Announcement of Classes: Fall 2004

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
An Exploration of Harm

MWF 9-10

"This course will take a brief look at what it is to be a woman in American culture. We will pair readings in psychoanalysis and philosophy with the texts listed above to flesh out the questions they raise about our society: Why are these girls' comin...(read more) Erin Khue Ninh

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Exile and Literature

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will examine the theme of exile in 20th century literature in English. Exile has become a subject of much interest, even considered by some critics to be the norm of contemporary existence. Yet its definitions vary widely, and one o...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Criminality and the Criminal Mind

MWF 12-1

"Once I falsely hoped to meet with beings who?would love me for the excellent qualities I was capable of unfolding. I was nourished with high thoughts of honor and devotion. But now crime has degraded me beneath the meanest animal?was there no injusti...(read more) Padma Rangarajan

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare's Problem Plays and Romances

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will read seven of Shakespeare's later plays, three of them often called the problem plays and four usually lumped together as the romances.Together, these constitute some of Shakespeare's most difficult, painful, and uncategorizabl...(read more) drienne Williams Boyarin

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

MWF 3-4

"Using texts that explore the exercise of unusual power by unusual characters, this course examines the entangled interfaces linking human and almost-human, individual and community, and identity and responsibility. Who determines what is ""human"" or...(read more) Sharon Goetz

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
"""On the Road"""

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course we will study what it means to be ""on the road"" in classic American literature (and one European novella.) We will read about the roadtrips of impulsive boys, American expatriates in Europe, European emigres in America, and Beat Gene...(read more) Els Andersen

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Seducer's Plots

TTh 8-9:30

"While it's unlikely that anyone has ever emerged from reading a particularly absorbing poem to find his or her shirt unbuttoned, we still find it helpful to use the metaphor of seduction to talk about a certain power that literature can have over us....(read more) Nicholas Nace

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Gossip

T/Th 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m.

This course will train you to write grammatical, concise, stylistically sophisticated, and convincing expository and analytic prose. We will develop your ability to close-read a text, develop a thesis, and marshal and analyze evidence in logically coh...(read more) Travis Williams

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Romantic Comedy: Misrecognition

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will investigate a certain strain of romantic comedy predicated on the hero?s (or heroine?s) inability to recognize his (or her) ideal partner. In addition to considering the history of romantic comedy more broadly, we?ll study how these ...(read more) Leslie Walton

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
Sympathy and The Social Contract

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-2:00

In this course, we will be using a wide variety of pre-Romantic, Romantic, Victorian and contemporary texts in order to examine the changing function of rhetorical strategies across disciplines and across centuries. In particular, we will be asking qu...(read more) D. Rae Greiner

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
TBA

Tu/Th 2-3:30

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Snehal Shingavi

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Love Stories

TTh 3:30-5

"This course fulfills the first portion of the undergraduate reading and composition requirement, and as such, it aims to strengthen students´┐Ż basic writing skills and teach them how to write increasingly complex expository and argumentative essays. T...(read more) Vlasta Vranje

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance

T Th 3:30 - 5:00

"In this course we will think about the relationship between the ""aesthetic"" and the ""political"" by reading works from two literary formations of the 1920s and 30s that are often taken to embody the two sides of this divide -- modernism, read most...(read more) Paul Stasi

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Melodrama and Morality

MWF 10-11

"Melodrama is often seen as an old-fashioned or simplistic genre, because it appeals to emotions rather than reason and dramatizes the battle between good and evil. But these characteristics also make melodrama a popular way of dealing with complex pr...(read more) Misa Oyama

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Realisms and Aesthetic Experience

MWF 1-2

"In this course we will experiment with reading against traditional notions of ?realism? in order both to grasp the central concerns of realist literature composed over the turn of the 20th century and to broaden our analytical horizons. This will mea...(read more) Jennifer Scappettone

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Katie Simon

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Evolution & Fiction: Generic, Social and Personal Adaptation

