Announcement of Classes: Summer 2012


Shakespeare

English N117S

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Time: MW 10-12
Location: 110 Barrows


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Complete Works of Shakespeare

Description

This course is an introductory survey at the upper-division level. We will attempt to read eight Shakespeare plays plus a selection of sonnets. As California Shakespeare Theater (“Cal Shakes”) in near-by Orinda will be performing The Tempest during the first week of classes, we will start with this play. The instructor will reserve tickets for two different performances. If you wish to attend, please set aside approximately $20 for a student ticket, plus BART fare. We will also read A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Henry IV Part 1, Twelfth Night, Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, and King Lear. Lectures will emphasize language, scene, gesture, character, verse, and narrative structure, along with the theatrical and publication history of Shakespeare’s plays and poems. Students will submit three short essays. Exams will include short quizzes, and a comprehensive final on the last day of the course.

The instructor maintains a website at the URL below (click on “CLASSES”). Since time will be of the essence for obtaining tickets for The Tempest, please go to this website IMMEDIATELY if you intend to take the class.

http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~ahnelson/index.html

Note that this class satisfies the Shakespeare requirement for the English major.

This course will be taught in Session C, from June 18 to August 8.


The Romantic Period

English N121

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: MTuTh 12-2
Location: 126 Barrows


Book List

Recommended: Coleridge, S.T.: The Major Works; Wordsworth, William: The Major Works; Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads

Description

We'll spend six weeks reading the poetry and prose of the Romantic Period.  Although we'll read a number of different figures, we will focus on the careers of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.  

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 2 to August 9.


American Literature: Before 1800

English N130A

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: MTuTh 4-6
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. A: Beginnings to 1820 (seventh edition); Brown, Charles Brockden: Wieland; Rowson, Susanna: Charlotte Temple

Description

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800.  We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of discovery and exploration through the literature of the American Revolution and the formations of an early national culture.  Topics to be discussed include: the role of Puritanism in American society, ethnic difference and the experience of the frontier, evangelism and secularism, the social makings of the new republic, the rise of the novel in America, and the literary place of women and slaves.  Readings will also address the language of rights and representation within a revolutionary culture that staged encounters between the will to independence and the respect for history.  Authors will include William Bradford, John Winthop, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Samuel Sewell, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Olaudah Equiano, Royall Tyler, Susanna Rowson, Hannah Foster, and Charles Brockden Brown.

Note that English N130A satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 2 to August 9.

 


American Literature 1900-1945

English N130D

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: MTuTh 10-12
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Cather, Willa: The Professor's House; Dreiser, Theodore: Sister Carrie; Eliot, T. S. : The Waste Land and Other Writings; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Hemingway, Ernest: The Sun Also Rises; Johnson, James Weldon: The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; West, Nathanel: Miss Lonelyhearts and Day of the Locusts; Wharton, Edith: Age of Innocence

Description

A survey of American literature tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century.  We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the particular influence of modernism and other experimental modes on writing of period, while also exploring the significance that realism and naturalism continued to hold for many U. S. authors.  We will be specifically concerned with how writers addressed such topics as national identity and racial difference; new psychologies of consciousness, emotion, and sexuality; high modernism and popular culture; class and cosmopolitanism; and the literary response to new mediums of information and entertainment.

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 2 to August 9.

 


American Novel

English N132

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-4
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter; Hurston, Zoara Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Islas, Arturo: The Rain God; Robinson, Marilynne: Housekeeping; Twain, Mark: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Description

We will concentrate on the central issues deeded to the American novel by democratic ideology -- refusal and autonomy, loyalty, guilt, and atonement, futurity and the burden of the past -- and try to figure out how the formal innovations in the American novel are responses to those issues.

Two six-page essays, a final quiz, and regular attendance will be required.

This course will be taught in Session C, from June 19 to August 9.

