Announcement of Classes: Spring 2006

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare?s Sonnets

M 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Pop Song Poetics

Tues. 2-3

All the core elements of versification found the world over?meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism?are normally taught with reference to high art forms of poetry. But these same basic elements are also found in some form in the lyrics of...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Boys and Girls in Mark Twain and Henry James

W 3-4

Historians often define the era from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the ?era of the child.? Some historians also include the problem of American adolescence in this period. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity, authors of the p...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Through Hell?Reading Dante?s Inferno

W 2-3

"""Divine Power, Supreme Wisdom and Primal Love made me,"" declares the scandalous inscription on the gate of Dante's Hell, the ""city of suffering,"" a place that resembles the totalitarian prison-states of our own political nightmares. Dante's journ...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

25/1

Lower Division Coursework:
English as a Language

TTh 11-12:30

This course examines the structure of modern English, including its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure) and semantics (linguistic meaning), as well as some aspects of pragmatics (contextual meaning). T...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

43A/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of short fiction?to explore the elements that make up the genre, and to enable students to talk critically about short stories and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writ...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

43B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 12:30-2

This workshop aims to help you develop skills as a writer of poetry. My hope is that you will bring to class works that you consider incomplete, that are still unfamiliar to you, and about which you are sincerely curious. In each meeting we will read ...(read more) Carr, Julie

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 9-10, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 9-10)

This course will concentrate on Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales, Spenser?s Faery Queene (Book I), and Milton?s Paradise Lost; additional works will be read for the sake of historical context. Written work for the semester will consist of short quizzes, one...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 10-11)

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Melville, Browning, Dickinson, Whitman...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

This course will attempt to survey major texts from the period 1660 to 1850. The instructor has a bias toward philosophy and toward the close reading of poetry, and is not an expert on the period. This may produce enthusiasm in the place of knowledge,...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

"A survey of English and American literature from the late-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century, with attention given both to conceptions of literature intrinsically claimed by the texts assigned and to the historical and cultural grounds out ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 1-2, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

In this semester we will cut a selective path through a vast swathe of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Our aim is less to survey the ?greatest hits? of the period than to get a feel for and analytical grasp of pat...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Stylin

MWF 11-12

"Humbert Humbert, the narrator of Lolita, speaks of the ?refuge of art? ? a notion that the sheer beauty of his text renders it permanent, impervious to the incursions of time or the judgments of his readers. But if transcendent immortality is the pre...(read more) Katz, Stephen A
Katz, Stephen

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Textual Embodiment?What is a text? What is a body?

TTh 2-3:30

"in order to see what a photograph is of, we must first repress the knowledge of what the photograph is?? George Batchen



This quote about the transparency of the photograph as object in relation to its photographic content is also a goo...(read more)
Edwards, Rebekah

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture, Low Culture?The Films of Woody Allen

M 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology. The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Arc...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Socrates as Cultural Icon

W 2-4

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the minds of his own and later ages. We will read the contemporary representations of Socrates?Aristophanes? ...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John

95/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one our of discussion section per week (W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
American Writers in Paris

MW 10:30-12

We will primarily address American writers who found themselves in Paris and environs during the 1920's, with a brief look backward to their main precursor in the late 19th century, Henry James. The ex-patriots, as these writers and artists were calle...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

MWF 11-12

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, a...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Home Invasions--Domestic Transgressions in 19th-Century Britain

TTh 2-3:30

"This class will analyze discourses of ""home"" in the Victorian and Edwardian eras (ex: the degeneration vs. purity of the house) and how issues of crime and criminality are variously constructed in a cultural context of growing unease regarding the ...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

MWF 1-2

"Reading, discussion, and writing about the works, life and times of Mark Twain. The primary texts will include a selection of short stories and sketches by Mark Twain and earlier humorists of the ""Old Southwest"" and the West; The Innocents Abroad; ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Modernism--Theory and Practice

MW 4-5:30

"""What are Master-pieces and why are there so few of them?"" asked Gertrude Stein in 1936. These basic questions of how to define literature, what it is for, what its function is, find new answers over time. This course follows the development of an ...(read more) Liu, Sarah

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Mapping the Atlantic´┐ŻSlavery and its Afterlife

TTh 9:30-11

This course focuses on issues of history and memory in contemporary novels of slavery. In particular, the course grapples with issues of literary representation and historical responsibility in African American letters, the complex interaction of mast...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Comedy, Carnival, and Folly

TTh 11-12:30

"""License"": what does it mean? It refers to permission, and the authority that grants it. It also refers to what one enjoys or indulges--one's liberty--and hence to behavior that might become licentious or libertine, thereby threatening the authorit...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

100/8

Junior Seminar:
William Faulkner and American Literary Criticism

TTh 11-12:30

How and why has William Faulkner been elevated into the pantheon of great American writers? To answer this question, we will study Faulkner's work in relation to the American literary critics who have significantly fashioned--and regularly revised--th...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

100/9

Junior Seminar:
The 1960s

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the literature and the culture of the 1960s, focusing primarily on fiction, poetry, drama (and some film) in Britain. What can we make of a moment suspended somewhere between the modern and the postmodern, one that has now rec...(read more) Blanton, Dan

100/10

Junior Seminar

TTh 12:30-2

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

100/11

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Women Writers--Women and Style

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus specifically on women and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves--in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists in the literary marketplace...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

100/12

Junior Seminar:
History and the Postcolonial

TTh 3:30-5

This class will examine the question of history and the conceptualization of the modern in postcolonial literature and theory. It is only at death, when the possibility of future action for an individual is foreclosed, that we are able to begin to giv...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Criminal Literature-Writing Against the Law

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will focus on a selection of twentieth-century American crime novels (as well as upon a few films). Throughout the course we will consider why America, a nation founded by puritan zealots and known infamously as the policeman of the world...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

105/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 12:30-2

This course will introduce students to the rich literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England, focusing particularly on the heroic poem Beowulf and its modern translations, but also exploring a wide variety of cultural forms: chronicle writing, charms...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

110/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Medieval Literature

TTh 9:30-11

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Renaissance: Literature of the 16th Century

TTh 2-3:30

"This will be a survey course, but a highly selective one. Although I plan to look at the best and/or most interesting work of several lesser sixteenth-century writers--for instance, some lyrics by Wyatt and some by Sidney, and Surrey's blank verse--I...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

MWF 11-12

We will read a basic set of Shakespeare plays exploring all his major genres. The primary focus for the class will be on close-reading the plays to analyze character and appreciate dramatic structure. Instructor is proudly ignorant of race, class, and...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

117J/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

"I expect the course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey and also to have seminar-like intellectual crossfire. I will take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but I will not take them up systematically. I find that presen...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

"This class is a single-semester introduction to the scope of Shakespeare's dramatic career, taught in lecture format. Our readings will range across different genres, from early plays to late, and from some of the greatest hits to some more unfamilia...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

117T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare in the Theater

TTh 2-3:30 in 200 Wheeler, plus rehearsals TTh 3:30-5 (also in 200 Wheeler)

"Detailed study and presentation of a single Shakespeare play--this semester the witty, wistful, clownish, and musical romantic comedy of country copulatives As You Like It, to be crafted into a full-scale public production for performance in late Apr...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

118/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Milton

TTh 9:30-11

"The later poet William Blake imagined Milton ""descending . . .clothed in black, severe and silent,"" and too often that is the image that has descended upon us as well. This course will offer a very different poet and political figure. As we read Mi...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 3:30-5

This course focuses on the European novel of education or formation (Bildungsroman), the novel whose protagonist is a student. We will be interested, among other things, in the meeting between the student and history, usually in the form of a revoluti...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

130C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
"American Literature--1865-1900:

The Making of Americans--U.S. Fiction from 1865 to 1914"

TTh 11-12:30

"We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the U.S. between the Civil War and World War I, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to new cultural figures such as...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

130D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Literature: 1900-1945

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

A survey of American literature between WWI and WWII, focusing on poetry and fiction, and with an emphasis on modernist innovations. ...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

131/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

American Poetry is a lecture course that surveys the history of American poetry from its beginnings to the present. The course has different emphases in different years. This course will focus for the first third of the semester on Walt Whitman and Em...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

133B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
"African-American Literature and Culture Since 1917:

20th-Century African-American Fiction"

MWF 2-3

"An examination of some of the major African-American novels of the second half of the 20th Century.



Each student will be required to write two papers (between 1250 and 1500 words each) and to take a final exam (which will either be a r...(read more)
JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

133T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Black Writers in the Americas

TTh 2-3:30

This introductory course examines eighteenth- , nineteenth- , and early twentieth-century literature written by black writers. The course is less a historical survey of African American literature than an extended engagement with questions of black le...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya

137A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Chicana/o Literature and Culture to 1910

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we will study major literary and cultural texts written by Mexican Americans from 1835 to 1910. We will concentrate mainly on prose: fiction, memoirs and essays. One section of the course, however, will be devoted to the study of folk ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

141/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 2-3:30

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing - fiction, poetry, drama, and memoir. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students w...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

143A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

MW 12-1:30

"A seminar in writing short stories.



To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESD...(read more)
Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, 10-20 pages in length. Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of student stories being workshopped as well as a 2-page j...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

MW 10:30-12

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today?aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems; ...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 2-3:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require reading essays in poetics and sometimes writing under extreme formal constraints...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

143N/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction: Creative Nonfiction?Writing Music, Dance & the Self

W 3-6

"A nonfiction workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies of memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will write and have workshopped in class two 10-20 page pieces. Each will emerge out of detailed d...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143N/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay. We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate?s anthology, as well as students? exercises and essays. Writing assignments will include 3 shor...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

This is a workshop for the translation of poetry. Translators are expected to share their work and to participate in the criticism of the work of others. Discussion will range from the larger problems of the possibility of translation to the particula...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Faulkner, Paredes, Garcia Marquez, and Morrison

MWF 1-2

"A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Americo Paredes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the New South and the Global South. Topics include the significance o...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Utopianism

MW 4-5:30

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Jane Austen (topic changed as of Jan. 5)

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form. Classic continental novel theory ignores her, and even recen...(read more) Miller, D. A.

150/4

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

MWF 3-4

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

150/7

Senior Seminar:
American Beauty

TTh 9:30-11

"When we think about what ?beauty? means in America, we immediately confront issues of race, ethnicity, sexuality, femininity, faith, and class. Beauty, we discover, is a highly coded word, a concept that expresses desire entangled with history, aesth...(read more) Adams, Jessica

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Chicana/o Poetry Since 1967

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we will study the major movements and developments in Chicana and Chicano poetry since 1967. The thematic focus of the course will be broad. Thus, at a minimum, we will discuss and analyze the following topics: the Epic Corrido as a re...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

150/9

Senior Seminar:
The Apocalyptic Imagination

MW 3-4:30

"When Lincoln's 1858 senate-race speech on The House Divided drew famously on biblical rhetoric to underscore the impending Union crisis over slavery, it offered one example of a peculiar American preoccupation?one now curiously shared by politicians,...(read more) Skinfill, Mauri

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Theories and Literatures of Globalization

TTh 12:30-2

Processes of globalization ostensibly have wrought economic interdependence, as well as mutual intelligibility, among a newly-integrated world citizenry. Literary studies has kept apace with this re-organization of people?s experiences by tracing prev...(read more) Ray, Kasturi

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Henry James and the Invention of Novel Theory

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will focus on James as a foundational figure for twentieth-century novel theory. We will consider how James?s literary critical writing inspired later thinkers to think systematically about the novel as a high art form; and why James?s ow...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

TTh 3:30-5

This seminar will focus on Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales, one of the most complicated, funny, tragic, moral, irreverent and engaging texts written in English. Students will learn to read Middle English both silently and out loud, and will have the opport...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

150/13

Senior Seminar:
Gender, Modernism, and Print Culture

TTh 3:30-5

Robert McAlmon famously observed that ?it is some kind of commentary on the modern period that Joyce?s work and acclaim should have been fostered by high-minded ladies, rather than by men,? without going into detail about why gender matters in the pub...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Romantic Versification

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

English Romantic poets issued a great many pronouncements about the language of poetry. In this course we will explore these views not so much through what they said as through what they did. Focusing specifically on those resources of poetry which ar...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir

Seminars Th 5:30-8:30 P.M. in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Th 8:30-10 P.M.(also in 300 Wheeler)

"We will examine film noir's relationship to ""classical"" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural bac...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

160/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 11-12:30

This course will attempt to define narrative fiction (the novel and short story) in terms of the linguistic properties of what Roland Barthes calls ?the writing of the novel, in particular, 1) its uses of narrative tenses to recount the past and 2) it...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

165AC/1

Special Topics:
Special Topics in American Cultures: Captivity in America

TTh 11-12:30

This course considers the captivity narrative as a recurring form in American literature and asks why it should be so prevalent in a ?land of freedom.? We will expand this category beyond its traditional focus on Puritan captivity (in which Indians ar...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

166/1

Special Topics:
Theorizing Children's Literature

TTh 9:30-11

What is children's literature? How do (real and imagined) children read? What do various texts in the canon of children?s literature (and texts that lie outside that tradition) reveal about our own culture's, and other cultures,? ideologies of childho...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

166/2

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers

TTh 11-12:30

Through close scrutiny of selected texts, students will explore forms and theories of the novel. The aim of the course is to discover the intimate connection between the authorial choices of narrative strategies and the construction of meaning. Partic...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati

166/3

Special Topics:
1922

TTh 3:30-5

The year 1922 (or Year 1, as Ezra Pound declared it) has long marked the central moment in histories of literary modernism: the date of Ulysses (published in February in Paris) and The Waste Land (published in October in London). But a number of other...(read more) Blanton, Dan

166/4

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and evenly divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After...(read more) Naiman, Eric

166/5

Special Topics:
Post-War Italian Cinema (1945-70)

MW 3:30-5 in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Tues. 6-9 P.M. (also in 300 Wheeler)

"Post-war Italian cinema became internationally famous for two things: first, for revitalizing a nineteenth-century realist aesthetic, and then, for developing the cinematic modernism that ran directly counter to this realism. It ought to have been fa...(read more) Miller, D. A.

171/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Sexual Identity

TTh 12:30-2

This course will take up the complicated relationship between literature and sexuality by way of sexual science, the aesthetics of sexuality, and sociologies and histories of sexuality. Throughout the course we will ask what role literature has to pl...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Disability

TTh 12:30-2

What is disability? Rosemarie Garland Thomson has provisionally defined it as ?first, a system for interpreting bodily variations; second, a relationship between bodies and their environments; third, a set of practices that produce both the able-bodie...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

180H/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Short Story

MWF 3-4

"Check back later for more information!"

Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

H195B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

M 5:30-8:30 P.M.

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by J. Bader in Fall 2005. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Bader will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MWF 10-11

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by A. JanMohamed in Fall 2005. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor JanMohamed will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

H195B/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by H. S. Wong in Fall 2005. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Wong will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

202/1

Graduate course:
History of Literary Criticsm

M 3-6

"This course offers a historical survey of important texts of literary theory, with particular focus on texts that are important for English graduate students. We will devote particular attention to the concept of the sublime and the emergence of the ...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Poetry and the ?Science of the Feelings

M 3-6

"William Wordsworth?s often-quoted statement that poetry is the ?science of the feelings? is double-edged, as such genitive constructions always are. It evokes both the contemporary sciences that took the feelings as their object of study (e.g., the p...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Visual Autobiography

TTh 11-12:30

"Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post) ""modern tendency to picture or visualize existence,? what W.J.T. Mitchell refers to as ""the pictorial turn."" While visual and literary studies have been seen as historically separate discip...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

203/3

Graduate Readings:
On Life

TTh 12:30-2

The structuring influence of vitalist aesthetics can be felt in the philosophy of the Fruhromantiks, Georg Simmel's tragedy of culture, the cult of Bergson in France, the pseudo-Nietzschean politics of Rosenberg, modernist poetics in North America, th...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

203/4

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

Wed. 3-6

"Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

243A/1

Graduate Course:
Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 2-3:30

This is a limited-enrollment workshop for graduate and undergraduate fiction writers. Workshop members will be expected to write approximately 45 pages of original fiction, which may be several short stories or chapters of a novel-in-progress. The cou...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati

243B/1

Graduate Course:
Poetry Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Topics in poetics raised by philosophers (Agamben, Badiou, Barthes, Bourdieu) and by practitioners (Alcalay, Ashbery, Joron, Moxley, Palmer) will focus our discussion of each other?s poetry. In addition to writing poems every week you?ll have two seme...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

246H/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Victorian Period

MW 1:30-3

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

246L/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Literature in English, 1945 to the Present

MW 9-10:30

"This seminar is designed to introduce students to US intellectual and cultural history between WWII and the present, with particular attention to the relationship between social movements in the realm of politics and cultural movements in the realm o...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

250/1

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Economies

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"This research seminar considers a range of possible forms that an economic criticism of sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century texts might take. The totality of scarcity-engendered choice that we know as ?the economy? was not a concept available to...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

250/2

Research Seminar:
Theory, Secular and Post-secular

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"Do we still live in a ""secular era""? Did we ever? By what gestures has ""the secular"" become an unmarked or habitual term? This course will offer one genealogy of secularism in the west -- we will trace the articulation of its terms in philosophy,...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher

250/4

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the City

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Skyscrapers and subways, crowds and solitary strollers, cacophony and kaleidoscope?the modern city provoked, both urged onward and challenged, the makers of literary modernism. We will investigate how a handful of more-or-less canonical modernist writ...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

250/5

Research Seminar:
Occultism, Postcoloniality, and Modernism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

"This course probes the shaping of the modern subject through such ""occult"" devises as mesmerism, ventriloquism, hypnotism, telepathy, disembodiment, telekinesis, and clairvoyance. We will examine the ways that occultism constituted a crucial enactm...(read more) Viswanathan, Gauri

310/1

Graduate course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) T.B.A.