Announcement of Classes: Fall 2014


Introduction to Old English

English 104

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: Note new location: 155 Kroeber


Book List

Baker, Peter S.: Introduction to Old English: Third Edition; Marsden, Richard: The Cambridge Old English Reader

Description

Hwæt! Leorniaþ Englisc!

In this class, you will learn to read, write, and even speak the language of Beowulf. Once you have completed it, you will be able to understand—and will have read!—a wide range of texts, from comic riddles and love-laments to King Alfred’s educational policy. Because Old English is the grandparent of modern English, success in this course will also help you understand the grammar of today’s language from the inside out.

This course does not assume any previous experience learning languages at the college level, or any prior knowledge of Old English. Work will include translation in and out of class; quizzes; daily participation, and exams.

Note:  Graduate students may enroll in this class, and will be expected to do additional intensive work for graduate credit.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Greenblatt, Stephen: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition, Volume B: The Sixteenth and the Seventeenth Century; Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Description

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture would elevate human beings above their natural state. Many of our authors supported the project; some opposed it fervently. But willingly or not, everyone we read during the semester contributed to it, if only by virtue of recording their impressions, thoughts, feelings, and fancies in writing. Our aim in the course is to understand both the project of the Renaissance and the beliefs behind it by looking at the works of Francis Petrarch, Thomas Wyatt, Mary Sidney, William Shakespeare, and John Donne, among others.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (17th century)

English 115B

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 160 Dwinelle


Book List

Bunyan, John: Pilgrim's Progress; Edited by Alan Rudrum, Joseph Black & Holly Faith Nelson : The Broadview Anthology of Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose: vol 1

Description

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature (poetry, prose, and drama), focusing on works by King James I, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Cavendish, Hutchinson, Halkett, and Bunyan. We will discuss the relationship between literature and the court of James I, the explosion of pamphlet literature during the English civil war, the controversy over gender roles, the texts surrounding the regicide of Charles I, and the political, religious, and sexual radicalism of dissenting literary culture.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 130 Dwinelle


Book List

Bevington, David: The Necessary Shakespeare, Student Edition

Description

This course will be a basic introduction to the major plays of Shakespeare.  It will include Midsummer Night 's Dream, probably Merchant of Venice, Richard II, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, Antony and Cleopatra, Winter's Tale, and Tempest.  The instructor is not a specialist in Shakespeare and is not very interested in historicist approaches of any kind.  The aim of this course is to develop a full vocubulary for the appreciation of the plays, the characters, how they handle their situations, and how Shakespeare handles that handling.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 2
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 101 Barker


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Norton Shakespeare

Description

Shakespeare's poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone--indeed, something like an obsession--for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to George Eliot to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Sarah Kane and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Kristeva to Zizeck. We will be especially concerned with five large issues: compassion; political representation and its discontents; the nature of identity and subjectivity; colonialism; and the relation between the ways Shakespeare's plays make meaning and the ways they produce emotional experience. Our readings will include Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.

I have ordered the second edition of The Norton Shakespeare (ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al.). If you already own another complete Shakespeare (e.g., The Riverside, The Pelican, the first edition of The Norton Shakespeare, etc.), you are welcome to use it for this course. Good single-play editions--Signet, Folger, Arden, Oxford World Classics, Pelican--would also serve you well.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held unitl Friday, September 5.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been postponed from fall 2014 to spring 2015.


Literature of the Restoration & the Early 18th Century

English 119

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 210 Wheeler


Book List

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume C: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century

Other Readings and Media

A few texts will be available to download, including William Wycherley's sex-farce The Country Wife (ebook that comes free with the Norton Anthology)

Description

The period from the "Restoration" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the most influential novels, the most amusing comedies, and the most outrageous obscenity. London (already the largest city in the world) burned to the ground - we will begin the course by reading contemporary accounts of this catastrophe - but within a few generations had developed all the benefits of modern civilization: a stock market, a scientific revolution, an insurance industry, a colonial empire based on slavery. This course will try to convey not only the abundance and brilliance of this period, but its contrasts and contradictions. Canonical figures like Hobbes, Dryden, Congreve, Pope and Swift will be juxtaposed to scandalous and/or marginal authors: women writers like Aphra Behn, Mary Astell and Mary Wortley Montagu, Puritan outlaws like John Bunyan, and renegade aristocrats like the Earl of Rochester. Dominant themes, always treated with devastating wit and skeptical realism, include sexuality and identity, the politics of gender as well as nation, and the representation of “other” cultures (Surinam, West Africa, Ottoman Turkey).

Our readings come from a single book, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition, Volume C, The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century – plus a few extra texts available to download.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The 20th -Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Gibson, William: Neuromancer; Mann, Thomas: The Magic Mountain; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Zola, Emile: La Bete Humaine

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics--history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narratiion within the novel; how has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel; and lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?


