Announcement of Classes: Fall 2012

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Snobbery

MWF 9-10

We know a snob when we see one, though snobbery itself is curiously hard to define. Is it a process of making aesthetic distinctions or social ones? Or both? How do the choices we make every day – reading the right books, riding the right bik...(read more)

Ling, Jessica

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Love Songs

MWF 10-11

This course takes as its object of study works of art that concern themselves with the nature of  “love.”  Arguably the most popular and ubiquitous of aesthetic productions, what we will broadly be calling Love Songs are now ...(read more)

Perry, R. D.

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
The Miniature

MWF 10-11

First and foremost, this course will be about writing.  A propos of the seminar’s theme, we will work on and revise mostly small pieces, while reading and thinking about miniatures of a...(read more)

Ty, Michelle

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Music and Modernism

MWF 11-12

“Poets who will not study music are defective.” So wrote Ezra Pound in 1917, as World War I raged in Europe and literary modernism gained momentum both alongside, and in response. Pound may have been among the bluntest of his contempor...(read more)

Le, Serena

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
What Have I Done ?

MWF 12-1

This course will examine the problematic interactions between experience, action, and knowledge. Focusing primarily on the second half of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century, we will read mostly narrative l...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
(Re)presenting the Past

MWF 12-1

This course will ask a variety of questions about the interaction of the past and the present in literature, beginning with one that may (at first) seem simple:  What exactly do we mean by “the past”?  This question, as we wi...(read more)

Dumont, Alex

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Imagining America, Imagining a New World

MWF 1-2

What do we imagine when we imagine America? Is America a place? A set of ideals? Both? For the writers we’ll look at, America was a “new world” – one that represented not only a new and uncharted space on the map but a spac...(read more)

Mansouri, Leila

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Perception and Revolution

MWF 2-3

"But these enchantments were a little disenchanted as his eye fell on the corroded main-chains."                                         ...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Eros and Its Discontents

MWF 2-3

This class will have two aims: to develop transferrable writing skills so that students will be well equipped to approach the variety of essay forms they will encounter throughout their college careers, an...(read more)

Lee, Richard Z

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Things Are Not Okay

MWF 3-4

 

This course will concentrate on American works written in the decades following the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.  We will be focusing on the work of authors who express unease, pessimism and even anger about the newly crea...(read more)

Junkerman, Nicholas

R1A/11

Reading & Composition:
Inhumanity

MWF 1-2

“Nature is acquainted with no forms and no concepts, and likewise with no species, but only with an X that remains inaccessible and undefinable for us”

—Friedrich Nietzsche

Nineteenth- and ...(read more)

Tazudeen, Rasheed

R1A/12

Reading & Composition:
Everywhere is Nowhere: Urbanism and Place in Literature and Art

TTh 8-9:30

How do you describe the feel of a city?  What gives a place character?  What enables someone know where they are?  What do we do when we are lost?   
 
This course will pursue fundamental ...(read more)
Miller, Christopher Patrick

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
Nostalgia, Homesickness and Exile

MW 4-5:30

“History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake,” declares Stephen Dedalus in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, wishing to unburden himself from the baggages of the past that placed him where he is.

Yet m...(read more)

Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)

R1A/14

Reading & Composition:
The Essay: Evidence and Idea

MW 10:30-12

Our work in this class will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forward, sometimes ploddingly, point by point.  The essays we will write in this class ...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth

R1A/15

Reading & Composition:
Tanto melior: The Rhetoric of Superiority

TTh 12:30-2

“Tanto melior: ne ego quidem intellexi!” [So much better: even I couldn’t understand it!]

So goes the famous compliment than an ancient orator once gave to his student. In response to this example of rhetorical pr...(read more)

Saltzman, Benjamin A.

R1A/16

Reading & Composition:
Unreliable Narrators

TTh 2-3:30

What happens when the teller of a story misleads us? What qualities make for a palatable narrator that we as readers are willing to follow to the end of the book? In this course, we will read select twentieth-century novels that prompt us to exami...(read more)

Xiang, Sunny

R1A/17

Reading & Composition:
History and Form

TTh 3:30-5

The goal of this course is to explore the conventions, contexts, and uses of writing about the past.  We will investigate historical "writing" in a variety of media (oral recitation, chronicles, poetry, plays, novels, film, etc.) an...(read more)

Garcia, Marcos Albert

R1A/18

Reading & Composition:
Taste Matters

TTh 3:30-5

What do we mean when we say that someone has “good taste” or a “cultured palate”? What makes a joke “tasteless” or a film “disgusting”? The concept of taste plays a role in our daily activities (&ldq...(read more)

Taylor, Bradford Alden

R1A/19

Reading & Composition:
What is Enlightenment?

