Announcement of Classes: Spring 2009

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Beyond Good and Evil

MWF 9-10

This course takes its title from Friedrich Nietzsche’s book on the "philosophy of the future," in which he argues that traditional moral categories no longer apply to the modern world. In this course we will test that claim. After a brief look at good...(read more) Kerschen, Paul

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Southernization of America

TTh 8-9:30

In 1927, the Mississippi River flooded some 27,000 square miles of American heartland, displacing hundreds of thousands of Southerners. Two years later, the stock market bottomed out and triggered the Great Depression. These national catastrophes prov...(read more) Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Confessing Animal

MWF 11-12

Written and oral confessions are a mainstay of western culture, with manifestations as different as Augustine's fourth-century spiritual autobiography and Rousseau's shocking eighteenth-century tell-all memoir. Confession in a variety of forms is cent...(read more) Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Browning, Catherine

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Plotting Suspicion

MWF 12-1

This course will inspect a lineup of “unusual suspects” plucked from what might be called a literature of suspicion. Although a motley generic arrangement encompassing revenge tragedy, psychoanalytic theory, detective fiction, and postmodern apocalyps...(read more) Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
“Native American Literature”

MWF 3-4

As studies in “American literature” or “Literature in English” grow increasingly diverse and inclusive, several important questions arise in relation to “Native American literature.”  What is Native American literature, and how does it relate to the l...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
The Long and Short of It

Th 8-9:30

You can’t judge a book by its cover, but can you judge it by its length?  Why is it that some of us love burying our noses in a large book, while others of us feel drowsy at the very sight of anything over 200 pages long?  Why don’t they sell books by...(read more) Tsao, Tiffany

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Googleable: Language, Politics and Mass Media

TTh 9:30-11

George Orwell's 1984 envisions a world where language, thought, and information are controlled by the ruling Party. Reading 1984 as a primer of media and information control, we will examine the challenges that mass media and the internet present in t...(read more) Ecke, Jeremy S
Ecke, Jeremy

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Dystopian Fiction and the Fate of the Body

TTh 3:30-5

This course will examine the body as a site through which dystopian fiction enacts many of its central conflicts.  We will discuss ways in which dystopian fiction both speculates about the future of the body and registers anxiety about the loss of mor...(read more) Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Ang Lee Films and James Schamus' screenplays

M 12-1

For this seminar, we will look at four of Ang Lee’s films and at two of the novels that are the sources of two of the films. Two of the screenplays were written by Lee’s producer and friend, James Schamus: The Wedding Banquet and Ride with the Devil....(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse:
Translation, Echo, and Originality

TTh 2-3:30

This poetry course is themed on the idea of “translation,” but conceived very largely, to include not just translations between languages, but also between different periods within a single language (such as between Old and Middle or Middle and Modern...(read more) Johnson, Eleanor

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 10-11 + Discussion F 10-11

Discussion will focus on three main works -- Chaucer's *Canterbury Tales*, Spenser's *Faerie Queene*, and Milton's *Paradise Lost* -- though we will also read shorter poems by Wyatt, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Suckling, and Lovelace....(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 1-2 + Discussion F 1-2

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these work...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 11-12 + Discussion F 11-12

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman,...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are major...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 + Discussion F 12-1

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world. We will concentrate on t...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovatio...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Social Reform in Literature

TTh 2-3:30

What is social reform? What are the thought processes involved in defining a social problem?  And how does this definition affect the manner and methods used to solve it?  This course seeks to better understand the impulse to want to solve a problem p...(read more) Black, Kelvin C.
Black, Kelvin

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Slavery in British and American Literature

TTh 5-6:30

The representation of slavery in Anglo-American literature between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries raises a number of interesting questions.  Is it possible to represent the trauma of slavery in the form of literature? What literary and rheto...(read more) Infante-Abbatantuono, Jhoanna
Infante, Jhoanna

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This introductory course looks at children's literature in several genres, historically and culturally. Readings will include fairy tales, The Princess and the Goblin, Charlotte's Web, and other novels, as well as picture books and poetry. There will ...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture/Low Culture: Film Genres and the Cinema of Ang Lee

Th 2-5

This course will examine the formal techniques, expectations, experiences, and thematic concerns of some of Ang Lee's films, in the context of Hollywood and foreign films. We will also take advantage of the resources of Cal Performances and the Pacifi...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Human Relationships in Literature, Art, and Culture

W 4-5

What do literature, art, and other cultural productions have to say about personal and social relationships - arrangements that are often central to our debates, with ourselves and others, about who we are and what we should do? This course will allo...(read more) Buckwald, Craig

84/3

Reading Walden Carefully

M 3-4

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week.  This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
British Literature and the Global 19th Century (note new title)

MW 4-5:30

During the nineteenth century, Britain emerged as the world’s most expansive planetary empire with a sphere of influence affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people and discrete communities. Although political historians are now seeking to u...(read more) Sanchez, Juan

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Contemporary American Drama

TTh 11-12:30

Contemporary American Drama is a course which will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.  In order to enliven the discussion, Professor Gotanda has asked leading theater artists from around the country to submit their favorite contempor...(read more) Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip

100/5

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

Proceeding historically, we will survey the poetry of the entire century.  We will focus on central poets now (Whitman, Dickinson) and then (e.g., Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Emerson).  We will also read several largely forgotten poets (Sigourney, V...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

100/6

Junior Seminar:
The Nineteenth-Century Middle Ages

TTh 3:30-5

The ‘Gothic’ or Medieval Revival gave life to a wide variety of literature in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course will examine a number of novels and narrative poems arising from this movement, with a particular focus on the way...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Women's Films of the '40s and '50s

TTh 5:30-7 + Film Screenings Th 7-10 PM

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre  “the womanÂ’'s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various “female” ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Post-War American Literature and the Problem of Evil

TTh 12:30-2 + Film Screenings T 6-9 P.M. in 106 Wheeler

"Is evil something you do or something you are?” asks Patrick Bateman, the narrator of Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. This course investigates how American writers have considered this question in the aftermath of World War II, a war that dramat...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

101/1

History of the English Language

TTh 11-12:30

This course is designed to introduce you to the historical development of the English language, from its earliest recorded appearance to its current state as a world language. It will cover the ways in which languages are written down and how English ...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

110/1

Medieval Literature: Before Chaucer - Philosophical Fictions from Vergil to Boccaccio

TTh 2-3:30

Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, the Romance of the Rose started by Guillaume de Lorris and continued by Jean de Meun, and Dante’s  Divine Comedy. These will be read alongside selections from other philosophical, e...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

112/1

Middle English Literature

MWF 1-2

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

An interdisciplinary exploration of literature produced in England mainly from 1550 to 1600 --a period that marks a considerable shift not only in literary production and consumption, but also in social, political, and ideological formations.  Issues ...(read more) Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of England’s “century of revolution,” focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics.This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

117B/1

Shakespeare After 1600

MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomedies). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll co...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

117S/1

Shakespeare in the Theater

TTh 2-3:30

Some large percentage of everything said and written about literary works is not about those works but about their topics, about the moral, philosophic, or social issues those topics touch upon and, in the case of fictions, about the kinds of situatio...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

118/1

Milton

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of John Milton’s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

121/1

The Romantic Period

MWF 11-12

The word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it has ceased to perform the function of a verbal sign.”  --Arthur O. Lovejoy This course will look with wild surmise at the phenomenon of Romanticism.  Is it true, as some crit...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

125C/1

The European Novel

MWF 1-2

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 133, The Russian Novel and the West. Focusing on key texts from English, Russian, and French literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th to the early 20th c...(read more) Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 11-12:30

By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism.  The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

126/1

British Literature, 1900-1945

TTh 5-6:30

The course will look at British and Irish literature written in the first half of the twentieth century, concentrating on the relation between modernity and modernism. We will read some short essays, stories and poems in addition to those on the read...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

130B/1

American Literature, 1800-1865

MW 4-5:30

A survey of literary culture from early Transcendentalism through the Civil War.  Our readings will look at the relationship between genteel society and mass culture, taste and consumerism, class politics and public intellectualism, while exploring th...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

130D/1

American Literature, 1900-1945

TTh 2-3:30

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

133B/1

African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

TTh 2-3:30

A survey of major African American writers in the context of social history. There will be weekly writing, a midterm, two essays, and a final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Orality and Black Literature

TTh 12:30-2

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral in the form of sermons, speeches, work songs, slave songs, spirituals, and the blues; yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an assumed connection between ...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Empire & Global English

TTh 2-3:30

The texts in this course bear a troubled relationship to the language, English, in which and about which they write.  Questions of cultural, ethnic, gendered and national identity suffuse both their content and their form.  We’ll be trying to understa...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

141/1

Modes of Writing:
Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.

TTh 12:30-2

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will wr...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 12:30-2

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are require...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

T 3:30-6:30

A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, generally 10-20 pages in length.  Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of each of the three student stories being works...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143B/1

Verse

M 3-6

Writing and Poems.  Weekly written assignments. To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Reines' mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER ...(read more) Reines, Ariana

143B/2

Verse:
How to Write Lyric Poems

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today -- aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; relations between the sentence and line of verse...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

MW 9-10:30

This course will offer students — in a workshop setting — the opportunity to read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction prose, with special attention to understanding, appreciating — and practicing — the essay as a li...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

MW 3-4:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 sh...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Novel to Film Adaptation

MW 4-5:30

This course intends to confront the conventional understanding that “The book is always better than the movie.” We will focus on the limitations and possibilities of the form of the novel and the film in the way that they represent, narrate, and engag...(read more) Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Sexuality

TTh 12:30-2

This course studies the treatment of sexuality in imaginative literature of the mid-nineteenth-century, a period of particular flux when the institutionalization of a strict heterosexual/homosexual binary was not fully in place, when gender roles and ...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain’s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he l...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Literature of California & the West Since World War I

TTh 3:30-5

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

150AC/1

Senior Seminar in American Cultures:
Fictions of Los Angeles

TTh 2-3:30

Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a "circus without a tent" (Carey McWilliams), "seventy-two suburbs in search of a city" (Dorothy Parker), "the capital of the Third World" (David Rieff), and "the only place for me that never rains in the ...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

165/1

Special Topics:
Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

MWF 2-3

This class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings, Pound, and Olson, who have presented their poetry in inventive ways. We’ll study other art form...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John

166/1

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

TTh 3:30-5

This course will focus on each author’s representation or invention of foundational national myths.  Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 10:30-12 + Film Screenings Th 5-8 P.M. in 123 Wheeler

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards.  As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling.  But thanks to the French reception of his work in 1950s, Hitc...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 12-1:30

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or staged reading from one of the plays...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180H/1

The Short Story

MW 4-5:30

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne -- Chaucer This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artifacts produced b...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 9:30-11

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Professor Goldsmith in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Goldsmith will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in Novem...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

H195B/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Professor Lye in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Lye will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. The ...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

H195B/3

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by Professor Langan in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Langan will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.Th...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will p...(read more) Staff

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

201B/1

Topics in the History of the English Language:
The Development of Linguistic Representations of Point of View

Note new time: Th 9:30-12:30

This course will be devoted to the history of the development of styles for the representation of subjectivity or consciousness in narrative, including, importantly, represented speech and thought (free indirect style). It will use the original compa...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Gender, Poetry and Psychoanalysis in Irish Poetry

MW 10:30-12

Using feminist theory, object relations theory and psychoanalysis, this course will examine the work of a number of leading contemporary Irish poets with a view to reflecting on gender, representation and representatives in contemporary Irish culture....(read more) Sullivan, Moynagh

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

MW 1:30-3

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common?  For one, both are usually about at least two of the following: sex, death, love, hate, jealousy, anxiety, loss, and the search for some kind of structure.  Seemingly made for each other, literatur...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

203/3

Graduate Readings: Victorian Novel

T 9:30-12:30

Over 7,000 novels were published in Victorian England; we’ll read the best seven.  The course will emphasize the place of novels and novelists in a variety of Victorian cultural innovations, such as the creation of modern cosmopolitan and historical c...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

203/4

Graduate Readings:
The Writings of Henry Adams and William James

TTh 2-3:30

These two American friends stand at the beginning of the twentieth century reprising the melancholy and experimental strains of New England culture, and anticipating modernism:  T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, W.E.B. DuBois, Wallace Stevens and Thomas   P...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

203/5

Graduate Readings

TTh 2-3:30

In “Reading Beowulf" we will be particularly interested in the making of Beowulf as a text and as a canonical poem. The first goal addresses issues of language, paleography, and textual editing as we translate; the second addresses the cultural invest...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Reading Novels Now

Th 3:30-6:30

This course aims to formulate new phenomenological models of reading contemporary novels.  We will conduct a broad survey of theories of reading, old and new, dabbling along the way in cognitive theories of reading; historical accounts of reading prac...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

203/7

Graduate Readings:
Narrative and Middle Passage

TTh 9:30-11

Toni Morrison once remarked, on the subject of African American slave culture, that “no slave society in the history of the world ever wrote more – or more thoughtfully – about its own enslavement.”  For those Africans who were kidnapped into slavery ...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

218/1

Milton

W 2-5

An introduction to the poetry and major prose of John Milton. We will discuss Milton's conception of authorship, Milton and the English civil war, Milton's relation to humanism and to the Protestant Reformation. Extensive secondary reading in seventee...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 12:30-2

This limited-enrollment workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction.  Undergraduate students may apply for admission to this graduate course.  To be considered for admission to this class, please submit approximately 1...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)

246C/1

Graduate Proseminars:
Renaissance (16th-Century): Faustus' Books

MW 10:30-12

               Divinity, adieu. These metaphysics of magicians And necromantic books are heavenly: ... his dominion that exceeds in this Stretcheth as far as does the mind of man. As the sixteenth century began, English literary culture was emerging ...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

250/1

Research Seminar:
Philosophy and the Arts

M 3-6

This course will try to relate the concept of sensuousness to the roles the affects can play in aesthetic experience.  The first half of the course will be devoted to familiarizing ourselves with basic concepts that establish a language for characteri...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

250/3

Research Seminar:
Native American Fiction

W 3-6

Contemporary Native American stories are survival stories, reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences:  they calculate indigenous positions, settle overdue accounts, note old debts, and demand an accounting. These ...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet