Announcement of Classes: Spring 2014

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
That Way Madness Lies

MWF 9-10

Can we locate the germ of madness in a character or text? Can a mad speaker be believed or relied upon, and by what evidence? Could insane avowals infect the listener and thereby be exported or exchanged? How do we know when madness should be read as...(read more) Kelly, Tyleen Louise

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
The Afterworlds of the American Revolution, 1776-1819

MWF 1-2

In 1776, as Jefferson declared, the American colonies could no longer tolerate the yoke of English rule, and had to "throw off such Government” and “dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” The Revolution that followed ac...(read more) Trocchio, Rachel

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
The Matter of Troy

TTh 9:30-11

What do we know about Troy and the Trojan War? What has anyone ever known about Troy and the Trojan War? In this course, we will read ancient, medieval, and early modern texts that will help us sketch the contours of any possible answer to this quest...(read more) Hobson, Jacob

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
From Nature Writing to Ecopoetics

TTh 11-12:30

This course is an introduction to American environmental literature of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Our focus will be on the modes of attention and composition that innovative writers have developed in response to the challenge of writing abou...(read more) Emerson, Maude

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
Life on the Inside and Outside

TTh 12:30-2

Everyone knows that thoughts occur in our heads and refer to the world “out there.”  We may also know that what we experience and refer to as “my head” is a product of what takes place “in” our actual head.  Our actual head we believe to be “out ther...(read more) Alexander, Edward Sterling

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Sympathy and the Problem of Identification

TTh 2-3:30

How does sympathy function to draw the reader into the text? How do readers navigate sympathizing with characters who are directly at odds with one another? Does sympathy require identification with the character or speaker? Is it possible to sympath...(read more) Ding, Katherine

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Getting Outside Ourselves: Beyond Wilderness

TTh 3:30-5

Do birds really sing, or is the idea of “song” a human construct? If humans have altered their environments for thousands of years, what do we mean when we try to preserve “wilderness” areas? Can we truly imagine what it would be like to see life thr...(read more) McWilliams, Ryan

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
How to Be Popular

MWF 9-10

Though this class unfortunately makes no promises to improve students’ own popularity (although, hey! you never know!) it will provide the opportunity to consider the problems and the pleasures of popularity in many other forms. To start, we will con...(read more) Dumont, Alex

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Profane Illuminations

MWF 10-11

Though Walter Benjamin coined the phrase to describe a specifically “materialistic, anthropological inspiration” that signifies “the true creative overcoming of religious illumination,” the profane illuminations this class will examine represent a br...(read more) Ahmed, Adam

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
(note new topic): Documents and Literature of the Undocumented

MWF 10-11

(note new course description):  In this class, we will study the emerging field of Undocumented Literature. Many documents—newspaper articles, academic studies, and government laws—have attempted to document the population of undocumented immigrants,...(read more) Huerta, Javier

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
The Way We Read Now

MWF 11-12

This course is an occasion to reflect on how—if at all—we read now. Our engagement with this famously vexed question will be twofold. We’ll first enter into debates on how print, the book, and media technologies shape our present-day experience of li...(read more) Ling, Jessica

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Defenses of Poetry

MWF 11-12

“Poetry defeats the curse which binds us to be subjected to the accident of surrounding impressions…and it purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being….It is the faculty which contains within it...(read more) Ketz, Charity Corine

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Representing American Education

MWF 12-1

What, exactly, do Americans expect education to do for us as individuals, or as a society? What does it mean to “be educated”? It seems there are as many answers to these questions as there are people in this country—but how do we arrive at any answe...(read more) Huang, Lynn

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Persuasion

MWF 12-1

This class is about persuasive writing—both as a genre and as a skill. Which is to say, we will follow Quintilian, who says that the best way to become eloquent is to imitate the masters. Of course, standards of eloquence have changed, but not the si...(read more) Moore, Stephanie Anne

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Regions

MWF 1-2

Regions are hard to pin down. On a map, there are states, countries, and other political designations outlined; a region, however, is something else, something more like that black splotch of terra incognita. It is not a cosmopolitan center, but the ...(read more) Chow, Juliana H.

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Human Environments: Ecology, Evolution, and Literature

MWF 2-3

This course will explore the relationship between humans and their environments, considering how literature helps us to map and even construct our environments. How do we adapt to our surroundings? How do we adapt our surroundings to us? Why do we, a...(read more) Cannon, Benjamin Zenas

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Representing California

MWF 2-3

“California is a place in which a boom mentality and a sense of loss meet in uneasy suspension; in which the mind is troubled by some buried but ineradicable suspicion that things had better work here, because here, beneath that immense bleached sky,...(read more) Lee, Richard Z

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
The Poetics of Honor

MWF 3-4

We tend to think of honor as the quintessence of achievement: a blanket term covering a wide range of excellences.  But why do we pursue honor when it so often fails to benefit us? The First World War is often considered to be the event that marks th...(read more) Acu, Adrian Mark

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Are There Stories?