TTh 5-6:30

What constitutes cultural progress? How do we value the potential of a life and a mind? This course will explore some of the complicated legacies of the European Enlightenment. To begin, we will survey ways in which the Enlightenment remains both ...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah

R1A/20

Reading & Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

TTh 5-6:30

Every day, we’re called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear.  But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we’re unable to judge it at all?  In addition to be...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1A/21

Reading & Composition:
Educating the Creature

MWF 12-1

"Well, sir, after all, I cannot help feeling very unco...(read more)

Naturale, Lauren

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Ideas of the University

MWF 9-10

This seems like a good a time to try to figure out, maybe even articulate, what we are all doing here. We will read and write around the themes of education, work and leisure, trying to come to some understanding of what they mean and how they fun...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
On the Road

MWF 11-12

The six decades between Frederick Jackson Turner’s 1893 declaration of the end of the American Frontier and John F. Kennedy’s commitment to a “Ne...(read more)

Yoon, Irene

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Quarrels with Ourselves

MWF 1-2

“Out of our quarrels with others we make rhetoric. Out of our quarrels with ourselves we make poetry.” – W.B. Yeats

In this college writing course, we will study works of literature that record an author’s quarrels w...(read more)

Emerson, Maude

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
The Cold War and American Art

MWF 3-4

National security, the nuclear family, racial tensions, and rampant consumerism mark the early years of the Cold War in the United States.  In this course, we will examine the cultural influence of the Cold War context on American literature,...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Adventures of the Unheroic: A Hero’s Journey in Fourteenth-Century Poetry

MWF 3-4

Narrow escapes, displays of prowess, and confrontations that end in triumph tend to typify the heroic in popular culture, whether in action films or graphic novels.  Although some contributions to these genres may at times complicate this por...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
"The Play's the Thing": Literature as Make-Believe

TTh 8-9:30

Course Description: Make-believe has an astonishing ability to register itself as fantasy, diversion, duplicity, therapy, etc. This course will introduce students to methods of close reading, argumentati...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Revolution and Counter-Revolution in the Long 20th Century

TTh 8-9:30

In "Modernity and Revolution," Perry Anderson begins with a periodizing claim, arguing that “the haze of social revolu...(read more)

Richards, Jill

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Fictions of the Human

TTh 11-12:30

What constitutes our humanness? Are thinking and language-use uniquely human capacities or can intelligence be attributed to animals and machines? Is it possible to conceive of a timeless definition of the human being, or is human identity periodi...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Yes: Fragmentary Literature

TTh 3:30-5

The work of the critic is often thought of as constructing a “yes” out of a “no”: of making meaning out of textual problems.  In order to better align the critic with the writer, this class will work with 20th(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Writing and Controversy

TTh 3:30-5

How do we approach writing that seeks to alienate us?  How can we understand books whose characters refuse to understand each other?  How should we react when confronted with art so offensive that understanding seems unethical? 

...(read more)
Rodal, Jocelyn

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Belief

TTh 5-6:30

(read more)

Kolb, Margaret

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Labyrinths of Language

TTh 5-6:30

Words, when they are well-behaved, are supposed to do our bidding. We trust them to contain our thoughts and mediate our relationships with each another without asserting their own agency or being. But Western literature is full of stories in whic...(read more)

Moore, Stephanie Anne

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Hip-hop and American Culture

TTh 3:30-5

In a typical college class on hip-hop, you might expect to investigate the history and sociology of this complex cultural movement, beginning in the South Bronx with DJ Kool Herc and the transformation of household appliance into musical instrumen...(read more)

Lee, Seulghee
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's Maus I & II

W 3-5 (8/29-10/10 only)

This seminar will meet for seven weeks on the following dates: August 29, September 5, September 12, September 19, September 26, October 3, and October 10.

