Announcement of Classes: Spring 2013

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Topics in the English Language: Meters of English Poetry

English 102

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: note new room: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The principal text for the course will be a draft of a book I am writing on meter in English.  The principal task will be practical scansion, with each student pursuing an extended exploration of the metrical practice of a poet of their choosing. Therefore, most materials will be either photocopies or electronic files which can be modified to allow ample room for scribbling on. Students should also expect to purchase a good edition of the works of the poet they choose to focus on, as will be discussed further in class.

Description

This course is an introduction to the major meters of the English poetic tradition from a linguistic perspective. Beginning with the iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets, we will explore its defining constraints on stress, syllable count and caesura placement, rhythmic variation these allow, expressive effects they create, and their relationship to rhythmic structure in language. We will then situate this meter historically, exploring its development from closely related forms in Romance languages, including Petrarch's Rime, and into various alternative forms of iambic pentameter in English, including those of Shakespeare's plays, Milton's Paradise Lost, and other English poetry. Finally, we will consider these several meters in relation to their still more distant ancestors in Old English and Classical Latin and Greek, and some of their descendents, including various forms of strong-stress and triple meters that came to be popular especially in the nineteenth century, in the work of such poets as Hopkins, Tennyson and Swinburne. Throughout, the main goal will be for students to become confident in ascertaining and describing metrical form and integrating it with consideration of other aspects of poetry. No prior background in metrics or linguistics or even English poetry is required.


English Drama from 1603 to 1700

English 114B

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new room: 110 Barrows


Book List

English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

This course will be a survey of some of the best seventeenth-century English drama. We will focus on the plays as plays – as series of actions upon the minds of audiences – and on ones first performed between 1603 and 1642, when the theaters were closed. If we have time, we may talk some about a Dryden play and possibly Congreve’s The Way of the World.

In no particular order, here are some of the plays I plan to assign: Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, Beaumont’s The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore, Jonson’s Epiocene and Bartholomew Fair, Middleton and Rowley’s The Changeling, Shirley’s The Cardinal, Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, and a couple of masques – Jonson’s The Masque of Blackness and Milton’s Comus.

Two formal essays and an essay in lieu of the final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 


Shakespeare: Shakespeare after 1600

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Norton Shakespeare

Description

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomedies). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll consider how the actions and utterances of performing bodies can define and reshape the boundaries between what's present, what's represented, and what is made real. I've ordered the Norton Shakespeare at the bookstore, but you may use any recent edition of the plays.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, W.: The Comedy of Errors; Shakespeare, W.: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays, Sonnets

Description

Shakespeare wrote a vast number of extraordinary plays.  We'll consider the range of these plays and why this range was important to him.  We'll also explore how the variety of plays in which he wrote affected Shakespeare's representation of plot and character, as well as the literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophical issues he conceptualized through plot and character.  Finally, we'll think about Shakespeare's plays in relation to the range of social types and classes in his mass audience.

[PLEASE NOTE: The Norton collection I've assigned is a paperback of selected plays, not the hardcover complete plays.]


Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

English 119

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 170 Barrows


Book List

Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy; Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Bunyan, John: Grace Abounding; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Pope, Alexander: Alexander Pope: The Major Works; Swift, Jonathan: The Writings of Jonathan Swift

Description

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's first advice column, the first "women's magazine," and the first periodical to be published daily), religious responses to the so-called "new science," the early novel, and the writings of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift. In addition to the texts listed, there will be a course reader.

Course requirements: two short analyses (1-2 pages), one substantial paper (7-9 pages), and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 106 Moffitt


Other Readings and Media

The books will be available at Analog Books, 1816 Euclid Ave.

Description

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with the first gothic horror stories. Poets reckoned with a literary market and tidal wave of printed works that threatened to render all writing mere commodities. They thematized their position as misunderstood guardians of creative spirit, sometimes of a national past, in model of the tortured poet with which we are still familiar. Women writers cannily intervened in the republic of letters, even as their public writing was seen as semi-scandalous. All helped develop a new sense of Literature with a capital “L”—not just writing but imaginative writing that might play a special role in society, from protecting classical values in a modernizing world, to promoting a standard national language and literature, to cultivating sentimental feelings for others in an increasingly anonymous society.