British Literature: 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Watt; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Green, Henry: Party Going; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Woolf, Virginia: Jacob's Room; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves

Description

A survey of the modernist period in British and Irish writing, concentrating on the development of the novel as both an artistic medium and a mechanism of social representation. Students should be prepared to read adventurously and to read a lot. We will attempt about a work per week, making a central exception for Joyce’s Ulysses, which will slow us to about a chapter per day.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Modern Poetry

English 127

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 103 Moffitt


Book List

Ramazani, Johan, ed.: Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, Vol. 1

Description

This course will survey the work of major American and British poets who flourished in the twentieth century.  Poets will include W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden,  Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens, W.C. Williams, Lorine Neidecker. Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and John Ashbery.  The focus will be on close reading to establish how poets compose modes of attention to the world by their control of language.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Baym, Nina: The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Seventh Edition), Vol. A: Beginnings to 1820; Brown, Charles Brockden: Edgar Huntly; Miller, Perry: The American Puritans: Their Prose and Poetry; Rowson, Susanna: Charlotte Temple

Other Readings and Media

Photocopied course reader

Description

This course will offer a survey of the literature in English produced in North America before 1800: competing British versions of settlement; Puritan history, sermons, and poetry; conversion, captivity, and slave narratives; diaries, journals, essays, and oratory; and eighteenth-century political debate, poetry, and novels. Authors will include William Bradford, John Winthrop, John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, Susanna Rowson, and Charles Brockden Brown. Two midterms and one final examination will be required.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 180 Tan


Book List

Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass ; Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Nature and Selected Essays ; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter ; Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick; Thoreau, Henry David: Walden and Civil Disobedience ; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass: The First (1855) Edition

Description

In the mid-nineteenth century, the U.S., a nation that had barely come together, was splitting apart. The fission helped to produce the remarkably energetic works we will be studying over the course of the semester. I will focus primarily on questions of freedom, cruelty, desire, and loss in my lectures, attempting to understand the relation between these abstract human experiences and the particular historical situation framing them. I will also emphasize the striking, baroque, often bizarre formal innovations attempted in these works.

Two ten-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance.


African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

English 133A

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 246 Dwinelle


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles: The Conjure Woman; Franklin, John Hope: Three Negro Classics; Gates, Henry Louis: The Classic Slave Narratives; Walker, David: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens

Description

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; and yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an embrace of literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exploration of selected works from the canon of African American literature. We will concern ourselves not only with the conceptual distinctions between orality and literacy, but also with how those distinctions gather force within debates over the power of language in politics and history: Rather than a teleological progression from orality to literacy, why does one find in much African American literature a promiscuous coupling of the two? What particular role does speech (e.g., confession, testimony) play in the formation of the subject? What are the politics of speaking, reading, and writing in early America? How might slaves have apprehended the power of orality – rhetoric, eloquence, performative speech – at a time when magnificent effects seemed to follow from the act of “declaring” independence?


African American Literature and Culture\nSince 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new room: 160 Dwinelle


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Jones, Edward: The Known World; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand & Passing; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Wright, Richard: Native Son

Description

An examination of some of the major 20th-century African American novels.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: The Fiction of Toni Morrison

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 174 Barrows


Book List

Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: Desdemona; Morrison, Toni: Home; Morrison, Toni: Love; Morrison, Toni: Paradise; Morrison, Toni: Playing in the Dark; Morrison, Toni: Song of Solomon; Morrison, Toni: Sula; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye

Description

A sequential examination of Toni Morrison’s fiction.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture

English 133T

Section: 2
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Other Readings and Media

.

Description

This section of English 133T has been canceled.


Literature of American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in American Cinema

English 135AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Films will include Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, The Jazz Singer, The Searchers, Touch of Evil, Imitation of Life, West Side Story, Night of the Living Dead, The Godfather, and Apocalypse Now.

There are no required screenings in this course. Films can be streamed through commercial outlets or checked out from Moffitt Library.

There will also be a course reader with essays in political theory and social history. 

 

Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced between the 1910s and the 1970s. Themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impersonation.

There will be weekly writing assignments, one short essay, and one long essay.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections wil not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Topics in American Studies: Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: Little Women; Aldrich, Thomas Bailey: The Story of a Bad Boy; Alger, Horatio: Ragged Dick; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Wiggin, Kate Douglas: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Description

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This is a period in which ordinary citizens felt that an economic and social revolution was taking place with the rise of industrial capitalism and urban transformations, creating a crisis of major cultural/political/economic rapid change.  Such a historical trauma seemed to demand difficult and painful reconsiderations and redefinitions. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity in the period, there  developed a problem about children and adolescents. Questions about boys and girls might be not only about gender definitions but also about the development of an ethical consciousness, what might be called everyday ethical coping.  Children seemed to represent either a last vestige of a world that was being lost or a promise of the future.  In the aftermath of the elevation of the importance of children in the Romantic era earlier in the century, in the U.S., the narratives of boys and girls gave artists the opportunity to observe, scrutinize, critique, and entertain.

There will be two papers and a final exam.  

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E.


Studies in World Literature in English: Partitioned States/Partitioned Selves

English 138

Section: 1
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi
Time: note new time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 179 Dwinelle


Book List

Buttalia, Urvashi: The Other Side of Silence; Cao, Lan: Monkey Bridge; Kanafani, Ghassan : Men in the Sun; Lee, Chang-rae: The Surrendered; Ninh, Bao: The Sorrow of War; Rushdie, Salman: Midnight's Children; Said, Edward: The Question of Palestine; Shelach, Oz: Picnic Grounds; Shin, Kyung-Sook: Please Look After Mom

Description

Territorial division has long been used as a means of political reorganization, especially in the face of ethnic or ideological conflict. This course examines the relationship between territorial splitting, or partition, and empire in the twentieth century. We will take a comparativist approach to two historical moments in which four major partitions took place: the 1947 partitions of India and Palestine, and the 1954 partitions of Korea and Vietnam. Taking seriously the historical contexts of decolonization and Cold War conflicts, this course considers literary and cinematic reflections on these geopolitical ruptures. After the lines have been drawn, making two states where there was once one, how do people imagine these new nations? How do they imagine themselves in relationship to what exists on the other side of that new border? Does partition make possible new kinds of nation-states and new kinds of national feeling? What is the relationship between the splitting of territory and psychic trauma?