Art Spiegelman has been called "one of our era's foremost comics artists&qu...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Margaret Atwood’s Dystopian Fictions

Tues. 10-11

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3ACambria%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-ch...<a href="/courses/3631" target="_blank">(read more)</a>

Snyder, Katherine

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley and Beyond

W 2-3

In this seminar we will attend literary, art, and musical performances in and around Berkeley to introduce first-year students to the astonishing range of cultural production on the campus and in the Bay Area. We will visit the Berkeley Art Museum...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  S...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: the Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, Donne's lyrics, and Paradise Lost.(read more)

Landreth, David

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

An introduction to English literary history from the fourteenth through the seventeent...(read more)

Justice, Steven

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends at sea in (read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Swift, Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Melville, Dickinson, Wh...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will focus on texts that I think are indispensable for the study of modernism in English and in American literature.  It will be primarily lecture on Mondays and Wednesdays, although there will considerable efforts at discussion.&...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This survey course of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present will consider a variety of literary forms and movements in their historical and cultural contexts. We'll examine the literature of colonization and impe...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors woking in the field. The aim of the course is to give students t...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert & Sposito, Gary

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture, Low Culture: Postmodernism and the Films of the Coen Brothers

Thurs. 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some ficti...(read more)

Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Know Thyself

M 2-4

This simple, two-word admonition ("Know Thyself") carved over the entrance to the ancient temple at Delphi might be called the founding oracle of western humanism. The phrase itself is alive and well today, as a Google search will amply ...(read more)

Coolidge, John S.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

104/1

Introduction to Old English

TTh 12:30-2

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to r...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 5-6:30

This course offers a wide-ranging survey of sixteenth-century drama up to and beyond the building of the first commercial theaters in London in the 1570s. After sampling the medieval mystery and morality traditions, we will consider the formal and...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

115A/1

The English Renaissance (Through the 16th Century)

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

116/1

Backgrounds of English Literature in the Continental Renaissance

TTh 12:30-2

This course will survey some of the major prose writings of the continental Renaissance in their cultural and historical contexts. Various in genre, including political philosophy (Machiavelli), essays (Montaigne), and proto-novels (Rabelais and C...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

117A/1

Shakespeare

TTh 3:30-5

We will read as much as possible of the Complete Works, up to and including Hamlet (generally thought to have been written in 1600). In fact we will begin and end with that extraordinary play, exploring the individual elements that run th...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

117S/1

Shakespeare

NOTE NEW TIME: WF 4-5:30

This class is a general survey of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic works. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular" and "irregular." What is the rule, and what is the exception ...(read more)

Marno, David

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 2-3

In the years 1837 to 1901 British literary culture responded to and helped to shape a range of world-historic events, trends, and revolutions. During these years Darwin published his theory of natural selection and evolution, the industrial city w...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Novel Since 2000

TTh 12:30-2

We who study literature are perhaps always belated. This course aims to redefine at least one literary period: the “contemporary” novel, scholarship about which sometimes stretches as far back as novels written in the 1950s! I protest....(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

This survey will look at British and Irish literature written in the first half of the twentieth century, focusing on key works by major modernist figures. The course will explore the different aims and effects of modernist innovation and consider...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Flynn, Catherine

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 1-2

(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

TTh 2-3:30

In the wake of the Civil War, six crises preoccupy American fiction: nationality, cities, race, wealth and misery, technology and gender. In this course we will explore the ways in which these areas of urgent concern intersect one another. Two sev...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

131/1

American Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

132/1

The American Novel

MWF 1-2

This course traces the formal and thematic development of the American novel, focusing on innovations in the novel’s form as it engages with history, identity, race, class and gender.  A principle goal of this course is to increase your...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Repression and Resistance

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will analyze representations of repression and resistance in nine novels, three each from the following three cultural groups: Chicanos/Chicanas, African Americans, and Euro-Americans.  We will examine various forms of repre...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Literature of The Great War

MWF 2-3

In the years following World War One, European intellectuals debated the implications of the new balance of power and the terms of the peace among the combatant nations, but they were haunted by the prospect of the decline of the West itself. A fo...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

141/1

Modes of Writing

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.&nb...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 12-1:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop where students will submit and discuss their own short fiction.  We will also closely examine the work of published writers.  Students will complete 3 short writing assignments and appro...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

This workshop is designed to hone basic elements of fiction writing: grammar, diction, syntax, structure, plot, character, style, and so on. We will read a handful of short stories from a coursepack, David Mitchell&r...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

143B/1

Verse

MW 4-5:30

This seminar/workshop in the writing of poetry is intended for the exploration of contemporary solutions to long-standing, as well as recent, questions facing poets. Students in the class will undertake writing projects in relation to technical an...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

143B/2

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined p...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/3

Verse

TTh 2-3:30

A seminar in writing poetry. This will be a series of writer-on-writing facilitated sessions, providing opportunities for students writing, reading, and talking about a range of poetries, including their own work. There will be a strong, text-base...(read more)

Walsh, Catherine
Walsh, Catherine

165/1

Special Topics:
Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

TTh 9:30-11

Among other issues associated with the composition of poetry, this class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings...(read more)

Campion, John

165/2

Special Topics:
The Elizabethan Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5 + one hour of disc. sec. (sec. 201: W 12-1, 2070 Valley LSB; sec. 202: W 9-10, 2066 Valley LSB)

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills. Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female monarch sur...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth

166/1

Special Topics:
18th-Century British Travel Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course is based on the idea that if there is one genre in which ideas of identity--ideas of how one's own self and culture are related to other selves and other cultures--are systematically negotiated, then this must be the hybrid genre o...(read more)

Bode, Christoph

166/2

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

TTh 12:30-2

The large scale transportation of Africans to the Americas is a signal fact of modernity in the West. The trouble is that we both do and do not know this. One of the most salient, confounding aspects of life in the Caribbean and the United States,...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

166/3

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play: Being the Player

TTh 2-3:30

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be followe...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan

166/4

Special Topics:
Hitchcock's Secret Style

MW 2-3:30 + films Thurs. 6-9 P.M.

It is the claim of “Hitchcock’s Secret Style” that the work of this famous filmmaker, viewed all over the world and analyzed ad infinitum, has only barely begun to be looked at.  DVD technology, by facilitating a closer atte...(read more)

Miller, D.A.

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is depicted in a diverse range of texts.  Sometimes disability is used as a metaphor or symbol of something else.  In other cases, texts explore disability as a lived experience.  We will analyze ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 12:30-2

The medium of literature is language. This course will explore this relationship through a survey of literary forms defined by linguistic forms, and through consideration of how these literary forms are both like and unlike forms of non-literary l...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

180H/1

Short Story

TTh 2-3:30

“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

                            &nb...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

180L/1

Lyric Verse

MWF 12-1

This course is an immersion in the history of lyric verse in English. We will read most of the standard warhorses. The focus of the course will be on the poems as poems, on what they do to minds in the time it takes to read or hear them, and only ...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P

190/1

Research Seminar:
Literature and the Post-human

MW 10:30-12

Does a life become a human life through the possibility of narrating a coherent story about a bounded person through time? This class explores the connection between narrative and the human against the backdrop of technological d...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

190/2

Research Seminar:
Too-Close Reading: Poe and Others

MW 11-12:30

Here are the main things we experience from within the reading practice scapegoated as “too close.” The first is that it is worse than useless: the futility, the irrelevance of its mountainous molehills demoralizes us all the more prof...(read more)

Miller, D.A.

190/3

Research Seminar:
Sentimentality

MW 1:30-3

In this seminar, we will examine the place of sentimentality in American literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Considering works of fiction, poetry, and performance, we will ask how and why certain kinds of feeling—and ...(read more)

Carmody, Todd

190/5

Research Seminar:
Poetry and the Archive

note new time: MW 9-10:30

This is a class about poets who have gone looking for the muse. They’ve found her in the form of libraries, photographs, legal records, interviews, websites, advertisements, and material artifacts, and have used these archival materials to s...(read more)

Pugh, Megan

190/8

Research Seminar:
Utopian & Dystopian Stories and Movies

W 6-9 P.M.

Most Utopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the social or political merits of their schemes than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing.  Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/9

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 9:30-11

For reasons to do with some of its most canonical texts (Achebe’s Things Fall Apart being the most proffered example), postcolonial literature is often thought to present a conflict between “tradition” and “moderni...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/10

Research Seminar:
John Clare: A Peasant Naturalist Among the Romantic Poets

TTh 9:30-11

John Clare was an uneducated farm laborer, a contemporary of Keats, who became very briefly a very famous poet in the 1820's in the wake of the great years of Burns, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley.  He published three books, co...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

190/11

Research Seminar:
Environmental Poetry and Poetics

TTh 11-12:30

I have emarked on this course to help us think about an emergent situation for poets—the earth in crisis.  In this seminar we will explore how poets represent, and think about their place in, their natural environment.  Our primary...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/13

Research Seminar:
Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, and the Cavalier Poets

MW 9-10:30

This seminar will focus on Jonson’s and Herrick’s verse, particularly on the openly frivolous poems. Our aim will be to come to conclusions about what these poems do that gives pleasure. We will also think about the usefulness and accu...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

190/15

Research Seminar:
Animals in Literature and Theory

note new time: MW 4-5:30

This course engages the question of the animal through novels, poetry, philosophy, theory, film, painting and photography, and popular culture.  Our approach will be to examine and track major trends in the burgeoning field of animal studies,...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin

190/16

Research Seminar:
Film Noir and Neo-Noir

TTh 5:30-7 P.M. + films Thurs. 7-10 P.M.

We will examine film noir’s influence on neo-noir and its relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will a...(read more)

Bader, Julia

190/17

Research Seminar:
Narrating Health--An Introduction to the Medical Humanities

MW 4-5:30

What is the relationship between medicine and the humanities? How do literature and medicine relate to one another? How do texts create ideas about health and wellness, illness and disability? This course will serve as an introduction to many issu...(read more)

Bednarska, Dominika

190/18

Research Seminar:
The New Journalism and the Nonfiction Novel

note new time: TTh 5-6:30

This course focuses on the intersection of literature and journalism, with particular attention to the emergence of the New Journalism. The genre, defined in terms of its application of literary techniques to news reporting, often constructs stori...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary

H195A/1

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

This two-semester course will prepare you to write, and will facilitate the writing of, an honors thesis.  In the fall semester, we will take a broad view of literary study and scholarship, working through a series of methods, theories, and p...(read more)

Falci, Eric

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

English H195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. It is designed to give students the critical tools and practical skills to write a strong essay, in the spring semester, that will have a gr...(read more)

Saul, Scott

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholary methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

...(read more)
Francois, Anne-Lise

203/1

Graduate Readings:
20th-Century Poetry

MW 1:30-3

This course will be devoted to how specific philosophical texts can help us think about models of authorship and reading typified by Pound, Yeats,  Stevens, and Ashbery, but with I hope significant implications for most recent poetry.  W...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Discursive Identities in British Romanticism

TTh 2-3:30

The Romantic Age is arguably the first age in which we see systematic attempts at deriving the self from itself, at constructing an identity through the discourse that is produced by a subject, which, however, is itself seen as the product of that...(read more)

Bode, Christoph
Bode, Christoph

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Course

This section of English 203 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Hanson, Kristin

203/4

Graduate Readings

This section of English 203 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2012-13, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes.(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

218/1

Milton

TTh 12:30-2

This course will perform various operations on the massive corpus of Milton's writing. We will try to break down the isolation and idealization of a few major poems, to bring the prose writings into focus, to confront the politics of gender, a...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction. Workshop participants are required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction, fulfill specific assignments on craft, attend all workshop sessions, and prov...(read more)

Mukherjee, Bharati

246I/1

American Literature to 1855

TTh 11-12:30

The series of great earthquakes at New Madrid, Missouri that rattled the entire Mississippi Valley in December 1811 sent shock waves of horror across the new nation. The newspaper and personal accounts of ...(read more)

McQuade, Donald

250/1

Research Seminars:
Victorian Cultural Studies

M 3-6

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.&n...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

250/2

Research Seminars

This section of English 250 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Marno, David

250/3

Research Seminars:
Reconstruction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner ...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3ACambria%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0...<a href="/courses/3629" target="_blank">(read more)</a>

Snyder, Katherine

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, April 6.

CHERNIN MENTORING PROGRAM:Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join the Chernin Mentoring Program!

The Chernin Mentoring Program fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Chernin groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for the Chernin Program, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one credit for an independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43A, 143A, 143B, AND 243A): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43A. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A or 143B. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243A. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 17, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the appropriate application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, April 26. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, April 26, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE FALL. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This course is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must hand in: 1) a completed H195A application form (available from the racks on the wall outside the English Department office [322 Wheeler Hall]), along with: 2) an (unofficial) copy of the transcript(s) that include all your already-completed college courses (whether taken at UC Berkeley or elsewhere); 3) a list of the courses you are currently enrolled in; and 4) a photocopy of a critical paper you have written for another class, to the box on the counter inside the English Department office BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 17, AT THE LATEST. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2012 semester and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES IN THE FALL, THE CLASS LISTS FOR H195A WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD IN THE HALL ACROSS FROM THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT. IF YOU ARE ADMITTED TO ONE OF THE H195A SECTIONS, YOU WILL NEED TO OTAIN YOUR CEC (CLASS ENTRY CODE) AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR, AND THEN YOU WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS AND ADD THE COURSE SOON AFTER THAT; NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN H195A BEFORE CLASSES START.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2012 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 27. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the April 27 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center , during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.