Announcement of Classes: Fall 2014

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
(Self) Portraits in (Post) Modern Literature

MWF 10-11

Our topic for this course in critical analysis and essay composition will be literary portraiture in a series of Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary novels, poems, and cross-genre works. During the semester we will encounter a dandy whose looks n...(read more)

Klavon, Evan

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
(new topic:) "Structures of Feeling": The Individual in Modernity

MWF 12-1

Let's begin with two loose assumptions, that novels register everyday experience and that novels bear witness to large epistemic shifts. As the possibilities of individual and collective life flounder spectacularly under the pressures of moder...(read more)

Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
How Taste Matters: Self-Curation, Public Identity, and the Modern Aesthetic Life

MWF 1-2

In 1862, Ruskin wrote of the state, “Economists usually speak as if there were no good in consumption absolute. So far from this being so, consumption absolute is the end, crown, and perfection of production; and wise consumption is a far mo...(read more)

Ciacciarelli, Helen

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
The First Person, Medieval to Modern

MWF 3-4

"I am large, I contain multitudes," Walt Whitman's Song of Myself admits parenthetically. This course takes Whitman's multitudes seriously, investigating change and continuity in six centuries of first-person narration. ...(read more)

Strub, Spencer

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Temptation and Desire in Renaissance Literature

MW 4-5:30

The great English epics and dramas of the Early Modern period can’t do without temptation. Why not? What makes temptation such a generative concept? Can we define it? Is temptation just an excuse to blame devils, monsters, or women for one&r...(read more)

Villagrana, José

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare and Film

TTh 8-9:30

How do filmmakers translate Shakespeare from live theater to screen? How do Shakespeare’s tragedies, versus his comedies, versus his histories, lend themselves to or resist certain types of movie adaptation? Do some genres or plays work bett...(read more)

Liu, Aileen

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Idea of the West

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine a variety of texts in order to ask the question: what do we mean when we talk about the West? What is it that writers and ar...(read more)

Zisman, Isaac

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Literary Character

TTh 11-12:30

How do loose bits of textual material transform into literary characters of heft and substance? The question seems deceptively simple when referred to the poles of cultural habit or of the fluid workings of the reader’s imagination. In this ...(read more)

Yu, Esther

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing and Rights: Literature and the Fight against Oppression in Nineteenth-Century America

TTh 2-3:30

"The artist ...  is the holiest reformer of them all, for she is creating."-- Paulina Wright Davis, The Una, 1854

"Polemics ...  are not likely to be epics.  They are likely to be pamphlets, even when they are ...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Making American Literature

TTh 5-6:30

What does it take to write American literature? What in the history of the United States distinguishes the culture, texture, and style of American letters?

In this course we'll explore highly effective strategies in American literary wr...(read more)

Ramirez, Matthew Eric

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Modern Minds

MWF 10-11

In this writing- and research-intensive course we will consider how late nineteenth and early twentieth century writers both responded to and helped shape modern  conceptions of the human mind. Our readings and discussions will focus on the b...(read more)

Abramson, Anna Jones

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
American Transience in the 20th Century

MWF 12-1

Since the imperious dream of Westward expansion, notions of American autonomy, power, and identity have often been caught up with living in motion.  But of course, motion also involves exposure: to displacement, to homelessness, to precarious...(read more)

Miller, Christopher Patrick

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: War, Empire, and Asian American Cultural Critique

MWF 2-3

Dubbed the "American Century," the 20th century bore witness to the rise of the United States as a global superpower, the outcome of American involvement in World War II and the Cold War. From the Philippine-American War to the Pacific W...(read more)

Lee, Amy

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Obsession

MWF 3-4

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can’t stop thinking about anyway. Throughout the ...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: Theorizing the Popular Song

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will examine recent scholarship on the emergence of the popular recording industry in the early 20th century, paying particular attention to how the demands of a capitalist marketplace (mass reproduction, advertising, and distrib...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Sincerity & Honesty

TTh 12:30-2

What does it mean to be sincere or honest? How does one even define honesty, and how has that definition changed over time? What are the prerequisites for truth-speaking to take place? Is sincerity even possible? What is the cost of honesty, and w...(read more)

Ding, Katherine

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Sorrow Songs: Aural Poetry in Nineteenth-Century America

TTh 3:30-5

In this introduction to college composition and research, we will develop skills of close-attention to literary texts and analytic argument through readings of songs, poems, and critical essays, and we will investigate how literary texts (or other...(read more)

Osborne, Gillian K.