We will examine novels, short stories, memoirs, and films alongside theories of psychoanalysis to consider the affective afterlives of partition, on nations and on individuals. 


Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 122 Barrows


Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  Please note that although Melanie Abrams will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Professor Robert Hass and Lecturer Melanie Abrams will actually team-teach the two sections of the course.  Students will enroll in one section and spend five weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams, and five weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass.  Both instructors will collaborate for two weeks to teach playwriting.

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

This course is open to English majors only.  


Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: B0005 Hearst Annex


Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  Please note that although Robert Hass will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Lecturer Melanie Abrams and Professor Robert Hass will actually team-teach the two sections of the course.  Students will enroll in one section and spend five weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass, and five weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams.  Both instructors will collaborate for two weeks to teach playwriting.

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Furman, Laura: The O. Henry Prize Stories 2013

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction, and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course.  To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file.  The deadline for completing this application process in 4 P.M. FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Tranter, Kirsten
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

La Plante, A.: The Making of a Story: A Norton Guide to Creative Writing

Other Readings and Media

Also a course reader

Description

This class is a workshop in short fiction. It is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of narrative style and structure, and to encourage a model of constructive critique in a workshop setting. Our readings will include short stories across a variety of literary genres, as well as essays and critical pieces on the writing process. Students will write at least two short stories as well as shorter writing and response exercises, and will be expected to share their work with the class and critique the work of others on a regular basis.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadine for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Blanchfield, Brian: A Several World; Hamilton, Peggy: Questions for Animals; Holiday, Harmony: Go Find Your Father; Saloy, Mona Lisa: Second Line Home

Other Readings and Media

A course reader to be available from Zee Zee Copy.

 

Description

What I take as a given is that poetry (and by implication, all "creative writing") is a public activity, one with the job of disrupting the status quo, the "interested" discourse of TV and advertising, the endless double-talk of politics. This semester I'm wanting us to emphasize poetry as a public site, as an event that necessarily takes place in public. We do shape poetry for our own purposes--some of these are classic (advancing art, e.g., or doing violence to language) and some are tawdry (use your imagination) and many fall inbetween--and I'm asking that this fall, as part of the work of this course, we work toward one or two public (open to the public) events involving poetry.

Reading, weekly writing expectations, interrogation, argument, field trips, public events, "workshopping," "woodshedding," etc.

From an essay:  I find [form] interesting as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment. Sonnets can be navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to get it right but to see how it feels to get involved in it, that and to look at what the poem (or the essay or joke or speech) does and at the ways the world presses on it, and at how it presses back on the world . . . . The point here being that both [Gwendolyn] Brooks and [Bernadette] Mayer tangle awkwardly and repeatedly with the [sonnet] form, with the received pattern of lines and syllables and turns, the daily order of arrival. Of course it's the wrestling that's important, the labor there, not the form so much. The form allows us to talk in class about the wrestling; it's a thing, a topic, a place or place-holder in the never-ending conversation.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 pages of your poems (any combination of long or short poems or fragments of poems, the total length not exceeding five pages), by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader from Krishna Copy.

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second, and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision. Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, with an eye and ear to renovating traditions. I have no "house style" and only one precept: you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we'll discuss four or so in rotation (I'll respond to every poem you write). On alternate days, we'll discuss illustrative poems in our course reader. If the past is any guarantee, the course will make you a better poet.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: Roberson, Edwin
Roberson, Ed
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

A Poet's Guide to Poetry

Description

A seminar in writing poetry.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Lopate, P.: The Art of the Personal Essay

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each), two new essays (8-20 pages each), written critiques of classmates' work, and a final revision project. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your literary nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

Within a workshop setting, we will read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction, with special attention to the essay as a literary genre.  Students will express their understanding and appreciation of this literary form in a series of well-crafted essays.  The primary texts will be the participants’ own prose.  We will also explore contemporary essays as well as the exquisite traditions within which they emerge.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 8-10 double-spaced pages of your writing (I am especially interested in reading your creative nonfiction rather than your academic prose) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new location: 110 Wheeler


Book List

Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction; James, Henry (ed. Peter Beidler): The Turn of the Screw; Leitch, Vincent, ed, et al: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism;

Recommended: Culler, Jonathan: Structuralist Poetics; Felman, Shoshana: Jacques Lacan and the Adventure of Insight; Lentricchia, Frank, et al: Critical Terms for Literary Study; Norris, Christopher: Deconstruction: Theory and Practice

Other Readings and Media

Required readings are available in the course reader produced by Odin Readers (841-7323 or <www.odinreaders.com>).

Description

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical schools: formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, identity politics, and post-colonialism.  We will examine the differences in value and method that define these approaches and also consider the ways critical traditions retool themselves in response to internal or external debate and critique.  Our abiding concern will be to ask what counts as “the literary” for each theorist and what is the role and function of literature in each argument.  Sometimes the literary will be defined explicitly; other times it will be represented by the exemplary literary texts each school enlists in its theoretical enterprise. 

To develop skills as close readers of theory, students will write two short papers (7-8 pages each).  Students will also complete a take-home final, which will give the opportunity for synthetic thinking.