MWF 3-4

Walter Benjamin wrote that “the art of storytelling is reaching its end,” arguing that the oral, communitarian art of storytelling encountered its first crisis in the rise of the bourgeois novel, and a second crisis in modern societies’ privileging o...(read more) Greer, Erin

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold

MW 4-5:30

What does it mean to re-imagine a Modernist novel as a series of e-mails?  Or to put the words of a beloved Jane Austen heroine into the mouth of a teenage valley girl?  And why do so many film versions of Shakespeare's plays take place in high schoo...(read more) Hsu, Sharon

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Photographic Memories

MW 4-5:30

"We work in unison with movement as though it were a presentiment of the way in which life itself unfolds. But inside movement there is one moment at which the elements in motion are in balance. Photography must seize upon this moment and hold immobi...(read more) Yoon, Irene

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Saints and Soldiers

TTh 8-9:30

While holy warriors have gained a bad reputation in today’s world, warrior-saints were once a flavor of holy persons popular in England from the Middle Ages up through the Early Modern period.  The lives and deeds of the martyrs, soldiers, and kings ...(read more) Miller, Jasmin

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
American Beauties

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the crystallization and dissemination of a set of uniquely American aesthetic ideals over the past seventy years of U.S. cultural production. We will take “the short American century” as our sample period to address how ideas...(read more) Fleishman, Kathryn

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
The Hazards of Belief

TTh 11-12:30

It is natural to think of perception as the bedrock of belief. We watch the sun appear over the eastern horizon every morning and then, after dark, we fall asleep secure in the belief that its light will wake us again tomorrow. This is how induction ...(read more) Langione, Matt

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Making Heirs and Heirlooms

TTh 12:30-2

After the Irish Civil War, W.B. Yeats wondered, "Did that play of mine send out / Certain men the English shot?" But in a poem in honor of Yeats, W.H. Auden famously assured us that “poetry makes nothing happen," while Paul Muldoon put it more to the...(read more) Lorden, Jennifer A.

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Still Life: Nature and Art

TTh 3:30-5

Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher. —William Wordsworth, “The Tables Turned”   I have always kept ducks, he said, even as a child, and the colours of their plumage, in particular the dark green and snow white, seemed to m...(read more) Stancek, Claire Marie

R1B/20

Reading & Composition:
Reader's Block

TTh 3:30-5

This course takes its title from David Markson’s novel—which itself takes its title from some experience we have all probably felt some time or another. Yet such a ubiquitous feeling is difficult to come to terms with. The intensity of reader’s block...(read more) Vandeloo, David Conigliaro

R1B/21

Reading & Composition:
On the Case

TTh 5-6:30

Do we gain a new perspective when we represent something as a "case"? How do we narrate the development and confines of a case? Is a case intended to showcase the unusual or extraordinary or, perhaps conversely, the typical or the real? This course e...(read more) Cordes Selbin, Jesse

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Shakespeare and Film

TTh 5-6:30

Since the earliest days of silent film, William Shakespeare's works have been adapted on screen hundreds of times in diverse settings, from fascist Italy to the Wild West, medieval Japan to the undiscovered planet of Altair IV.  In this course, we wi...(read more) Bahr, Stephanie M
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Music and Literary Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

“All art,” wrote English critic Walter Pater in 1877, “constantly aspires to the condition of music.” In this course, we will launch our own investigation into music’s influence on British and American modernist writers as they grappled with the poli...(read more) Le, Serena

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts and Culture at Berkeley and Beyond

W 3-4

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets, study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum, attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall, see and discuss films at the Pacific Film ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Seeking Justice: The Art of Argument

W 2-4 (1/29-3/12 only)

This course, like its title, has both a subject and an object. Its subject is argument; its object is to study how arguments are constructed, what the rhetoric of persuasion consists of, what constitutes evidence, how to identify good logic and weak ...(read more) Friedman, Donald M.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Mark Twain's Boys

W 12-1

Mark Twain became immensely popular with his stories about boys like Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, as well as his prince and pauper.  In the post-Civil War era, 1865-1910, writers like Horatio Alger, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, and others (even Henry ...(read more) Hutson, Richard