R1B/8

Reading and Composition :
Life Stories

MWF 1-2

This course will examine how authors born in nineteenth-century Britain shaped lived experience into nonfictional narrative, turning their own lives and the lives of those around them into stories. We’ll consider autobiography, biography, me...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist

R1B/9

Reading and Composition :
Wild Child

MWF 3-4

This course will explore the literary depiction of the “wild child” and the association of childhood with “primitive,” “savage,” or “natural” conditions. We’ll consider a broad spectrum of wild...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's MAUS

Tues. 2-4 (Sept. 2-Oct. 14 only)

Art Spiegelman has been called “one of our era’s foremost comics artists” and “perhaps the single most important comic creator working within the field.” In this seminar we will devote ourselves to a close reading of ...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Crime and Punishment

Mon. 3-5 (Sept. 8-Oct. 27 only)

In Crime and Punishment (1866), the main characters are two intelligent young men (temporarily college drop-outs because they cannot afford the tuition) and two remarkable young women, in St. Petersburg, Russia, about the time of the Amer...(read more)

Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
FSM

Fridays 10-12 (Sept. 19 to Nov. 7 only; no meeting Oct. 24)

Every fall semester, The College of Letters and Scie...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

MWF 12-1

This course is designed to develop students’ ability and confidence in reading, analyzing, and understanding poetry. Through the course of the semester, we will read a wide range of modern and contemporary poets, beginning with Walt Whitman ...(read more)

Gardezi, Nilofar

26/2

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

How can we become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry, and at the same time better writers of prose? This course attends to the rich variety of poems written in English, drawing on the works of poets from William Shakespeare to Elizabeth Bi...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

28/1

Introduction to the Study of Drama

MWF 2-3

The dramatic arts confound most of the certainties we generally hold about literary writing. Although there are playwrights, each performance is necessarily social and collaborative. Although the printed playscript can last indefinitely on the she...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Immigrant Inscriptions

TTh 9:30-11

A few miles from UC Berkeley’s campus, positioned in the San Francisco Bay near Alcatraz, sits Angel Island, site of a California State Park and one-time “processing center” (1910-1940) for migrants crossing the Pacific into the ...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

MW 10:30-12

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  S...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course will focus on three extraordinary works of late medieval and early modern English literature:  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Spenser's Faerie Queene, and Milton's Paradise Lost.  We'll...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

In this course you will explore some of the great foundational works of English literature, ranging from the very earliest period up to Milton's Paradise Lost. In the process, you will learn to understand--and even speak!--the forms o...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonp...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + discussion secctions F 3-4

On the face of it, English 45B seems like a “neither/nor” course; neither a course in the great English "originals" (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton) nor a course in “modern(ist)” literature. It represents n...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course provides an overview of the many literary innovations now grouped under the term “modernism,” as well as their relations to the historical and social disruptions associated with the term “modernity.”  After...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovati...(read more)

Goble, Mark

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discusssion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

W 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some ficti...(read more)

Bader, Julia

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 11-12

Hwæt! Leorniaþ Englisc!

In this class, you will learn to read, write, and even speak the language of Beowulf. Once you have completed it, you will be able to understand—and will have read!—a wide range of te...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th century)

MWF 3-4

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming a...(read more)

Marno, David

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th century)

TTh 11-12:30

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature (poetry, prose, and drama), focusing on works by King James I, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Cavendish, Hutchinson, Halkett, and Bunyan. We will discuss the relationship bet...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

This course will be a basic introduction to the major plays of Shakespeare.  It will include Midsummer Night 's Dream, probably Merchant of Venice, Richard II, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

117S/2

Shakespeare

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Shakespeare's poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone--in...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

118/1

Milton

This course has been postponed from fall 2014 to spring 2015.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

119/1

Literature of the Restoration & the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

The period from the "Restoration" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the mo...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

125D/1

The 20th -Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

(read more)
Blanton, C. D.

127/1

Modern Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

This course will survey the work of major American and British poets who flourished in the twentieth century.  Poets will include W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden,  Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens, W.C. Williams, ...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

This course will offer a survey of the literature in English produced in North America before 1800: competing British versions of settlement; Puritan history, sermons, and poetry; conversion, captivity, and slave narratives; diaries, journals, ess...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 2-3:30

In the mid-nineteenth century, the U.S., a nation that had barely come together, was splitting apart. The fission helped to produce the remarkably energetic works we will be studying over the course of the semester. I will focus primarily on quest...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 3:30-5

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; and yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an embrace of literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exp...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

133B/1

African American Literature and Culture\nSince 1917

TTh 2-3:30

An examination of some of the major 20th-century African American novels.

 

...(read more)
JanMohamed, Abdul R.

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
The Fiction of Toni Morrison

TTh 9:30-11

A sequential examination of Toni Morrison’s fiction.

 

...(read more)
JanMohamed, Abdul R.

133T/2

Topics in African American Literature and Culture

This section of English 133T has been canceled.

...(read more)
Ellis, Nadia

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Race and Ethnicity in American Cinema

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced between the 1910s and the 1970s. Themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impers...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

MWF 12-1

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and ...(read more)

Hutson, Richard

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Partitioned States/Partitioned Selves

note new time: TTh 2-3:30

Territorial division has long been used as a means of political reorganization, especially in the face of ethnic or ideological conflict. This course examines the relationship between territorial splitting, or partition, and empire in the twentiet...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi

141/1

Modes of Writing:
Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

141/2

Modes of Writing:
Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 1:30-3

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  S...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This class is a workshop in short fiction. It is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of narrative style and structure, and to encourage a model of constructive critique in a workshop setting. Our readings will include short stor...(read more)

Tranter, Kirsten

143B/1

Verse

MW 4-5:30

What I take as a given is that poetry (and by implication, all "creative writing") is a public activity, one with the job of disrupting the status quo, the "interested" discourse of TV and advertising, the endless double-talk o...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143B/2

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-li...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/3

Verse

TTh 3:30-5

A seminar in writing poetry.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the applicati...(read more)

Roberson, Edwin
Roberson, Ed

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

MW 12-1:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing ass...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction

TTh 2-3:30

Within a workshop setting, we will read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction, with special attention to the essay as a literary genre.  Students will express their understanding and appreciation of this lite...(read more)

McQuade, Donald

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on th...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

165/1

Special Topics:
Critical Influences in Contemporary Culture

TTh 9:30-11

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments of this course are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of difficult and important texts concerning the concepts of free...(read more)

Campion, John

165/2

Special Topics:
Freedom and the University: The 1960s and Its Afterlives

TTh 11-12:30

The sixties represent a period in which the university became for the first time a central locus of struggles for freedom—for civil rights, Black Power, Third World self-determination, and women’s and gay liberation, and a...(read more)

Lye, Colleen

165/3

Special Topics:
Greek Tragedy in Translation

TTh 12:30-2

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students' ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

165/5

Special Topics:
The Graphic Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

The graphic novel is often defined as "a single-author, book-length work meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes."  Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term as a preten...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

165/6

Special Topics:
The End of the Poem: Poetic Closure

TTh 2-3:30

This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem’s entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

166/2

Special Topics:
Chicano Literature and History

TTh 2-3:30

The Chicano Movement of the late sixties and early seventies was a social movement that reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the Mexican American community. It represented a political challenge to inequality and racism as well as a cul...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

166/3

Special Topics:
Black Science Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This course considers two specific genres—black fiction and science fiction—to explore how they inflect each other when they blend. Under the umbrella “black,” we include fictions that issue out of and/or purport to describ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

166/4

Special Topics:
Global Cities

TTh 9:30-11

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives--fictional and otherwi...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidin...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
British Cinema

TTh 12:30-2 + films Tues. 6-9 P.M.

This course will look at the British cinema from the 1930s to the present from a number of different angles. First, we will consider British cinema as a national industry and ask how the economic and social conditions under which British films hav...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

174/1

Literature and History:
The French Revolution

MWF 12-1

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contr...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group presentation project, and a take-home final examination.  (This is a c...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180A/1

Autobiography

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

190/1

Research Seminar:
American Captivities

MW 3-4:30

The Indian captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.”  Its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, but American captivity narratives also related the captivities ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

190/2

Research Seminar:
Recent African American Literature

MW 3-4:30

A seminar focused on poetry and prose published by African Americans in the last 25 years. One short essay, one group presentation, and one long essay due at the end of the semester.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructio...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

190/3

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 4-5:30

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the tr...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

190/4

Research Seminar:
Victorian Masculinities

TTh 9:30-11

The Queen for whom the Victorian era was named defines the period’s cultural reputation in more ways than one; the stereotypes of Victorianism—moral constraint, prudery, repression—are almost always associated with women. This co...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios

190/5

Research Seminar:
Paradise Lost and the Ancient Epic

TTh 11-12:30

“Not less but more heroic” … that is Milton’s claim in his modern epic Paradise Lost, comparing his own Biblical theme to the achievements of ancient epic, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Vir...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

190/6

Research Seminar:
Ecopoetry

TTh 12:30-2

What is ecopoetry, and what, if anything, distinguishes it from nature poetry? How does ecopoetics differ from another poetics? In this seminar we will explore topics surrounding this question, which include the pathetic fallacy and anthropomorphi...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/7

Research Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf’s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read t...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

190/8

Research Seminar:
Dialect Literature

TTh 12:30-2

In this seminar we will read works written in what the novelist and human rights activist Ken Saro-Wiwa termed “rotten English,” primarily the work of authors from the African diaspora, though not exclusively.  Our conversations w...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

190/9

Research Seminar:
Contemporary British Culture and Literature

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will investigate the literary and cultural landscape of contemporary Britain.  After several introductory sessions on the postwar period (1945-1979), we'll spend the bulk of our time in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s.&nbsp...(read more)

Falci, Eric

190/10

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel

TTh 2-3:30

Readings in the “novelistic revolution” (Franco Moretti’s phrase) of European Romanticism. With our main focus on the establishment of  “the classical form of the historical novel” in Scott’s Waverley(read more)

Duncan, Ian

190/11

Research Seminar:
Manifesto Modernism

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine modernist prose and poetry in English from the perspective of a particularly modern genre of writing, the manifesto. By exploring the literary qualities of the manifesto as well as the manifesto-like qualities of modernist...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper

190/12

Research Seminar:
The Rejection of Closure: Slow Readings

TTh 3:30-5

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Works by Larry Eigner,...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

190/13

Research Seminar

 

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen

190/14

Research Seminar:
20th-Century California Literature and Film

Tues. 6-9 P.M.

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions o...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/15

Research Seminar:
Film Noir

MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.

We will examine the influence of film noir on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory, and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course...(read more)

Bader, Julia

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

English 195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. This course gives you the opportunity, training, and time to conduct original research that will enable you to make a scholarly contribution ...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

This course will guide and accompany you as you undertake the capstone project of your English major: a Heartbreaking (40-60 pages!) Honors Thesis of Staggering Genius. The fall semester will serve as an introduction to literary theory and critici...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Allegories of Late Capitalism and the Writing of Everyday Life

TTh 12:30-2

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, location, historical awaren...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretica...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2014-15, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), this fall in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

211/1

Chaucer

MW 1:30-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

217/1

Shakespeare

M 3-6

Instead of pursuing a master problematic, we will take up a wide range of issues: when I read Shakespeare these days, I am interested in his representations of citizenship, compassion, artificial persons (political representatives, diplomats, surr...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Farber, Thomas

246C/1

Renaissance

W 3-6

This survey course will focus on the poetry, drama, and prose literature of sixteenth-century England.  We'll also read key works from the past fifty years of literary scholarship on the period.

Whenever possible, readings will be ...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

246K/1

Literature in English 1900-1945:
The Modernist Novel

MW 12-1:30

In this seminar, we will read ten modernist novels. We will consider the strangeness of their modes of narrative and characterization as they respond to challenges such as the destabilizing of traditional social hierarchies and gender roles, the...(read more)
Flynn, Catherine

250/1

Research Seminars:
Comintern Modernisms

W 3-6

It has long been common practice to see Western metropolises like Paris and New York as competing centers of global modernism, as capitals of a "world republic of letters."  The aim of this seminar is to posit an alternate mapping o...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

250/2

Research Seminars:
Victorian Prose Style

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we’ll look at the idea of prose style in a few different ways.  First, we’ll read some key texts on the theory of st...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

250/3

Research Seminars:
Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

M 3-6

This comparative seminar in lyric poetry borrows its title from Susan Stewart's Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (University of Chicago Press, 2002), to ask about the relation between poetry and sensory deprivation (or plenitude) and...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

Staff

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and\nLiterature

Thurs. 9-11

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing both at UC Berkeley (in Eng...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, April 4.

BERKELEY CONNECT (previously designated "The Chernin Mentoring Program"): Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 3, 4, 6, and 9 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 5, 7, and 8 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43A, 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 243N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only lower-division students should apply for 43A; only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, and 143N; and only graduate students (and upper-division students with considerable writing experience) should apply for 243N.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Tuesday, April 29. Please come on or shortly after Tuesday, April 29, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE FALL. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must electronically apply, using the link on the course listing in this "Announcement of Classes"; your submittal will need to include: (a) the on-line application form, along with PDFs of: (b) your college transcript(s); (c) a list of your spring 2014 classes; and (d) a critical paper (in a PDF or Word document) that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality). These applications must be submitted, via the corresponding link, BY 4 P.M., FRIDAY, MAY 2 (which is later than the orginal deadline to apply for this course). Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2014 semester, and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, applicants will be contacted by email sometime between late July and late August to be informed if they have been selected for admission, and, if so, to which section.  (Since there might be more applicants for one section than the other, some students might end up being placed in the section that was not their first choice). IF YOU ARE ADMITTED TO ONE OF THE H195A SECTIONS, YOU WILL NEED TO OBTAIN YOUR CEC (CLASS ENTRY CODE) AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR, AND THEN YOU WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS AND ADD THE COURSE SOON AFTER THAT; NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN H195A BEFORE CLASSES START.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2014 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MAY 2. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the May 2 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, obtainable in 319 Wheeler. After you have received the instructor's signature on the form, you will need to return to 319 Wheeler to obtain a course control number before you can enroll in the course on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.