Announcement of Classes: Spring 2009

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Reading and Composition: Beyond Good and Evil

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Kerschen, Paul
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; James Joyce, Dubliners; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; a Course Reader containing poems, stories, essays and critical articles.

Description

This course takes its title from Friedrich Nietzsche’s book on the "philosophy of the future," in which he argues that traditional moral categories no longer apply to the modern world. In this course we will test that claim. After a brief look at good and evil as understood in Homer, Dante and Milton, we will turn to modern texts which seek to rework these moral categories for their own time. We will ask what is gained and what is lost along the way - as good and evil become more doubtful and provisional, to what extent can they be judged at all? This inquiry will give us a vantage point on some of the monumental changes in Western culture and society over the last two centuries.

In addition to reading and enjoying these works, we will work hard on skillful writing about literature. Students will learn to read closely and carefully, to construct solid theses and arguments, and to deploy the resources of the English language to express their insights with clarity, conviction, and verve. Course assignments will include at least 32 pages of writing divided among several short essays; peer editing and revision will be mainstays. This course fulfills the first half of the university's reading and composition requirement.


Reading and Composition: The Southernization of America

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Erskine Caldwell and Margaret Bourke-White, You Have Seen Their Faces; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Flannery O’Connor, A Good Man is Hard to Find; a course reader, including works by James Agee, Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, and others.

Film list: Gone With the Wind; The Little Colonel; Cabin in the Sky.

Description

In 1927, the Mississippi River flooded some 27,000 square miles of American heartland, displacing hundreds of thousands of Southerners. Two years later, the stock market bottomed out and triggered the Great Depression. These national catastrophes provided a reason for the region to break with its agrarian past and explore progressive reforms. As rural Southerners moved to cities in record numbers, they brought their culture with them, a culture that was picked up by new neighbors and disseminated more broadly than ever before. Southern culture had become national culture.

This introduction to college writing and argument explores the Southernization of America from the 1930s to the 1950s. We’ll read a good deal of fiction and poetry alongside manifestos, documentary photography, music, and film. Our course material will help us ask questions about the relations between history and memory, race and nation, art and politics—themes you will explore in your papers. This is a writing-intensive course, so you will complete and revise four essays, and we’ll spend much of our time discussing how to improve your composition skills.


Reading and Composition: The Confessing Animal

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Browning, Catherine
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Augustine, Confessions; De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater; Hacker, A Writer’s Reference (6th ed. 2007); Hogg, Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Rousseau, Confessions; and a Course Reader.

Description

Written and oral confessions are a mainstay of western culture, with manifestations as different as Augustine's fourth-century spiritual autobiography and Rousseau's shocking eighteenth-century tell-all memoir. Confession in a variety of forms is central to many religious faiths, to our criminal justice system, and to our popular culture.  Confessions play a part in psychoanalysis and in politics.  This course will explore the phenomenon of confession, asking such questions as:  What is confession? How and why do we value it?  What social, literary, and political conventions govern its performance?  How does confession both reinforce and destabilize the social order?

As part of the university’s Reading and Composition requirement, this course develops reading, writing, and research skills that are applicable across the curriculum.  We will focus on how to find, evaluate, and make effective use of research tools and resources for analytic writing.  The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers (2-3 pages, 6-8 pages, 8-10 pages), combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources.  The first paper will be a personal essay in response to Augustine’s Confessions; the second, an argumentative essay supported by research and evidence; and the third, an expository research paper.  Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work (and feedback) at the prewriting and draft stages of composition.


Reading and Composition: Plotting Suspicion

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

William S. Burroughs, Cities of the Red Night; Arthur Conan Doyle, The Sign of Four; Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams; Sigmund Freud, Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria; Jamyang Norbu, The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes; William Shakespeare, Hamlet; selected short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Edgar Allan Poe.

Description

This course will inspect a lineup of “unusual suspects” plucked from what might be called a literature of suspicion. Although a motley generic arrangement encompassing revenge tragedy, psychoanalytic theory, detective fiction, and postmodern apocalypse, the texts that we will read nevertheless all, in different but related ways, assign a prime role to fiction in procedures of suspicion, detection, and evidence evaluation. This course will concentrate on close, careful reading of these works and their interpretive methods, placing them in historical and cultural context.

Above all, this course is designed to teach you how to work with principal modes of academic rhetoric: description, analysis, and argument. You will be required to write, in addition to a diagnostic essay and a number of short writing assignments, at least two formal essays, each of which you will substantially revise, and the last of which will include a research component. As each student will also workshop these essays with a peer-editing group, you must be prepared to write detailed comments on other students’ work.


Reading and Composition: “Native American Literature”

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Sherman Alexie, Ten Little Indians; John Rollin Ridge,, the The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit: Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine. There will also be a course reader containing works by writers such as E. Pauline Johnson, Zitkala-Sa, D’arcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Simon Ortiz, Michael Dorris, Linda Hogan, Wendy Rose, Joy Harjo, Marilou Awiatkwa, and Thomas King.

Film List: The Business of Fancydancing

Description

As studies in “American literature” or “Literature in English” grow increasingly diverse and inclusive, several important questions arise in relation to “Native American literature.”  What is Native American literature, and how does it relate to the larger canons of American and Anglophone literature?  On one level, Native literature predates European settlement by thousands of years; on another level, Native literature in English is barely older than the United States itself.

This class will examine a wide range of word art produced in English during the last 160 years by writers of Indigenous American descent.  We will engage works of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and film.  Since the writers who create these texts come from such different backgrounds and employ great variations of style and substance, we will ultimately question what makes “Native American literature” what it is.  From the 19th century myth of Joaquin Murieta to the widely popular contemporary work of Sherman Alexie, how does Native American literature give readers some wonderfully entertaining stories while simultaneously pushing us to question the implications of living in “America” in the 21st century?


Reading and Composition: The Long and Short of It

English R1B

Section: 13
Instructor: Tsao, Tiffany
Time: Th 8-9:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Charles Dickens, Bleak House; James Joyce, Dubliners; Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies; Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance; Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight!; a course reader.

Description

You can’t judge a book by its cover, but can you judge it by its length?  Why is it that some of us love burying our noses in a large book, while others of us feel drowsy at the very sight of anything over 200 pages long?  Why don’t they sell books by the pound, like meat or produce?  Why are so many of the “timeless classics” we feel we should read sooooooooo darn long?  Was Yoda right when he told Luke in Empire Strikes Back, “Size matters not”?

In this class, we’ll explore the respective merits of wordiness and brevity by reading two long works over the course of the entire semester, alongside a series of short works.  For the long novels, we’ll start in post-independence New Delhi with Rohinton Mistry’s A Fine Balance, and travel back in time to Victorian London in Charles Dickens’s Bleak House.  The shorter works we’ll be reading include short stories by Jhumpa Lahiri and James Joyce, a short novel by Jean Rhys, and a variety of other stories, plays, excerpts, and essays included in a course-reader.

Students will be required to write three essays, respectively, 2-3 pages, 6-7 pages, and 8-10 pages in length. The last two essays will each undergo a substantial amount of revision (including peer-revision), and the 8-10 page writing assignment will be a research paper.


Reading and Composition: Googleable: Language, Politics and Mass Media

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Ecke, Jeremy S
Ecke, Jeremy
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Joseph Gibaldi,  MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; George Orwell,  1984; Richard Marius,  A Writer's Companion; and a course reader containing selections from George Orwell, Don Watson, Frank Luntz, George Lakoff, Geoffrey Nunberg, J.L. Austin, Steven Pinker, and Robert Stockwell and Donka Minkova.

Description

George Orwell's 1984 envisions a world where language, thought, and information are controlled by the ruling Party. Reading 1984 as a primer of media and information control, we will examine the challenges that mass media and the internet present in the so-called information age. We will examine the democratization of information, the credibility of sources, issues of access, and the problems that arise when journalists, researchers, and students limit their information to that which is "googleable."

Your research project will span the semester.  You will propose a set of related research topics, compose a research prospectus, and compile bibliographies.  You will be required to attend office hours, prior to the submission of your prospectus, following the submission of your bibliography, and during one of your essay revisions.  Your research will culminate in a final expository essay of 7-10 pages, and you will revise your essay twice.  A strong emphasis will be placed on feedback and self-evaluation.