Special Topics: Critical Influences in Contemporary Culture

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Beaudrillard, Jean: Simulacra and Simulation; Chomsky, Noam: Necessary Illusions; Deleuze, G. and Guattari, F, Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari: A Thousand Plateaus; Foucault, Michel: Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison; Reich, Wilhelm: The Mass Psychology of Fascism

Description

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments of this course are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of difficult and important texts concerning the concepts of freedom, knowledge, and political practices in contemporary democratic (and other) societies. Along the way, the course will introduce a number of critical issues connected to these themes, including: agency, selfhood, ecology, psychotherapy, economics, gender, race, and literature.

 


Special Topics: Freedom and the University: The 1960s and Its Afterlives

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Anzaldua, Gloria, et al.: This Bridge Called My Back; Aptheker, Bettina: Intimate Politics; Bloom, Aexander: Takin' it to the Streets: A Sixties Reader, 2nd edition; Bloom,, Joshua, et al.: Black Against Empire; Charter, Ann: The Portable Sixties Reader; Cohen, Robert: Freedom's Orator; Davis, Angela: Angela Davis: An Autobiography; Edufactory Collective: Toward a Global Autonomous University; Freire, Paulo: Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Marcuse, Herbert: One-Dimensional Man; Newfield, Christopher: Unmaking of the Public University

Description

The sixties represent a period in which the university became for the first time a central locus of struggles for freedom—for civil rights, Black Power, Third World self-determination, and women’s and gay liberation, and against imperialism and colonialism, militarism and war, capitalism and heterosexist patriarchy. The result was that conceptions of what higher education should be and whom it should be for were also profoundly changed. This course is being offered in coordination with next Fall’s commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement (FSM), which in 1964 put Berkeley on the “World Sixties” map. Instead of dichotomizing the “good” early sixties from the “bad” late sixties, this course will be interested in locating productive encounters between liberal ideals and radical quests for freedom and equality. Examining the intellectual and material legacies of that era in light of today’s precarious public university, this course will trace the historical dialectic between “Cultural Revolution” and Ethnic Studies, and between the counterculture and cyberculture. The course will geographically emphasize the San Francisco Bay Area, so that students may pursue final research projects if they choose on topics rich in local archives. Course readings will include a wide range of media and genres: biography, history, memoir, poetry, manifesto, fiction, anthology, theory, film, drama. As such, students should expect that though this is an English-listed course, it will be taught as an interdisciplinary cultural studies, history and theory course. Students should attend the first day of class before purchasing any books, as there may be adjustments to the book list.

 


Special Topics: Greek Tragedy in Translation

English 165

Section: 3
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Aeschylus, ed. Grene, Lattimore, et al.: Aeschylus II: The Oresteia--Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides I : Medea, Alcestis, The Children of Heracles, Hyppolytus; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides II: Andromache, Hecuba, The Suppliant Women, Electra; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides V: Bacchae, Iphigenia in Aulis, The Cyclops, Rhesus; Sophocles, ed. Griffith et al.: Sophocles I: Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone

Description

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students' ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early sources and how they raised critical questions that concern western societies up to the present day. The class will look at their concepts of individuality, family, freedom, will, meaning, knowledge, mind, God, and political practice. Along the way, the course will consider some connecting tissue, such as psychotherapy, economics, gender, literary theory, and ecology.

 


Special Topics: The Graphic Memoir

English 165

Section: 5
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Barry, Lynda: One! Hundred! Demons!; Bechdel, Alison: Are You My Mother? A Comic Drama; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Gloeckner, Phoebe: A Child's Life: And Other Stories; McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Sacco, Joe: Palestine; Satrapi, Marjane: Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; Spiegelman, Art: Maus, Vols I & II; Yang, Gene Luen: American Born Chinese

Description

The graphic novel is often defined as "a single-author, book-length work meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes."  Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term as a pretentious and disingenuous attempt to rebrand comics in order to elevate their cultural status.  We will explore the definitions, history, and diverse forms of graphic narratives with an emphasis on the graphic memoir or autobiography or personal narrative.  Along the way, we will develop a critical vocabulary to help us articulate the special blend of visual and verbal narrative as well as notions of subjectivity.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: The End of the Poem: Poetic Closure

English 165

Section: 6
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All primary and secondary readings will be in a course reader, available at Metro Publishing on Bancroft.

Description

This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem’s entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which a poem generates itself, deferring then delivering (or thwarting) the sense of an ending. In addition to the question I.A. Richards poses in his essay “How Does a Poem Know When It is Finished?” we’ll ask some versions of the following: Can a poem end without concluding? What comes after the last line of the poem? Why do so many poems close by recalling their beginnings? How have closural strategies in English poetry changed over time? We’ll pair theoretical accounts of closure with test-cases from across the history of poetry in English, acquiring along the way some facility with its prosodies, its use of figures from classical rhetoric (especially figures of repetition), and its major and minor formal environments.

Update (on June 26):  We were previously not sure whether this section of English 165 would be offered or not, but now we know that it WILL be offered.

 


Special Topics: Chicano Literature and History

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 104 Barrows


Book List

Acosta, Oscar Zeta: The Revolt of the Cockroach People; Baca, Jimmy Santiago: Martin and Meditations on the South Valley; Bardacke, Frank: Trampling Out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers; Blackwell, Maylei: Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement; Cisneros, Sandra: House on Mango Street; Corpi, Lucha: Eulogy for a Brown Angel; Lopez, Ian Haney: Racism on Trial: The Chicano Fight for Justice; Montejano, David: Quixote's Soldiers: A Local History of the Chicano Movement; Rivera, Tomas: ... y no se lo trago la tierra/...and the earth did not swallow him

Description

The Chicano Movement of the late sixties and early seventies was a social movement that reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the Mexican American community. It represented a political challenge to inequality and racism as well as a cultural renaissance that expressed itself in literature, art, and music. In this class, co-taught by Professor David Montejano of Chicano Studies, we will explore the politics and culture generated by the Chicano Movement. Our readings will illustrate the various tendencies and perspectives of the activists and artists who led, informed, and inspired the movement.

This class is cross-listed with Chicano Studies 180 section 2.


Special Topics: Black Science Fiction

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 12 Haviland


Book List

Butler, Octavia E.: Lilith's Brood; Delany, Samuel R.: Babel-17; Díaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Okarafor, Nnedi: Lagoon; Schuyler, George: Black No More; Whitehead, Colson: The Intuitionist;

Recommended: Butler, Octavia E.: Bloodchild, and Other Stories; Delany, Samuel R.: Aye, and Gomorrah; Poe, Edgar Allen: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

Other Readings and Media

Movies:  Franklin J. Schaffner, Planet of the Apes; John Sayles, The Brother From Another Planet; Neill Blomkamp, District 9

Description

This course considers two specific genres—black fiction and science fiction—to explore how they inflect each other when they blend. Under the umbrella “black,” we include fictions that issue out of and/or purport to describe the African, the Caribbean, and the African-American experience. The category of “science fiction” will comprise stories, novels, films, and television shows that speculate about wild, hybrid, alternative, cosmic, neo-ecological, dystopian, and ancient technologies of human experience. Overlapping—and mutually transforming—concepts include: genetics, race, diaspora, miscegenation, double consciousness, time, memory, history, futurity, and, of course, the alien.


Special Topics: Global Cities

English 166

Section: 4
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Boo, Katherine: Behind the Beautiful Forevers; Buekes, Lauren: Zoo City; Cole, Teju: Open City; Mpe, Phaswane: Welcome to Our Hillbrow; Rushdie, Salman: The Moor's Last Sigh; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth; Theroux, Paul: Kowloon Tong

Description

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives--fictional and otherwise--that live in those cities, the stories those cities give birth to. Our itinerary will take us to five global cities: New York, London, Johannesburg, Mumbai, and Hong Kong. At each stop we will consider representations of these cities and their inhabitants from above and from below, from theories of transnational capital to narratives of the dispossessed. Are these cities sites of interconnection and aspiration, or do they indicate a world increasingly unequal and divided? How do the local and the foreign intersect in these global urban spaces? What do they tell us about globalization, its histories, and the literary and cultural forms it now takes?

 

 


Literature and Sexual Identity: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

English 171

Section: 1
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 9 Evans


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood ; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Cunningham, Michael: The Hours; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Fiction; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Toibin, Colm: The Master; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando

Other Readings and Media

An electronic reader of poetry, short fiction, and critical essays will be available on b-space, and a selection of key critical works will be on reserve at Moffitt. During the semester, we will also screen several films, including Brokeback Mountain, Boys Don't Cry, and Looking for Langston.

Description

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel: and on the other as the freeing of desire from the burden of reproduction, and of language from the burden of reference. Sexual and literary experimentation went hand in hand, but their intersections varied considerably. At the turn of the twenty-first century, a different phase of the sexual revolution produced a spectrum of intensive cultural production, political action, and theoretical debate about the construction of gender and sexuality. In this course, we will read back and forth across the twentieth century to stage a series of encounters between the cultural practices of modernism and those of contemporary queer theorists and communities.

This course is cross-listed with L.G.B.T. 100 section 1.


The Language and Literature of Films: British Cinema

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + films Tues. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 56 Barrows for lectures; 166 Barrows for films


Other Readings and Media

In addition to regular film screenings, we'll look at a number of essays, which will all be available on our course site.

Description

This course will look at the British cinema from the 1930s to the present from a number of different angles. First, we will consider British cinema as a national industry and ask how the economic and social conditions under which British films have been made, distributed, and received have affected their form, their content, and their relation to other national cinemas. What, if anything, makes British films different from what was and is happening in France, Hollywood or Mumbai? In order to answer these questions we will pay special attention to genre films: the war film, the romance, the spy film, the gangster film, etc. Second, we will look at different ways (both kind and unkind) in which the British cinema has represented Britishness at home and abroad. How does a national cinema respond to, help, or hinder shifts in the way national identity is understood and experienced? We'll look at films about the preservation of Britishness as a form of heritage, nostalgia about the passing of Britishness "as it was," and the presentation of other stories about Britishness that run against the grain of the first two. Finally, we will treat these British films as films and look very closely at them in order to develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze and describe film at the level of form and content.


Literature and History: The French Revolution

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 110 Wheeler


Description

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contradictory.  Yet both statements underscore the difficulty of conceptualizing revolution as an event.  Emphasizing its radical novelty, Edmund Burke declared the French Revolution “the most astonishing thing that has hitherto happened in the world,” whereas William Hazlitt described it as “the remote but inevitable result of the invention of the art of printing.”  Is revolution a consequence or a cause--or a rupture of causality? What is the relation between the revolutionary event and liberation, between acts or episodes of violent unmaking and the unleashing of a discourse and praxis of human rights that continues to reverberate?

This course is designed to consider that literature of and about the French Revolution is peculiarly adapted to illuminate the problem of historical eventfulness (and human freedom) insofar as it yokes the temporality of revolution to fictive (dramatic, poetic, and novelistic) utterance.  Texts will include “eye-witness” accounts and documents of the French Revolution; its representation in poetry, drama, novel, letters, painting, film, and “history”; philosophies of history (Rousseau, Marx, Arendt) and theories of writing (Derrida, Barthes) in which the French Revolution operates as a central (if absent) figure.  Because the discourse of civil rights will figure prominently in our discussion, it's a course of particular relevance to students considering a human rights minor.

Partial book list:  Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man; Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Helen Maria Williams, Letters from France; W. Wordsworth, The Prelude; Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution (selections); Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities;  Peter Weiss, The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat.  Films:  Marat/Sade; Danton.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Barker, P.: Regeneration; Finger, A.: Call Me Ahab; Friel, B.: Molly Sweeney; Lewis, V.: Beyond Victims and Villains; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III; Simon, R.: The Story of Beautiful Girl

Description

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group presentation project, and a take-home final examination.  (This is a core course for the Disability Studies Minor). 


Autobiography

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


The Novel

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Research Seminar: American Captivities

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Baepler, P.: White Slaves, African Masters; Derounian, K. Z.: Women's Indian Captivity Narratives; Gates, H. L.: The Classic Slave Narratives; Rowson, S.: Slaves in Algiers; Tyler, R.: The Algerine Captive

Other Readings and Media

Course reader.

Description

The Indian captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.”  Its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, but American captivity narratives also related the captivities of sailors and pirates at sea, Christians and Muslims on the Barbary Coast, and Africans enslaved and transported throughout the Atlantic world. 

Captivity is always a middle ground, a testing ground, and a proving ground.  In these narratives, the captive’s plight stands in for a host of historical contests imbued with political crisis, personal danger, warring ideologies, and the promise of deliverance.  The captive’s position is necessarily liminal, and thus offers an exceptional opportunity to observe how race, gender, and religion function in the constrained space of bondage.

In this course, we will study a range of Indian, pirate, and slave captivities, from the period of colonial settlement through the early nineteenth century. We will also pursue research in secondary sources, tracing and critiquing traditions of literary criticism around the issue of captivity.  Finally, you will learn the research methods and writing skills to complete an original research paper connected to the themes of our course.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Recent African American Literature

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Butler, Octavia: Wild Seed; Hopkinson, Nalo: Midnight Robber; Jones, Edward P.: The Known World; Mackey, Nathaniel: From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Mullen, Harryette: Recyclopedia; Philip, Nourbese: Zong!; Rankine, Claudia: Citizen; Roberson, Ed: Voices Cast Out to Talk Us In

Description

A seminar focused on poetry and prose published by African Americans in the last 25 years. One short essay, one group presentation, and one long essay due at the end of the semester.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: James Joyce

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Joyce, James: Finnegans Wake; Joyce, James: Ulysses

Description

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the transformation of Joyce's style and concerns as well the surprising return of phrases and themes in his major works, from the Dubliners collection of short stories through the autobiographical novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, to the spectacular innovations of Ulysses and the Wake. We will also ask what Joyce was trying to achieve in works that have been dismissed as failures, such as his collection of poetry titled Chamber Music and his play, Exiles. Throughout the course, we will think about the different contexts of Joyce’s writing: turn-of-the century Dublin, Paris of 1902, pre-war Trieste, wartime Zurich, and Paris in the 1920s and 1930s.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Victorian Masculinities

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, C.: David Copperfield; Haggard, H.: King Solomon's Mines; Stevenson , R.: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Wilde, W. : The Importance of Being Earnest

Description

The Queen for whom the Victorian era was named defines the period’s cultural reputation in more ways than one; the stereotypes of Victorianism—moral constraint, prudery, repression—are almost always associated with women. This course seeks to explore how the Victorians defined masculinity, both in relation to femininity and on its own terms. What were the Victorian ideals of maleness, the counterparts to the female “Angel in the House”? When Thomas Carlyle wrote “On Heroes,” what kind of men was he envisioning, and how was the image of the hero shaped by different literary forms as well as historical events? We will examine new ideas of boyishness and development, from schoolroom ethics to muscular Christianity, and delve into the complex and intersectional subcategories of Victorian masculinity: the gentleman, the professional, the adventurer, the citizen, the voter, the dandy, and the degenerate. Over the course of the semester, we will also question the rigidity of these classifications, and trace their fluctuations throughout the century.

Students will write two research papers: an exploratory essay of 5-8 pages and a larger culminating essay of 12-15 pages. Research projects will also be presented to the class. 

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Paradise Lost and the Ancient Epic

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Homer: Iliad; Homer: Odyssey; Milton, John, ed. Kastan: Paradise Lost ; Virgil: Aeneid

Other Readings and Media

If you already own another version of the epics, or another SCHOLARLY edition of Milton (with footnotes good enough to identify the echoes), you can use those. Electronic texts of the ancient epics may also be useful.

Description

“Not less but more heroic” … that is Milton’s claim in his modern epic Paradise Lost, comparing his own Biblical theme to the achievements of ancient epic, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid. Even so, those three mighty works were the foundation of Western literature and the gold standard for literary genius. We will read Milton’s epic book by book, then bring in for comparison the episodes, characters and images from the Classics that he is quoting, recreating or transforming. Your research paper will be developed out of a comparative moment that particularly fascinates you, and will test Milton’s claim by asking what each poet means by “heroic.” Ancient texts will be taught in translation, but I will have the original on hand for reference.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Ecopoetry

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

What is ecopoetry, and what, if anything, distinguishes it from nature poetry? How does ecopoetics differ from another poetics? In this seminar we will explore topics surrounding this question, which include the pathetic fallacy and anthropomorphism; representation and reference (content and imitative form, abstraction and specificity); anthropocentrism and ecocentrism; evolution, ecology and ecopoetics; ecopoetry vs. nature poetry, didacticism vs. aestheticism; feminist ecopoetics; animal cognition and species extinction; global warming; Native American and African American ecopoetry, and so on. We will confine ourselves to poetry written in the United States, from the romantics, while focusing on the present, including Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson; Frost, Stevens, Moore, Jeffers; Bishop, Ammons, Berry, Snyder, Merwin, Hass, Graham, Spahr, Hillman, Alexie, Harjo, Hogan, and Roberson. You will learn how to read and evaluate a poem ecocritically. You will be asked to write a five-page ecocriticism of a single poem, and a fifteen-page research paper on a collection of poems and/or a problem in ecopoetics. Toward this end, we will spend one class in the library learning how to research your particular topics with a research librarian. The seminar will cullminate in a GREEN PARTY, during which you will be encouraged to share your own ecopoems or ecological musings.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-liting for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Virginia Woolf

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 100 Wheeler


Book List

Woolf, Virgiinia: Between the Acts; Woolf, Virginia: A Room of One's Own; Woolf, Virginia: Jacob's Room; Woolf, Virginia: Moments of Being; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves; Woolf, Virginia: The Years; Woolf, Virginia: Three Guineas; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse;

Recommended: Bell, Quentin: Virginia Woolf; Lee, Hermione: Virginia Woolf

Other Readings and Media

An electronic reader of Woolf's most important essays and short fiction, as well as key critical essays about her fiction, will be available on b-space. A range of secondary materials will also be placed on reserve at Moffitt.

Description

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf’s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that movement through a literary oeuvre that has been cherry picked to illustrate a particular turn within it.  As we map the trajectory from Woolf’s apprenticeship works in the teens through the experimental narratives of the twenties to the politically pressured projects of the late thirties, we will explore the textual strategies through which these turns were achieved and the cultural crosscurrents in which they were embedded. We will read Woolf’s critical essays to situate her narrative practice within her commentary on it (as well as within narrative theory generally); we will take advantage of the recently published holograph manuscripts to read published texts in the context of their revisions; we will scrutinize the proliferation of Woolf biographies to interrogate the assumptions and functions of that genre; and we will put pressure on Woolf’s appropriation and revision by various critical schools and contemporary writers. There will be two written assignments: a short five-page paper to jumpstart the research process and a fifteen-page critical paper at the conclusion of the course.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Dialect Literature

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new location: 175 Dwinelle


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles: The Conjure Woman; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Iweala, U.: Beasts of No Nation; James, Marlon: The Book of Night Women; Saro-Wiwa, Ken: Sozaboy

Description

In this seminar we will read works written in what the novelist and human rights activist Ken Saro-Wiwa termed “rotten English,” primarily the work of authors from the African diaspora, though not exclusively.  Our conversations will be focused on developing an account of how black writers turned a badge of dishonor into an occasion for literary experimentation, specifically the technical challenge of figuring character consciousness and illicit community.  (When characters speak in English vernaculars -- whether slangs, cants, dialects, pidgins, or creoles -- their deviant speech is likely to give off a whiff of inferiority even as it provides the illusion of heightened interiority.)  We will address the formal challenges of the works in question, specifically their narratological and linguistic aspects: free indirect discourse and the return of omniscient narration in contemporary literature; grammar and ethics; grammar as thought; dialect as a representation of the secrecy of thought (and of linguistic communities).  Must characters think in the same linguistic register in which they speak?  What makes dialect seem simultaneously like a foreign tongue and the language of the people?  Is there experience that Standard English prose cannot capture?  Does dialect's deformation of words and sentences present a more subtle means of registering shifts in the ethical landscape of a world out of joint (e.g., the topsy-turvy world in which some people can own others, postcolonial African states torn apart by civil war)?

List of authors to include: Junot Diaz, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, Ken Saro-Wiwa, Marlon James, Sapphire, and Uzodinma Iweala.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Contemporary British Culture and Literature

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Churchill, Caryl: Cloud Nine; Evaristo, Bernardine: The Emperor's Babe; Rowling, J.K.: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban; Rushdie, Salman: The Satanic Verses; Welsh, Irvine: Trainspotting

Description

In this course, we will investigate the literary and cultural landscape of contemporary Britain.  After several introductory sessions on the postwar period (1945-1979), we'll spend the bulk of our time in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s.  We’ll read several novels, a clutch of poems, a play or two, and a handful of essays; we’ll watch several films; and we’ll listen to some music.  We’ll sketch a capacious picture of British culture and literature, examining a variety of forms, modes, and genres, and considering a range of issues that emerge from our readings.  You will be responsible for writing 2 essays: a 3-5 page close reading and a 15-20 page research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-liting for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Romantic Novel

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Mansfield Park; Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Godwin, William: Caleb Williams; Hogg, James: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Scott, Walter: Redgauntlet; Scott, Walter: Waverley; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein

Description

Readings in the “novelistic revolution” (Franco Moretti’s phrase) of European Romanticism. With our main focus on the establishment of  “the classical form of the historical novel” in Scott’s Waverley, published two hundred years ago in 1814, we’ll look at a range of novelistic experiments and genres in British fiction between 1794 and 1824, following two interwoven threads:

  • Comedies of national and conjugal union, in the historical and marriage plots of Walter Scott (Waverley, Redgauntlet) and Jane Austen (Mansfield Park, Persuasion)
  • Gothic scenarios of homosocial obsession, persecution, fanaticism, and monstrous secrets, in tales by William Godwin (Caleb Williams), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein), and James Hogg (Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner).

Students will attend the symposium on 1814, taking place at Berkeley on the weekend of September 20, and write a 20-25 research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Manifesto Modernism

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Agee, James and Evans, Walker: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich: The Communist Manifesto; McKay, Claude: Banjo; Williams, W. C.: Spring and All

Description

This course will examine modernist prose and poetry in English from the perspective of a particularly modern genre of writing, the manifesto. By exploring the literary qualities of the manifesto as well as the manifesto-like qualities of modernist literary form, we will think about what these pronouncements and declarations share with the wider intellectual and political culture of the early 20th century. What is the relationship between modernist visions of cultural renewal and the political manifestos and programs of the same period? To what extent might we think of modernism as a form of cultural "planning" analogous to the economic and social planning of the era?

Authors read will include Mina Loy, Claude McKay, Laura Riding, William Carlos Williams, and others.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Rejection of Closure: Slow Readings

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Clark, T. J.: The Sight of Death: An Experiment in Art Writing; Eagleton, T.: How to Read a Poem

Other Readings and Media

Course books will be available from Mrs. Dalloway's (an independent bookstore located at 2904 College Avenue).

Description

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Works by Larry Eigner, Rae Armantrout, Jack Spicer, Ed Roberson, Geoffrey G. O’Brien, Juliana Spahr, and Susan Howe are among those that will be considered. Such works will be read against the backdrop of their historical moment and contextual purport and in conjunction with assigned critical texts, but students will be expected to conduct their own research using primary and secondary sources in the process of coming to relevant, meaningful readings of the poems. Students will be asked to maintain a reading journal and to write two critical papers.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 13
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Time:
Location: 103 Wheeler


Description

 

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: 20th-Century California Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 203 Wheeler


Book List

Chandler, R.: The Big Sleep; Dick, P. : Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J.: Slouching Towards Bethlehem; Stegner, W.: The Angle of Repose; West, N.: Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books listed, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. selections from J. Steinbeck's The Pastures of Heaven and The Long Valley, poetry by R. Jeffers, W. Everson, J. Spicer, T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Film Noir

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.
Location: note new location: 221 Wheeler


Book List

Kaplan, E.: Women in Film Noir; Krutnik, F.: In a Lonely Street; Martin, R.: Mean Streets and Raging Bull; Osteen, M.: Nightmare Alley; Telotte, J.: Voices in the Dark

Description

We will examine the influence of film noir on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory, and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and maculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 24 Wheeler


Book List

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Seventh Edition); Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Booth, Wayne C.: The Craft of Research; Dickinson, Emily: The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition; Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction (Third Edition); Empson, William: The Structure of Complex Words; Foucault , Michel: The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction; Gay, Peter: The Freud Reader; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Tucker, Robert C.: The Marx-Engels Reader (Second Edition); White, Hayden: The Content of the Form

Other Readings and Media

Course reader, available in PDFs.

Description

English 195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. This course gives you the opportunity, training, and time to conduct original research that will enable you to make a scholarly contribution to literary studies. The first semester will prepare you for the research and writing of this long essay (40-60 pages), which will be on a topic and texts of your choosing and will be completed in the second semester (H195B). In the first semester, we will read literary and cultural theory and also exemplary primary texts along with related literary criticism from a variety of perspectives. Through a series of activities and assignments, you will be developing your thesis topic, learning about research methods, preparing a bibliography on your texts and issues, and planning your work for the spring semester. 

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

•  a PDF of your college transcript(s),

• a  PDF of your spring 2014 course schedule, and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality).

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, May 2 (which is later than the original deadline).


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; Booth, Wayne: The Craft of Research; Eagleton, Terry: How to Read a Poem; Richter, David: Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views on Reading Literature

Other Readings and Media

Most of our readings will be available on bSpace in PDF format or collected in a photocopied course reader. Please attend the first class meeting before purchasing books for the course.

Description

This course will guide and accompany you as you undertake the capstone project of your English major: a Heartbreaking (40-60 pages!) Honors Thesis of Staggering Genius. The fall semester will serve as an introduction to literary theory and criticism, beginning with an overview of the origins of English literature as an academic discipline, the rise of the New Criticism, the poststructuralist turn, the burgeoning of ideology-focused and identity-based critique, and the more recent (re)turns to affect, aesthetics, and ethics in contemporary critical studies. We will consider several literary texts—some poetry, a bit of short fiction, a novel, and a film and/or play—in context of their publication history and critical reception, as a way to explore what literary criticism is and what it can do.

At the same time, you will be actively engaged in the preliminary stages of your thesis project: establishing a research topic, preparing an annotated bibliography of secondary materials, performing an initial analytical close reading of your primary text, and writing and presenting a 6-8 page thesis proposal. In the spring, students will meet regularly with me in individual conferences, and also together in small writing groups, to discuss their work in progress; we will also have several full group meetings to discuss finer points of critical writing including introductions and conclusions, footnotes, and abstracts. 

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

• a PDF of your college transcript(s),

• a PDF of your spring 2014 schedule, and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality).

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, May 2 (which is later than the original deadline).