Announcement of Classes: Spring 2005

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Noise

MWF 9-10

"This course is about reading and writing through noise. I have chosen texts that teach us how to listen, that are deliberately indulgent, layered, provocative, and intense. Because the opposite of noise isn't silence but signal, no matter where you w...(read more) Jami Bartlett

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Language of Authorship

MWF 11:00-12:00

"This course will focus on the language and craft of writing through our examination of the themes of authorship and narration in experimental, twentieth century literature. We will read, discuss and write about literature and critical essays that cha...(read more) Sophia Wang

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Austenmania!

MWF 12-1

"This course seeks to refine composition skills (thesis building, argumentation, processes of analysis, use of evidence, and mechanics) while also introducing students to the discipline of literary study. Students will be responsible for 32 pages of w...(read more) Leslie Walton

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Literary Sleuths

MWF 3 - 4 pm

"From Sherlock Holmes to Columbo, fictional detectives have captured the popular imagination in books, movies, and television. These figures are often set apart from the crowd by their extraordinary skills in perception, analysis, and deduction as wel...(read more) Kristine Ha

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Bringing the Dead Paper to Life

T/TH 8-9:30

"This course is an introduction to the mechanics and pleasures of critical reading and writing. We will explore what your professors mean when they ask you to read texts 'critically,' and what they want when they ask you to write a 'critical' essay. I...(read more) Kristin Fujie

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Literary and Cinematic Cities

TTh 9:30-11

"In one of the conversations that compose Invisible Cities, Marco Polo tells Kublai Khan:With cities it is as with dreams; everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire or its reverse, a fea...(read more) Erin E. Edwards

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
High Modernism and its Others

Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-2:00

"In this class we will spend time acquainting ourselves with some of the literary works known as 'high modernist' and the orthodox critical views of what it means to be high modern. Once we have a good idea of what this term means, we will try to deve...(read more) Charles Sumner

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Science and Literature

TTh 2-3:30

"Several of last year's Hollywood movies-I, Robot, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, and Van Helsing-seem to register a continuing anxiety that scientists lack a moral sense and cannot control their invented technologies. Neither this anxiety tha...(read more) Jhoanna Infante

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Making and Unmaking the Self-Made (Wo)Man

T Th 3:30-5

In this course we will work to hone your analytical reading, writing, and thinking skills by examining stories -- including your own -- of self-made men (and women), as well as alternatives to, and critiques of, this archetypal American story. To what...(read more) Liza Kramer

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Language, Writing and the Self

TuTh 3:30-5:00

"The purpose of the course is to teach you what it means to ""think critically"" about sophisticated texts and how to express the results of this critical thinking in well-conceived, thesis-driven essays as well as orally. In working towards our goals...(read more) Richards, Diane

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Prose Poem: The Past, Present and Future of a Form

MWF 9-10

"In this course we will be reading and responding to nineteenth and twentieth, and twenty-first century texts which fall into the amorphous category of the prose-poem. With an eye toward sharpening our sensitivity to form and our appreciation for expe...(read more) Julie Carr

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
"You See a Dead Pig That Has Been Lying There a Long Time': Dirt, Darwin,

Dickens, Dogma "

MWF 10:00-11:00

"In this class, we will examine a wide variety of texts leading up to the 'Darwinian Revolution,' and will read from several of his core texts, as well as letters and entries from his travel logs and autobiography. We will then move from Darwin's core...(read more) D. Rae Greiner

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Faust Tradition

MWF 11-12

This course will focus on the Faust story, the legend of the magician (or scholar) who sells his soul to the Devil for love (or knowledge, or money). The Faust character has had a long life in legend and folklore, from early Christian times to the pre...(read more) Adrienne Williams Boyarin

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Politics of Romance and Miscegenation

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12-1

"The purpose of this course is to trace the history of 'romance' beginning with its early use by American authors to introduce a humane foundation for American democracy. We will follow how the idea of romance as a literary form that emerges alongside...(read more) Janice Tanemura

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Relationships

MWF 1-2 p.m.

"The thing these books and films have in common is the problematic nature of the main character's relationship to other people, usually one particular person. The relationships range from the disturbing and exploitative to the comical and unconvention...(read more) Misa Oyama

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Subjects of Mobility: Wanderers, Outcasts, Detectives, and Expatriates

MWF (2-3 p.m.)

"This class will examine the individual character in literature as a subject of mobility, autonomy, and alienation, while exploring his or her relationship to larger social networks and systems of belief. The characters in the works that we will read ...(read more) Monika Gehlawat

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Holiday Literature

MWF 3-4

"Holidays find much common ground with literature. In their ways, both exist outside of time and place by means of their inherent, if relative, universality. Thanksgiving is not celebrated around the globe, just as Donne is not read the world over, bu...(read more) Alan Drosdick

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
The Mind's Island

MWF 3-4

This course takes as its organizing topic early modern and modern literary islands. As we hop from island to island, starting with Thomas More's Utopia (at once overdetermined as literally 'nowhere,' as a mirrored double of England, and as the New Wor...(read more) Joseph Ring

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
City Images

TTh 8:00-9:30

A number of prominent 19th and 20th century writers and artists felt drawn to represent urban experience in their imaginative works, as well as to analyze critically the place of cities in their lives and those of their contemporaries. What is so comp...(read more) Katherine Anderson

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Fessing Up

TTH 8-9:30

"The most casual glance at 'bad' television or print media is enough to confirm Michel Foucault's claim that 'Western man has become a confessing animal.' From Jerry Springer and Pete Rose to that inimitable Hilton heiress herself, public and truthful...(read more) Stephen Katz

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Literature and World War I

T Th 9:30-11

World War I, or the Great War, has inspired a tremendous amount of great poetry and fiction. Writers immediately turned the experience of war into the subject of verse and novelists continue to use it as a subject more than eighty years after the war ...(read more) James Murphy

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Cities and their Representations

TTH 9:30-11:00

"Rousseau described cities as 'the abyss of the human species,' and this conviction lives on in modern consciousness. But cities--both then and now--also represent the promise of diverse global community, innovation, and the ideals of human civilizati...(read more) Slavica Naumovska

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Female subjects: an exploration of harm

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will take a brief look at what it is to be a woman in American culture. We will pair readings in psychoanalysis and philosophy with the texts listed below to flesh out the questions they raise about our society: Why are these girls' comin...(read more) Erin Khue Ninh

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

TTh 12:30-2

"Using texts that explore the exercise of unusual power by unusual characters, this course examines the entangled interfaces linking human and almost-human, individual and community, and identity and responsibility. Who determines what is ""human"" or...(read more) Sharon Goetz

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Literature of the Suburbs

TTh 12:30-2:00

White picket fences, well-groomed lawns, 2.5 well-groomed kids, a station wagon in the font, an elm tree in the back: Middle America is a seemingly benign place, but it is also where extremes collide. It's not quite rural, and it's not completely urba...(read more) Nicholas Nace

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Tales of Two Places

TTh 2:00-3:30

"Over the last few decades many scholars have written extensively on the nature of Otherness and on various ways in which portrayal and creation of one's ethnic, racial, or gender 'opposite' reflect concerns and dilemmas of one's own subjectivity or s...(read more) Vlasta Vranjeŝ

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
(Ab)Normal Bodies

T TH 3:30-5

"The novels and short stories we will read for this class revolve around characters who are perceived by their community as being physically 'abnormal.' We will read these texts in conversation with a series of essays on the history and/or social cons...(read more) Rebekah Edwards

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Realism and Contemporary Fiction

T Th 3:30-5:00

"Realism names a complicated array of literary conventions and procedures, but it is also a familiar term in everyday usage. One film or TV show may be 'realistic' while another is not, but in either case we tend to judge the success of the work in te...(read more) Ben Graves

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Advocacy and Abilidad: Filipino American Literature

TTh 3:30-5,

"This course examines selected texts in Filipino American literature, with emphasis on elements of advocacy and abilidad (the latter is a Filipino term for creating with found and scavenged resources) as expressed through media (newspapers, magazines,...(read more) Jean Vengua Gier

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Psychological Approaches to Contemporary Asian-American Literature and Film