MWF 3-4

"In this course, we will engage with the concept of ""adaptation"" as it relates to literary genre, social change, Darwin's theory of evolution, and your own approach to writing. You will learn how to be an observant reader, as well as how to be an ""...(read more) Jhoanna Infante

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Wisdom Literature

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course we will read a variety of works that have been?or might be?construed as offering ?wisdom? to their readers. We will examine sacred texts from several religious traditions, classical forms of wisdom writing (fables, aphorisms, dialogues...(read more) Mark Allison

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing Communities and Reading Constituencies: Filipino American Literature

TTH 8-9:30

"This course examines selected texts in Filipino literature in English, with emphasis on how writing communities and reading constituencies are developed through media (newspapers, magazines, film) for a minority literature. We focus on how Filipinos ...(read more) Jean Gier

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Detective Fiction

T/Th, 9:30-11:00 a.m.

"Whodunnit? Who cares? This course about detective fiction will pose more complex questions: What is the relationship between the detected and detective? Between detection and desire? Between criminal and police? What constitutes moral culpability? Ho...(read more) Peter Goodwin

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Out of the One, Many: Ethnicity in American Literature Before Ethnic Literature

TuTh 11-12:30

"1953 marked the first appearance of the word ?ethnicity?; three years later, the U.S. officially abandoned e pluribus unum as its national motto. These minor events were mirrored by a larger scholarly recognition that the history of American society ...(read more) L. von Morze

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Truth, Lie, and Narration in the Novel and Film

T/Th, 12:30 ? 2:00

"This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth, and applying those debates to works of literature. We will spend the first few weeks familiarizing ...(read more) Chris Eagle

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Canonical and African-American Modernism

TTH 3:30-5

In this class we will explore some of the unique challenges posed by modernist literature. Then we will explore the relationship between canonical modernism and African-American literature of the first half of the twentieth century. Further, we will t...(read more) Charles Sumner

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
The Postmodern and Beyond

TT 3:30-5

"This course is designed to introduce the complex problem of the postmodern. Despite the frequent deployment of this term, its definition remains vague, ranging from the fuzzy to the completely opaque. The central questions driving the course will rev...(read more) Franklin Melendez
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
(topic unknown)

Tues. 3:30-5:30

List and Course Description: For more information on this course, please email the professor at gpadilla@berkeley.edu...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience

W 2-4

"In recent years the study of William Blake has come to concentrate more and more upon what has been called his composite art--the union of text and image that characterized Blake's work in illuminated printing. In this seminar we'll study the interac...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
British and American Poetry of the 19th Century

W 4-5

In this seminar, we will consider what nineteenth-century British and American poets have to say (issues of self, desire, pleasure, memory, freedom, faith, beauty, nature, and nation, among others) and how they say these things (features of line, synt...(read more) Otter, Sam

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Joyce's Dubliners in Joyce's Dubliners

Mon. 3-5

James Joyce?s Dubliners (1914) is a collection of short stories about his native city. Joyce helps invent the modern short story as he tries to evoke the mood or spirit of Dublin as it manifests itself in the behavior of the Dublin men and women. When...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

43A/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

MW 9:30-11

In this course the elements of fiction will be practiced and discussed. Students will be expected to complete at least two short stories during the semester. This work will be edited and criticized by the instructor and the class. The class will also ...(read more) Reed, Ishmael S.
Reed, Ishmael

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 1-2 in 2 LeConte, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 1-2)

This course is an introduction to major works by Chaucer, Spenser, and Milton, with supplements from the Norton Anthology. In each case, I will ask you to consider both the strangeness and the odd familiarity of these works, so far away from us in tim...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 3-4 in 160 Kroeber, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 3-4)

An introduction to English literary history from the late fourteenth to the late seventeenth centuries, with an emphasis on epic and epic romance. The Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost will be our main texts, but we will also look...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

MW 10-11 in 141 McCone, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 10-11)

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and American literature from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state, with the political incorporation of Scotland and Ireland; the massive expansion of...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Century

"Our course begins at sea, with the ""violent storm"" and shipwreck of Gulliver?s Travels, and ends at sea in Benito Cereno, with a tragic convergence of Europe, America, and Africa, just off ""a small, desert, uninhabited island toward the southern e...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 in 120 Latimer, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 11-12)