Authors include: David Hume, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Horace Walpole, Jane Austen, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Gray, William Collins, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Victorian Period

English 122

Section: 1
Instructor: Jordan, Joseph P
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new room: 247 Cory


Book List

Dickens, Charles: Great Expectations; Eliot, George: Silas Marner; Hardy, Thomas: The Mayor of Casterbridge; Wilde, Oscar: The Importance of Being Earnest

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

This course is designed to be a wide-ranging survey of some of the best imaginative writing in English from the so-called “Victorian” period (roughly, 1837-1901), as well as an introduction, though only incidentally, to the historical pressures that shaped the works. The focus will be on the works themselves – and why twenty-first century readers might value them.

We will spend most of our time on the works of the major poets (Tennyson, Browning, the pre-Raphaelites, Arnold, Hopkins, and so forth) and novelists (Eliot, Dickens, Hardy, maybe Thackeray). We will spend a shorter amount of time on the prose writers (Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Pater). And we will end the term with The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.

Three formal essays. The third essay in lieu of the final exam.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new room: 175 Barrows


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Beckford, W.: Vathek; Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Burney, F.: Evelina; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Smollett, T.: Humphry Clinker

Description

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most of it, published anonymously, purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so strenuously disavowed their status as romances or novels, and why for purposes of disguise they chose the genres they did.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.
 


The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

English 125B

Section: 1
Instructor: Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new room: 210 Wheeler


Book List

Bronte, Emily: Wuthering Heights; Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Eliot, George: The Mill on the Floss; Gaskell, Elizabeth: North and South; Hardy, Thomas: Jude the Obscure; Kipling, Rudyard: Kim; Trollope, Anthony: Dr. Wartle's School; Wells, H.G.: The War of the Worlds

Description

What do novels do? How do they 'think'? How do they change the ways in which we perceive fictional and real worlds? Why does the novel come to dominate the literary scene so thoroughly in the Victorian period and into the twentieth century? What did nineteenth-century readers get out of reading prose fiction, whether in serial or volume form, and how do past reading practices connect with the ways we read and consume fiction today?

We will pursue these questions and others through a range of novels by authors including Dickens, Emily Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, Trollope, Hardy, H.G. Wells, Rudyard Kipling and Joseph Conrad. The class will consist of a mix of lecture, full-class discussion, in-class activities, a paper, and two exams.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Achebe , Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Gibson , William : Neuromancer; Mann , Thomas: The Magic Mountain; Woolf , Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Zola, Emile: La Bête Humaine

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics-- history, modernism and empire. These are some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel; how has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel; and lastly how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?


Modern Poetry

English 127

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Ramazani, Jonathan: Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry

Description

This course will survey major work and significant stylistic innovations in a variety of poets.  Major figures incude William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Mina Loy, T.S. Eliot and Wallace Stevens.  I am not sure if I will include poets of John Ashbery's generation.  The major work of the class will be finding the kinds of critical questions that deepen our pleasure and sense of significance in the work.  There will be two papers, a mid-term and final, and regular attendance is required.


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new room: 9 Lewis


Book List

Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into literary texts; and the discovery of a number of forgotten writings which, while often raw, possess a surprising energy and complexity that make them worthy of a study on their own.”  In this class we will consider many of the major authors of the period (for example: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Emily Dickinson) against the vibrant backdrop of antebellum politics and popular culture.  

This was an age when Andrew Jackson redefined the presidency and James K. Polk expanded the nation’s territory.  This was also a period of violent mobs, Barnum’s freaks, all-seeing mesmerists, polygamous prophets, temperance advocates, revivalist preachers, and resolute feminists. The literature and popular culture of the 1830s, 40s, and 50s bear witness to democracy caught in the throes of the controversy over slavery, the rise of capitalism, and the birth of urbanization.  In the midst of this turbulence, a remarkable range of mass cultural forms surfaced, including P.T. Barnum's American Museum, the moving panorama, and an early form of photography called daguerreotype.

Together, we will read, talk, and write about a great deal of the major literature of this era, study fascinating examples of the popular culture of the period, and explore the emergent cultural practices that make the antebellum period such an instructive and significant period in American cultural history.  We will focus on issues of "self" (the search for transcendence and the complexities of relations); the Puritan legacy; the landscape; the democratic experiment; the efforts to reform the American character; and the struggles over the rights and roles of women, African Americans, and Native Americans in the expanding nation.  Two midterms — or essays — and a final examination will be required.