MWF 9-10

"While psychological discourse often claims universality, literary discourse by and large celebrates particularity, which leads us to ask: what do these two discourses have to say to each other? Dividing our reading roughly equally between literature ...(read more) Carlos Reyes

R1B/21

Reading and Composition:
Ethics, Morality, Law and Literature

MWF 10-11

"This course focuses on issues of ethics, morality, and law as a way to both analyze arguments and to apply critical thinking and reading to one's own writing. The readings include essays on current events such as first amendment rights, affirmative a...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
British Literature and Culture, 1840s - 1914

TTh 8- 9:30

"This course will introduce students to a wide range of fiction and non-fiction prose written during the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Selected works of literary criticism and theory will deepen our understanding of the social and historical climate a...(read more) Antoinette Chevalier

R1B/23

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling and the Problem of History

T Th 9:30-11

"This course is designed to prepare you to compose college level essays that are superior in form and content. Our focus will be on acquiring strategies that enable you to develop your intuitions about what you read into viable, complex theses. We wil...(read more) Joy Viveros

R1B/24

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling and the Problem of History

T Th 12:30-2

"This course is designed to prepare you to compose college level essays that are superior in form and content. Our focus will be on acquiring strategies that enable you to develop your intuitions about what you read into viable, complex theses. We wil...(read more) Joy Viveros
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Representing Psychiatric Disability

M 12-1

In this seminar we will view films and read works of fiction that deal with various issues related to psychiatric disability (including questions of the social construction of mental illness, diagnosis, treatment, accommodation, ADA court cases, and t...(read more) Susan Schweik and Aaron Cohen

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Pleasure, Politics, and Public Fantasy in Bollywood Cinema

M 4-5

"Every day, over twelve million people go to the movies in India. Seated on planks of wood and on the floor, in air-conditioned movie palaces and open maidans, the world's most avid cinema-goer watches the hundreds of films that roll out of the world'...(read more) Joshi, Priya

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 2-3

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

31AC/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Literature of American Cultures: Exceptional Bodies --Disability, Race, Ethnicity and Medicine in American Cultures

TTh 12:30-2

"This course will analyze the categories of 'disability,' 'race' and 'ethnicity' critically. Much work on that ambiguous umbrella term 'disability' treats disabled people as ungendered (that is, male), unraced (that is, white), without nationality (th...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

43B/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

MW 1:30-3

"In this workshop, we will analyze and experiment with archaic through current modes of writing in verse. We will develop and discuss a substantial number of poems over the course of the semester: approximately one a week. On the premise that creative...(read more) Scappettone, Jennifer

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

Lectures MW 12-1 in 3 LeConte, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 12-1)

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will dominate the semester, as objects of study in themselves, of course, but also as occasions f...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

This course will consider four long poems: Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queen and Paradise Lost. Twice weekly lectures will focus on reading the texts, with some attention paid to questions of literary and linguistic history. ...(read more) Howe, Nicholas

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

MW 10-11, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 10-11)

An introduction to literature in English from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries, including works by Pope, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Emily Bronte, Hawthorne, Dickens, Browning, and Whitman. (It is strongly recommended that you ta...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

MW 3-4, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

I will lecture on the cataclysmic rise of bourgeois modernity as it registers in English and American literature during the period 1660-1860. I will emphasize the mixture of euphoria, wonder, deprivation, and anxiety that this transformation provokes,...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 , plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

We will survey a broad range of literature in English, paying careful attention to situate our texts in their world-historical and literary-historical contexts. A major preoccupation of the class will be to distinguish between different technologies a...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 , plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

"A survey of English and American literature from the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century, with attention given both to conceptions of literature intrinsically claimed by the texts assigned and to the historical and cultural grounds out ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Tradition and Dislocation

MWF 11-12

"The child,' William Wordsworth famously wrote, 'is father to the man,' a line that argues for the determinant power of an individual's past on his/her future. The modern world, however, has lost faith in this concept, leading to our so-called 'postmo...(read more) Stasi, Paul

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Grim Things That Must Be Told' -- The Graphic Novel in an Era of Human Rights

TTh 2-3:30

"It performs the essential magic trick of all good narrative art: the characters come to living, breathing life. The drawing's greatest virtue is its straightforward, blunt sincerity. Its conviction and honesty allow you to believe in the unbelievable...(read more) Hong, Christine

