Announcement of Classes: Fall 2013

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
On Campus: Fictions of College Life

MWF 9-10

What would it mean to imagine our own lives at university as part of an invented universe? The fictional possibilities of the college...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Narratives We Live By

MWF 11-12

How does narrative shape our experience of ourselves and the world around us? In what ways do established narratives inflect the choices we make? What possibilities does narrative offer for a more active reworking of our world? In this class, we&r...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Gossip

MWF 1-2

Gossip, according to Roland Barthes, constitutes “murder by language”—which, although extreme, is hardly a surprising condemnation. From Soren Kierkegaard’s dismissal of gossip as “idle talk,” to one contemporar...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Narrative, Narration, Narrators

MWF 2-3

In this course, we will read a series of texts that highlight, question, or vex their own status as narratives.  Along the way, we will encounter frame narratives that do not seem to fit the stories they enclose or that fail to close at all, ...(read more)

Hsu, Sharon

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

MWF 3-4

This course is a study of the nature of greatness. We will discuss the strained relationship between greatness and goodness, and the relationship between goodnes...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Demands of Beauty

MW 4-5:30

Channeling Dante’s insight that “beauty awakens the soul to act,” Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that the love of beauty begins with appreciation—the cultivation of taste—and culminates in the creation of a work of ar...(read more)

Langione, Matt

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
A Meet and Happy Conversation

TTh 9:30-11

In Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, John Milton writes that “a meet and happy conversation is the chiefest and noblest end of marriage.” This course will explore the ethical, romantic, and philosophical implications of this...(read more)

Greer, Erin

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
Saints and Soldiers

TTh 11-12:30

While holy warriors have gained a bad reputation in today’s world, warrior-saints were once a flavor of holy persons quite popular in England from the Middle Ages up through the Early Modern period.  Though not all are canonized (offici...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
War In Words: Literature of the Great War

TTh 12:30-2

During World War 1, combatant poets wrote poetry directly from the trenches and even circulated literary publications while bursting shells and gunfire threatened sudden death at any moment. This co-incidence between exploding shells and explosive...(read more)

Abramson, Anna Jones

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Transmission, Tradition, Translation

TTh 2-3:30

How, and to what extent, can one person’s experiences be transmitted to another person?  What would it mean for a made object to enable an encounter in which the perspectives and concerns unique to someone in profoundly distant circumst...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
The Way We Read Now

TTh 3:30-5

This course is an occasion to reflect on how--if at all--we read now. Our engagement with this famously vexed question will be twofold. We'll first consider what we read, entering into contemporary debates on how digital and media tec...(read more)

Ling, Jessica

R1A/15

Reading and Composition:
Boundaries and Borders

TTh 5-6:30

What is “race”? This class explores the concept of race, racial identity, and the fictions of racial difference as authored by history and science, power and dominance, culture and social standing. We will focus on exploring the permea...(read more)

Seeger, Andrea Yolande

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Really Quite Contemporary

MWF 9-10

In this course we will investigate our reals, some [real]isms, and maybe even realityism in contemporary prose and poetry.  We will look at works of contemporary fiction and poetry—and also at television and film— that both insist...(read more)

Gregory, Jane

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Conscience

MWF 10-11

This course explores how writers and philosophers have grappled with notions of the “conscience” throughout western literature. Far from being a static, universal or unchanging concept, “the conscience” has a long, dynamic,...(read more)

Ding, Katherine

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Afterworlds of the American Revolution, 1776-1819

Note new time: TTh 3:30-5

In 1776, as Jefferson declared, the American Colonies could no longer tolerate the yoke of English rule, and must “throw off such Government” and “dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” The Re...(read more)

Trocchio, Rachel

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Bloodfeud

MWF 1-2

Blood, guts, violence, bravery, cowardice, obligation, and various combinations of the above will be the focus of this course. We will study medieval and modern accounts of feud in a variety of genres (including heroic poetry, sagas, grammatical t...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
What's Serious About What's Funny?

