Announcement of Classes: Fall 2012

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholary methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Graduate Readings: 20th-Century Poetry

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Ashbery, John: Collected Poetry; Hegel, F.: Phenomenology of Spirit; Pound, Ezra: Gaudier-Brzska; Stevens, Wallace: Collected Poetry and Prose; Wittgenstein, Ludwig: Culture and Value; Wittgenstein, Ludwig: Major Works

Other Readings and Media

  There will be texts on bspace.

Description

This course will be devoted to how specific philosophical texts can help us think about models of authorship and reading typified by Pound, Yeats,  Stevens, and Ashbery, but with I hope significant implications for most recent poetry.  We will read Nietzsche on knowledge, value, and morality in relation to Pound (his work from 1912-25); Hegel on concepts of expression and perhaps ethics in relation to selections from Yeats; and Wittgenstein on expression, confession, display, and aspect seeing in relation to Stevens and to Ashbery (primarily to imagine how indeterminacy can be a valued state).  Participants will be expected to produce one class project and review one as well as a twenty-page paper.

This course satisfies the 20th-century historical breadth requirement.


Graduate Readings: Discursive Identities in British Romanticism

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Bode, Christoph
Bode, Christoph
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 202 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

William Wordsworth: The Prelude (1805 version); Samuel Taylor Coleridge: "Frost at Midnightand other poems, Biographia Literaria; George Gordon, Lord Byron: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Don Juan; P.B. Shelley: "On Life," A Defence of Poetry, The Triumph of Life; John Keats: Hyperion, The Fall of Hyperion, Lamia, the Odes of 1819, the letters that are reprinted in The Norton Anthology of English Literature; Charlotte Smith: Elegiac Sonnets, Beachy Head

Description

The Romantic Age is arguably the first age in which we see systematic attempts at deriving the self from itself, at constructing an identity through the discourse that is produced by a subject, which, however, is itself seen as the product of that same discourse. Inevitably, such attempts must end in paradoxes, non sequiturs, and infinite regresses. But the different ways in which they do this can be highly illuminating, especially so if this happens in poetry and other self-referential texts that do not try to hide their own paradoxicality, but rather exhibit and foreground it. We will look at different manifestations of this urge to ground the self in itself (or the desire to transcend or negate the self), but we will also take other matters into account, such as the role of Romantic irony or the extent to which narration is a basic prerequisite for the discursive production of (the illusion of) identity.

This course satisfies the 19th-century historical breadth requirement.


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Course

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 203 has been canceled.


Graduate Readings

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 203 has been canceled.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course will not be offered in 2012-13, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes.


Milton

English 218

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

Milton, John: The Riverside Milton [hardcover]

Description

This course will perform various operations on the massive corpus of Milton's writing. We will try to break down the isolation and idealization of a few major poems, to bring the prose writings into focus, to confront the politics of gender, and to see how Milton "produces himself" in his work. Though we are unlikely to abolish Milton's canonical position, we may invert the internal canon of his work, giving a central place to hitherto marginal texts: prose, minor poems, manuscript variants, foreign-language writings. Individual projects can develop from within this programme of intensive reading. I will not assume previous knowledge of Milton, but I would certainly recommend a preliminary (re)reading of Paradise Lost. Nor do I formally require reading in secondary sources, though we will often cross-refer to the standard positions. I will provide a list of research tools and suggestions for further reading, once I learn your particular interests and lines of enquiry.

This course satisfies the 17th-18th-century historical breadth requirement.


Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

eds. R.V. Cassill & Joyce Carol Oates: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction, Second Edition

Description

This workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction. Workshop participants are required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction, fulfill specific assignments on craft, attend all workshop sessions, and provide written feedback on peers' works.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction writing, along with an application form, to Bharati Mukherjee's box in 322 Wheeler Hall, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 17, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


American Literature to 1855

English 246I

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Barnum, P.T.: The Colossal P. T. Barnum Reader; Melville, Herman: The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade

Description

The series of great earthquakes at New Madrid, Missouri that rattled the entire Mississippi Valley in December 1811 sent shock waves of horror across the new nation. The newspaper and personal accounts of this calamitous event had special appeal for preachers of doom, watchers for the Second Coming, as well as believers in spiritualism and lovers of sensation. To be an American in the early nineteenth century was in no small part to read portents, to be lured by great expectations, and to breathe air that was tonic.

Nearly fifty years later, on the eve of the Civil War, Ralph Waldo Emerson observed in the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .”  In the August 1849 issue of The Literary World, Evert Duyckinck, a prominent biographer and publisher, argued that “It is not the worst thing that can be said of a country that it gives birth to a confidence man. . . .  It is a good thing, and speaks well for human nature, that . . . men can be swindled.”

Within this time frame, we will consider carefully artful readings — and mis-readings — of what I call the “promissory tradition” in antebellum American literature and culture, initially as it is pre-figured in the evangelical discourse of such celebrated itinerant preachers as Lorenzo Dow, Peter Cartwright, and Charles Grandison Finney.  The majority of our conversations, however, will focus on the writings of Emerson, Whitman, Poe, and Melville.  We will explore Poe’s fascination with hoaxes and the art of “diddling” as well as examine expressions of this tradition in the popular culture of the period, ranging from the celebrated humbugs of P. T. Barnum to the ubiquitous appeals of patent medicine advertising. We will also devote considerable time to grappling with issues of identity and duplicity in Melville’s complex and disquieting novel, The Confidence Man, in which Melville suggests that “the great art of telling truth” may well best be practiced by telling lies. 

We will explore research questions that emerge from studying the appeal of various versions of the “confidence man,” at once a celebrant of promise and a broker of trust who trades on the ambiguities of imaginative authority in transactions that encourage faith and persuade audiences to believe.

This course satisfies the 19th-century historical breadth requirement.

 


Research Seminars: Victorian Cultural Studies

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Arnold, M.: Culture and Anarchy; Dickens, C.: Great Expectations; Eliot, G.: Felix Holt, The Radical; Eliot, T.S.: Selected Prose; James, C.L.R.: Beyond a Boundary; Ruskin, J.: Unto This Last; Woolf, V. : To the Lighthouse;

Recommended: Williams, R.: Culture and Society

Other Readings and Media

Films: David Lean, Great Expectations (1946), Tony Richardson, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Steven Frears and Hanif Kureishi, My Beautiful Laundrette (1985), Shane Meadows, This is England (2006)

 

Description

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture”--culture as “the idea of human perfection,” as “society as a whole,” as “the general body of the arts,” or as “a whole way of life”--appear and reappear in Mill, Carlyle, Arnold, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, C. Rossetti, Newman, Ruskin, and Morris.  We’ll supplement these readings with selections from the emerging fields of nineteenth-century anthropology, ethnography, and sociology: Tylor, Frazer, Durkheim, etc.  In the course’s second half, we’ll follow the culture concept as it makes its way through twentieth-century Britain: before, between, and after the wars (T.S.Eliot, Virginia Woolf, I.A. Richards, Q.D., and F.R. Leavis); in the long, fraught wake of British socialism (Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, C.L.R. James, and E.P. Thompson); and in the “New Times” of British cultural studies under and after Thatcher (Stuart Hall, Angela McRobbie, Paul Gilroy, and Dick Hebdige).  In the process of reading through these works, we’ll consider the strange tenacity of an especially Victorian idea, a particularly British effort to mark out practical relations between the social and the aesthetic, and the institutional and literary roles that education and, in particular, adult education have played in the post-Romantic imagination.

This course may be used to satisfy the 19th-century historical breadth requirement, the 20th-century historical breadth requirement, or the non-chronological requirement.

 


Research Seminars

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Marno, David
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.


Research Seminars: Reconstruction

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

Chesnutt, C.: The Marrow of Tradition; Dayan, C.: The Law is a White Dog; Du Bois, W. E. B.: Black Reconstruction; Harper, F. E. W.: Iola Leroy; Muhammad, K.: The Condemnation of Blackness; Toomer, J.: Cane; Twain, M.: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Description

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner has written. And nowhere was this revolutionary process more dramatic, more all encompassing, than in the United States—the only society in the history of the world where ex-slaves were granted citizenship rights and political representation directly on the heels of emancipation. Reconstruction was an exceptional moment in world history, to be sure, but one that swelled with the main currents of its time. It was an experiment in statecraft that tried to remake society all at once, turning a traditional situation where individuals were restricted by inherited relations of dependency into a modern scene based on the liberty to contract. This course aims to grasp Reconstruction, in all its complexity, as a narrative problem. We will be thinking in the abstract about the nature of historical transition, and in particular about the role of violence in times of transition, while we look to some of the major works from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries that turned Reconstruction into a story to be passed down. We will pay close attention to how these works sustain their most parochial commitments—to blood, family, race, nation—by adapting the moral vocabulary of the marketplace, and we we will observe how they represent history as romance, tragedy, and farce. Along the way, we will mark the formal devices (marriage plots, frame narration, analepses) that move these works from slavery to freedom while considering the material conditions (the stratification of the book trade, the professionalization of historical research, the emergence of the cinema) that determined how such devices could be employed.

We will also be reading through a collection of shorter works (ethnography, fiction, history, poetry, polemic, theory, and criticism) by writers such as Sterling Brown, William Dunning, Elsie Clews Parsons, Albion Tourgee, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Woodrow Wilson.

Films include Birth of a Nation (D. W. Griffith), Within Our Gates (Oscar Micheaux), and Gone with the Wind (Victor Fleming).  

This course satisfies the 19th-century historical breadth requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 302

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3ACambria%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%7D%0A%40page%20Section1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.Section1%0A%09%7Bpage%3ASection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E--> This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching close reading; running a section of a lecture course; responding to student papers; teaching writing; time management; grading; labor politics and the work of teaching. We’ll use the course as a place to invent, to debrief, and to collectively support development of each teacher’s own effective, distinctive pedagogical approach.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Book List

Meyer, E., and Smith, L.: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP. Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 2. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.