Announcement of Classes: Spring 2013

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Introduction to the Writing of Verse

English 43B

Section: 1
Instructor: Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Finch, Annie: An Exaltation of Forms; Kowit, Steve: In the Palm of Your Hand: The Poet's Portable Workshop;

Recommended: Boisseau, Michelle: Writing Poems

Description

Watermelons

Green Buddhas

On the fruit stand.

We eat the smile

And spit out the teeth.

--Charles Simic

Poetry’s hardy stuff. It doesn’t have to be sacred. In this course we’re going to wade in with muddy hands, take poetry and make it do things. We’ll read it, write it, bend it, hem it, saw it, smell it. We’ll talk about what energizes and what drags, and whether vim or sloth seems right for that poetic moment. We’ll be thinking hard, not about what we like or what we don’t—though that’s part of it too—but how our liking or misliking is born. What effect triggered it? How was the effect built? On what grounds, in other words, is your aesthetic response built? By the end of this course we’ll have experimented with a wide range of poetic angles on the world and thought deeply about craft, form, and how we’ve been invited to see. Hopefully, we’ll come to understand poetry as a flexible material with which to make new experiences (earthy, sonic, passionate, formal, quiet, rhythmic, carnal or abstract).

We’ll be investigating some forms and production methods you might know as well as some new ones (these will include elegies, aubades, sonnets, litanies, etc.). Each week, we’ll be exploring a different mode while studying a wide variety of poems and writing and workshopping poems of our own. The final assignment will be a portfolio of your revised poems. 

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Lili Loofbourow's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 110 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales; Greenblatt, Stephen, ed.: Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1; Milton, John: Paradise Lost

Description

Edmund Spenser admired and imitated Geoffrey Chaucer; John Milton admired and imitated both Chaucer and Spenser. This kind of admiration and imitation constitutes “literary tradition.” Early modern English authors looked not only to native precedents, but also to ancient Greece and Rome, and to contemporary Italy and France, for inspiration and approval. This course will concentrate on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faery Queene (Book I), and Milton’s Paradise Lost; additional texts will be read for the sake of historical context. Written work for the semester will consist of several quizzes, one midterm exam, several short papers, and a final exam. Students must be prepared to attend lectures and discussion sections faithfully. 


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 3 LeConte


Book List

Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales; Greenblatt, Stephen: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1

Description

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry;  and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings think about desire, commerce, liberty, God, power, the environment, subjectivity, empire, justice, death, and science.  We will study how a literary text emerges out of the author's reading of his or her predecessors and in relation to contemporary political, religious, social, and scientific discourses and events.

 


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: MW 12-1+ discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 3 LeConte


Book List

Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko and Other Writings ; Blake, William: Poems; Burns, Robert: Poems and Songs; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Gates, Henry Louis: Classic Slave Narratives; Melville, Herman: Bartleby and Benito Cereno; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Man and Other Poems; Rowlandson, Mary: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels; Wordsworth, W. and Coleridge, S.T.: Lyrical Ballads and Other Poems

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available including poems by Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Lady Mary Montagu, Mary Leapor, William Collins, Thomas Gray, James Macpherson, Stephen Duck and Mary Collier, and short fiction by Walter Scott, E. A. Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Description

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose narrative and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and then Ireland, the global expansion of an overseas empire, and the revolt of the North American colonies. Our readings will explore the relations between home and the world in writings preoccupied with journeys outward and back, real and imaginary -- not all of which are undertaken voluntarily.

 


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 2 LeConte


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Bronte, Emily: Wuthering Heights; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass an American Slave ; Franklin, Benjamin: Autobiography; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Man and Other Poems; Rowlandson, Mary: Sovereignty and Goodness of God ; Wordsworth, William: The Major Works: Including The Prelude

Description

I will lecture on the cataclysmic rise of bourgeois modernity as it registers in English and American literature during the period 1660-1860. I will emphasize the mixture of euphoria, wonder, deprivation and anxiety that this transformation provokes, and I will concentrate on the Enlightenment and Romanticism as attempts to exploit historical opportunity while compensating for history’s deficiencies. Two five-page essays, a final exam, and regular participation in lecture and discussion section will be required.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10
Location: 2 LeConte


Book List

Conrad, J.: Heart of Darkness; Joyce, J.: Dubliners; Morrison, T.: Beloved; Nabokov, V.: Speak, Memory; Pynchon, T.: The Crying of Lot 49; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse; le, t.: The Gangster We Are All Looking For

Description

This course provides an overview of the many literary innovations now grouped under the term “modernism,” as well as their relations to the historical and social disruptions associated with the term “modernity.”  After providing a firm grasp of these terms, the course will emphasize both literary form and historical context.  How does literature respond to the pressures of industrialization, revolution, and empire, as well as to an ever-growing awareness of a diverse, interconnected world? 


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 2 LeConte


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Morrison, Tony: Jazz; Ramazani, Jahan: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry (Third Edition). Volume 1: Modern Poetry.; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Description

This course examines radical changes and unexpected continuities in literature in English from 1850 to (almost) the present.  We will read poetry and fiction from Britain, Ireland, North America and Africa in order to explore a range of literary responses to different aspects of modernity, such as urbanization, colonialism and popular culture. We approach these texts in a variety of ways: we will consider them as belonging to different modes (realism, naturalism, modernism, postmodernism); we will think about them as producing new kinds of narrative and poetic form; and we will read them closely.


Sophomore Seminar: Woody Allen

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Allen, W.: The Insanity Defense: The Complete Prose

Description

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology.  The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Archive.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.