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

W 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Goble at mgoble@berkeley.edu. This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major....(read more) Goble, Mark

37/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture

MWF 1-2

We will survey the literary and cultural production of the Chicano/a Movement during the 1960s through the mid-1980s. This was a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano com...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 9:30-11

This course is primarily a poetry workshop.  Reading and writing assignments will help generate our workshop material and give us the language and tools to treat that material.  These assignments will engage both vision and process; they will inflate...(read more) Gregory, Jane

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings thi...(read more) Arnold, Oliver

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends at sea in Moby-Dick, with the Pequod sinking in a “vortex” just above the equator in the Pacific Ocean.  These scenes of oceanic dislocation correspond t...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish, and North American prose fiction, autobiography, and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland ...(read more) Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course will focus on the formal consequences of the social and cultural revolutions of the early twentieth century. We will examine the changes in narrative strategy and voice and the transformations of poetic syntax and diction that have come t...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course examines radical changes and unexpected continuities in literature in English from the middle of the nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth century.  We will read poetry and fiction from Britain, Ireland, North America, and Africa...(read more) Flynn, Catherine

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Woody Allen

W 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Arc...(read more) Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Films

W 7-10 P.M.

In this course no texts will be assigned, but certain background materials will be posted on bSpace. This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major....(read more) Starr, George A.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

102/1

Topics in the English Language:
The Structure of the English Language

TTh 11-12:30

This course will be an introduction to linguistic study of modern English.  We will explore English phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (linguistic meaning), as well as some aspects of ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

110/1

Medieval Literature:
Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland - Visions of Other Worlds

MWF 2-3

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the afterlife ...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.

111/1

Chaucer

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

This will be an introduction to close reading Shakespeare that will address all of his genres and periods, at least after 1596.  I am interested primarily in unabashedly celebrating Shakespeare’s various forms of genius by tracing how complex, engagi...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.

117S/2

Shakespeare

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, so...(read more) Arnold, Oliver

118/1

Milton

TTh 3:30-5

Intensive reading in the poetry and prose of John Milton (1608-1674), written during a period of dramatic historical change, and including the most influential single poem in the English language, Paradise Lost. Our goal is to get under the skin of t...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 9:30-11

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with th...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

121/1

Romantic Period

MWF 2-3

Romanticism was once defined as a turn toward “nature” in response to the industrialization marking Britain’s transition to modern capitalism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Rather than simply resurrecting the idea of the Roman...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise

127/1

Modern Poetry

TTh 2-3:30

A survey of the modernist turn in poetry. This course will explore some of the more remarkable (and occasionally notorious) formal experiments of the twentieth century's turbulent first half. We will contend with work from Britain, Ireland, and the U...(read more) Blanton, C. D.

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MW 9:30-11

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of colonial settlement through the literature of the American Revolution and the early republic. Topics to be discuss...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

 A survey of American texts tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century. We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the influence of modernism and other experimental...(read more) Goble, Mark

C136/2

Topics in American Studies:
The Great Exhaling: American History, Culture, and Politics, 1946-1952

TTh 3:30-5 + disc. sec. 201: W 2-3; disc. sec. 202: W 3-4; disc. sec. 203: Thurs. 10-11; disc. sec. 204: Thurs. 11-12

1948 was the year that America, after the Great Depression, after the Second World War, after sixteen years of the all but revolutionary experiment in national government of the New Deal and even in the face of a Red Scare that would dominate the nex...(read more) Moran, Kathleen and Marcus, Greil

141/1

Modes of Writing: Exposition, Fiction, Verse, Etc.

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them.  Students will wr...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop where students will submit and discuss their own short fiction.  We will also closely examine the work of the published writers in the assigned anthology.  Students will complete 3 short writing assi...(read more) Kleege, Georgina

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This class is a workshop in short fiction. It is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of narrative style and structure, and to encourage a model of constructive critique in a workshop setting. Our readings will include short stories...(read more) Tranter, Kirsten
Tranter, Kirsten

143B/1

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined...(read more) Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

W 3-6

From an essay: I find  [form] interesting as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment.  Sonnets can be navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to get it r...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A seminar in the writing of prose nonfiction as an art. To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 -10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to the box labled...(read more) Solnit, Rebecca
Solnit, Rebecca

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech, as moral value or political right, informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  We will trace the conceptual intersection of freedom and speech both historical...(read more) Langan, Celeste

165/1

Special Topics:
Donne: Poetry, Prose, Letters

MW 4-5:30

“I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I did, till we loved?” Fresh, intimate, vulnerable and yet tyrannical: Donne’s voice demands our full attention -- but rarely receives it. Writing between Shakespeare and Milton, Donne is the underdog of the Engl...(read more) Marno, David