 


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Speirs, Kenneth
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new room: 155 Kroeber


Book List

Eliot, T. S.: The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems; Faulkner, William: Light in August; Frost, Robert: Early Poems; Hammett, Dashiell: Red Harvest; Hemingway, Ernest: The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway; Hughes, Langston: Selected Poems of Langston Hughes; Wharton, Edith: The House of Mirth

Description

This course traces the formal and thematic development of American literature from 1900 to 1945, focusing on innovations in literary forms as they engage with history, identity, race, class, and gender. A principle goal of this course is to bring you to an almost fatal fascination with the choices the writers we study make (the striking stylistic, rhetorical, and structural features of the writing, including word choice and order, style, symbol, metaphor, structure, and narrative). We will also want to consider the writers' lives, prevailing beliefs, and the various environments (literary, geographical, political, etc.) within which these writers worked.

 

 


American Novel

English 132

Section: 1
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new room: 85 Evans


Book List

Three Classic African American Novels; Cather, Willa: Sapphira and the Slave Girl; Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Johnson, James Weldon: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom's Cabin; Twain, Mark: Pudd'n'head Wilson

Description

This course offers a survey of major American novels written in the years between the Civil War and the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement. Course requirements include two essays as well as midterm and final exams.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: African Diaspora Literature: Conversations in Black

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Book List

Achebe, C.: Arrow of God; Adichie, C.: Half of a Yellow Sun; Baldwin, J.: Go Tell It On the Mountain; Brodber, E.: Louisiana; Diaz, J.: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Marshall, P: Brown Girl, Brownstones; McKay, C.: Home to Harlem; Rhodes-Pitts, S.: Harlem is Nowhere

Other Readings and Media

We will also study shorter works and critical essays by such writers as Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, George Lamming, CLR James, Stuart Hall, Edouard Glissant, Nathaniel Mackey, Brent Hayes Edwards, Krista Thompson, and Saidiya Hartman.

Description

This course surveys 20th and 21st century texts by black writers in order to explore the making and meaning of African diaspora literature. Through attention to writers' citational practices, including their references to music, religion, visual art, and each other, we will explore how a black global imaginary is constructed and delineate the conversations that emerge amongst writers in the global sphere of literature. We will also tackle the difficult questions diaspora poses. What might it mean to belong to the diaspora, for instance? How are the claims of identity balanced against the antagonisms of difference? How do writers speak to each other across nation, region, and diaspora? And how do gender and sexuality refract any presuppositions of diaspora?

Students will write regular response papers, make presentations, and conduct a substantial final research paper.

 


Literature of American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in Hollywood Cinema

English 135AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 3:30-5 + M 6-9 films
Location: 105 North Gate (lectures) + 2040 Valley LSB (films)


Other Readings and Media

There will be an online reader or some pdfs to download.

Films:  Broken Blossoms (1919)The Sheik (1921)The Jazz Singer (1927), Bordertown (1935)Intruder in the Dust (1949)The Searchers (1956)Touch of Evil (1958), Imitation of Life (1959)West Side Story (1961)Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967)Night of the Living Dead (1968)Apocalypse Now (1979), Do the Right Thing (1989).

Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced in the United States over the twentieth century. Major themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impersonation. There will be weekly writing assignments, two essays, and three exams.

This course satisfies U. C. Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: Chicano Art and Literature

English 137T

Section: 1
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 123 Wheeler


Description

We will survey Chicano/a literature, art and film from the Chicano/a Movement (1960s through the 1980s) through more recent political and aesthetic formations.

The class will open with study of  a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano community that led to publication/performance of politically spirited and unifying poetry, art, novels and documentary film.

We will think about the convergence of a political aesthetic in the work of these novelists, poets, painters/sculptors, filmmakers, and we will try to account for the contrasts and connections with the wider spheres of art and politics that influenced their work.  To help situate and ground our thinking, we will outline  the historical and political backgrounds of this period and press these up against a cultural production that articulated resistance to the U.S. hegemony just as it often restated the patriarchal, homophobic, and nationalist and identitarian problematic that confronted the Chicano community in the first place. We will think about social and political content, of course, but I also want to look at the formation of a distinct aesthetic experimentation with language and form/genre and audience.