MW 4-5:30

"Comedy proceeds out of suffering.  Usually someone else's."--Joseph Gelmis

"Comedy is in long shot, tragedy in close-up."--Charlie Chaplin

In this course we will consider a series of formal and historica...(read more)

Beck, Rachel

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: Vaudeville Blues and the Harlem Renaissance

TTh 8-9:30

Karl Miller's text Segregating Sound offers readings of previously unavailable record label archival material that gives us a revised reading of the U.S. popular recording industry and its marketing of racial categories and hierarchie...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Suspension, Uselessness

TTh 9:30-11

I mean Negative Capability, that is when man is capable of being in uncertainties, Mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact & reason.

- John Keats

As an R&C course, th...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Profane Illuminations

TTh 11-12:30

Though Walter Benjamin coined the phrase to describe a specifically “materialistic, anthropological inspiration” that signifies “the true creative overcoming of religious illumination,” the profane illuminations this class ...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: Novel/Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course is a study of the relationship between two modern social forms: the novel and the nation. As historian Benedict Anderson has shown, the rise of the nation has an intimate, if not mutually constitutive, relation to the rise of the novel...(read more)

Nadal, Paul

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: When Reading Goes Wrong

TTh 2-3:30

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear.  But what happens when we misjudge a text, or when we're unable to judge it at all?  Depictions of failed readings are...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: The Bonds of Taste

TTh 5-6:30

What does it mean to cultivate "good taste" for oneself? What sorts of social relationships happen when we judge someone else's taste or recognize through their appreciations a kindred spirit? How is taste learned and taught? How doe...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

W 12-1

This seminar will investigate the nature of Shakespearean comedy in Twelfth Night, which involves disguise, cross-dressing, gender-bending, mistaken identities, and misdirected affections. The seminar will read the entire play thorough in...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Hamlet

Tues. 3-5 (Sept. 3 to Oct. 15 only)

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consid...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's Maus I & II

Tues. 11-1 (Sept. 3 to Oct. 15 only)

Art Speigelman has been called "one of our era's foremost comics artists" and "perhaps the single most important comic creator working within the field." In this seminar we will devote ourselves to a close reading of his Pu...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Immigrant Inscriptions

TTh 3:30-5

This course will explore the varieties of ways in which migrants to the United States inscribe their experiences and subjectivities on the U.S. landscape. We will be interested in how narratives of race and ethnicity are constructed in the wake of...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

We will study the changing nature of creative writing "through" Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. 45 is a lower-division course, the pre-required gateway to th...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course offers an introduction to English literary history from the late fourteenth to the late seventeenth centuries. Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, Edmund Spenser&rs...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonp...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course traces the expansion and transformation of English literature, from an insular cultural form to an incipient global fact, from a writing produced in England to a writing produced in English. We will begin in the wake of one civil war (...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic...(read more)

Falci, Eric

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 1-2

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovati...(read more)

Goble, Mark

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors woking in the field. The aim of the course is to give students t...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers: High and Low Culture

W 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some ficti...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

105/1

Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 2-3:30

“Britain, once called Albion, is an island of the ocean...” When the priest Bede set out in the early 700s to write the history of the place we now call England, he portrayed it as a new nation with a deep past, a remote corner of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 1-2

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

A study of a dozen plays from the second half of Shakespeare's career, including HamletTwelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular&quot...(read more)

Marno, David

121/1

The Romantic Period

MWF 10-11

This course will examine the Romantic movement in Britain, a movement often described as an outgrowth of the “Age of Revolution.” From the hopes for the French Republic to the “revolution in poetic language” attempted in (read more)

Savarese, John L.
Savarese, John

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 2-3

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to literature in Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre for describing the ...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Lavery, Joseph

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will analyze nine 20th-century American novels, taking note of how their formal organization participates in their thematic concerns.  We'll spend the first few class meetings reviewing the history of the novel as a form...(read more)

Loewinsohn, Ron

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

TTh 8-9:30

A survey of major novels, including nonfiction novels, published in the last fifty years.  There will be two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Note:  The instructor (and book list and course description) of this course changed ...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

MWF 2-3

In the mid-nineteenth century, the U.S., a nation that had barely come together, was splitting apart. The fission helped to produce the remarkably energetic works we will be studying over the course of the semester. I will focus primarily on quest...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

132/1

American Novel

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore eight major American novels.  There will be two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Note:  The instructor (and book list and course description) of this course changed in June.  There has been no cha...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Gender and Class

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will explore the interconnectedness of gender and class as represented in a cluster of Chicana/o literary works, films, and art.  The films will include Lourdes Portillo and Nina Serrano’s, Despues del Terremoto (...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Race, Creative Writing, and Difference

TTh 2-3:30

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing.

The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public la...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction--to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them. Students will write tw...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143B/1

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-li...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 3:30-5

A seminar in writing poetry.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Sutherland's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APR...(read more)

Sutherland, Keston
Sutherland, Keston

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143T/1

Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

This is a workshop in the translation of poetry into English. Workshop members will develop a project and submit a translation a week (together with the original poem and a word-for-word version) and the work of the class will be for members to gi...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

152/1

Women Writers:
Early American Women Writers

TTh 9:30-11

This course will survey the writing of American women from narratives of colonial settlement through the novels of the early republic.  During this period, women produced immensely popular works and developed major literary traditions that wo...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

165/1

Special Topics:
Modern Poetry

MWF 12-1

The reading and writing assignments—linked with the lectures and class discussions—are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret modern poetry, as they gain greater authority in critical writing....(read more)

Campion, John

165/2

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poetry

MW 4-5:30

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was poetry sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting "literature"'s own history and etymology, is ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

166/2

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play--Being the Player

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be follow...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan

166/1

Special Topics:
Literature and Science from the Romantics to the Present

MWF 1-2

This course offers an introduction to questions and problems in the study of literature and science, with special attention to Romantic science and its afterlife. Romanticism has come to name both a historical moment (sometimes called an “ag...(read more)

Savarese, John L.
Savarese, John

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define.&nbsp...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a cor...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180A/1

Autobiography:
American Autobiography: Race, Gender, Culture

TTh 11-12:30

We will take a group of texts--conventional memoir, poetry, painting, photography, and I-focused new media--to explore what American auto/bio/graphy really means.  We will start in the 18th century with Benjamin Franklin and close with a...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

180L/1

Lyric Verse

MW 4-5:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

180N/1

The Novel:
The American Novel Since 1900

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

A survey of the American novel: its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and interaction with other media. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—w...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

190/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Sensations

MW 4-5:30

The literary genre of the Victorian sensation novel of the 1860s-1870s was defined less by its form and content than by the response it was supposed to engender in its readers. This course will explore the significance of physical and psy...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios

190/5

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Brolaski, Julian T.

190/6

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 11-12:30

For reasons to do with some of its most canonical texts, postcolonial literature is often thought to present a conflict between “tradition” and “modernity,” a conflict often imagined as the peaceful village intruded upon by...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/7

Research Seminar:
Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics

TTh 11-12:30

What is ecopoetry, and what, if anything, distinguishes it from nature poetry?   How does ecopoetics differ from another poetics?  In this seminar we will explore topics surrounding this question, which include the pathetic fallacy ...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/8

Research Seminar:
Suspicious Mind

TTh 12:30-2

Suspicious reading, which is sometimes called “symptomatic reading,” starts from the assumption that a text’s true meaning lies in what it does not say, know, or cannot understand.  For symptomatic readers, influenced by the...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

190/9

Research Seminar:
Words and Images: The Intellectual Marketplace of Antebellum America

TTh 12:30-2

This seminar will focus on the literature and visual culture of the early United States — roughly the 1790s through the 1840s, with more than a glance back to George Whitefield and Jonathan Edwards and forward to Walt Whitman and Herman Melv...(read more)

McQuade, Donald

190/11

Research Seminar:
The Politics and Aesthetics of Participation

TTh 2-3:30

This course will track the concept of participation across the 20th century, tracing its manifestation in key aesthetic, political, economic and technological forms. The first half of the course will investigate how, over the course of the 20th ce...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper

190/12

Research Seminar:
Metaphysical Poets from Donne to Vaughan

TTh 2-3:30

This class focuses on a group of poets who were philosophical before there was philosophy. Four decades before the publication of René Descartes’ Meditations, John Donne began writing poems in which, in the words of a later c...(read more)

Marno, David

190/15

Research Seminar:
Studies in Children's Literature

TTh 3:30-5

This course will explore the history and theory of writing for children from the mid-eighteenth century through the present. We’ll read works that, in twenty-first-century terms, are considered appropriate for readers from kindergarten throu...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist

190/16

Research Seminar:
Film Noir

MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.

We will examine film noir’s influence on neo-noir and its relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The cour...(read more)

Bader, Julia

190/17

Research Seminar:
Utopian and Dystopian Literature

TTh 5-6:30 + film screenings Tues. 7-10 P.M.

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 12-1:30

This course is designed as the accompaniment to the writing of an honors thesis, the research for and the writing of which will take place in the second semester (H195B). The first semester will prepare you to move toward crafting this long essay ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

H195A/2

Honors Course

MW 1:30-3

This seminar has the goal of preparing students to write an Honors thesis on a topic of their own devising in the spring semester.  To prepare for that adventure, together we will read ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory and practice.

This course satisfies the Group 1 (problem...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Post-9/11 Fiction

M 1-4

Note: Those interested in taking the course, please email me (ksnyder@berkeley.edu) the first week of classes for the reading assignment required for our first seminar meeting on September 9.

For mo...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Modernism and Film

MW 4-5:30

This course surveys a range of twentieth-century texts that allow us to explore connections between film and modernist literary practice, and the cultural implications of cinema for the period as a whole. Working with a broad conception of moderni...(read more)

Goble, Mark

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Course

Th 2-5

This is a practical writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transitions from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar....(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

205A/1

Old English

TTh 11-12:30

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The later eighteenth century has presented literary historians with more than the usual challenge to periodization or organization by author and movement; they have responded with an unusual number of designations: the “Age of Johnson,&rdquo...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

250/1

Research Seminar:
Critical and Peripheral Realisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

To what extent has our tendency to measure aesthetic achievement within the terms set by the historical modernisms of 1890-1920 blocked our perception of twentieth century peripheral literatures? This course will entertain historical diagnoses of ...(read more)

Lye, Colleen

250/2

Research Seminar:
Sensory Aesthetics in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Poetry and Drama

W 1-4

Sensation is a liminal phenomenon, a phenomenon that marks edges and borders. It is the interface between the material world and the physical body as well as between the body and the mind. Medieval writing is full of sensation, from the theoretica...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel and the History of Man

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In his introduction to Tom Jones (1749) Henry Fielding formally announced the “rise of the novel” by grounding the new genre on “human nature,” which David Hume had recently proclaimed the foundation of all the sci...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

Staff

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 1-3

This course (previously numbered English 302) will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as cours...(read more)

Landreth, David

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, April 5.

CHERNIN MENTORING PROGRAM:Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join the Chernin Mentoring Program!

The Chernin Mentoring Program fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Chernin groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for the Chernin Program, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for an independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 143T): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only upper-division students should apply for the workshops being offered in Fall '13, as they are all upper-division classes. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 23, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the appropriate application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, May 2. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, May 2, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE FALL. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This course is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must hand in: 1) a completed H195A application form (available from the racks on the wall outside the English Department office [322 Wheeler Hall]), along with: 2) an (unofficial) copy of the transcript(s) that include all your already-completed college courses (whether taken at UC Berkeley or elsewhere); 3) a list of the courses you are currently enrolled in; and 4) a photocopy of a critical paper you have written for another class, to the box on the counter inside the English Department office BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 23, AT THE LATEST. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2013 semester and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES IN THE FALL, THE CLASS LISTS FOR H195A WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD IN THE HALL ACROSS FROM THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT. IF YOU ARE ADMITTED TO ONE OF THE H195A SECTIONS, YOU WILL NEED TO OBTAIN YOUR CEC (CLASS ENTRY CODE) AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR, AND THEN YOU WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS AND ADD THE COURSE SOON AFTER THAT; NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN H195A BEFORE CLASSES START.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2013 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MAY 3. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the May 3 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center , during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.