165/2

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

TTh 11-12:30

Oscar Wilde’s jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially hostile p...(read more) Lavery, Grace

165/3

Special Topics:
Modern Short Story Masters: James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, and Flannery O'Connor

TTh 2-3:30

The reading and writing assignments—linked with the lectures and class discussions—are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret four great masters of the short story: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka (in translation), and O'...(read more) Campion, John

166/1

Special Topics:
Theory of the Poet

MWF 11-12

The figure of The Poet occupies a significant place in cultural imagination, even when The Poet is thought to occupy a marginal position or engage in useless activity. Bard, rebel, cultural diplomat, priest, historian, recluse—who or what is The Poet...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.

166/2

Special Topics:
Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

This course will survey British and Irish poetry from the past sixty years. It is a large and multifaceted body of work, and much of it remains under-read, especially in the U.S. We will consider the development of a late modernist and postmodern aes...(read more) Falci, Eric

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America

TTh 11-12:30

This survey will have two primary aims: first, to interrogate the concept of nationhood and, particularly, what it means to be American.  Focusing on writings by peoples of Asian descent across the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, we will...(read more) Lee, Steven S.

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

MW 4-5:30

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

174/1

Literature and History:
Writing the British Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will offer an introduction to critical methods focused on practices of historical interpretation. While we will read widely in critical and theoretical writing, our case studies will focus on key texts in the history of nationhood and nat...(read more) Savarese, John L.

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 3:30-5

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these te...(read more) Kleege, Georgina

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…                                                                   -- Chaucer This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on re...(read more) Chandra, Vikram

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 9:30-11

This is a course in the short poem in English, its past and its present. It’s been said that the short poem in English in the sixteenth century, alongside the development of the soliloquy in the theater, invented and staged the modern conception of s...(read more) Hass, Robert L.

180N/1

The Novel

MWF 12-1

A survey of the novel, this course will cover eight examples of the genre from the beginning of the 19th century to the end of the 20th, with a focus on the representation of subjectivity and history. Readings will include selections from novel theor...(read more) Gordon, Zachary

190/1

Research Seminar:
American Gothic

MW 4-5:30

In this course, we will study the Gothic tradition in American literature from the aftermath of the Revolution to the cusp of the Civil War.  We will explore how and why the dark energies of the Gothic imagination haunted our national literature, and...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen

190/2

Research Seminar:
Charles Darwin and George Eliot

MW 4-5:30

George Eliot was the Victorian novelist most attuned to contemporary developments in the natural and human sciences. We will read three of her major novels -- The Mill on the Floss, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda -- in relation to nineteenth-century...(read more) Duncan, Ian

190/3

Research Seminar:
Reflections of the French Revolution

TTh 9:30-11

“In France it was what people did that was wild and elemental; in England it was what people wrote…Verbally considered, Carlyle’s French Revolution was more revolutionary than the real French Revolution” –G. K. Chesterton, The Victorian Age in Litera...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios

190/4

Research Seminar:
Samuel Beckett

TTh 11-12:30

An intensive reading of the works of Samuel Beckett. Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course....(read more) Blanton, C. D.

190/5

Research Seminar:
Reading Like a Victorian

TTh 11-12:30

This course will recreate the reading experiences of the nineteenth-century public, examining publishing trends and literary forms in Victorian Britain. We'll explore the rise of mass literacy, the growth of the periodical press, the serialization of...(read more) Browning, Catherine Cronquist

190/7

Research Seminar:
Cybernetics; or Control and Communication in the Postwar Novel

TTh 12:30-2

The title of this course plays on Norbert Wiener’s highly influential 1948 book, Cybernetics; or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. Though hardly remembered today, the field that it inaugurated, cybernetics, enjoyed a non-specia...(read more) Bernes, Jasper

190/8

Research Seminar:
Moby Dick

TTh 12:30-2

We will read Moby-Dick very closely, twice. Regular attendance and participation will be required, along with two ten-page essays. Students should purchase the Penguin Classics edition, not the Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition. Please read the paragra...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/9

Research Seminar:
Literature of the Ocean

TTh 12:30-2

Provisional Book List:  William Wycherley, The Plain-Dealer; Ned Ward, The Wooden World Dissected; Daniel Defoe, Captain Singleton; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Tobias Smollett, Roderick Random; Frances Burney, Evelina; Jane Austen, Persua...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

190/11

Research Seminar:
American Poetry After 1950

TTh 3:30-5

This course will survey trends in recent American poetry.  We will start by familiarizing ourselves with the work that has been most influential on contemporary writing--John Ashbery, Frank O'Hara, Sylvia Plath, and Robert Creeley.  Then students in ...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.

190/12

Research Seminar:
Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

Henry James asked a lot of his readers, especially in these fictions written late in his career, but they’re extremely rewarding, and worth the labor they require, rewarding because of the labor they require. Students enrolling in the class should th...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/13

Research Seminar:
Realism and Naturalism

TTh 3:30-5

Our readings will focus on major American writers of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century whose works helped to define the literary modes of realism and naturalism. We will be asking questions about how literature responds to new ways of r...(read more) Goble, Mark

190/14

Research Seminar:
Crisis and Culture: The 1930s, 1970s, and Post-2008 in Comparative Perspective

TTh 3:30-5

This research seminar will explore the impact of economic crisis and systemic transformation on cultural production.  To what extent is culture determined by economic forces, and to what extent is it separate from these forces?  How do moments of cri...(read more) Lee, Steven S.

190/15

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 11-12:30 + films Tues. 7-10 P.M.

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards. As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling. But thanks to the French reception of his work in the 1950s, H...(read more) Miller, D.A.

190/16

Research Seminar:
Film Melodrama/The Woman's Film

MW 5:30-7 P.M. + films W 7-10 P.M.

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre "the woman's film" of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various "female" problems and fantasie...(read more) Bader, Julia

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Namwali Serpell in Fall 2013. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Serpell will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali

H195B/2

Honors Course

TTh 8-9:30

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Celeste Langan in Fall 2013.  No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Langan will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more) Langan, Celeste

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of mimesis and the discourse of the s...(read more) Kahn, Victoria

203/1

Graduate Readings:
American Enlightenment and Revolution

M 2-5

This course broadly examines the history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, and religious texts alongside visual arts of the period, we will look at the American Revolution's impact on the Atlanti...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Campus/Novel/Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course considers the relationship between the campus, the novel, and literary theory in the West. Accordingly, we will discuss theories of the novel, read some post-war British and American “campus novels,” consider the campus as a locus for aca...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali

203/4

Graduate Readings:
African American Literature in the Twentieth Century

F 11-2

A survey of major African American writers in the context of social history.  This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th century) or Group 6 (non-historical)  requirement. Advance syllabus here....(read more) Wagner, Bryan

205B/1

Old English:
Reading Beowulf

TTh 2-3:30

In “Reading Beowulf” we will be particularly interested in the making of Beowulf as a text and as a canonical poem. The first goal addresses issues of language, paleography, and textual editing as we translate; the second addresses the cultural inves...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

M 11-2

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Anne Boyer, Farnoosh Fathi, Brenda Hillman, Ben Lerner, Fred Moten, Lisa Robertson, Dana Ward, and others) and a few essays will focus our discussions of each other's poems. To be considered for admission to this...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

246E/1

Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography, and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

246J/1

American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not” – f...(read more) Best, Stephen M.

246L/1

Literature in English, 1945 to the Present:
In the Archive with American Fiction and Poetry

TTh 9:30-11

This course is two courses rolled into one. First, it offers a survey of post-WWII American fiction and poetry, with an eye especially to how aesthetic forms were reshaped under the pressure of social movements (the 1930s left, the Civil Rights movem...(read more) Saul, Scott

250/1

Research Seminars:
Religion and Poetry in Early Modern England

W 11-2

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century religious poetry along with the...(read more) Marno, David

250/2

Research Seminars:
Aesthetics and the Orient

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The kinds of writing called “aesthetics” and “Orientalism” are usually studied in relative isolation from each other, but they share certain features. Both pull readers outside their comfort zones, towards an unfamiliar place of beauty and sublimity;...(read more) Lavery, Grace

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, you can log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B are posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall).

BERKELEY CONNECT (previously designated "The Chernin Mentoring Program"):  Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98 or 198, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98 sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198 sections 6 and 7 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198 sections 1-5 and 8-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited. Only lower-division students should apply for 43B. Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, or 143N. Graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must submit a writing sample AND an application form to the corresponding instructor's mailbox in 322 Wheeler Hall BY 4 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, AT THE LATEST; consult the course description in this Announcement of Classes for the section you are applying to for details concerning the length and nature of the writing sample required, and get the application form from the racks outside the door to the English Department (322 Wheeler Hall). The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 7. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 7, to see if your name is on the class list for the section you applied to; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2013 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2014 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 31 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before they deliver copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.