This course is open to all English majors interested in questions of race, ethnicity, gender, and the convergences and contestations of literary and  artistic representation and experiment and form. 

Course Requirements:

30%: sustained in-class contribution and group projects/presentations. At the beginning of class, I will clarify how this will work

30%: mid-term paper of 6 pages

40%: final essay of 8-10  pages based on topics of your own choosing, but covering at least three writers, artists or filmmakers.


Studies in World Literature in English: What Is South African Literature?

English 138

Section: 1
Instructor: Boniface Davies, Sheila
Boniface Davies, Sheila
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 183 Dwinelle


Book List

Coetzee, J. M.: Life and Times of Michael K; Magona, S.: Mother to Mother; Mda, Z.: The Heart of Redness; Paton, A.: Cry the Beloved Country; Van Niekerk, M.: Agaat

Other Readings and Media

There will also be a course reader.

Description

‘What is South African Literature?’ is an introduction to a broad range of storytellers who make up the country’s literature from the colonial period to the present day. Students will be exposed to a variety of voices in English or English translation – including, but moving well beyond, Nobel Prize winners J.M. Coetzee and Nadine Gordimer – through in-depth explorations of novels, shorts stories and poetry. But the question ‘What is South African Literature?’ is also, of course, entangled with issues of power. Not only are repression and resistance persistent themes in the literature itself, the history of South African literature has been shaped by political acts – from the earliest transcriptions of indigenous oral poetry, to the conscription of ‘culture as a weapon of the struggle’ during apartheid, and the suppression of creative expression, and disruption of literary traditions, through censorship and exile. This course will engage students in debates over what comprises ‘Literature’ (the place of orature and the interaction of oral and written forms; ‘aesthetics of revolution’ vs. ‘aesthetics of transcendence’...), whether it is possible/helpful to talk of a unitary South African Literature, and the role of South African literature in a post-apartheid, post-colonial and transnational world. In short, this course will consider how the story of South African literary historiography has been written and rewritten – giving insight into how canons are formed, why they are challenged, and by whom. The aim is to develop close-reading skills while never losing sight of socio-political and historical concerns.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.) : Writing Fiction, Drama, and Poetry

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new room: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available from Zee Zee Copy

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Perrotta, Tom: Best American Short Stories 2012

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, to be purchased at Zee Zee Copy.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Vikram Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

(eds.) R.V. Cassill & Joyce Carol Oates.: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction (Second Edition);

Recommended: Mukherjee, Bharati.: The Middleman & Other Stories

Description

This limited-enrollment workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of short fiction.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-12 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Bharati Mukherjee's (a.k.a. B. Blaise) mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!

 


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 3
Instructor: Oates, Joyce Carol
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Oates, J. C., ed.: The Oxford Book of American Short Stories 2012

Description

A fiction workshop in which students will be expected to turn in material approximately every third week, to be edited and discussed in class.

Emphasis will be upon editing and revising. Quality rather than quantity is the ideal, but each student should be prepared to write about fifty pages through the term, to be gathered into a small “book” and turned in on the last class day. Appropriate assignments will be made in the new, 2012 edition of THE OXFORD BOOK OF AMERICAN SHORT STORIES edited by Joyce Carol Oates.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Prof. Joyce Carol Oates' mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concenring creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course reader, available from Krishna Copy (University & Shattuck)

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision.  Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, with an eye and ear to renovating traditions.  I have no “house style” and only one precept:  you can do anything, if you can do it.  You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss four or so in rotation (I’ll respond to every poem you write).  On alternate days, we’ll discuss illustrative poems in our course reader.  If the past is any guarantee, the course will make you a better poet.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to John Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction: Like & Love

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

No texts.

Description

An upper-division creative nonfiction writing workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three literary nonfiction 5-10 page pieces. Each will take as point of departure the words and emotions like or love. What’s liked or loved (or not) and so described may include people, places, things. Each week, students will also turn in one-page critiques of the two or three student pieces being work-shopped as well as a 1-2 page journal entry on prompts assigned (these entries may be used as part of the longer pieces). Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques: 60-70. Class attendance: mandatory.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 pages of your creative nonfiction or fiction, along with an application form, to Thomas Farber's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Poetry Translation Workshop

English 143T

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Copy Central on Bancroft.

Description

This is a workshop in the translation of poetry into English. Workshop members will develop a project and submit a translation a week (together with the original poem and a word-for-word version) and the work of the class will be for members to give one another feedback on their translations and to talk with one another about the pleasures and perils of the process. There will be weekly reading in the theory and practice of verse translation. The final project will be for each workshop member to produce a chapbook of a dozen or so translations.

Admission will be by permission of the instructor, based on (1) five to eight pages of YOUR OWN translations of either your own poems or other people's poems (or a combination of the two) into English, as well as the corresponding pages in the original language, and also a brief statement (no more than a sentence or two) describing the translation project you hope to work on; (2) a one-paragraph statement of your interest in translation; and (3) an application form; all of the above is to be submitted to Robert Hass's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Special Topics: Modern Latin American Fiction

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Borges, Jorge Luis: Ficciones; Donoso, Jose: The Obscene Bird of Night; Fuentes, Carlos: The Death of Artemio Cruz; Garcia Marquez, Gabriel: One Hundred Years of Solitude; Lispector, Clarice: The Passion According to G.H.; Rulfo, Juan: Pedro Paramo

Description

The reading and writing assignments--linked with the lectures and class discussions--are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret six great masters of Latin American fiction (in English translations): Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, Clarice Lispector, Jose Donoso, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  As the course develops, we'll examine the deep Latin American contexts (philosophical, historical, psychological...) of the works as well as their innovative and influential forms. Students will be expected to participate fully in class discussions and to write critical papers effectively arguing how the works achieve their particular aims.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: African American Literature from Reconstruction to Renaissance

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Carmody, Todd
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: note new room: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Norton Anthology of African American Literature; Three Classic African American Novels; Dunbar, Paul: Sport of the Gods; Johnson, James Weldon: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

Description

This course offers an overview of African American literature from Reconstruction through the New Negro (or Harlem) Renaissance. Particular attention will be paid to questions of history, memory, and changing notions of modernity.


Special Topics: Readings for Fiction Writers

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 220 Wheeler


Book List

Coetzee, J.M.: Disgrace; Danticat, Edwidge: The Dew Breaker; Diaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Flaubert, Gustave: Madame Bovary; Forster, E.M.: Howards End; Mukherjee, Bharati: Jasmine; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth

Description

This course will focus on each novelist's invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis.  Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


Special Topics: Infrastructuralism: Reading Setting in Literature and Film

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 210 Wheeler


Book List

Barthes, Roland: Camera Lucida; Waldie, D.J.: Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir; Ware, Chris: Building Stories; Yamashita, Karen Tei: Tropic of Orange

Other Readings and Media

The course will include a reader.

Description

In a film essay on the way movies depict Los Angeles, Thom Andersen raises a question that will form the basis for this course: “If we can appreciate documentaries for their dramatic qualities, perhaps we can appreciate fiction films for their documentary reflections.” Beginning with Andersen’s film, Los Angeles Plays Itself, we’ll consider his hypothesis and investigate the surprising importance, sometimes even the primacy, of setting in literary and filmic works—including Charles Lamb’s essays in praise of urban London, a Hitchcock film, William Wordsworth’s Guide to the Lakes, Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, Karen Tei Yamashita’s magical-realist novel Tropic of Orange, Chris Ware's new graphic novel Building Stories (this text is a 'total work of art,' with a number of different pieces, so it retails for $50--it is currently $30 on Amazon), D.J. Waldie’s suburban memoir Holy Land, and Patrick Keiller’s Robinson in Space.

Rather than take spaces, places, and infrastructure in these works as the object of a transparent representation, we will pay close attention to the way the written word and the camera shape how we read, see, and perceive the worlds that fictional characters inhabit. We will consider both the role of places and spaces in these works and their relevance (or irrelevance) to story and discourse, to narrative and descriptive modes, and to theories of novelistic and filmic space. While our primary focus will be on what literary and film scholars have to say on these issues, we will also consider the work of geographers and architectural theorists, among others. Theorists and critics of literary, filmic, and urban space will include Stephen Heath, Roland Barthes, Michel de Certeau, and György Lukács.