"This course is an introduction to modernism, the period in literary history that Perry Anderson has called a ""portmanteau concept,"" and that we might likewise today frustratedly conclude was a suitcase of largely failed aesthetic and political impu...(read more) Joshi, Priya

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 2-3 in 2060 Valley LSB, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections F 2-3)

This course is primarily an introduction to literary modernism in early- through mid-twentieth-century Britain, America, and Ireland. We will be asking what constitutes the modern in a range of now canonical texts that broke with narrative, rhetorical...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 in 105 North Gate, plus 1? hours of discussion section per week (sec. 101: Tues. 2-3:30; sec. 102: Thurs. 11-12:30; sec. 103: Tues. 3:30-5; sec 104: Thurs. 2-3:30; sec. 105: Thurs. 8-9:30; sec. 106: Thurs. 9:30-11)

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Contemporary Native American Short Fiction and Poetry

M 12-1

"We will focus on the short fiction and poetry of a select number of contemporary Native North American writers (from within the U.S., not Canada). Key concerns will be on how writers map themes central to contemporary Native American literatures: cer...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Sweet Wong, Hertha
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
"Fabricating ""Englishness"""

MW 1:30-3

"This is a research intensive junior seminar that explores some of the compulsions and contradictions inherent in the fabrication of a national culture. We will begin by posing two questions: who are the ""English"" who have named our language, this d...(read more) Joshi, Priya

100/2

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Women Writers--Women and Style

MW 10-12

"This course will focus specifically on women and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves-in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists, how they encode textual se...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

100/3

Junior Seminar:
American Objectivist Poets, 1928-1980

MW 12-2

"With strong literary affiliations to Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams (and with political commitments thoroughly antithetical to those of Pound), the Objectivist Poets emerged as a group in a 1931 issue of Poetry magazine, guest edited by the g...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Song Cycles and Poetic Sequences from Shakespeare to Bishop

TTh 9:30-11

"This seminar focuses on the protean form of the poetic sequence in a broad range of poets mostly writing in English. It is NOT a survey course in literary history and makes no pretense to canonical coverage. It IS a chance to read some great poetry w...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

TTh 9:30-11

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, a...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Workers and the Law in Chicana/o Novels

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will examine representations of working class characters and their encounters with the law in nine Chicana/o novels. All of these novels tell stories of workers who challenge the law in one form or another. Six of the novels were written ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

100/10

Junior Seminar:
The Novel and its Theory/Theory and its Novels

TTh 2-3:30

"The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bahkti...(read more) Miller, D. A.

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ""regional"" terms--emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/13

Junior Seminar:
The Author in the Text

TTh 3:30-5

"Reading across a wide historical and generic range, we will explore how literary works conceive of their creators. Whether presented as a literal ""expression""-a symptom of melancholia, lovesickness, or religious ecstasy-as an extension of the autho...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Three Nineteenth-Century British Novels

TTh 5-6:30

"Big nineteenth-century novels are noted for sprawling. The novels of Charles Dickens are particularly noted for sprawling. I want this course to show you that genuine sprawl can and often does coexist with organizations of wholes and parts as precise...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

MW 5:30-7 P.M. in (note new room) 203 Wheeler, plus film screenings M 7-10 P.M. in 203 Wheeler

We will examine film melodramas from some early silent examples to 50?s & 60?s Hollywood classic realist/narratives. Melodrama has affiliations to a range of genres and invites interpretations from neo-Marxist, psychoanalytic and feminist critique...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

102/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in the English Language

TTh 3:30-5

This course will focus on the structure of English. There will be a dual emphasis on a rich array of constructions and on the grammatical theories proposed to account for them. While the primary focus is on the grammar of spoken English, some attentio...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

115B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Renaissance: Literature of the 17th Century

TTh 2-3:30

"Although I am putting a history book on the recommended list, this will be a course on works written in the first three quarters of the seventeenth century, not a course on the century itself.I think I can teach you more about the seventeenth-century...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen

117A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

"We'll read six plays from the chronological first half of Shakespeare?s output, considered loosely to allow us to end with a reading of Hamlet. We?ll include some of the sonnets as well, which were written and re-written in this period. Our approach ...(read more) Koory, Mary Ann

117S/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Shakespeare: Selected Plays

TTh 11-12:30

This course is designed to give you a sense of the range of Shakespeare?s career. Lectures will focus on two related topics: first, how Shakespeare uses plot and character to think about literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophica...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

118/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Milton

MWF 1-2

This course offers an introduction to the poetry and prose of one of the greatest writers and political radicals in English literature. We will learn to read Milton?s work closely, with attention to all of its rhetorical complexity. We will also study...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria

119/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Augustan Age

TTh 3:30-5

"The period from the ""Restoration"" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the most influent...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

125B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

TTh 11-12:30

This course will consider the British novel between Late Victorianism and Modernism. The reading list will include some of the above. ...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian literatures, this course traces the development of the novel as a genre in 19th-century Europe. Our discussions will emphasize strategies of close reading and literary analysis and elements of th...(read more) Paperno, Irene

130A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

"This course will offer a survey of the literature produced in North America before 1800: European accounts of ""discovery"" and exploration; competing Puritan versions of settlement; conversion, captivity, and slave narratives; diaries and journals; ...(read more) Otter, Sam

130C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
American Literature: 1865-1900

MW 4-5:30

A survey in United States literature from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the twentieth century. The course pays special attention to matters of violence, urban life, and social reform as they were refracted within an increasingly stratif...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

135AC/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature of American Cultures: Visibility and Invisibility in 20th-Century American Narrative Literature

MWF 12-1

"This course will examine images, metaphors and strategies of visibility and invisibility in narrative literature produced by members of three American cultures--African American, Asian American and European American--taking note of the differences an...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

TTh 12:30-2

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a transitional period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late 19th-century and t...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

C136/2

Topics in American Studies:
The American 1920's

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on American literature and culture in the 1920?s. We will address the main features of this extraordinary decade through novels, memoirs, films, and cultural histories. We will devote substantial time to Americans in Paris, incl...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Borderlands of Chicano/a Literature

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the invention of a Chicano and Chicana sense of place, and with the sense of freedom and dystopia associated with ethno-racial structures of feeling tied to a geoculture and region. How do imaginative writers such as Am?rico P...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose

143A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Short Fiction

MW 2:30-4

This is an advanced workshop course in writing fiction, intended for students who are already pretty experienced with the basic skills of characterization, plotting, etc. This course has no prerequisites, but a knowledge of the critical vocabulary we ...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

143B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

MW 10-12

"In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today--aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lin...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

TTh 5-6:30

This workshop is for those who love to read and write poetry and who wish to continue the serious study and practice of poetics. Although much of our time will be spent discussing student poems, we'll also analyze poetry and essays on poetics from two...(read more) Fulton, Alice

143B/3

Upper Division Coursework:
Verse

Thurs. 3:30-6:30 P.M.

The purpose of this class will be to produce a mobile, surprising, unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing poems will be a part of this task, but only a part. There will also be a modest amount of critical writing, short written commenta...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

143N/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Prose Nonfiction

TTh 3:30-5

"This class will concentrate on the art and craft of the personal essay. Students will complete three short writing assignments and two new essays. We will discuss the essays in the assigned anthology as well as students? work.To be considered for adm...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

"This is a workshop for the translation of poetry. Translators are expected to share their work and to participate in the criticism of the work of others. Discussion will range from the larger problems of the possibility of translation to the particul...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

150/2

Senior Seminar:
14th-Century Alliterative Traditions

MW 10-12

"This seminar will read a substantial selection of the best alliterative poetry of the later 14C in England. These works represent an intensive cultivation, during a few decades, of a metrical preference with much deeper roots in earlier English verse...(read more) Middleton, Anne
Middleton, Anne

150/3

Senior Seminar

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.