 


Literature of American Cultures: Repression and Resistance

English N135

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: MTuTh 12-2
Location: 180 Tan


Book List

Allison, Dorothy: Bastard Out of Carolina; Jones, Gayl : Corregidora; Ozick, Cynthia: The Shawl; Ruiz, Ronald: Happy Birthday Jesus; Viramontes, Helena Maria: Under the Feet of Jesus; Wideman, John Edgar: Philadelphia Fire

Description

In this course we will analyze representations of repression and resistance in the fiction of three cultural groups: Chicanos/Chicanas, African Americans, and European Americans.  We will examine various forms of repression--social, physical, and psychological--represented in these texts, and we will study the various ways these works resist repression.  (Please be forewarned: some of these works include graphic and disturbing representations of violence.)  Several questions inform the course theme:  What are the causes of repression?  What solutions, if any, do these works offer in response to the forms of repression they represent?  What is the relation, if any, between the negative effects of repression and the formation of a positive conception of cultural identity?  From a literary perspective:  What are the formal aspects of a literature of repression and resistance?  The comparative approach in this course will allow us to analyze the similarities and differences in the literatures of these three cultural groups. It will also provide us with a critical appreciation of the social significance and aesthetic quality of the literature. 

Note that this class satisfies UC Berkeley’s American Cultures requirement.

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 21 to June 28.

 

 

 


Modes of Writing

English N141

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: MTuTh 2-4
Location: 219 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader available at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of writing short fiction. Students will learn to talk critically about short stories and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write both longer and shorter pieces and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 2 to August 9.


Special Topics: Graphic Novels

English N166

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: MTuTh 10-12
Location: 219 Dwinelle


Book List

Barry, Lynda: One! Hundred! Demons!; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Sacco, Joe: Palestine; Spiegelman, Art: Maus, Volume 1; Spiegelman, Art: Maus, Volume II; Tomine, Adrian: Shortcomings; Yang, Gene: American Born Chinese

Description

Graphic novel is often defined as: “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes.” Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term as a pretentious and disingenuous attempt to rebrand comics in order to elevate their cultural status. We’ll examine the definitions, history, and various forms of graphic narratives in the U.S.

Students will be expected to attend and participate in class regularly, keep up with the reading, do some in-class writing, write two 6-page papers, and complete a final exam.

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 21 to June 28. 


Special Topics

English N166

Section: 2
Session:
Instructor: Loewinsohn, Ron
Time: TTh 4-6
Location: 220 Wheeler


Book List

Burroughs, William: Junky; Burroughs, William: Naked Lunch; Ginsberg, Allen: Howl; Ginsberg, Allen: Kaddish; Kerouac, Jack: On The Road; Snyder, Gary: No Nature

Description

We will examine mostly the early work of the four central figures of the Beat Geneartion--- William S Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg,. Jack Kerouac and Gary Snyder.  We will look at the hisrtorical and literary-historical context in which they worked to appreciate those features of American literature that they continued, as well as those they reblled against. 

This course will be taught in Session C, from June 19 to August 9.


The Language and Literature of Films: The Film Western

English N173

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: M 2-5 & W 2-4
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Cooper, James Fenimore: The Pioneers; Grey, Zane: Riders of the Purple Sage; L'Amour, Louis: Hondo; McCarthy, Cormac: Blood Meridian

Description

An exploration of the durability and the versatility of this literary genre. We will watch a film each week, and read four novels.

Two six-page essays, a final quiz, and regular attendance will be required.

This course will be taught in Session C, from June 18 to August 8.

 


The Short Story

English N180H

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: MTuTh 2-4
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Bausch, Richard, Ed. et al: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter Edition, Ed. 7; Erdrich, Louise: Love Medicine, Newly Revised Edition (P.S. Series)

Other Readings and Media

Reader

Description

After considering theories about the origin, development, and form(s) of the short story, we will read a wide and diverse selection of short fiction in the United States, paying particular attention to close readings as well as to the functions of story-telling/making and consuming for individual readers and their communities. We’ll begin with indigenous stories in an oral storytelling mode, move to a contemporary short story cycle influenced by Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) oral narratives as well as by Western literary traditions, then read several nineteenth-century short stories as precursors to our focus on twentieth-century and contemporary short fiction.

Students should expect to read, participate in class discussion and activities, take weekly quizzes, write two 5-page critical essays and one short story with analysis.

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 21 to June 28. 


Science Fiction: New Currents in Science Fiction

English N180Z

Section: 1
Session:
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MTuTh 10-12
Location: 126 Barrows


Book List

Capek, Karol: R.U.R.; Dick, Phillip K. : Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep?; Hoffmann , E.T.A : The Tales of Hoffman; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never let Me Go ; Mieville, China: Embassytown; Wells, H.G. : The Island of Doctor Moreau; Whitehead , Colson : Zone One

Other Readings and Media

Gattica; The Matrix; Pumzi

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature’s encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation stand the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of ‘being’, a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. 

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 21 to June 28.