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture

M 2-5

Using neo-noir films, the short stories of Raymond Carver and cultural events, the course will analyze issues of representation, narration, and modernism. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

95/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Colonialism and Its Dissed Contents: An Introduction to Postcolonial Theory

MW 11-12:30

"This is a research intensive junior seminar in which we will explore the theories and fictions that have characterized the encounter between the European metropolis and its colonial peripheries during the very long nineteenth century that has somehow...(read more) Joshi, Priya

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Science Fiction

MW 12-2

Escapism' is effective when it is intricately and intensely related to the world from which the reader escapes, and we are therefore entitled to try to read back from the work to the longing it addresses, especially in the case of works such as these,...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

MW 12-2

Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in 'regional' terms -- emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Irish Writing in English, 1900-45

MW 2-4

Irish writing in the period is almost invariably concerned with Irish national independence, which was often justified by way of arguments for Irish difference or Irish originality. We will explore the idea of Irishness through the writing of those, i...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Men, Women and Texts

TTh 3:30-5

"The Junior Seminar is intended to introduce English majors to ""intensive study of critical and methodological problems in the study of literature."" Ever since Virginia Woolf's classic A Room of One's Own (1929) issues of gender have been central to...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson and Her Legacies

MW 4-5:30

"This course presents a study of Dickinson's poetry, with an eye to writers who inherited and re-interpreted her legacies in the twentieth century. Taking as our starting point the coincidence between the publication of 'serious' critical editions of ...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Black Experimental Writing

MW 4-5:30

African American literature arrived, at its inception, as the self-acknowledged antidote to a longstanding tradition that relegated black expression to the status of noise. Whether cast as the malapropism of the urban parvenu or the stuttering of the ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Jane Austen

TTh 9:30-11

We will read the complete works of Jane Austen, an author who thoughtfully wrote exactly one semester's worth of novels, stories, and letters. In class we will examine Austen's contributions to the novel as a form, including her revision of its style,...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Gender and Asian/Pacific America

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will explore how different Asian/Pacific American writers, over time, have mapped out the pitfalls and possibilities of both normative and transgressive gender roles for Asian/Pacific Americans. There are two main goals for this seme...(read more) Ray, Kasturi

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Modernism and the City

TTh 12:30-2

Skyscrapers and subways, crowds and solitary strollers, cacophony and kaleidoscope -- the modern city provoked, both urged onward and challenged, the makers of literary modernism. We will investigate how a handful of modernist writers of the 1920s and...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Victorian Prosody

TTh 3:30-5

The age of Victorian poetry was an age of great metrical experimentation and achievement. From Tennyson's renowned 'exquisite' versifying through Browning's innovative dramatic iambic pentameter to Hopkins' 'Sprung Rhythm' which so transformed the mod...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Women's Films of the 40's and 50's

MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings M 7-10 P.M. in 140 Barrows

We will examine women's films of the 40's and 50's from historical, structural, thematic, psychoanalytic and feminist perspectives. Issues of gender, race and the gaze as well as cinematic techniques and theories will be considered in our analyses, as...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

MW 3:30-5

Students interested in this newly added section should attend the class; the instructor will give out class entry codes to the students he admits to enable them to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. It is possible that some non-majors and students of ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

101/1

Upper Division Coursework:
History of the English Language

TTh 11-12:30

"This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle, and Early Modern periods, to its different forms in use throughout the world today. Topics include changes in the core grammatical systems ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

111/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Chaucer

TTh 9:30-11

"In this lecture course on Chaucer's major works, we will read some short poems and prose selections, including Hous of Fame, Troilus, and possibly Parlement of Foules, then turn to a selection of Canterbury Tales, emphasizing portions of this work no...(read more) Middleton, Anne
Middleton, Anne

112/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Middle English Literature

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu . ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Renaissance through the 16th Century

TTh 9:30-11

"This is a course on genres of English literature, excluding drama, as they developed over the course of the sixteenth century. In particular, we will attempt to understand how English authors created what in retrospect seems a quintessentially nation...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan

117B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will read all the plays conventionally attributed to the second half of Shakespeare's career, beginning with Hamlet and ending with The Tempest. This period includes all the so-called great tragedies (Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macb...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

117J/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

"I expect the course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey and also to have seminar-like intellectual crossfire. I will take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but I will not take them up systematically. I find that presen...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare, the Self and the Theater

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we'll be studying Shakespeare's richest work in the London theater from early in his career to his retirement from the stage. We'll also read many of his sonnets, which are often linked thematically to the plays and offer tantalizing gl...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

118/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Milton

TTh 2-3:30

"The later poet William Blake imagined Milton 'descending . . . clothed in black, severe and silent,' and too often that is the image that has descended upon us as well. This course will offer a very different poet and political figure. As we read Mil...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

120/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Age of Johnson

TTh 11-12:30

"A sampling of writings in English from the doom-filled last years of Pope to the stirrings of Revolution and abolitionism. Texts have been included from the Irish, Scots, African, and English diasporas, and from verse satire, drama, criticism, autobi...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

121/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Romantic Period

MWF 1-2

"In 1796, Samuel Taylor Coleridge published a poem in the Monthly Magazine with an odd subtitle: ""A Poem which affects not to be Poetry."" Literature since that time has been in conversation with the experimental poetry of Coleridge and of the Romant...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

127/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Modern Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

This course will be a survey of major British and American poetry between 1912 and 1950. We will rely on an anthology buttressed by a reader. Close-reading will be emphasized, along with the intellectual commitments that seem to be driving how poets e...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

130D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

This course will survey a range of significant works of American literature from the first half of the twentieth century. The course will emphasize the shifting economic, social, and political circumstances of the Gilded Age and the Great Depression. ...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

131/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

American Poetry is a lecture course that surveys the history of American poetry from its beginnings to the present. The course has different emphases in different years. This course will focus for the first third of the semester on Walt Whitman and Em...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

132/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Novel

TTh 2-3:30

"This will be a quick survey of eight major American novels and their authors, from Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter to Ellison's Invisible Man, paying some attention to the development of the novel as a form, from its origins in Europe through its Amer...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

133B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
African American Literature and Culture Since 1917: Voice/s of Autobiography

MWF 2-3

"This course attempts to read identity politics through the lens of autobiography that has become, to quote Roland Barthes ""an exchange, an interpenetration"" where ""the writers themselves practice criticism [and] their work articulates the conditio...(read more) Nanda, Aparajita

133T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in African American Literature and Culture

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this class, please email the professor at saidiyah@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya

135AC/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature of American Cultures: American Fictions of Self-Formation

TTh 12:30-2

We will read a variety of American novels, short stories and plays, exploring how specific biological, evolutionary, mythic, psychological and philosophical accounts of the human individual shape the author's vision of a self's formation in relation t...(read more) Wardley, Lynn

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: New York and Philadelphia

Lectures TTh 12:30-2 in 2040 Valley LSB, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of the literature and history of these two American cities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will read fiction, poetry, urban sketches, diaries, and autobiographies by writers such as Ben...(read more) Sam Otter and David Henkin

C136/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The War of 1898 and the Cultures of US Imperialism

MWF 10-11

"This survey course explores the narratives (memoirs, essays, novels, paintings, testimonies, letters) and history of the Cultures of United States Imperialism. We will start by considering the multiple meanings of US imperialism and anti-imperialism,...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

143A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

W 3-6

"A short fiction workshop open to students from any department. Students will write three short stories, 10-20 pages in length. Each week, students will also turn in one-page written critiques of student stories being workshopped as well as a 2-page j...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

143B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today -- aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-li...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

150/2

Senior Seminar:
The Contemporary Indian Novel in English

MW 12-2

Over the last twenty-five years Indian novelists writing in English have achieved extraordinary prominence in the global literary marketplace. Their success has coincided with a protracted and profound crisis of the Indian nation-state, which has mani...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

150/3

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 4-5:30

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Early Modern Women Writers

M 3-6

"Reading works written or dictated by women in England from the fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries, we will explore how exclusion from the priesthood prompted women to style themselves as religious authorities outside the pulpit, how the Engl...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Shakespearean and Postmodern Sensibilities