Reading and Composition: Dystopian Fiction and the Fate of the Body

English R1B

Section: 18
Instructor: Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale; William Gibson, Neuromancer; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers; Aldous Huxley, Brave New World; Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go; Thomas More, Utopia; and a Course Reader.

Film List: Blade Runner (1982); Children of Men (2007)

Description

This course will examine the body as a site through which dystopian fiction enacts many of its central conflicts.  We will discuss ways in which dystopian fiction both speculates about the future of the body and registers anxiety about the loss of more traditional bodily forms.  Reading and viewing a range of novels and films, we will encounter topics such as gender, sexuality, reproduction, cloning, and cyborg bodies.  Despite the apparent exoticism of its worlds and bodies, dystopian fiction asks fundamental questions about what a body is, and how it is produced, controlled, or altered by outside forces.  The course will thus consider how dystopian fiction affords a critical distance through which contemporary political and social contexts are critiqued.

In class discussions and in short paper assignments, we will practice close readings skills, working toward developing arguments from initials questions and observations about the text.  The course will also introduce students to research skills and will culminate in a final paper that incorporates historical, theoretical, or critical sources into its argument.


Freshman Seminar: Ang Lee Films and James Schamus' screenplays

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: M 12-1
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J.:  Sense and Sensibility; Moody, R.:  The Ice Storm

Description

For this seminar, we will look at four of Ang Lee’s films and at two of the novels that are the sources of two of the films. Two of the screenplays were written by Lee’s producer and friend, James Schamus: The Wedding Banquet and Ride with the Devil. Students will be expected to screen the films on their own, outside of class, and are expected to participate in class discussions. Students are also required to read two (of three) of the novels that are the source of the screenplays. (Students may choose to read Daniel Worrell’s Woe to Live On, also entitled Ride with the Devil, instead of one of the in-print books.  It is available as a used book from on-line bookstores.) There will be a short paper (4-6 double space pages) due at the end of the class.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to the Writing of Verse: Translation, Echo, and Originality

English 43B

Section: 1
Instructor: Johnson, Eleanor
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

(all readings will be available in a course reader or on bspace): Anon., Beowulf, trans. Seamus Heaney: Introduction; Anon., Wycliffite Bible: Selections; Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy: Selections; Basil Bunting, "Variations on a Theme by Milton"; Anne Carson, Decreation; Geoffrey Chaucer, Boece: Selections; Homer, The Odyssey, ed. trans. Fagles: Introduction; Andrew Joron, The Cry at Zero; John Milton, "Sonnet XXIII"; Alice Notley, The Descent of Alette; William Packard, The Art of Writing Poetry: Selections; Lisa Robertson, Debbie, an epic; Sappho, Poems, ed. and trans. Mary Barnard; Juliana Spahr, Spider Wasp; Tzvetan Todorov, Introduction to Poetics.  

Description

This poetry course is themed on the idea of “translation,” but conceived very largely, to include not just translations between languages, but also between different periods within a single language (such as between Old and Middle or Middle and Modern English), between lexica, between forms, between metaphoric systems, between genres.  By selecting a series of poems and working on different kinds of “translations” of these poems over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to play with and explore horizons of “gettability,” the limit of cultural recognition and archival echo.  

The governing thought experiment for the class will be the notion that all poetry is, on some level, a translation—literally, a “carrying over”—of ideas and forms, of ethical and aesthetic commitments.  By the end of the semester, each student will have produced a series of “translations,” as well as a brief ars poetica, either in prose or verse, reflecting upon and analyzing her own creative process.  

As we pursue our own acts of creative translation, we will read essays on poetic translations, treatments of how poetry differs from prose, and poetic works that are, in some way, wrestling with issues of translation and originality.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Eleanor Johnson's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: MW 10-11 + Discussion F 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Chaucer, Geoffrey, The Canterbury Tales; Donne, John, The Complete English Poems; Milton, John, Paradise Lost; Spenser, Edmund, Edmund Spenser's Poetry;  Class Reader (at Copy Central)

Description

Discussion will focus on three main works -- Chaucer's *Canterbury Tales*, Spenser's *Faerie Queene*, and Milton's *Paradise Lost* -- though we will also read shorter poems by Wyatt, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Suckling, and Lovelace.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: MW 1-2 + Discussion F 1-2
Location: 3 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Heaney S., trans., Beowulf; Donaldson, E., trans., Beowulf; Chaucer, G., The Canterbury Tales; Marlowe, C., Dr. Faustus; Spenser, E., The Faerie Queene; Milton, J., Paradise Lost.

Description

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these works were written when they were written, and what the unfamiliar cultures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance have to say to us now.  We will also focus on developing reading skills and on understanding the literary tradition as a set of interrelated texts and problems that recur over the course of centuries.  We will examine these works as formal artifacts as well as historical documents.  Students will work on close readings, on literary language, and on understanding generic distinctions as they functioned in the past and function now.  Expect to write three papers, to take a midterm, and a final exam.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 11-12 + Discussion F 11-12
Location: 2 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 2 (8th edition); Austen, J.: Emma; Equiano, O., The Interesting Narrative; Franklin, B.: Autobiography; Melville, H.: Billy Budd and Other Tales; Shelley, M., Frankenstein; Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey.

Description

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, and others) and think about how politics, aesthetics, the everyday, race, gender, and identity all find expression in a number of different literary forms. We'll especially consider the material and symbolic roles played by the idea and practice of revolution in the period.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Time: MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4
Location: 60 Evans


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J: Pride and Prejudice; Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights; Douglass, F: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Franklin, B: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Irving W: The Sketch-Book; Pope, A: Selected Poetry and Prose; Rowlandson, M: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Swift, J: Gulliver’s Travels; Walpole, H: The Castle of Otranto; Wordsworth, W: The Five-Book Prelude.

Description

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are major intellectual and literary transformations taking place in the course of this century and a half, and we will follow a few of them.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MW 12-1 + Discussion F 12-1
Location: 2 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Possible texts include:  Achebe, C., Things Fall Apart; Coetzee, J. M., Waiting for the Barbarians; Ellmann, R., O’Clair, R., and Ramazani, J.,The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry; Faulkner, W., As I Lay Dying; Ford, F. M., The Good Soldier; James, H., The Turn of the Screw; The Jolly Corner; Pynchon, T., The Crying of Lot 49; Wilde, O., The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, V., Mrs. Dalloway

Description

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world. We will concentrate on the era’s efforts in poetry and fiction, attending to the ways in which texts both incorporate and shape the formal effects of modernity at large.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark
Time: MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4
Location: 2 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 and Ramazani, Ellmann, and O’Clair (eds.), The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, vol. 1.

Description

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovations that also help us see how literature operates as a means of cultural response. We will also consider modernism alongside other literary modes and styles (realism, naturalism, postmodernism) that look to different ways of representing the experience of the modern world—and of finding a place for literature within it. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and questions of literary form even as we think about such larger issues as the relationship between reading and entertainment, the changing status of art in respect to new technologies of information and representation, and the challenges to traditional conceptions of the self that are posed by new languages of psychological, national, and racial identity.


Freshman and Sophomore Studies: Social Reform in Literature

English R50

Section: 1
Instructor: Black, Kelvin C.
Black, Kelvin
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Jane Addams, Twenty Years at Hull House; Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward; Benjamin Disraeli, Sybil; Richard Wright, Native Son.

Supplementary Texts:  Frederick Crews, The Random House Handbook, 6th ed; Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed.; William Strunk Jr., E.B. White, Roger Angell, The Elements of Style.

Description

What is social reform? What are the thought processes involved in defining a social problem?  And how does this definition affect the manner and methods used to solve it?  This course seeks to better understand the impulse to want to solve a problem perceived in society.  Before they can be solved, problems are things that first must be imagined as solvable.  The literature of social reform affords us the distinct opportunity to observe such imaginings. This course is reading and writing intensive, and aims to develop in students fluency with the method and discourse of the analytical essay.  Special emphasis shall be placed on the refinement of sentence construction, thesis development, and research methods.  Additionally, systematic reasoning through close reading will be stressed both in class discussion and in the course’s various writing opportunities. 

English R50 is intended for students who are planning to be English majors and who have already taken R1A. It satisfies the College’s R1B requirement.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required for the English major.


Freshman and Sophomore Studies: Slavery in British and American Literature

English R50

Section: 2
Instructor: Infante-Abbatantuono, Jhoanna
Infante, Jhoanna
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave. Equiano, O.: An Interesting Narrative in the Life of Olaudah Equiano. Jacobs, H.: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Course Reader.

Description

The representation of slavery in Anglo-American literature between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries raises a number of interesting questions.  Is it possible to represent the trauma of slavery in the form of literature? What literary and rhetorical techniques did authors use on both sides of the abolition debate?  How did an author’s class, race, religion, or politics influence his or her arguments for or against slavery?  Did the collaboration of English and American abolitionists challenge national boundaries?  We will begin by reading Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave (1688). Moving from Behn’s narrative, which appeared during the period of Britain ’s domination of the Atlantic slave trade, we will turn to late eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century abolitionist writers who sought to end the trade or slavery itself. Our readings from this period will include Olaudah Equiano’s An Interesting Narrative in the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1794), Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and poetry and prose by anti-slavery and pro-slavery writers.  The writing requirement includes composing and writing three essays of increasing length, including one research paper. 

English R50 is intended for students who are planning to be English majors and who have already taken R1A. It satisfies the College’s R1B requirement.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required for the English major.


Children's Literature

English 80K

Section: 1
Instructor: Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 3108 Etcheverry


Other Readings and Media

Book list still T.B.A., but the texts will be in the bookstore by the time classes begin.

Description

This introductory course looks at children's literature in several genres, historically and culturally. Readings will include fairy tales, The Princess and the Goblin, Charlotte's Web, and other novels, as well as picture books and poetry. There will also be critical readings, exams and papers.


Sophomore Seminar: High Culture/Low Culture: Film Genres and the Cinema of Ang Lee

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: Th 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Yueh-yu Yeh, Davis, D., eds.:  Taiwan Film Directors; Berry & Farquhar:  China on Screen; Davis, D.:  Picturing Japneseness; Chow, R.:  Primitive Passions

Description

This course will examine the formal techniques, expectations, experiences, and thematic concerns of some of Ang Lee's films, in the context of Hollywood and foreign films. We will also take advantage of the resources of Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Archive.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: Human Relationships in Literature, Art, and Culture

English 84

Section: 2
Instructor: Buckwald, Craig
Time: W 4-5
Location: 202 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Berger, J.:  Ways of Seeing; Freud, S.:  Five Lectures on Psychoanalysis; a course reader.

Description

What do literature, art, and other cultural productions have to say about personal and social relationships - arrangements that are often central to our debates, with ourselves and others, about who we are and what we should do?

This course will allow students to begin answering this question with respect to a diverse group of influential and provocative "texts" from the ancient world to the present. Specifically, we will ask: What is really going on in a given relationship? What is the relationship's place in the big scheme of things? And what cultural ideas and values underlie, or are challenged by, the way the text presents the relationship?

Emphasizing "close reading" and "close discussion" rather than a lot of reading, this course is meant equally for those with a particular interest in the above-mentioned subject, and for those simply wishing to gain more experience analyzing how a poem, painting, popular film, or other creative or non-creative piece "works."

Our reading/viewing/listening list will be subject to some modification depending on the interests of seminar members. But it will include two short books - John Berger's Ways of Seeing and Freud's Five Lectures on Psycho-Analysis - plus a course reader with manageable excerpts or pieces from Homer, Marie de France, Chaucer, Milton, Keats, Marx, Christina Rossetti, and perhaps a few others. To end the semester, we will all watch a Hollywood film, listen to some contemporary music, or experience some other high-profile production of popular culture.

Requirements: Regular attendance and participation, a paragraph offering observations and/or engaged questions brought to each meeting, and shared responsibility with a few others to lead a portion of one class.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Reading Walden Carefully

English 84

Section: 3
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: M 3-4
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Thoreau, H.D.:  Walden

Description

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week.  This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only heard about it, realize.  We will also try to work some with online versions of the books, using the wordsearch command to identify words such as "woodchuck" or "dimple" that reappear frequently, in order to speculate on patterns Thoreau is trying to establish.  Regular attendance and participation, along with a loose five-page essay at the end, are required.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Junior Seminar: British Literature and the Global 19th Century (note new title)

English 100

Section: 1
Instructor: Sanchez, Juan
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

British Literature: 1780-1830; Hamilton, Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah; Owenson/Morgan, The Wild Irish Girl; Arnold, Culture and Anarchy; Collins, Moonstone; Haggard, She.

Description

During the nineteenth century, Britain emerged as the world’s most expansive planetary empire with a sphere of influence affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people and discrete communities. Although political historians are now seeking to understand the role of this vast empire in the development of a new global order beginning to take root in the nineteenth century, one of the main challenges for literary critics remains to determine the complex, and often vexed relations of global politics to the production of art, society, and culture at large. In this course we will seek to develop a greater understanding of nineteenth-century literature as a global phenomenon. This means not only attending to the relationship of literary works to Britain’s colonial enterprise—paying attention, for example, to the particular ways in which poetry, novels, drama, and other imaginative works helped shape, reinforce, and critique British imperial ideology—but also its role in more broadly shaping nineteenth-century global formations, including international law and thought, ideas about political boundaries and state sovereignty, economic liberalism, and the place of war and violence in maintaining peace throughout the globe. As a result, some of the topics to be discussed will include the relationship between nineteenth-century literature and the following: transatlantic and worldwide commercial systems, the slave trade, travel and exploration, foreign wars and political revolutions, and the collision of regional environments, especially with respect to religious and cultural conflicts. We will also attend to recent work on global feminisms, cosmopolitanisms, and “contact zone” experiences created by travel, migration, and Britain’s colonial enterprise. While key critical works will help us establish these geo-political frameworks, we will also read literature about Other places—including Ireland, India, the Middle-East, Africa, North America, Latin America, and Spain.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100! 


Junior Seminar: Contemporary American Drama

English 100

Section: 2
Instructor: Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

TopDog/UnderDog, Suzan-Lori Parks; Angels in America, Tony Kushner; Dance and the Railroad, David Henry Hwang; Ballad of Yachiyo, Philip Kan Gotanda; Joe Turners Come And Gone, August Wilson; Aunt Dan And Lemon,  Wallace Shawn; How I learned To Drive, Paula Vogel; One Flea Spare, Naomi Wallace; Six Degrees of Separation, John Guare.

Description

Contemporary American Drama is a course which will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.  In order to enliven the discussion, Professor Gotanda has asked leading theater artists from around the country to submit their favorite contemporary American plays.  From this pool, a select number of texts will be chosen to cover during the term.  The traditional lecture format will be supplemented by the students themselves enacting rehearsal techniques.  This experiencing of the actual theater process will give insight as to how theater text spoken aloud, put on its feet, performed, can afford another kind of "reading" of what is written on page.  Films made of the play texts will also be exhibited to augment alternative methods of engaging the material.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100! 


Junior Seminar: 19th-Century American Poetry

English 100

Section: 5
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 283 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Walt Whitman, Selected Poems, 1855-1892; Emily Dickinson, The Poems of Emily Dickinson:  Reading Edition; Whitman's & Dickinson's Contemporaries, ed. Robert Bain;  Course reader (available at Krishna Copy)

Description

Proceeding historically, we will survey the poetry of the entire century.  We will focus on central poets now (Whitman, Dickinson) and then (e.g., Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Emerson).  We will also read several largely forgotten poets (Sigourney, Very, Crane).  We will consider their poetics advanced implicitly or explicitly, and we will become proficient in 19th-century poetic forms.  Special attention will be paid to the emergence of women and African-American poets.  We will read all these poets in relation to American and English literarature; to American painting and music; and to American history, especially the cultural upheavals of Indian Removal, Abolition, and the Civil War, and industrial and technological changes  

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


Junior Seminar: The Nineteenth-Century Middle Ages

English 100

Section: 6
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Walpole, H., The Castle of Otranto; Scott, Walter, Ivanhoe; Tennyson, Alfred, Idylls of the King; Morris, William, A Dream of John Ball; Twain, Mark, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; Jefferies, Richard, After London; Alexander, Michael, Medievalism: The Middle Ages in Modern England (recommended); Course reader. (Students are advised to attend the first class before purchasing books.)

Description

The ‘Gothic’ or Medieval Revival gave life to a wide variety of literature in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course will examine a number of novels and narrative poems arising from this movement, with a particular focus on the ways in which authors used the British Middle Ages as a lens to examine issues of social justice and the quality of everyday life in the nineteenth century. Requirements for the course will include a substantial term paper and research presentations.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.
 
Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


Junior Seminar: Women's Films of the '40s and '50s

English 100

Section: 7
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: TTh 5:30-7 + Film Screenings Th 7-10 PM
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Doane, M., The Desire to Desire; Gledhill, C., Home Is Where the Heart Is; Kaplan, E. A., Motherhood and Representation; Landy, M.,  Imitations of Life; Thornham, S., ed., Feminist Film Theory

Description

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre  “the womanÂ’'s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various “female” problems and fantasies. We will also look at feminist film theory and its conceptualization of subjectivity and desire in the cinematic apparatus.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in 100! 


Junior Seminar: Post-War American Literature and the Problem of Evil

English 100

Section: 8
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + Film Screenings T 6-9 P.M. in 106 Wheeler
Location: Note new location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Thompson, J.: The Killer Inside Me; Heller, J.: Catch 22;  Capote, T.: In Cold Blood; Goines, D.: Black Gangster; Spiegelman, A.: Maus; Milgram, S.: Obedience to Authority; Bugliosi, V. and Gentry, C.: Helter Skelter; Herr, M.: Dispatches; Simon, D.: Homicide; Ellis, B.: American Psycho; Shepard, J.: Project X; DeLillo, D.: Falling Man.

 Film List: Hitchcock, A.: Psycho; Penn, A.: Bonnie and Clyde; Polanski, R.: Rosemary’s Baby; Kubrick, S.: Full Metal Jacket; Lehman, M.: Heathers; Demme, J.: The Silence of the Lambs; Hughes, A. and Hughes A.: Menace II Society; Morris, The Fog of War; Miller, B.: Capote; Cronenberg, D.: A History of Violence; Gibney, A.: The Human Behavior Experiments; Greengrass, P.: United 93; Cohen, J. and Cohen, E.: No Country For Old Men.

Description

"Is evil something you do or something you are?” asks Patrick Bateman, the narrator of Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. This course investigates how American writers have considered this question in the aftermath of World War II, a war that dramatically staged mankind’s capacity for evil. To limit the seemingly endless range of evils that we might explore, we will focus primarily on murder (serial killing; gang violence; school massacres; war; homicide; terrorism). We will juxtapose nonfiction texts, films, graphic novels, television shows, autobiographies, music, and novels. The aim is to analyze various paradigms, structures, and ideas about the nature of evil as they emerge out of representations of killing in the United States of the last half century or so. The relationship between aesthetics and ethics will also be key: as Nabokov’s Humbert Humbert says, “You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style.” Average 250 pages reading and one film screening per week. Two papers (5-8 pages and 12-15 pages).

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Be sure to read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 100!


History of the English Language

English 101

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 20 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Millward, Celia M.: A Biography of the English Language; Millward, Celia M.:  Workbook to Accompany a Biography of the English Language. 

Description

This course is designed to introduce you to the historical development of the English language, from its earliest recorded appearance to its current state as a world language. It will cover the ways in which languages are written down and how English has been written, the ways people have understood language to work in the past and in the present, the major developments in the grammar, syntax, and pronunciation of English over time, loan words and foreign influences on the word stock of English, and the social forces driving linguistic change in English. This is a course for anyone who loves words and is curious about their history or for anyone who is interested in developing a deeper knowledge of the structures of English, early and late. 


Medieval Literature: Before Chaucer - Philosophical Fictions from Vergil to Boccaccio

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: Note new location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Vergil: Aeneid; Augustine: Confessions; Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy; G. de Lorris and J. de Meun: Romance of the Rose; Dante: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso; selections from Cicero, Ovid, Macrobius, Prudentius, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.

Description

Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, the Romance of the Rose started by Guillaume de Lorris and continued by Jean de Meun, and Dante’s  Divine Comedy. These will be read alongside selections from other philosophical, exegetical, and literary authors (like Cicero, Ovid, Macrobius, Boccaccio) that will help clarify the questions that the large fictive enterprises tried to answer. We will think about these works both in themselves, in relation to practices of reading and interpretation that they shaped and were shaped by, and as part of a developing and self-defining tradition.

 This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. 


Middle English Literature

English 112

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 170 Barrows


Description

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: Note new room: 185 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Erasmus, Desiderius, Praise of Folly; Thomas More, Utopia; Baldasarre Castiglione, The Book of the Courtier; Nashe, Thomas, The Unfortunate Traveller;  Marlowe, Christopher, Edward the Second; William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew and The Merchant of Venice; Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene. There will also be a xerox course reader (containing some poems and critical materials) available at Copy Central, 2560 Bancroft.

Description

An interdisciplinary exploration of literature produced in England mainly from 1550 to 1600 --a period that marks a considerable shift not only in literary production and consumption, but also in social, political, and ideological formations.  Issues to be discussed will include: the place of literary imitation in the construction of individual as well as national identities; the tensions between the established elite culture and the emerging institutions of "middle-class" and popular culture; the role of discourses of sex/gender in various domains of domination and marginalization.  Reading will be drawn from canonical literary figures, such as Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare as well as more "marginal" and/or "non-literary" texts, including contemporary pamphlets (and ballads).  

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (17th Century)

English 115B

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: Note new room: 145 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Di Cesare, M.:  George Herbert and the Seventeenth- Century Religious Poets; Donne, J.:  Complete English Poems; Maclean, H.: Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets; McMillin, S.:  Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy; Milton, J.: Samson Agonistes; Webster, J.:  The Duchess of Malfi. There will also be a course reader.

Description

A survey of England’s “century of revolution,” focusing on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and politics.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare After 1600

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3
Location: 2 Le Conte


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W., The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. Evans

Description

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomedies). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll consider how the actions and utterances of performing bodies can define and reshape the boundaries between what's present, what's represented, and what is made real. 


Shakespeare in the Theater

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Works,  ed. Alfred Harbage et al. 

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Pelican Shakespeare, ed., S. Orgell and A.R.Branmuller     

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G. B. Evans et al.,

OR
Shakespeare, W.: The Complete Works, ed. David Bevington

OR
Shakespeare, W.: Signet Classic Shakespeare,  ed. Sylvan Barnet et al., out of print

OR
Shakespeare, W.:The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al.

AND
McDonald, Russ: The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare    

Description

Some large percentage of everything said and written about literary works is not about those works but about their topics, about the moral, philosophic, or social issues those topics touch upon and, in the case of fictions, about the kinds of situations depicted in them.  This course is about Shakespeare’s plays—the plays as plays, actions upon the understandings of their audiences. I expect the course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey.  I plan to take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but I will not take them up systematically.  I find that presenting a topic like “Establishing Shakespeare’s Texts” causes people to try to memorize a lot of distinguished guesswork and understand nothing.  Instead of organizing the communal and active ignorance of the last 300 years of scholarship, I will wait for particulars of particular plays and texts to invite comment and background on printing-house practices, Shakespeare’s stage, the composition of his audience, and stuff like that.  If we work from stray particulars, you are less likely than you might otherwise be to come away with “knowledge” of matters about which we have—and have only evidence enough for—pure but immensely detailed guesses. I don’t yet know for sure how I will want to use in-class time, but I will  certainly concentrate on Shakespeare’s language and on the plays as plays—experiences for audiences—and on what it is about them that has caused the western world and much of the eastern to value them so highly.    

I don’t yet know which plays I’ll want to lecture on.  The list is pretty sure to include Twelfth Night, Macbeth, and The Winter's Tale.  Almost as sure are 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IVA Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, and King Lear.  Less certain are Much Ado About Nothing, The Tempest, The Merchant of Venice, Love's Labor's Lost, and All's Well That Ends Well.
Three papers, each of a length determined by how much you have to say and how efficient you are in saying it.  The third paper will be in lieu of a final examination.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: Note new location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J., The Riverside Milton.

Description

A survey of John Milton’s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Romantic Period

English 121

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Perkins, D.: English Romantic Writers; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Shelley, P.B.: The Cenci; a Course Reader

Description

The word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it has ceased to perform the function of a verbal sign.”  --Arthur O. Lovejoy

This course will look with wild surmise at the phenomenon of Romanticism.  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic writers “invent” the modern concept of literature?  What is the relation between Romantic literature and the signal historical and social events of the period:  the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the early industrial revolution, the proliferation of print?  Do Romantic writers turn to poetry in order to evoke nostalgia for the past or to forge an aesthetic avant-garde?  Through extensive reading of the major figures—Blake, Coleridge, the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, and Keats—we may not achieve an adequate definition of the word ‘romantic,’ but we will examine the Romantic word.  Why are Romantic writers so interested in the origins of language, and why are so many of their major poems unfinished?  We’ll begin with Rousseau’s representation of the (first) word as a gasp of surprise by which the speaking subject responds to the unfamiliar, and consider the poetry and prose of the major writers in the context of Shelley’s argument that “every author of a revolution in opinions is a poet.” 


The European Novel

English 125C

Section: 1
Instructor: Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist (1838); Honoré de Balzac, Père Goriot (1835); Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (1866); G. K. Chersterton, The Man Who Was Thursday (1908); Andrey Bely, Petersburg (1916); Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925).

Description

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 133, The Russian Novel and the West.

Focusing on key texts from English, Russian, and French literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th to the early 20th century, and the all-important shift from Realism to Modernism.  The texts are chosen to allow us to follow a specific thread: the intimate relationship between the European novel and the European city. Reading novels set in London, Paris and Petersburg, we will examine the changing experience of space and time, self and consciousness, private and public, center and periphery, high art and popular culture. Lectures will emphasize strategies of close reading and concepts from theories of the novel. We will use visual materials (photography, painting, and film) and discuss how the novel interacts with the visual arts and prepares the way for cinematography. In comparing novels from different national traditions, we will explore the interplay between genre and culture.  (All readings in English.)  There will be two midterms and one final examination.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Proust, M.:  Remembrance of Things Past, Volumes 1-3 (translated by Moncrieff and Kilmartin)

Description

By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism.  The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, of the individual subject, and of the pressures of history, as these are figured in the particular rhetorics and structures of this paradigmatic novel, will provide the central axes of our investigation.  Active in-class participation and a willingness to engage in both copious reading and regular dialogues are the only prerequisites for the course. Please note that we will be reading all of Proust's novel, rather than, as is often the case, only the first and last chapters (volumes).


British Literature, 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Beckett, Samuel, Murphy; Conrad, Joseph, Under Western Eyes; Eliot, T. S., The Wasteland and Other Poems; Eliot, T. S., Four Quartets (available on-line); Lawrence, D. H., The Blind Man (available on-line) ; Joyce, James, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James, Ulysses [selections]; Yeats, William Butler, The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats; Woolf, Virginia, Jacob’s Room; Woolf, Virginia, Mrs. Dalloway.

Description

The course will look at British and Irish literature written in the first half of the twentieth century, concentrating on the relation between modernity and modernism. We will read some short essays, stories and poems in addition to those on the reading list.


American Literature, 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Emerson, R. W., Nature and Selected Essays; Thoreau, H. D., Walden and Civil Disobedience; Douglass, F., Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Melville, H., The Piazza Tales; Hawthorne, N., The Scarlet Letter; Alcott, L. M., The Portable Louisa May Alcott; Whitman, W.; Leaves of Grass (1855 edition); a course reader with selections by Nat Turner, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Rebecca Harding Davis, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Emily Dickinson, and Abraham Lincoln.

Description

A survey of literary culture from early Transcendentalism through the Civil War.  Our readings will look at the relationship between genteel society and mass culture, taste and consumerism, class politics and public intellectualism, while exploring the way that social status in the U.S. has been historically accommodated to democratic practice.  We will examine the literary distinctions that emerge in a market-based culture, and chart the forms that become increasingly elite in this period, with special attention to the way that images of taste speak to questions of political status.  Our readings will take us from early nineteenth-century debates over institutions of culture through later representations of style, intellectual practice and cultural dissent, and will be discussed alongside contemporary paintings and visual materials from the popular press.  At the same time, we will address the ethics and epistemology of African American literary culture in this period as it responded to and participated in a variety of aesthetic forms.  The course will work across literary genres—essays, autobiography, poetry, novels—while asking questions about the conditions in which these genres appeared, their readership, their manner of circulation, and their changing function across the decades that would come to be known as the "American Renaissance."


American Literature, 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: Note new location: 101 LSA


Other Readings and Media

Readings for the course will include some, but not all, of the following (so please wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your books):  Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; Nella Larsen, The Complete Fiction; Anita Loos, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Jean Toomer, Cane; Anzia Yezierska, Breadgivers; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Richard Wright, Native Son; plus a photocopied reader including shorter writings by some, but not all, of the following:  Mary Antin, Willa Cather, Countee Cullen, John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, W.E.B. DuBois, Finley Peter Dunne, Jessie Fauset, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jacob Riis, Frank Norris, Jack London, Gertrude Stein, Sui Sin Far.

Description

We will read a diverse selection of writing, predominantly prose fiction, published in the first four decades of the twentieth century, a period of rapid urbanization, industrialization, and (im)migration that gave rise to such new cultural figures as The New Negro, the New Woman, and the New Immigrant.  We will focus on issues of social, economic, and geographic mobility during the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression, as it affected a wide array of American authors and fictional characters, including those who immigrated to the U.S., those who moved from one region to another or between country and city, and those who took up residence abroad.  We will explore the plot trajectories and narrative stances that these authors deployed to map their own cultural identities, as well as those of their fictional creations, in the new American century.

Requirements include:  several 5-7 page essays; occasional pop quizzes, and possibly a midterm and a final exam.  Please note that regular attendance at lectures is required.


African American Literature and Culture Since 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Alain Locke, ed., The New Negro; Nella Larsen, Passing; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Richard Wright, Native Son; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Leroi Jones, Dutchman and the Slave; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Ed Roberson, Voices Cast Out to Talk Us In

Description

A survey of major African American writers in the context of social history. There will be weekly writing, a midterm, two essays, and a final exam.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Orality and Black Literature

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed.; Three Negro Classics, John Hope Franklin, ed.; Charles Chesnutt, The Conjure Woman and Other Tales.

Description

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral in the form of sermons, speeches, work songs, slave songs, spirituals, and the blues; yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an assumed connection between literature and literacy.  In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exploration of selected works from the canon of African American literature.  We will concern ourselves not only with the conceptual distinctions between orality and literacy, but also with how those distinctions gather force within debates over the power of language in politics and history: Rather than a teleological progression from orality to literacy, why does one find in much African American literature a promiscuous coupling of the two? What is the relation of this literature’s recurrent, slippery orality to a codified, authenticating literary apparatus?  How does speaking relate to subjectivity?  What are the politics of speaking, reading, and writing in British North America and the emergent United States? How might slaves have apprehended the power of orality – rhetoric, eloquence, performative speech – at a time when magnificent effects seemed to follow from the act of “declaring” independence?


The Cultures of English: Empire & Global English

English 139

Section: 1
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916);  Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (1958); Friel, B.: Translations (1980); Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1989); Arundati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997); J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1999).

Description

The texts in this course bear a troubled relationship to the language, English, in which and about which they write.  Questions of cultural, ethnic, gendered and national identity suffuse both their content and their form.  We’ll be trying to understand some of the causes and consequences of the spread of English as a literary medium, from the age of imperialism to the age of so-called globalization.  One short and one longer paper, alongside active and regular class participation, are required.


Modes of Writing: Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a. Chandra, M.J.)
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 110 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Zee Zee Copy

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.    

Note:  This course is open to English majors only. 


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Best American Short Stories 2008, ed. Salman Rushdie and Heidi Pitlor

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas
Time: T 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

None

Description

A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, generally 10-20 pages in length.  Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of each of the three student stories being workshopped as well as a 2-page journal entry.  Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques: 75-80. Class attendence mandatory.

Students not admitted or late in applying can come to office hours the first week of class to speak with Professor Farber or email tfar@berkeley.edu.  (Any students admitted who have worked with Professor Farber before must contact him in November about bringing their first new story, with xeroxes, to the first class meeting.)

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Farber's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Reines, Ariana
Time: M 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Photocopied readings will include selections from Ableard, Acker, Artaud, Ashbery, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Cahun, Calle, Celan, Cleaver, Dickinson, Dlugos, Donne, Duras, Emin, Flanagan, Flaubert, Héloise, Keats, Kinnell, Kraus, Labé, Leduc, Parks, Pasolini, Pasternak, Pessoa, Proust, Mayer, Melville, Mozart, Nijinsky, Nin, Notley, Rankine, Rilke, Salamun, Schuyler, Sebald, Tvestayeva, Vallejo, Villon, Wojnarowicz, and Woolf.

Description

Writing and Poems.  Weekly written assignments.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Reines' mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!   


Verse: How to Write Lyric Poems

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Recommended Texts:  The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, 3rd ed.; The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Poetry , 3rd ed.,\r

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today -- aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; relations between the sentence and line of verse; image & figure; shortlined and longlined free verse; stanza; graphics and poetic space; poetic forms (villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, prose poem, etc.); the first, second, third  personas (speaker and poet, addressee and reader; apostrophe and drama; narrative and description); and cultural translation.  Our emphasis will be placed on recent poets, with an eye & ear always to renovating traditions.  You will write a poem a week, and we'll discuss several in class; on alternate days, we'll discuss examples drawn from a course reader.  It will be delightful.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!  


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don
Time: MW 9-10:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See the course description.

Description

This course will offer students — in a workshop setting — the opportunity to read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction prose, with special attention to understanding, appreciating — and practicing — the essay as a literary genre.  Students will express their understanding of this literary form in a series of well-crafted essays. The primary texts in the course will be the participants’ own writing.  Additional readings will be drawn from modern and contemporary essayists. 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 8-12 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to Professor McQuade's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!  


Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List: Lopate, P. ed.: The Art of the Personal Essay.

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each) and two new essays (8-15 pages each). 

To be considered for admission in this course, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to Professor Kleege’s mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., October 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Senior Seminar: Novel to Film Adaptation

English 150

Section: 1
Instructor: Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Tentative Books: Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad; The Quiet American, Graham Greene; Dream Jungle, Jessica Hagedorn; The Ugly American, William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick; Beloved, Toni Morrison

Tentative Films:
Apocalypse Now (1979) and Apocalypse Now Redux (2001), dir. Francis Ford Coppola; Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991), dir. Eleanor Coppola; Beloved (1998), dir. Jonathan Demme; The Quiet American (1956), dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz; The Quiet American (2002), dir. Phillip Noyce; Tropic Thunder (2008), Ben Stiller; The Ugly American (1963), dir. George Englund

Description

This course intends to confront the conventional understanding that “The book is always better than the movie.” We will focus on the limitations and possibilities of the form of the novel and the film in the way that they represent, narrate, and engage with the histories of slavery, U.S. foreign policy and intervention, and the U.S. war in Vietnam. We are going to explore the representational changes that occur between novel and film as well as when films are remade, re-issued, or parodied and the particular meanings that they generate in the time that they are released to viewers. In addition, we will consider artistic choice and creative license as well as conditions of production, especially with respect to film. In-class discussions and writing assignments will involve the use of both literary terms and film language.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B. 

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Senior Seminar: Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Sexuality

English 150

Section: 3
Instructor: Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Julia Ward Howe, The Hermaphrodite; George Lippard, The Quaker City; E.D.E.N. Southworth, The Hidden Hand; Herman Melville, Typee; poetry by Dickinson, Poe, and Whitman; short stories by Rose Terry Cooke, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Henry James, and Constance Fenimore Woolson.

Description

This course studies the treatment of sexuality in imaginative literature of the mid-nineteenth-century, a period of particular flux when the institutionalization of a strict heterosexual/homosexual binary was not fully in place, when gender roles and conceptions of the body were undergoing rapid change, and when the structure of the family was subject to critique and revision from reformers. As we encounter in the reading autoeroticism, marriage, cross-dresssing, “romantic friendship”, hermaphroditism, utopian sexual experiments, and, sometimes, models of sex and gender that are quite different from our own, we will reflect on the historicity and construction of sexuality. We will situate the literature in relation to both historical context and current work in sex and gender studies.  Requirements include class presentations, class discussion, and a 20-page research paper.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Senior Seminar: Mark Twain

English 150

Section: 4
Instructor: Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 479 Bancroft Library (Seminar Room B)


Other Readings and Media

See Course Description.  The instructor will discuss the exact list at the first class meeting, so please do not buy any texts until then.

Description

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain’s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he left unpublished). The class will have ready access to the Mark Twain Papers, whose extensive primary and secondary resources students are encouraged to take advantage of for their research. One brief oral report (as the basis for class discussion) and one research paper, due at the end of the term.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150! 


Senior Seminar: Literature of California & the West Since World War I

English 150

Section: 5
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books that follow, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. poetry by T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Chandler, R., The Big Sleep; Dick, P., Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J., Slouching toward Bethlehem; Jeffers, R., Selected Poems; Stegner, W., The Angle of Repose; Steinbeck, J., The Long Valley; West, N., The Day of the Locust.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California.  Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of a single term paper of around twenty pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!

 


Senior Seminar in American Cultures: Fictions of Los Angeles

English 150AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 (1994); T. Coraghessen Boyle, The Tortilla Curtain (1996); Nathanael West, Day of the Locust (1939); Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man (1964); Walter Mosley, Little Scarlet (2004); Scott Bukatman, Blade Runner (1997); Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange (1997)

Description

Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a "circus without a tent" (Carey McWilliams), "seventy-two suburbs in search of a city" (Dorothy Parker), "the capital of the Third World" (David Rieff), and "the only place for me that never rains in the sun" (Tupac Shakur). This class will investigate these and other ways that Los Angeles has been understood over the last century—as a city-in-a-garden, a dream factory, a noirish labyrinth, a homeowner's paradise, a zone of libidinal liberation, and a powderkeg of ethnic and racial violence, to name but a few.  We will trace the rise of Los Angeles from its origins as a small city, built on a late-19th-century real estate boom sponsored by railroad companies, into the sprawling megacity that has often been taken as a prototype of postmodern urban development; and we will do so primarily by looking at the fiction, film, drama, and music that the city has produced.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following: English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement. 

Enrollment is limited and a written application is due  BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in English 150!


Special Topics: Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

This class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings, Pound, and Olson, who have presented their poetry in inventive ways. We’ll study other art forms that provide useful ideas and guidance—using landscape architecture as model for a poetics of the page, for example.   Throughout the course, we will see how ecological perspectives can help shape the work of poetry.

Students will write a short manuscript of poetry and critique work by others.

Note: This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 155 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Flaubert, G., Madame Bovary; Hawthorne, N., The Scarlet Letter; Fitzgerald, F.S., The Great Gatsby; Morrison, T., Beloved; Erdrich, L., Love Medicine; Mukherjee, B., Jasmine; Conrad, J., Heart of Darkness; Forster, E.M., Howards End; Rushdie, S., Midnight’s Children; Coetzee, J., Disgrace.

Description

This course will focus on each author’s representation or invention of foundational national myths.  Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


The Language and Literature of Films: Alfred Hitchcock

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 10:30-12 + Film Screenings Th 5-8 P.M. in 123 Wheeler
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Spoto, D.:  The Art of Alfred Hitchcock; Truffaut, F.:  Hitchcock; plus a course reader

Description

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards.  As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling.  But thanks to the French reception of his work in 1950s, Hitchcock also came to be considered a master of art, the Auteur par excellence.  If his films had nothing to say, they hardly needed to; in their unparalleled formal originality, they distilled the pure essence of cinema itself.  The course will focus on this dialectic between entertainment and art, between saying nothing and being everything. We shall pay particular attention to a Style that is, on the one hand, commodified as a “touch” that all can recognize, and, on the other, recessed in strange, inconsequential, gibberish-making details that, far from courting recognition, seem to defy it.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barker, P.:  Regeneration; Dunn, K.: Geek Love; Haddon, M.: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time; Lewis, V. A. ed: Beyond Victims and Villains: Contemporary Plays by Disabled Playwrights; McCullers, C.: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Medoff, M.: Children of a Lesser God; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III; plus a course packet of short fiction.

Description

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or staged reading from one of the plays.   


The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 4 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artifacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty; how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories. So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Professor Goldsmith in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Goldsmith will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 87 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Professor Lye in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Lye will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 3
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged.

Description

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by Professor Langan in Fall 2008.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application form needs to be filled out.  Professor Langan will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

The seminar requirement for the English major may be satisfied by any ONE of the following:  English 100, 150, 150AC, or H195A-B.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I. : Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 13. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Topics in the History of the English Language: The Development of Linguistic Representations of Point of View

English 201B

Section: 1
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Time: Note new time: Th 9:30-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Beowulf, Seamus Heaney translation; Chaucer, Geoffrey, Troilus and Criseyde; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Austen, Jane, Lady Susan; Austen, Jane, Sense and Sensibility; Mansfield, Katherine, Stories; Woolf, Virginia, To the Lighthouse.

Description

This course will be devoted to the history of the development of styles for the representation of subjectivity or consciousness in narrative, including, importantly, represented speech and thought (free indirect style). It will use the original comparative method, i.e., comparing texts of different periods. The reading list is meant to be suggestive, a starting point. The interests of the class will also determine the directions of our inquiry, i.e., students can concentrate on a particular period and genre, e.g. on the medieval romance, the early novel or the modernist novel, selecting texts they wish to focus on and presenting their findings to the class as a whole. Since our focus is on a style, we will look at short texts or even selections from longer texts. The readings will also include articles on the styles for representing point of view, including readings presenting some historical hypotheses.


Graduate Readings: Gender, Poetry and Psychoanalysis in Irish Poetry

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Sullivan, Moynagh
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Eavan Boland, New Collected Poems; Seamus Heaney, Opened Ground: Selected Poems; Rita Ann Higgins, Throw in the Vowels; Michael Longley, Collected Poems; Medbh McGuckian, Selected Poems; Jessica Benjamin, Like Subjects Love Objects Essays on Recognition, Identification and Difference; Christopher Bollas, The Shadow of the Object: Psychoanalysis of the Unthought Known; Toril Moi, Ed, The Kristeva Reader;  Rosalind Minsky, Psychoanalysis and Culture: Contemporary States of Mind;  Margaret Whitford, ed., The Irigaray Reader

Recommended Reading:  Christopher Bollas, The Mystery of Things; Jessica  Benjamin, The Shadow of the Other Intersubjectivity and Gender in Psychoanalysis;  Grosz, Elizabeth. Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism; Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams; Julia Kristeva, Revolution in Poetic Language, trans. Margaret Waller; Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection, trans. Leon S. Roudiez; Price, Janet and Margaret Shildrick, Eds. Feminist Theory and the Body: A Reader; Scarry, Elaine. The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World.

Additional readings to be announced.

Description

Using feminist theory, object relations theory and psychoanalysis, this course will examine the work of a number of leading contemporary Irish poets with a view to reflecting on gender, representation and representatives in contemporary Irish culture. It also asks why, in a post-structuralist cultural world, the practice of poetry remains a semi-sacred, quietest cultural activity, with semi religious undertones, and seeks to answer questions about how male and female poets are positioned within such an economy. To this end, the student is invited to explore Irish poetry and the cultures that sustain it as well as those that are derived from it, from a number of related angles. Sample questions to enable such analysis will include:

•    How is the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland treated in the work of these poets?

•    How can representations of the political border be read in psychoanalytical terms?

•    Can poetry criticism be related to psychoanalytical practice?

•    What insights can psychoanalytical theory provide for poetic and broader cultural analysis?

•    What roles does a poet perform in contemporary Irish culture?

•    What functions does poetry have in contemporary Irish culture?

•    Does the role of the contemporary poet differ from that of the traditional bard?

•    Does a belief in cogent national identity enable the notion of a poetic public representative?

•    Does playing with fixed and inherited gender roles trouble traditional or popular beliefs in a cogent national identity?

•    Are representations of land and landscape gendered and how do you think this is significant?

•    What is the significance of houses and dwelling places in the work of these poets?

•    How do these poets negotiate the legacy of the Irish Cultural Renaissance?

•    How can these poets be placed/read in terms of international poetry schools and movements?


Graduate Readings: Literature and Psychoanalysis

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Freud, S., Beyond the Pleasure Principle; Freud, S., The Interpretation of Dreams; Freud, S., Three Case Histories; Gay, P., The Freud Reader; Klein, M., Selected Melanie Klein; Lacan, J., The Ethics of Psychoanalysis; Shakespeare, W., Hamlet; Sophocles, Antigone, Oedipus the King, Electra; a course pack of readings.

Description

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common?  For one, both are usually about at least two of the following: sex, death, love, hate, jealousy, anxiety, loss, and the search for some kind of structure.  Seemingly made for each other, literature and psychoanalysis have been in a more or less close conversation since the latter's emergence at the end of the nineteenth century. In this course, we will consider the relationship between literature and psychoanalysis in a number of ways: we will look at Freud's own writing as literature in the context of psychoanalysis's early days as practice, institution, and scandal; we will consider historical and intellectual connections between Freudian and post-Freudian psychoanalysis and different kinds of literary interpretation; and we will work to derive from the language of psychoanalysis tools to help us cope with the considerable formal and thematic complexity of literary texts. We'll consider other questions as well: how does psychoanalysis manage or mismanage time?  In what ways can we understand psychoanalysis as a distinct kind of reading?  What, in turn, can we say about psychoanalysis as writing?  Does psychoanalysis have a style?  The syllabus will include writing by Freud, Lacan, Klein, Laplanche, and others as well as works by literary critics who derive some or all of their terms from the language of psychoanalysis.


Graduate Readings: Victorian Novel

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Time: T 9:30-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Brontë, Charlotte, Jane Eyre (Norton Critical); Brontë, Emily, Wuthering Heights (Norton Critical); Conrad, Joseph, Heart of Darkness (Norton Critical); Dickens, Charles, Great Expectations (Norton Critical); Eliot, George, Middlemarch (Norton Critical); Hardy, Thomas, Tess of the D’Urbervilles (Norton Critical); Thackeray, William, Vanity Fair (Barnes & Noble Classics)

Description

Over 7,000 novels were published in Victorian England; we’ll read the best seven.  The course will emphasize the place of novels and novelists in a variety of Victorian cultural innovations, such as the creation of modern cosmopolitan and historical consciousness, of changing temporal perceptions, of deep psycho-sexuality, and of new aesthetic expectations.  We will be interested as well in how novels helped reorganize social categories and seemed to give substance to the very concept of “society”.   We will be asking why the novel, a genre explicitly disclaiming to represent real persons and events, came to be implicated in such large cultural and social transformations.  What was it about the novel’s form, specifically, that equipped the genre for its role in helping to make the modern world?  And what is it about these novels, individually, that seems to exceed the category “Victorian”? You will write one short oral report and two papers suitable for twenty-minute oral presentations at conferences.


Graduate Readings: The Writings of Henry Adams and William James

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 221 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature and Selected Essays; Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams; Henry Adams, Mont St. Michel and Chartres; Henry Adams, Democracy: An American Novel; William James, The Writings of William James; William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience.

Description

These two American friends stand at the beginning of the twentieth century reprising the melancholy and experimental strains of New England culture, and anticipating modernism:  T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, W.E.B. DuBois, Wallace Stevens and Thomas   Pynchon would cite them as focalizing influences.  I hope that our discussions will be based on close reading and adventurous speculation, and that we will achieve at least a preliminary understanding of Adams’s and James’s countervailing views concerning American possibility.  In addition to regular attendance and participation in discussion, a total of twenty five pages of writing will be required, whether in the form of a single essay or divided into several pieces of various lengths.  Essays relating Adams and/or James to other American writers will be welcome.


Graduate Readings

English 203

Section: 5
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Klaeber, Fr., et al. Beowulf and the Fight at Finnsburg [Note: Fourth edition only].

Description

In “Reading Beowulf" we will be particularly interested in the making of Beowulf as a text and as a canonical poem. The first goal addresses issues of language, paleography, and textual editing as we translate; the second addresses the cultural investments of the last two centuries (and of the present moment) that have shaped our reading(s) of the poem. Attending to the particularity of the poem’s language and the poem’s vexed relationship with the culture that produced it will raise questions about Anglo-Saxon poetics, literary history, and aesthetics; it will also invite other strategies of reading that the members of the course bring to the table. If you have questions about the course please contact Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe at kobok@berkeley.edu.

Prerequisite: Completion of English 205A (Old English) or the equivalent.


Graduate Readings: Reading Novels Now

English 203

Section: 6
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Time: Th 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Novels:  Robbe-Grillet, A. : La Jalousie ; Nabokov, V.: Pale Fire ; Pynchon, T.: The Crying of Lot 49 ; Jones, G. Corregidora ; Calvino, I.: If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler… ; Beckett, S.: Nohow On ; Ellis, B.: American Psycho ; Morrison, T. Jazz ; Eugenides, J.: The Virgin Suicides ; Saramago J.: Blindness ; Sebald, W. G., Austerlitz ; McEwan, I.: Atonement ; Jones, E. P.: The Known World ; Mitchell D.: Cloud Atlas ; Safran Foer, J.: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close ; Diaz., J.: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Theory:  Barthes, R.: The Pleasure of the Text ; Rosenblatt, L.: The Reader, The Text, The Poem ; Iser, W.: The Act of Reading ; Tompkins, J.: Reader Response Criticism: From Structuralism to Post-Structuralism

Description

This course aims to formulate new phenomenological models of reading contemporary novels.  We will conduct a broad survey of theories of reading, old and new, dabbling along the way in cognitive theories of reading; historical accounts of reading practices; analyses of the ethics of reading; theories of translation; and theories of rereading.  We will then pose some simple questions about turn to reading as it takes place now in the West:  Who reads?  What do we read?  Why do we read?  And most importantly: do we read?  We will examine twenty-first century debates about the status of reading, taking into consideration competing genres (film, blogs, photography); new modes of production and distribution (self-publishing, e-books, books on tape); and new technologies (hypertext, the internet, electronic readers like Sony’s Reader and Amazon’s Kindle).  Throughout the semester, we will read a set of European and American novels (1957-now) alongside the theories of reading we explore. Each student will undertake a final project to construct a new phenomenology of reading, using one or more of these novels to make a case for, to exemplify, or to derive the theory.  Two papers (8-10 pages and 15-20 pages).


Graduate Readings: Narrative and Middle Passage

English 203

Section: 7
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave; Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil of Slavery; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Robert Harms, The Diligent; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Charles Johnson, Middle Passage; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon; Caryl Phillips, The Atlantic Sound; Stephanie Smallwood, Saltwater Slavery;Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past

Description

Toni Morrison once remarked, on the subject of African American slave culture, that “no slave society in the history of the world ever wrote more – or more thoughtfully – about its own enslavement.”  For those Africans who were kidnapped into slavery the truth is much closer to the opposite.  African narratives of captivity and enslavement are comparatively scarce; and, in fact, there is not one extant autobiographical narrative of a female captive who survived the Middle Passage. Illiteracy, violence, and an historical record predisposed toward the quantitative (e.g., markets, values, property) have provided strong impediments to the narration of middle passage. Our knowledge of transatlantic slavery is structured around an absence – the silence of the slaves themselves.
In this course we will explore how two domains – history and literature – deploy similar narrative and figurative strategies to compensate for this silence, and will attend as well to the paradox of trying to recover slave voices from structures that in the act of apprehending them destroy them.  We will generate a critical vocabulary out of recent work on black memory that engages both questions of the archive and affective history.  Some of our questions will include the following: What relation to these figures do we hope to cultivate?; What desire propels our engagement with them?; What do we believe eyewitness accounts of middle passage afford us that other types of evidence do not?; Can a fiction of middle passage be redemptive and redressive, or will it only serve to make explicit the inevitable failure of any attempt to recover the past?; Do fictions provide us with “information” on the slave trade, or is their most potent effect to provide readers with an experience of representational failure or absence that approaches that of an ethical encounter?; Should it make any difference to us that the narrative protagonists of middle passage can be both slaves (The Life of Olaudah Equiano) and slave ships (The Diligent)?


Milton

English 218

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria
Time: W 2-5
Location: 2505 Tolman


Other Readings and Media

John Milton, Complete Poetry and Major Prose, ed. Merritt Y. Hughes

Description

An introduction to the poetry and major prose of John Milton. We will discuss Milton's conception of authorship, Milton and the English civil war, Milton's relation to humanism and to the Protestant Reformation. Extensive secondary reading in seventeenth-century works and modern criticism.


Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

(eds. R.V. Cassill & Joyce Carol Oates). The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction (2nd. Edition).

Description

This limited-enrollment workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction.  Undergraduate students may apply for admission to this graduate course. 

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit approximately 12-15 photocopied pages of your original fiction (short story or chapter of a novel) to Professor Mukherjee's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for further information on enrollment in such courses!  


Graduate Proseminars: Renaissance (16th-Century): Faustus' Books

English 246C

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Bacon, F., Essays (1597); Bible, "King James" Version; Cranmer, T., et al. The Book of Common Prayer; Erasmus, D., The Praise of Folly; Jones, E., ed., Oxford Book of Sixteenth-Century Verse; Machiavelli, N., Prince; Marlowe, C., Doctor Faustus; Marlowe, C., Tamburlaine; Montaigne, M., Essays (tr. Florio 1603, if you can get it, or Frame); More, T., Utopia; Nashe, T.,The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works; Ovid, Metamorphoses, tr. Golding; Shakespeare, W., A Midsummer Night's Dream; Sidney, M., Sidney Psalter; Sidney, P., Defense of Poesy; Spenser, E., Faerie Queene
Spenser, E. Minor Poems; Virgil, Aeneid.

Description

               Divinity, adieu.
These metaphysics of magicians
And necromantic books are heavenly:
... his dominion that exceeds in this
Stretcheth as far as does the mind of man.

As the sixteenth century began, English literary culture was emerging from the long shadow of domestic strife to claim the cosmopolitan promises of humanism— a citizenship both of the modern world and of classical history.  Yet as suddenly as that world had doubled with Columbus' discovery, the Reformation split it in half.  The consuming passion and the divisive trauma of learning are the twin legacies of humanism to the Elizabethan Renaissance: the deal with the devil that Faustus makes in order at once to know more and to flee from what he knows already.

Students should read the "A-text" (1604) of Doctor Faustus before the first class meeting and bring the text to class. The rest of the following booklist is tentative (and will be trimmed).


Research Seminar: Philosophy and the Arts

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

There will be an elaborate reader. In addition, students will be asked to buy Spinoza’s Ethics, Altieri’s The Particulars of Rapture, and Buat, The Emotions: Art and Ethics. Then by the third week we will have to buy many of the texts students choose to work with. I will Xerox the relevant passages from Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (Miller translation) but I envision it being used enough to merit students' buying it.

Description

This course will try to relate the concept of sensuousness to the roles the affects can play in aesthetic experience.  The first half of the course will be devoted to familiarizing ourselves with basic concepts that establish a language for characterizing a range of affective experiences and connecting them to concerns for the values within what we are doing as well as the values that they might help establish beyond art.  Then there begins the hard work. Students will be asked to chose a text—a novel or play or movie or series of poems—and present the text in class by exploring what it is possible to claim about distinctive aspects of its engagement with concerns about affects we have developed.  Conversation will focus on what problems the critic faces in applying this critical perspective to making claims about the significance of particular works of art.


Research Seminar: Native American Fiction

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet
Time: W 3-6
Location: 2525 Tolman


Other Readings and Media

Alexie, S., The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven; Callahan, S. A., Wynema; Endrezze, A., throwing fire at the sun, water at the moon; Erdrich, L., Love Medicine; Harjo, J., The Woman Who Fell from the Sky; Hogan, L., Power; McNickle, D., The Surrounded; Momaday, N.S., House Made of Dawn; Power, S., The Grass Dancer; Silko, L.M., Ceremony or Almanac of the Dead; Wong, H., et. al, Reckonings: Contemporary Short Fiction by Native American Women.

Description

Contemporary Native American stories are survival stories, reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences:  they calculate indigenous positions, settle overdue accounts, note old debts, and demand an accounting. These are the stories, says Joy Harjo, that “keep us from giving up in this land of nightmares, which is also the land of miracles.” Focusing on contemporary Native North American writers from within the U.S., we will examine how these Native writers convey: cultural survival in the wake of colonization; struggles for sovereignty; rejuvenations of ceremonial healing; retellings of myth and history; experiments with orality and literacy; articulations of a geocentric epistemology and land-based narrative; and an engagement with contemporary literary forms. In addition, we will examine the literary, cultural and regional influences on these writers and place their work in the context of Native American literatures specifically and U.S. literatures and global indigenous literatures, generally.