by published a...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a.: Blaise, B.)

143B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

W 3-6

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing d...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

143B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today�aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse: Transelation/Mistranslation

TTh 11-12:30

How might the writer use the various techniques and theories of translation, including mistranslation, as experimental tools to aid in the composition of new poems? Rather than approaching translation as the conventional transfer of meaning from one l...(read more) Robertson, Lisa

143N/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Prose Non-fiction: The Personal Essay

TTh 11-12:30

This course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write approximately 45 pages of non-fictional narrative. Format of course...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a.: Blaise, B.)

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Fictions of Los Angeles

MW 4-5:30

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World "" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rain...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Victorian Masculinities in Conflict

TTh 9:30-11

"In this class we will examine the varied and often conflicting forms of masculinity in the latter-half of the Victorian era. We will look at �hegemonic� masculinities (i.e., heterosexual, white, middle-upper class) alongside �other� masculinities and...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette

150/7

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

TTh 11-12:30

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: Classical and Renaissance Drama

TTh 11-12:30

In a famous poem prefixed to the first edition (1623) of Shakespeare's collected works, Ben Jonson claimed that Shakespeare was at least the equal of ancient tragedians such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes, and Seneca, while for comedy Shakespeare ...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Irish Writing in the 20th Century

TTh 12:30-2

This course surveys some of the most popular Irish literature in the last one hundred years. Irish Writing in the early part of the 20th century was part of a cultural revolution that culminated in a political revolution, a war of independence and the...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Is It Useless to Revolt?

TTh 2-3:30

�Is it useless to revolt?� Our seminar borrows its lead question from the title of an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Foucault urges us to listen to the voices of revolt, even as they seem entangled in a history of inescapable, re...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

150/16

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir/Neo-Noir

TTh 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. (also in 203 Wheeler)

Our focus will be on the evolution of neo-noirs from classic noirs. We will follow the genre from early European and American examples to the 70's and onwards, and analyze gender presentations, popular narrative patterns, postmodern nostalgia, and que...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

165/1

Special Topics:
Elegy, Mourning, and the Representation of the Holocaust

TTh 2-3:30

"The German critic Theodor Adorno famously commented that it is �barbaric� to continue to write poetry after Auschwitz , that any attempt to convert such suffering into aesthetic images commits an injustice against the victims. Yet as Adorno also ackn...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

165AC/1

Special Topics:
Special Topics in American Cultures: Captivity in America

TTh 2-3:30

This course considers the captivity narrative as a recurring form in American literature and asks why it should be so prevalent in a �land of freedom.� We will expand this category beyond its traditional focus on Puritan captivity (in which Indians ar...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

166/1

Special Topics:
Race and Performance in the 20th-Century U.S.

MWF 11-12

"This course takes as its point of departure an observation made by writer James Baldwin in 1953: ""The time has come to realize that the interracial drama acted out on the American continent has not only created a new black man, it has created a new ...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

166/2

Special Topics:
The 20th-Century Epic in Prose

TTh 9:30-11

Historically the epic has to do with heroes. The problem in the twentieth century, with the �coming of the state,� of rationalization and modernization, is that the age of heroes is, generally speaking, over. How does the novel, then, both preserve so...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

170/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and the Arts

MWF 1-2

Areas of Concentration, Book List, and Course Description: For more information on this class, please email the professor at khanson@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

180E/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Epic

TTh 12:30-2

I imagine this course as an introduction to the pleasure of reading and thinking about the major epics in Western Culture. We will look especially at changing definitions in what is meant by �culture.� And we will immerse ourselves in how writers buil...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

H195A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 9:30-11

The fall semester of this section of the honors course will be devoted to a rigorous examination of the theoretical paradigms that cast strong influences on contemporary critical practices. (Students averse to theory might not be happy in this section...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

H195A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

"This course is designed to enable students to undertake a significant research project in the study of literature in English. In the fall semester, we will concentrate largely on two terms in that sentence: �significant� and �literature.� What makes ...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

H195A/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

By the end of this year-long course you will have produced a substantive and polished piece of writing on a topic of your choosing. In the fall semester, we�ll work on developing your theoretical self-consciousness and honing your analytic skills as y...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, and from prospectus conference to the first dissertation chapter. Every week, students will submit some formu...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

W 3-6

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical sch...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Cultures of U.S. Imperialism & the War of 1898

TTh 11-12:30

This course has a double trajectory. One examines representations of U.S. imperialism in a variety of literary and nonliterary texts within a broad time frame, from the 1880s to the present. The second explores recent theoretical work about culture an...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Renaissance Drama

TTh 2-3:30

A survey of English drama from the sixteenth to the seventeenth centuries. We will consider the drama from a variety of perspectives: its roots in classical and medieval theater; its generic diversity and complexity; the business practices of the prof...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

217/1

Graduate Course:
Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

"This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester through following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the receptio...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

243B/1

Graduate Course:
Poetry Writing Workshop

MW 12-1:30

This workshop is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. It presupposes two things: that poetry as a project is as rigorous an undertaking as more typically scholarly...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

246E/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Restoration and Early 18 th Century

MW 4-5:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography, and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and 1725; these will include Behn�s...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

246G/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
British Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

This class is not a 203 or a 250 in disguise. We will read widely in and around Romanticism, taking up as many pertinent topics as we can, perhaps including: aesthetics, politics, and ideology; the performance of lyric subjectivity; the gendering of g...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

250/1

Research Seminar:
Death and Reproduction in 20th-Century African-American Fiction

M 3-6

Having recently completed a study of a paradigmatic instance of the production of the death-bound-subject in African-American literature, I am currently exploring the reproduction of that subject. Thus this course will focus predominantly on black fem...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Faulkner

Tues. 3:30-6:30

An intensive seminar on the major works of William Faulkner. ...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

250/3

Research Seminar:
Studies in the Lyric�Genre and Theory

W 3-6

"This course offers an introduction to the genre and theory of lyric poetry, as well as indirectly to the theory of genre itself. While weekly readings will be organized by topics rather than historically determined, we will address the following bro...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

250/4

Research Seminar:
Philosophy and the Arts

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore some of the ways that reading in philosophical texts can have an impact on literary studies and on the arts in general. I don�t want to call this either �theory� or �aesthetics,� because such choices obviously tilt the philoso...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

250/5

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Prosopography and Drayton�s Polyolbion

Thurs. 3:30-630

"Check back later for more information!"

Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

250/6

Research Seminar:
The Medieval Lyric

M 3-6

"This course surveys the forms, traditions, and environments of lyric poetry in the European Middle Ages. It will read closely in examples from Latin and the vernacular languages, but it also hopes to ask some broader theoretical and cultural question...(read more) Lerer, Seth

302/1

Graduate course:
The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

"This jointly taught course will introduce new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching in 45 A-B-C, R1A and R1B, and other classes they are likely to teach both at Berkeley and beyond. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on pra...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Katz, Stephen A
Goodman, Kevis and Katz, Stephen

310/1

Graduate course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff