Announcement of Classes: Fall 2005

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Metaphysical Literature

MWF 10-11

"Many works in literature have been said to have a ?metaphysical? quality; in this class we will examine some of those works, paying special attention to the claims of imaginative literature upon philosophy. During the course of the semester, our read...(read more) Paul Hurh

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 12-1

TBA...(read more) Len von Morze

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Comparing Asian American and African American Literature

MWF 1-2

"This course will examine Asian American and African American literature and ask what might be gained in a comparative approach to ethnic literature. While texts produced by a specific ethnic group are usually read apart from both the dominant white E...(read more) Janice Tanemura

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

TBA...(read more) Katie Simon

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 8-9:30

TBA...(read more) Avilah Getzler

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Ralph Ellison and Double-Consciousness

TTh 8-9:30

"In this class we will read Ralph Ellison?s two novels, Invisible Man and the recently compiled reader?s edition of his magisterial forty-year work-in-progress, Juneteenth. We will also read sizable excerpts from his collection of essays, Shadow and A...(read more) Joel Nickels

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Improper Love in the Renaissance

TTh 9:30-11

"A story of forbidden love can compel a reader through both sympathy and repulsion. We hope the frustrated lovers can somehow overcome the unjust exigencies preventing their happy union. We fear they will not demonstrate self-control if consummating t...(read more) Alan Drosdick

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Modern Theater of Attractions

TTh 9:30-11

Theater historians of Shakespeare?s London often observe the intense demand for innovation and novelty a diverse but sophisticated playgoing public exerted on rival theater companies vying for its interest. Confined to the frontier zone of the suburbs...(read more) Joseph Ring

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
The Novel and Revolution

TTh 11-12:30

"In this course we will consider the relationship between two phenomena closely associated with modernity: the novel and political revolution. How do novels represent?or fail to represent?the revolutionary event? In what ways do they seek to promulgat...(read more) Mark Allison

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Adapting the Nineteenth Century

TTh 12:30-2

This course seeks to refine composition skills (thesis building, argumentation, processes of analysis, use of evidence, and mechanics) while also introducing students to the discipline of literary study. Students will be responsible for 32 pages of wr...(read more) Leslie Walton

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 2-3:30

TBA...(read more) Ben Graves

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Mocked with Art

TTh 2:00-3:30

"In Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Leontes, astonished by the seemingly lifelike rendering of his wife, exclaims, ?The fixure of her eye has motion in 't, / As we are mocked with art? (V.iii.67). Leontes's words provide the thematic prompt for our c...(read more) Dori Takata

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 3:30-5

TBA...(read more) Rae Greiner

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Poetic Richness

MWF 11-12

"Literature as art and, more specifically, poetry and poetic drama as art will be our main concern in this class. We will be reading some of the most famous plays and poems in the language and talking about the ways they give their readers the experie...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
V-Chips and Codpieces: Intersexions of Early Modern and Modern Texts

MWF 1-2

"What relationships can we discover between the Elizabethan sonnet sequence and the contemporary hip-hop record? How have debates about marriage and the domestic scene been transformed and re-shaped into debates about homosexuality and the ?sanctity? ...(read more) Brendan Prawdzik

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

TBA...(read more) Arthur Bahr

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Myth, Fable, and History

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course, we will examine the works of a handful of authors and filmmakers who utilize myth in the 20th century. ?Myth? is difficult to define convincingly, but the assumption for this course will be that myths tell us how to think about oursel...(read more) Jesse Constantino

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Translators, Interpreters, and Go-Betweens

TTh 8-9:30

"This course brings together a series of literary texts which focus around acts of translation or interpretation in some fashion. We will begin the course thinking about linguistic translation and will use that as a foundation for discussion of other ...(read more) Sarah Townsend

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Shipwreck'd: How to Survive (with a little help)

TTh 9:30-11:00

"Two of the most famous survival stories are Shakespeare?s The Tempest and Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe. However, these are not just simply grand adventure stories. These narratives, which celebrate the self-made (English) man, demonstrate that his ...(read more) Kimberly Tsau

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The Making of Evil

TTh 11-12:30

"Evil is a shifting, nebulous notion. The conception of it has differed between time periods, cultures and nationalities. And, of course, its conception can differ between contemporaneous social and political groups ? that the phrase ?Axis of Evil? ca...(read more) Simon Huynh

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Female Fantasy and the Gothic

TuTh 12:30-2

"This class is designed to help you develop your essay writing skills as we read and view our way through some classics of the Female Gothic genre. The most famous canonical text in this genre is Charlotte Bront?s Jane Eyre, while non-canonical exampl...(read more) Monica Soare

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Mobile Americans: Travel, Literature, Belonging

TTh 2-3:30

"Ralph Waldo Emerson described traveling as ?a fool?s paradise.? In this course, we will work on refining critical reading and writing skills by examining and discussing the role of travel in literature, particularly in what Gertrude Stein called ?the...(read more) Carlo Arreglo

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Asian American Literature and the Rhetorics of Nation and Transnation

TTh 3:30-5:00

"In recent years, Asian American studies has been influenced by postcolonial critiques of nationalism and the New American Studies? focus on American imperialism. This course is, in part, a comparative study of the framings of nation and transnation i...(read more) Audrey Wu Clark

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Thematics and Forms of Obsession in Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will focus on literature and the craft of critical writing through an exploration of obsession as a principle of narration. We will begin in the late Middle Ages with selections from Chaucer and will finish off over 600 years later with N...(read more) Eleanor Johnson
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Children, Families and Disability

Tues. 10-11

This course will explore how disability, gender and race intersect in the lives of people with disabilities across the early lifespan (from birth to age 18), primarily in the United States. The questions we'll address are fundamental disability issues...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan and O'Toole, Corbett Joan

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

W 10-11

"Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post)""modern tendency to picture or visualize experience""--what W.J.T. Mitchell calls ""the pictorial turn."" Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that conv...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Growing Up Chicano/Latino

W 4:30-5:30

We will read a small group of narratives about growing up Chicano/Latino. I believe that this is a particularly difficult time for all children as they face sexual pressure, violence, discouraging schools. By focusing on Chicano youth we will glimpse ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen

Fri. 10-12

"This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We'll read and discuss two novels: : Sense and Sensibility and Emma a. We'll approach the novels from a number of different perspectiv...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Robert Frost

Mon. 4-5

"In a letter to a publisher friend, Robert Frost offered the following engaging definition of poetry: �A poem starts with a lump in the throat, a homesickness or a lovesickness. It is a reaching out toward expression, an effort to find fulfillment. A ...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Contemporary Irish Theater-The Plays of Brian Friel

Mon. 3:30-5:30

Brian Friel (b. 1928) is the most prominent playwright of the contemporary Irish theater, best known for Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa. In a series of innovative plays, he has examined some of the stories the Irish tell themselves about their p...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/7

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

222 Wheeler

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

43A/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

MW 3-4:30

In this course, students will learn the basic elements of fiction writing. Students will be expected to write two short stories during the semester. The course will be organized as a workshop. All stories will be edited and critiqued by the instructor...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

43A/2

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This is a workshop course intended for students who have recently begun to write fiction or who have not previously taken a course in creative writing. ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

43B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce a mobile, surprising, unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing poems will be a part of this task, but only a part. There will also be a modest amount of critical writing and reading, short writ...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 11-12 in 2 LeConte, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

For more information on this section of English 45A, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 1-2 in 2 LeConte, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

This course is an introduction to major works by Chaucer, Spenser, and Milton, with occasional supplements from a class reader. In each case I will ask you to consider both the strangeness and the odd familiarity of these works, so far away from us in...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

MW 10-11 in 50 Birge (NOTE NEW CLASSROOM), plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 10-11)

I will lecture on the cataclysmic rise of bourgeois modernity as it registers in English and American literature during the period 1660-1860. I will emphasize the mixture of euphoria, wonder, deprivation, and anxiety that this transformation provokes,...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

MW 3-4 in 390 Hearst Mining, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and American literature from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state, with the political incorporation of Scotland and Ireland; the massive expansion of...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 in 277 Cory, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 12-1)

"In this course we will begin with a Victorian text and end with a postmodern one, but we will focus primarily on the intervening period of literary modernism. Topics for discussion will include the status of high art and artists in an era of mass cul...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 2-3 in 101 Morgan, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

"In surveying British and American literature from 1865-1965, this course will focus on what may be called the modernist tradition of innovation. We will study authors--such as Henry James, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, and Samuel Beckett--whose revolut...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 in 159 Mulford, plus 1_ hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture/Low Culture--The Coen Brothers and the Arts

M 2-5

Using film, fiction, and cultural events, the course will focus on the work of the Coen brothers and the stories of J. Lahiri to discuss the representation of sexuality, domesticity, and violence. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Work in the Mid-Victorian Novel-- Elisabeth Gaskell and Charles Dickens

MWF 1-2

"In this course we will read novels by two of Victorian England's most brilliant writers of social fiction, Elizabeth Gaskell and Charles Dickens. Focusing on theme of work, we will discuss central questions of Victorian social, economic and political...(read more) Ben-Yishai, Ayelet

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Zora Neale Hurston

MW 3-4:30

"The two-volume Library of America edition of Hurston's major works will provide the foundation for our exploration of one of the twentieth century's most brilliant, elusive and contradictory writers. Our goal will be to understand how Hurston used he...(read more) Kramer, Eliza

100/4

Junior Seminar:
The End of the Poem

MW 4-5:30

"This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem's entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which a poem ge...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Diasporic Identities

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines representations of the African diaspora in contemporary literature by black writers in the U.S., Africa and the Caribbean. Through an engagement with literature, film and theories of diaspora, the class will consider a range of qu...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Christopher Marlowe

TTh 9:30-11

"Marlowe invented the modern theater, unleashing a power of spectacle, dialogue, and oratory that instantly addicted much of the teeming city of London and horrified the rest. This seminar will use the unbounded, amoral ambition of Marlowe's staged pr...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Criminal Literature--Writing Against the Law

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will focus on a selection of twentieth-century American crime novels (as well as upon a few films). Throughout the course we will consider why America, a nation founded by puritan zealots and known infamously as the policeman of the world...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Ventriloquism and the Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Our topic is the curious relation of identification-and-dissociation between a novel's implied author and its given protagonist. We will concentrate on specific formal features that structure this relation: narration, focalization, and, most important...(read more) Miller, D. A.

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Holocaust Literature

TTh 11-12:30

The German philosopher Theodor Adorno made the famous comment that to write poetry after Auschwitz was barbaric--but not to produce it even more barbarous. In this class we will focus on how literary art responds to this paradoxical injunction. How ca...(read more) Liu, Sarah

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Darkest London--Exploring the Post-1945 Metropolis

TTh 12:30-2

"Throw away your A to Z Street Atlas--we'll find our way around London this semester with a different set of guides. Our reading will foreground a series of narratives of colonial and postcolonial figures at loose in twentieth-century London. We'll co...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

TTh 12:30-2

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common? For one, both are usually about two or more of the following: sex, death, love, hate, work, jealousy, obsession, parents, children, anxiety, and loss. Seemingly made for each other, literature and ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Literature of California and the West

TTh 12:30-2

"Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ""regional"" terms--emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Tragedy, Agony, Vision, and Death

TTh 2-3:30

"In this course, we will explore the dramatic genre of tragedy as it has manifested itself at three different times in history: Athens in the 5th century, B.C.; late 16th- and early 17th-century England, and 20th-century France and America. All the pl...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel;...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

100/16

Junior Seminar:
William Carlos Williams

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will introduce you to one of the most prolific, most daringly experimental, most influential, and most passionately autobiographical American writers of the 20th century. William Carlos Williams is primarily known, anthologized, and taugh...(read more) Buck, Chansonette

102/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in the English Language: English Phonology

MWF 2-3

Phonology is the part of grammar which involves the structure of sound in language. It has three principal components: melody, the qualitative aspects of sounds which distinguish for example a [p] from an [f], or an [i] from a [u]; rhythm, the organiz...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

114A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
English Drama to 1603

MWF 2-3

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

114B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
English Drama from 1603 to 1700

TTh 11-12:30

In the first three decades of the seventeenth century, an extraordinary burst of energy and talent was visible and audible on the London stage. Socially aspiring dramatists satirized the pretensions of the upwardly mobile, revealed the tragic, sometim...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

117A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

"We'll read six plays from the chronological first half of Shakespeare's output, considered loosely to allow us to end with a reading of Hamlet. Our approach will be to consider Shakespeare's plays as they shaped and were shaped by a lively theatrical...(read more) Koory, Mary Ann

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

MW 4-5:30

"In this course we will analyze a selection of Shakespeare's plays, arranged both by genre and chronologically, in order to explore not only what is peculiar to each play but also what links the plays to each other and to the culture and the psyche th...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

118/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Milton

MWF 1-2

An introduction to the poetry and prose of one of the greatest writers in English literature. Sexual radical, political revolutionary, and literary genius, Milton is a one-man introduction to the cultural ferment of the English Renaissance, the Reform...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria

122/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Victorian Period

TTh 9:30-11

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

125A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Novel: Defoe through Scott

TTh 3:30-5

The English Novel, 1660-1800. ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian literatures, this course traces the development of the novel as a genre in 19th-century Europe. Our discussions will emphasize strategies of close reading and literary analysis and elements of th...(read more) Paperno, Irene

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 12-1

"Novels take a really long time to read, and they are filled with lies, or, more politely, fictions. Why write novels? Why read them? If you can ask these questions, and at the same time and without hesitation look forward to reading novels, then this...(read more) Rubenstein, Michae

125E/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 12:30-2

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them written in the second half of the twentieth century. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to und...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

126/1

Upper Division Coursework:
British Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of early modern British literature, treating representative works of major figures (see book list) in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. There will be two midterm papers and a final exam. ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

127/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Modern Poetry

MWF 11-12

British and American poetry: 1860 to the present...(read more) Blanton, Dan

133A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 2-3:30

"African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral in the form of sermons, speeches, work songs, slave songs, spirituals, and the blues. At the same time, African American literary culture has displayed a manifest propens...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

135AC/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature of American Cultures: Literature of Resistance and Repression

MWF 11-12

In this course we will analyze representations of repression and resistance in the fiction of three cultural groups: Chicanos, African Americans, and European Americans. We will seek answers to the following kinds of questions: What is the relation be...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The 1950's

TTh 2-3:30

"This class will explore the American 1950's through a sampling of history, literature, movies, and the popular culture of the decade, trying to understand some of its concerns and its contradictions. A period of massive conformity (""The Man in the G...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

137T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: The Borderlands of Chicano/a Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the invention of a Chicano and Chicana sense of place. How do imaginative writers such as Am�rico Paredes, Gloria Anzald�a, and Sandra Cisneros negotiate the tension between the national and transnational forces at work in the...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

139/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Cultures of English: Culture of the Great War--Art in the Age of Decline

MWF 11-12

"The Great War set loose on the world an heretofore unimaginable scale of violence and destruction. In this five-year conflict 8.5 million people were killed and 20 million wounded--making a mockery of the now jejune anxieties of social degeneration a...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

143A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

T.B.A. ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This is a course on the form, theory and practice of short fiction. It will be conducted as a workshop. Students are required to fulfill assignments on specific aspects of craft, to analyze aesthetic strategies in selected short stories by published a...(read more) Blaise (Mukherjee), Bharati

143B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 12:30-2

In this workshop/seminar, we will engage in hands-on investigations into a variety of possibilities inherent to poetic logic, and with an emphasis on inventions and experiments, we will attempt to employ those logics. Attention will also be paid to mo...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

143B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 2-3:30

"In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today--aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The advanced workshop in poetry will give students the opportunity to learn about their own capabilities as writers. We will stress poetry as an art of composition in language that differs from other uses of language (journal writing, letter writing, ...(read more) McMorris, Mark

143N/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction

TTh 3:30-5

"This course concentrates on the practice of creative non-fiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write approximately 45 pages of non-fictional narrative.



...(read more)
Blaise (Mukherjee), Bharati

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Literature of the Americas--History, Narrative and Event

MW 1:30-3

Examining a wide selection of texts from throughout the Americas, this class will look at the literary and historiographic methods of representing the discontinuous historical narratives of the New World. How does the way we narrate history influence ...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Modernism/Postmodernism

W 2-5

We will read an array of 20th-century novels which will stand as test cases for a baggy, theoretical construction which sometimes lumps together the modern and the postmodern, and sometimes sets them apart from each other. Topics for discussion will i...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Nation and Narration

MW 3-4:30

"Why does it seem so natural to study literary forms by breaking them up into distinct national literatures? Why do we persistently study ""American Literature"" or ""British Literature"" as opposed, say, to ""Literatures in English""? What is the cur...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group

MW 4-5:30

"This course situates Virginia Woolf, the Bloomsbury Group, and British modernism within the social and historical context of the early 20th century, while also investigating ""Virginia Woolf"" and the ""Bloomsbury Group"" as categories still resonant...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine

150/5

Senior Seminar:
The Short Poem--Wyatt to the Present

TTh 9:30-11

For more information on this class, please email the professor at bobhass@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Asian American Novel

TTh 11-12:30

"It is by now a commonplace to describe Asian American identity as impossibly heterogeneous and hybrid. At the same time, Asian American Studies is founded upon the strategic necessity of the pan-ethnic category. Can there be a textual basis for Asian...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 11-12:30

"This is an intensive course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will read her poems, along with her letters and a biography, deeply but also broadly throughout her career. Topics include early poetry; musical poetics; figuration; definition and ridd...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Underbelly-- Other Classes, Other Cultures in Victorian England

TTh 12:30-2

"In this class we will explore the literature and culture surrounding Britain's poor, working classes, and racial outsiders in the Victorian era. Critical analysis of these marginalized classes and cultures will give us a more thorough and nuanced und...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Homocinema

TTh 2-3:30

"Under the assumption that male homosexual fantasy is not the peculiar coinage of a homosexual brain, but the common, even central daydream of the normal world, the course identifies three modes of broaching it in narrative cinema. In Hollywood classi...(read more) Miller, D. A.

150/17

Senior Seminar:
Fictions of Los Angeles

TTh 3:30-5

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World"" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rains...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

150/18

Senior Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

TTh 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. in 140 Barrows

"The course focuses on Hitchcock, ""auteur"" and consummate craftsman, with a remarkably long and varied career. We will view most of his films, discuss them from a variety of critical perspectives, and examine the key critical writings about them. "...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

166/1

Special Topics:
Race and Performance in the 20th-Century U.S.

TTh 11-12:30

"This course takes as its point of departure an observation made by writer James Baldwin in 1953: ""The time has come to realize that the interracial drama acted out on the American continent has not only created a new black man, it has created a new ...(read more) Scott, Saul

176/1

Upper Division Coursework:
"Literature and Popular Culture: The Western in Fiction and Film

Hutson, Richard "

In this course, I plan to get us all thinking about the popular genre of the Western and its cultural background. The films each week are an important and integral part of the course, and the films are required viewing. It is in the films that we see ...(read more) Seminars MWF 2-3. in 120 Latimer, plus film screenings Wednesdays 5-8 P.M. in 105 North Gate

180A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Disability Autobiography

MWF 12-1

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these text...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180N/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Novel

MWF 11-12

"This course will consider the history and theory of the novel form, reading both novels and essays on the novel. (Theorists or critics of the novel may include Erich Auerbach, Mikhail Bakhtin, Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Dorrit Cohn, Margaret Do...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

H195A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

M 5:30-8:30 P.M.

"Applying major critical theories to a number of genres, the course will lay the foundation for the theses to follow.



Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the 150 (Senior Seminar) requirem...(read more)
Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 9:30-11

"The fall semester of this section of the honors course will be devoted to an examination of the theoretical paradigms that cast strong influences on contemporary critical practices. While the course will try to do justice to diverse theoretical appro...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

H195A/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MWF 12-1

"In this honors seminar, we will become familiar with a wide range of theoretical approaches to literature. In addition, we�ll use Leslie Marmon Silko�s novel, Almanac of the Dead, to focus questions about literacy, history, memory, story, nation(alis...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Graduate course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

200/2

Graduate course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

MW 12-1:30

Dissertation prospectus writing workshop ...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Transnational Feminisms

MW 1:30-3

This course will trace the emergence and vicissitudes of feminist theory, struggle, and literature in moments of national crisis--particularly decolonization and globalization. The focus of our work will be conversations and contestations among femini...(read more) Ray, Kasturi

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Coercion and Resistance in 20th-Century African American Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

"Lying precisely at the intersection of hegemonic and violent forms of coercion as well as at the intersection of absolute power and absolute powerlessness, the threat of death (lynching, etc.) is arguably the most fundamental mode of coercion. The de...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Literature and the American Ugly Laws, 1881-1991

223 Wheeler

"""It is hereby prohibited for any person, who is diseased, maimed, mutilated or deformed in any way, so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object, to expose himself to public view."" Between 1881 and the First World War, cities around the U.S. passe...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Contemporary Long Poem

TTh 3:30-5

"It is often said that the fragmentation and disjuncture characteristic of postmodern poetry is a reflection (or symptom) of contemporary life--a speedy life of multiple distractions, constant interruptions, unconnected events. How then do we account ...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

211/1

Graduate Course:
Chaucer

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on Chaucer�s poetry, excluding the Canterbury Tales, and on its sources and intertexts. We will also be exploring the various critical approaches to Chaucer that have emerged in the last thirty years or so. Students will be resp...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

243A/1

Graduate Course:
Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 11-12:30

This is a graduate level workshop course in writing fiction, intended for students who have already achieved the basic skills of characterization, plotting, etc. Qualified undergrad-uates will be eligible. This course has no prerequisites, but I'll ex...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Renaissance

TTh 5-6:30

"Aside from Bacon's essays and, perhaps, Pilgrim's Progress, the course will concentrate on verse (because verse is what the seventeenth century did best and because I'm not worth listening to about seventeenth-century prose). We will read as much as ...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

"In his 1987 ""Bicentennial Speech"" Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that ""[w]hile the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not""; the latter, he added, had been superceded by...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the Novel Form

M 3-6

"This course will examine the modernist novel and short story (or fiction in general) as perhaps the modernist genres par excellence. We will look at alternative views of ""modern fiction"" (to use Virginia Woolf's term) in its relation to nineteenth-...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Blake

M 3-6

" For in this Period the Poets Work is Done: and all the Great Events of Time start forth & are conceived in such a Period-- Within a Moment: a Pulsation of the Artery.



What does Blake mean by ""the Poets Work,"" achieved ""Within a ...(read more)
Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

250/3

Research Seminar:
Race as Method--Or, What Is Ethnic Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will be concerned with the implications of recent research in racialization theory --in particular, historical/materialist approaches to conceptualizing race, racism, and racialization-- for how we might go about reconceptualizing what is ...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

250/4

Research Seminar:
Tragic Realism--Tragedy and Revolution in Postcolonial Narrative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore tragedy as a key site for coming to terms with the consequences of revolutionary politics in modernity. We'll focus in particular on the renewed interest in tragic modes among postcolonial literary practitioners and theorists,...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

310/1

Graduate Course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff