Announcement of Classes: Spring 2009

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Junior Seminar: British Literature and the Global 19th Century (note new title)

English 100

Section: 1
Instructor: Sanchez, Juan
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

British Literature: 1780-1830; Hamilton, Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah; Owenson/Morgan, The Wild Irish Girl; Arnold, Culture and Anarchy; Collins, Moonstone; Haggard, She.

Description

During the nineteenth century, Britain emerged as the world’s most expansive planetary empire with a sphere of influence affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people and discrete communities. Although political historians are now seeking to understand the role of this vast empire in the development of a new global order beginning to take root in the nineteenth century, one of the main challenges for literary critics remains to determine the complex, and often vexed relations of global politics to the production of art, society, and culture at large. In this course we will seek to develop a greater understanding of nineteenth-century literature as a global phenomenon. This means not only attending to the relationship of literary works to Britain’s colonial enterprise—paying attention, for example, to the particular ways in which poetry, novels, drama, and other imaginative works helped shape, reinforce, and critique British imperial ideology—but also its role in more broadly shaping nineteenth-century global formations, including international law and thought, ideas about political boundaries and state sovereignty, economic liberalism, and the place of war and violence in maintaining peace throughout the globe. As a result, some of the topics to be discussed will include the relationship between nineteenth-century literature and the following: transatlantic and worldwide commercial systems, the slave trade, travel and exploration, foreign wars and political revolutions, and the collision of regional environments, especially with respect to religious and cultural conflicts. We will also attend to recent work on global feminisms, cosmopolitanisms, and “contact zone” experiences created by travel, migration, and Britain’s colonial enterprise. While key critical works will help us establish these geo-political frameworks, we will also read literature about Other places—including Ireland, India, the Middle-East, Africa, North America, Latin America, and Spain.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100! 


Junior Seminar: Contemporary American Drama

English 100

Section: 2
Instructor: Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

TopDog/UnderDog, Suzan-Lori Parks; Angels in America, Tony Kushner; Dance and the Railroad, David Henry Hwang; Ballad of Yachiyo, Philip Kan Gotanda; Joe Turners Come And Gone, August Wilson; Aunt Dan And Lemon,  Wallace Shawn; How I learned To Drive, Paula Vogel; One Flea Spare, Naomi Wallace; Six Degrees of Separation, John Guare.

Description

Contemporary American Drama is a course which will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.  In order to enliven the discussion, Professor Gotanda has asked leading theater artists from around the country to submit their favorite contemporary American plays.  From this pool, a select number of texts will be chosen to cover during the term.  The traditional lecture format will be supplemented by the students themselves enacting rehearsal techniques.  This experiencing of the actual theater process will give insight as to how theater text spoken aloud, put on its feet, performed, can afford another kind of "reading" of what is written on page.  Films made of the play texts will also be exhibited to augment alternative methods of engaging the material.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100! 


Junior Seminar: 19th-Century American Poetry

English 100

Section: 5
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 283 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Walt Whitman, Selected Poems, 1855-1892; Emily Dickinson, The Poems of Emily Dickinson:  Reading Edition; Whitman's & Dickinson's Contemporaries, ed. Robert Bain;  Course reader (available at Krishna Copy)

Description

Proceeding historically, we will survey the poetry of the entire century.  We will focus on central poets now (Whitman, Dickinson) and then (e.g., Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Emerson).  We will also read several largely forgotten poets (Sigourney, Very, Crane).  We will consider their poetics advanced implicitly or explicitly, and we will become proficient in 19th-century poetic forms.  Special attention will be paid to the emergence of women and African-American poets.  We will read all these poets in relation to American and English literarature; to American painting and music; and to American history, especially the cultural upheavals of Indian Removal, Abolition, and the Civil War, and industrial and technological changes  

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


Junior Seminar: The Nineteenth-Century Middle Ages

English 100

Section: 6
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Walpole, H., The Castle of Otranto; Scott, Walter, Ivanhoe; Tennyson, Alfred, Idylls of the King; Morris, William, A Dream of John Ball; Twain, Mark, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; Jefferies, Richard, After London; Alexander, Michael, Medievalism: The Middle Ages in Modern England (recommended); Course reader. (Students are advised to attend the first class before purchasing books.)

Description

The ‘Gothic’ or Medieval Revival gave life to a wide variety of literature in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course will examine a number of novels and narrative poems arising from this movement, with a particular focus on the ways in which authors used the British Middle Ages as a lens to examine issues of social justice and the quality of everyday life in the nineteenth century. Requirements for the course will include a substantial term paper and research presentations.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.
 
Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


Junior Seminar: Women's Films of the '40s and '50s

English 100

Section: 7
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: TTh 5:30-7 + Film Screenings Th 7-10 PM
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Doane, M., The Desire to Desire; Gledhill, C., Home Is Where the Heart Is; Kaplan, E. A., Motherhood and Representation; Landy, M.,  Imitations of Life; Thornham, S., ed., Feminist Film Theory

Description

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre  “the womanÂ’'s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various “female” problems and fantasies. We will also look at feminist film theory and its conceptualization of subjectivity and desire in the cinematic apparatus.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in 100! 


Junior Seminar: Post-War American Literature and the Problem of Evil

English 100

Section: 8
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + Film Screenings T 6-9 P.M. in 106 Wheeler
Location: Note new location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Thompson, J.: The Killer Inside Me; Heller, J.: Catch 22;  Capote, T.: In Cold Blood; Goines, D.: Black Gangster; Spiegelman, A.: Maus; Milgram, S.: Obedience to Authority; Bugliosi, V. and Gentry, C.: Helter Skelter; Herr, M.: Dispatches; Simon, D.: Homicide; Ellis, B.: American Psycho; Shepard, J.: Project X; DeLillo, D.: Falling Man.

 Film List: Hitchcock, A.: Psycho; Penn, A.: Bonnie and Clyde; Polanski, R.: Rosemary’s Baby; Kubrick, S.: Full Metal Jacket; Lehman, M.: Heathers; Demme, J.: The Silence of the Lambs; Hughes, A. and Hughes A.: Menace II Society; Morris, The Fog of War; Miller, B.: Capote; Cronenberg, D.: A History of Violence; Gibney, A.: The Human Behavior Experiments; Greengrass, P.: United 93; Cohen, J. and Cohen, E.: No Country For Old Men.

Description

"Is evil something you do or something you are?” asks Patrick Bateman, the narrator of Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. This course investigates how American writers have considered this question in the aftermath of World War II, a war that dramatically staged mankind’s capacity for evil. To limit the seemingly endless range of evils that we might explore, we will focus primarily on murder (serial killing; gang violence; school massacres; war; homicide; terrorism). We will juxtapose nonfiction texts, films, graphic novels, television shows, autobiographies, music, and novels. The aim is to analyze various paradigms, structures, and ideas about the nature of evil as they emerge out of representations of killing in the United States of the last half century or so. The relationship between aesthetics and ethics will also be key: as Nabokov’s Humbert Humbert says, “You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style.” Average 250 pages reading and one film screening per week. Two papers (5-8 pages and 12-15 pages).

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


History of the English Language

English 101

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 20 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Millward, Celia M.: A Biography of the English Language; Millward, Celia M.:  Workbook to Accompany a Biography of the English Language. 

Description

This course is designed to introduce you to the historical development of the English language, from its earliest recorded appearance to its current state as a world language. It will cover the ways in which languages are written down and how English has been written, the ways people have understood language to work in the past and in the present, the major developments in the grammar, syntax, and pronunciation of English over time, loan words and foreign influences on the word stock of English, and the social forces driving linguistic change in English. This is a course for anyone who loves words and is curious about their history or for anyone who is interested in developing a deeper knowledge of the structures of English, early and late. 


Medieval Literature: Before Chaucer - Philosophical Fictions from Vergil to Boccaccio

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: Note new location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Vergil: Aeneid; Augustine: Confessions; Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy; G. de Lorris and J. de Meun: Romance of the Rose; Dante: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso; selections from Cicero, Ovid, Macrobius, Prudentius, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.

Description

Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, the Romance of the Rose started by Guillaume de Lorris and continued by Jean de Meun, and Dante’s  Divine Comedy. These will be read alongside selections from other philosophical, exegetical, and literary authors (like Cicero, Ovid, Macrobius, Boccaccio) that will help clarify the questions that the large fictive enterprises tried to answer. We will think about these works both in themselves, in relation to practices of reading and interpretation that they shaped and were shaped by, and as part of a developing and self-defining tradition.

 This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. 


Middle English Literature

English 112

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 170 Barrows


Description

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: Note new room: 185 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Erasmus, Desiderius, Praise of Folly; Thomas More, Utopia; Baldasarre Castiglione, The Book of the Courtier; Nashe, Thomas, The Unfortunate Traveller;  Marlowe, Christopher, Edward the Second; William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew and The Merchant of Venice; Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene. There will also be a xerox course reader (containing some poems and critical materials) available at Copy Central, 2560 Bancroft.

Description

An interdisciplinary exploration of literature produced in England mainly from 1550 to 1600 --a period that marks a considerable shift not only in literary production and consumption, but also in social, political, and ideological formations.  Issues to be discussed will include: the place of literary imitation in the construction of individual as well as national identities; the tensions between the established elite culture and the emerging institutions of "middle-class" and popular culture; the role of discourses of sex/gender in various domains of domination and marginalization.  Reading will be drawn from canonical literary figures, such as Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare as well as more "marginal" and/or "non-literary" texts, including contemporary pamphlets (and ballads).  

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (17th Century)

English 115B

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: Note new room: 145 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Di Cesare, M.:  George Herbert and the Seventeenth- Century Religious Poets; Donne, J.:  Complete English Poems; Maclean, H.: Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets; McMillin, S.:  Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy; Milton, J.: Samson Agonistes; Webster, J.:  The Duchess of Malfi. There will also be a course reader.

Description

A survey of England’s “century of revolution,” focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare After 1600

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3
Location: 2 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W., The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. Evans

Description

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomedies). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll consider how the actions and utterances of performing bodies can define and reshape the boundaries between what's present, what's represented, and what is made real. 


Shakespeare in the Theater

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Works,  ed. Alfred Harbage et al. 

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Pelican Shakespeare, ed., S. Orgell and A.R.Branmuller     

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G. B. Evans et al.,

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Works, ed. David Bevington

OR
Shakespeare, W.: Signet Classic Shakespeare,  ed. Sylvan Barnet et al., out of print

OR
Shakespeare, W.:The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al.

AND
McDonald, Russ: The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare    

Description

Some large percentage of everything said and written about literary works is not about those works but about their topics, about the moral, philosophic, or social issues those topics touch upon and, in the case of fictions, about the kinds of situations depicted in them.  This course is about Shakespeare’s plays—the plays as plays, actions upon the understandings of their audiences. I expect the course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey.  I plan to take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but I will not take them up systematically.  I find that presenting a topic like “Establishing Shakespeare’s Texts” causes people to try to memorize a lot of distinguished guesswork and understand nothing.  Instead of organizing the communal and active ignorance of the last 300 years of scholarship, I will wait for particulars of particular plays and texts to invite comment and background on printing-house practices, Shakespeare’s stage, the composition of his audience, and stuff like that.  If we work from stray particulars, you are less likely than you might otherwise be to come away with “knowledge” of matters about which we have—and have only evidence enough for—pure but immensely detailed guesses. I don’t yet know for sure how I will want to use in-class time, but I will  certainly concentrate on Shakespeare’s language and on the plays as plays—experiences for audiences—and on what it is about them that has caused the western world and much of the eastern to value them so highly.    

I don’t yet know which plays I’ll want to lecture on.  The list is pretty sure to include Twelfth Night, Macbeth, and The Winter's Tale.  Almost as sure are 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IVA Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, and King Lear.  Less certain are Much Ado About Nothing, The Tempest, The Merchant of Venice, Love's Labor's Lost, and All's Well That Ends Well.
Three papers, each of a length determined by how much you have to say and how efficient you are in saying it.  The third paper will be in lieu of a final examination.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: Note new location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J., The Riverside Milton.

Description

A survey of John Milton’s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Romantic Period

English 121

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Perkins, D.: English Romantic Writers; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Shelley, P.B.: The Cenci; a Course Reader

Description

The word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it has ceased to perform the function of a verbal sign.”  --Arthur O. Lovejoy

This course will look with wild surmise at the phenomenon of Romanticism.  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic writers “invent” the modern concept of literature?  What is the relation between Romantic literature and the signal historical and social events of the period:  the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the early industrial revolution, the proliferation of print?  Do Romantic writers turn to poetry in order to evoke nostalgia for the past or to forge an aesthetic avant-garde?  Through extensive reading of the major figures—Blake, Coleridge, the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, and Keats—we may not achieve an adequate definition of the word ‘romantic,’ but we will examine the Romantic word.  Why are Romantic writers so interested in the origins of language, and why are so many of their major poems unfinished?  We’ll begin with Rousseau’s representation of the (first) word as a gasp of surprise by which the speaking subject responds to the unfamiliar, and consider the poetry and prose of the major writers in the context of Shelley’s argument that “every author of a revolution in opinions is a poet.” 


The European Novel

English 125C

Section: 1
Instructor: Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist (1838); Honoré de Balzac, Père Goriot (1835); Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (1866); G. K. Chersterton, The Man Who Was Thursday (1908); Andrey Bely, Petersburg (1916); Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925).

Description

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 133, The Russian Novel and the West.

Focusing on key texts from English, Russian, and French literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th to the early 20th century, and the all-important shift from Realism to Modernism.  The texts are chosen to allow us to follow a specific thread: the intimate relationship between the European novel and the European city. Reading novels set in London, Paris and Petersburg, we will examine the changing experience of space and time, self and consciousness, private and public, center and periphery, high art and popular culture. Lectures will emphasize strategies of close reading and concepts from theories of the novel. We will use visual materials (photography, painting, and film) and discuss how the novel interacts with the visual arts and prepares the way for cinematography. In comparing novels from different national traditions, we will explore the interplay between genre and culture.  (All readings in English.)  There will be two midterms and one final examination.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Proust, M.:  Remembrance of Things Past, Volumes 1-3 (translated by Moncrieff and Kilmartin)

Description

By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism.  The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, of the individual subject, and of the pressures of history, as these are figured in the particular rhetorics and structures of this paradigmatic novel, will provide the central axes of our investigation.  Active in-class participation and a willingness to engage in both copious reading and regular dialogues are the only prerequisites for the course. Please note that we will be reading all of Proust's novel, rather than, as is often the case, only the first and last chapters (volumes).


British Literature, 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Beckett, Samuel, Murphy; Conrad, Joseph, Under Western Eyes; Eliot, T. S., The Wasteland and Other Poems; Eliot, T. S., Four Quartets (available on-line); Lawrence, D. H., The Blind Man (available on-line) ; Joyce, James, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James, Ulysses [selections]; Yeats, William Butler, The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats; Woolf, Virginia, Jacob’s Room; Woolf, Virginia, Mrs. Dalloway.

Description

The course will look at British and Irish literature written in the first half of the twentieth century, concentrating on the relation between modernity and modernism. We will read some short essays, stories and poems in addition to those on the reading list.


American Literature, 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Emerson, R. W., Nature and Selected Essays; Thoreau, H. D., Walden and Civil Disobedience; Douglass, F., Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Melville, H., The Piazza Tales; Hawthorne, N., The Scarlet Letter; Alcott, L. M., The Portable Louisa May Alcott; Whitman, W.; Leaves of Grass (1855 edition); a course reader with selections by Nat Turner, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Rebecca Harding Davis, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Emily Dickinson, and Abraham Lincoln.

Description

A survey of literary culture from early Transcendentalism through the Civil War.  Our readings will look at the relationship between genteel society and mass culture, taste and consumerism, class politics and public intellectualism, while exploring the way that social status in the U.S. has been historically accommodated to democratic practice.  We will examine the literary distinctions that emerge in a market-based culture, and chart the forms that become increasingly elite in this period, with special attention to the way that images of taste speak to questions of political status.  Our readings will take us from early nineteenth-century debates over institutions of culture through later representations of style, intellectual practice and cultural dissent, and will be discussed alongside contemporary paintings and visual materials from the popular press.  At the same time, we will address the ethics and epistemology of African American literary culture in this period as it responded to and participated in a variety of aesthetic forms.  The course will work across literary genres—essays, autobiography, poetry, novels—while asking questions about the conditions in which these genres appeared, their readership, their manner of circulation, and their changing function across the decades that would come to be known as the "American Renaissance."


American Literature, 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: Note new location: 101 LSA


Other Readings and Media

Readings for the course will include some, but not all, of the following (so please wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your books):  Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; Nella Larsen, The Complete Fiction; Anita Loos, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Jean Toomer, Cane; Anzia Yezierska, Breadgivers; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Richard Wright, Native Son; plus a photocopied reader including shorter writings by some, but not all, of the following:  Mary Antin, Willa Cather, Countee Cullen, John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, W.E.B. DuBois, Finley Peter Dunne, Jessie Fauset, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jacob Riis, Frank Norris, Jack London, Gertrude Stein, Sui Sin Far.

Description

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as The New Negro, the New Woman, and the New Immigrant.  We will focus on issues of social, economic, and geographic mobility during the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression, as it affected a wide array of American authors and fictional characters, including those who immigrated to the U.S., those who moved from one region to another or between country and city, and those who took up residence abroad.  We will explore the plot trajectories and narrative stances that these authors deployed to map their own cultural identities, as well as those of their fictional creations, in the new American century.

Requirements include:  several 5-7 page essays; occasional pop quizzes, and possibly a midterm and a final exam.  Please note that regular attendance at lectures is required.


African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Alain Locke, ed., The New Negro; Nella Larsen, Passing; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Richard Wright, Native Son; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Leroi Jones, Dutchman and the Slave; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Ed Roberson, Voices Cast Out to Talk Us In

Description

A survey of major African American writers in the context of social history. There will be weekly writing, a midterm, two essays, and a final exam.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Orality and Black Literature

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed.; Three Negro Classics, John Hope Franklin, ed.; Charles Chesnutt, The Conjure Woman and Other Tales.

Description

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral in the form of sermons, speeches, work songs, slave songs, spirituals, and the blues; yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an assumed connection between literature and literacy.  In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exploration of selected works from the canon of African American literature.  We will concern ourselves not only with the conceptual distinctions between orality and literacy, but also with how those distinctions gather force within debates over the power of language in politics and history: Rather than a teleological progression from orality to literacy, why does one find in much African American literature a promiscuous coupling of the two? What is the relation of this literature’s recurrent, slippery orality to a codified, authenticating literary apparatus?  How does speaking relate to subjectivity?  What are the politics of speaking, reading, and writing in British North America and the emergent United States? How might slaves have apprehended the power of orality – rhetoric, eloquence, performative speech – at a time when magnificent effects seemed to follow from the act of “declaring” independence?


The Cultures of English: Empire & Global English

English 139

Section: 1
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916);  Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (1958); Friel, B.: Translations (1980); Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1989); Arundati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997); J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1999).

Description

The texts in this course bear a troubled relationship to the language, English, in which and about which they write.  Questions of cultural, ethnic, gendered and national identity suffuse both their content and their form.  We’ll be trying to understand some of the causes and consequences of the spread of English as a literary medium, from the age of imperialism to the age of so-called globalization.  One short and one longer paper, alongside active and regular class participation, are required.


Modes of Writing: Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 110 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Zee Zee Copy

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.    

Note:  This course is open to English majors only. 


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Best American Short Stories 2008, ed. Salman Rushdie and Heidi Pitlor

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas
Time: T 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

None

Description

A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, generally 10-20 pages in length.  Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of each of the three student stories being workshopped as well as a 2-page journal entry.  Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques: 75-80. Class attendence mandatory.

Students not admitted or late in applying can come to office hours the first week of class to speak with Professor Farber or email tfar@berkeley.edu.  (Any students admitted who have worked with Professor Farber before must contact him in November about bringing their first new story, with xeroxes, to the first class meeting.)

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Farber's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Reines, Ariana
Time: M 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Photocopied readings will include selections from Ableard, Acker, Artaud, Ashbery, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Cahun, Calle, Celan, Cleaver, Dickinson, Dlugos, Donne, Duras, Emin, Flanagan, Flaubert, Héloise, Keats, Kinnell, Kraus, Labé, Leduc, Parks, Pasolini, Pasternak, Pessoa, Proust, Mayer, Melville, Mozart, Nijinsky, Nin, Notley, Rankine, Rilke, Salamun, Schuyler, Sebald, Tvestayeva, Vallejo, Villon, Wojnarowicz, and Woolf.

Description

Writing and Poems.  Weekly written assignments.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Reines' mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!   


Verse: How to Write Lyric Poems

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Recommended Texts:  The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, 3rd ed.; The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Poetry , 3rd ed.,\r

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today -- aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; relations between the sentence and line of verse; image & figure; shortlined and longlined free verse; stanza; graphics and poetic space; poetic forms (villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, prose poem, etc.); the first, second, third  personas (speaker and poet, addressee and reader; apostrophe and drama; narrative and description); and cultural translation.  Our emphasis will be placed on recent poets, with an eye & ear always to renovating traditions.  You will write a poem a week, and we'll discuss several in class; on alternate days, we'll discuss examples drawn from a course reader.  It will be delightful.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!  


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don
Time: MW 9-10:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See the course description.

Description

This course will offer students — in a workshop setting — the opportunity to read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction prose, with special attention to understanding, appreciating — and practicing — the essay as a literary genre.  Students will express their understanding of this literary form in a series of well-crafted essays. The primary texts in the course will be the participants’ own writing.  Additional readings will be drawn from modern and contemporary essayists. 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 8-12 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to Professor McQuade's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!  


Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List: Lopate, P. ed.: The Art of the Personal Essay.

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each) and two new essays (8-15 pages each). 

To be considered for admission in this course, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to Professor Kleege’s mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., October 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Senior Seminar: Novel to Film Adaptation

English 150

Section: 1
Instructor: Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Tentative Books: Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad; The Quiet American, Graham Greene; Dream Jungle, Jessica Hagedorn; The Ugly American, William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick; Beloved, Toni Morrison

Tentative Films:
Apocalypse Now (1979) and Apocalypse Now Redux (2001), dir. Francis Ford Coppola; Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991), dir. Eleanor Coppola; Beloved (1998), dir. Jonathan Demme; The Quiet American (1956), dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz; The Quiet American (2002), dir. Phillip Noyce; Tropic Thunder (2008), Ben Stiller; The Ugly American (1963), dir. George Englund

Description

This course intends to confront the conventional understanding that “The book is always better than the movie.” We will focus on the limitations and possibilities of the form of the novel and the film in the way that they represent, narrate, and engage with the histories of slavery, U.S. foreign policy and intervention, and the U.S. war in Vietnam. We are going to explore the representational changes that occur between novel and film as well as when films are remade, re-issued, or parodied and the particular meanings that they generate in the time that they are released to viewers. In addition, we will consider artistic choice and creative license as well as conditions of production, especially with respect to film. In-class discussions and writing assignments will involve the use of both literary terms and film language.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B. 

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Senior Seminar: Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Sexuality

English 150

Section: 3
Instructor: Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Julia Ward Howe, The Hermaphrodite; George Lippard, The Quaker City; E.D.E.N. Southworth, The Hidden Hand; Herman Melville, Typee; poetry by Dickinson, Poe, and Whitman; short stories by Rose Terry Cooke, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Henry James, and Constance Fenimore Woolson.

Description

This course studies the treatment of sexuality in imaginative literature of the mid-nineteenth-century, a period of particular flux when the institutionalization of a strict heterosexual/homosexual binary was not fully in place, when gender roles and conceptions of the body were undergoing rapid change, and when the structure of the family was subject to critique and revision from reformers. As we encounter in the reading autoeroticism, marriage, cross-dresssing, “romantic friendship”, hermaphroditism, utopian sexual experiments, and, sometimes, models of sex and gender that are quite different from our own, we will reflect on the historicity and construction of sexuality. We will situate the literature in relation to both historical context and current work in sex and gender studies.  Requirements include class presentations, class discussion, and a 20-page research paper.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Senior Seminar: Mark Twain

English 150

Section: 4
Instructor: Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 479 Bancroft Library (Seminar Room B)


Other Readings and Media

See Course Description.  The instructor will discuss the exact list at the first class meeting, so please do not buy any texts until then.

Description

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain’s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he left unpublished). The class will have ready access to the Mark Twain Papers, whose extensive primary and secondary resources students are encouraged to take advantage of for their research. One brief oral report (as the basis for class discussion) and one research paper, due at the end of the term.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150! 


Senior Seminar: Literature of California & the West Since World War I

English 150

Section: 5
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books that follow, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. poetry by T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Chandler, R., The Big Sleep; Dick, P., Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J., Slouching toward Bethlehem; Jeffers, R., Selected Poems; Stegner, W., The Angle of Repose; Steinbeck, J., The Long Valley; West, N., The Day of the Locust.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California.  Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of a single term paper of around twenty pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!

 


Senior Seminar in American Cultures: Fictions of Los Angeles

English 150AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 (1994); T. Coraghessen Boyle, The Tortilla Curtain (1996); Nathanael West, Day of the Locust (1939); Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man (1964); Walter Mosley, Little Scarlet (2004); Scott Bukatman, Blade Runner (1997); Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange (1997)

Description

Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a "circus without a tent" (Carey McWilliams), "seventy-two suburbs in search of a city" (Dorothy Parker), "the capital of the Third World" (David Rieff), and "the only place for me that never rains in the sun" (Tupac Shakur). This class will investigate these and other ways that Los Angeles has been understood over the last century—as a city-in-a-garden, a dream factory, a noirish labyrinth, a homeowner's paradise, a zone of libidinal liberation, and a powderkeg of ethnic and racial violence, to name but a few.  We will trace the rise of Los Angeles from its origins as a small city, built on a late-19th-century real estate boom sponsored by railroad companies, into the sprawling megacity that has often been taken as a prototype of postmodern urban development; and we will do so primarily by looking at the fiction, film, drama, and music that the city has produced.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following: English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement. 

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Special Topics: Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

This class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings, Pound, and Olson, who have presented their poetry in inventive ways. We’ll study other art forms that provide useful ideas and guidance—using landscape architecture as model for a poetics of the page, for example.   Throughout the course, we will see how ecological perspectives can help shape the work of poetry.

Students will write a short manuscript of poetry and critique work by others.

Note: This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 155 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Flaubert, G., Madame Bovary; Hawthorne, N., The Scarlet Letter; Fitzgerald, F.S., The Great Gatsby; Morrison, T., Beloved; Erdrich, L., Love Medicine; Mukherjee, B., Jasmine; Conrad, J., Heart of Darkness; Forster, E.M., Howards End; Rushdie, S., Midnight’s Children; Coetzee, J., Disgrace.

Description

This course will focus on each author’s representation or invention of foundational national myths.  Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


The Language and Literature of Films: Alfred Hitchcock

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 10:30-12 + Film Screenings Th 5-8 P.M. in 123 Wheeler
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Spoto, D.:  The Art of Alfred Hitchcock; Truffaut, F.:  Hitchcock; plus a course reader

Description

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards.  As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling.  But thanks to the French reception of his work in 1950s, Hitchcock also came to be considered a master of art, the Auteur par excellence.  If his films had nothing to say, they hardly needed to; in their unparalleled formal originality, they distilled the pure essence of cinema itself.  The course will focus on this dialectic between entertainment and art, between saying nothing and being everything. We shall pay particular attention to a Style that is, on the one hand, commodified as a “touch” that all can recognize, and, on the other, recessed in strange, inconsequential, gibberish-making details that, far from courting recognition, seem to defy it.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barker, P.:  Regeneration; Dunn, K.: Geek Love; Haddon, M.: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time; Lewis, V. A. ed: Beyond Victims and Villains: Contemporary Plays by Disabled Playwrights; McCullers, C.: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Medoff, M.: Children of a Lesser God; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III; plus a course packet of short fiction.

Description

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or staged reading from one of the plays.   


The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 4 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artifacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty; how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories. So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Professor Goldsmith in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Goldsmith will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 87 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Professor Lye in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Lye will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 3
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by Professor Langan in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Langan will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I. : Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 13. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.