TTh 9:30-11

While 'Shakespeare' has been an important presence in western culture since the seventeenth century, that presence has never been self-identical. Shakespeare the man began turning himself into 'Shakespeare' in his own lifetime, as he revised his plays...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Maxine Hong Kingston and 'Postmodern

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine writings by this major figure of Asian American letters and consider the ways in which she has been taken up in the academy and by a wider public. Kingston's experimentation with different forms of writing will be used as a lens throug...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

150/7

Senior Seminar:
Reading New Orleans

TTh 9:30-11

The Big Easy, the City that Care Forgot, The Most Interesting City in the World, the Great Southern Babylon....what has New Orleans done to earn these sobriquets? In what ways has New Orleans been imagined by those who have lived or visited there? Wha...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

150/8

Senior Seminar:
William S. Burroughs and the Beat Generation

TTh 11-12:30

This class will examine the work of William S. Burroughs within the context of the Beat Generation, concentrating on the work of Burroughs' two closest friends and mutual influences, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. We will spend some time on the hist...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Charles Dickens

TTh 12:30-2

This course will trace the career of the nineteenth century's most exuberantly creative novelist. We will pay special attention to the idea of 'character' in the novels, to their innovative narrative techniques and to their role in creating the Victor...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain's most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he l...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Chaucer and the Traditions of Amatory Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar will examine Chaucer's varied use of traditions of verse about love and lovers, and the sentiments and values attached to amatory experience in relation to other discursive and ideational registers of fictive and philosophical writing, si...(read more) Middleton, Anne
Middleton, Anne

150/12

Senior Seminar:
The Poetry of Edmund Spenser

TTh 3:30-5

I am offering this course because I am frustrated by the constraints of 45A. I have always found reading Spenser's work to be not only an intellectually enlivening and emotionally enriching experience but also a delight, and I am convinced that readin...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

150/13

Senior Seminar:
Poe, and More

TTh 3:30-5

We will immerse ourselves in Edgar Allan Poe's career: poetry, tales, comic satires and grotesques, essays, and reviews. We will discuss issues of aesthetics, style, genre, humor, politics, authorship, gender, sexuality, and race. We will consider Poe...(read more) Otter, Sam

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 11-12:30

The semester will be devoted to an intensive and extensive reading of Virginia Woolf's literary career, focusing on her fiction but also taking into account her essays, diaries, and letters. We will trace the evolution of Woolf's narrative strategies ...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir and Neo-Noir

Seminars TTh 5:30-7 P.M. in 210 Wheeler, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. in 210 Wheeler

We will analyze the cinematic texts and social/theoretical contexts of a variety of post-WWII film noirs, using a range of critical approaches, focusing on spectatorship, the femme fatale, the noir hero and techniques of narration. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

161/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 3:30-5

"Origins of Literary Theory. Before there was ""literary theory,"" there was ""aesthetics""; and before that, there was ""rhetoric."" This course is designed to serve as a kind of prequel to the story of modern literary theory: during the first two th...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher

165/1

Special Topics:
Hollywood Film of the 1930s

MW 2-4

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in 1930s Hollywood. ...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

165/2

Special Topics:
Fictions of Los Angeles

MW 4-5:30

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World"" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rains...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

166/1

Special Topics:
In Flanders Field--The Great War in European Literature

TTh 3:30-5

This course is first of all devoted to the very different ways in which the First World War is represented in European literature. British poets like Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg, Brooke, and Graves are internationally known for their work--they are The W...(read more) Buelens, Geert

166/2

Special Topics:
Hitchcock and His Artistic Children

MW 11-12:30 in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Mondays 5-8 P.M. in 300 Wheeler

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards. As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling. But thanks to the French reception of his work in the 1950s, Hi...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Racial Modernity

TTh 12:30-2

It is by now something of a truism that the reason why there is no socialism in the United States is because in this country race matters more than class. Nevertheless, this course will take up as its challenge a serious revisitation of this question....(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Fantasy Film and Realms of Enchantment

TTh 11-12:30 in 22 Warren, plus film screenings Tues. 5-8 P.M. in 2040 Valley LSB

"Fantasy is an unusually elastic cinematic category that encompasses horror films, animation, science fiction, Arabian Nights adventures, fairy tales, religious epics, and even musicals. Its roots are labyrinthine and very old; we will try to fashion ...(read more) Merritt, Russell

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Representations of Disability in Literature

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction, autobiography and drama. We will also screen some film versions of these texts. Writing assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays and a take-home fi...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

180A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Auto/bio/graphy

TTh 11-12:30

In 1909 William Dean Howells called autobiography, 'the most democratic province in the republic of letters.' Acknowledging autobiography as a 'characteristically American mode of storytelling,' contemporary scholars tend to celebrate the liberatory p...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Sweet Wong, Hertha

180L/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Lyric Verse

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will try for answers to the following questions (and questions like them). What is the essential thing about verse that causes us to distinguish it from prose? What value has verse that makes it any more worth readers' time than a paraphr...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

H195A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by S. Goldsmith in Fall 2004. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Goldsmith will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

H195A/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MW 12-2

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by C. Porter in Fall 2004. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Porter will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

H195A/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Honors Course

MW 2-3:30

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by D.A. Miller in Fall 2004. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Miller will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

MW 12-1:30

Dissertation prospectus writing workshop ...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Coercion and Resistance in 20th-Century African American Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

"Lying precisely at the intersection of hegemonic and violent forms of coercion as well as at the intersection of absolute power and absolute powerlessness, the threat of death (lynching, etc.) is arguably the most fundamental mode of coercion. The de...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Transnational Feminisms

MW 1:30-3

This course will trace the emergence and vicissitudes of feminist theory, struggle, and literature in moments of national crisis--particularly decolonization and globalization. The focus of our work will be conversations and contestations among femini...(read more) Ray, Kasturi

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Literature and the American Ugly Laws, 1881-1991

223 Wheeler

"""It is hereby prohibited for any person, who is diseased, maimed, mutilated or deformed in any way, so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object, to expose himself to public view."" Between 1881 and the First World War, cities around the U.S. passe...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Contemporary Long Poem

TTh 3:30-5

"It is often said that the fragmentation and disjuncture characteristic of postmodern poetry is a reflection (or symptom) of contemporary life--a speedy life of multiple distractions, constant interruptions, unconnected events. How then do we account ...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

211/1

Graduate Course:
Chaucer

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on Chaucer´┐Żs poetry, excluding the Canterbury Tales, and on its sources and intertexts. We will also be exploring the various critical approaches to Chaucer that have emerged in the last thirty years or so. Students will be resp...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

243A/1

Graduate Course:
Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 11-12:30

This is a graduate level workshop course in writing fiction, intended for students who have already achieved the basic skills of characterization, plotting, etc. Qualified undergrad-uates will be eligible. This course has no prerequisites, but I'll ex...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Renaissance

TTh 5-6:30

"Aside from Bacon's essays and, perhaps, Pilgrim's Progress, the course will concentrate on verse (because verse is what the seventeenth century did best and because I'm not worth listening to about seventeenth-century prose). We will read as much as ...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

"In his 1987 ""Bicentennial Speech"" Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that ""[w]hile the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not""; the latter, he added, had been superceded by...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the Novel Form

M 3-6

"This course will examine the modernist novel and short story (or fiction in general) as perhaps the modernist genres par excellence. We will look at alternative views of ""modern fiction"" (to use Virginia Woolf's term) in its relation to nineteenth-...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Blake

M 3-6

" For in this Period the Poets Work is Done: and all the Great Events of Time start forth & are conceived in such a Period-- Within a Moment: a Pulsation of the Artery.What does Blake mean by ""the Poets Work,"" achieved ""Within a Moment"" tha...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

250/3

Research Seminar:
Race as Method--Or, What Is Ethnic Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will be concerned with the implications of recent research in racialization theory --in particular, historical/materialist approaches to conceptualizing race, racism, and racialization-- for how we might go about reconceptualizing what is ...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

250/4

Research Seminar:
Tragic Realism--Tragedy and Revolution in Postcolonial Narrative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore tragedy as a key site for coming to terms with the consequences of revolutionary politics in modernity. We'll focus in particular on the renewed interest in tragic modes among postcolonial literary practitioners and theorists,...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

310/1

Graduate Course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff