Announcement of Classes: Fall 2014


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Readings to be provided.

Description

Approaches to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory and practice.

This course satisfies the Group 1 (problems in the study of literature) requirement. Restricted to entering doctoral students in English.


Graduate Readings: Allegories of Late Capitalism and the Writing of Everyday Life

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 202 Wheeler


Book List

Benjamin, W.: The Arcades Project; Brainard, J.: I Remember; Gladman, R.: Newcomer Can't Swim; Harvey, D.: Spaces of Hope; Kennedy, E.: Terra Firmament; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: Foundations for a Sociology for the Everyday; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: From Modernity to Modernism; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: Introduction; Mayer, B.: Midwinter Day; Silliman, R.: Revelator; Spahr, J.: This Connection of Everyone With Lungs; Ward, D.: This Can't Be Life

Other Readings and Media

Course books will be available from Mrs. Dalloway’s (an independent bookstore located at 2904 College Avenue)

Description

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, location, historical awareness, resistance, language, etc., with reference to a range of theoretical works read in parallel with some recent (and largely “experimental”) literary texts. In addition to keeping up with the readings, each student will be required to undertake a daily writing project of his or her own that is capable of querying the conditions and character of dailiness, within the contexts of postmodern subjectivity, global precarity, and the ubiquity of “late” capitalism.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th[-21st]-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: The Novel in Theory

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Coetzee, J.M.: Elizabeth Costello; Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction; Genette, Gerard: Narrative Discourse; Hale, Dorothy: The Novel: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory; Hurston, Zora: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Lukacs, George: The Theory of the Novel;

Recommended: Abbott, H. Porter: The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative; Cohn, Dorrit: Transparent Minds; Culler, Jonathan: Structuralist Poetics

Other Readings and Media

Some of the required course reading will either be available in a course reader or posted on bspace.

Description

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools have made novels the privileged object of critical attention.  Topics of discussion include the difference between narrative and the novel; the location of novelistic difference in the representation of time and space; the definition of subjectivity in terms of vision and voice; the valorization of grammatical structures; the search for a masterplot; the historicization of genre; the confusion of realism and reality; and the belief in a politics of form.  Readings will be drawn from, but not limited to, works by H. James, Shklovsky, Lukács, Jameson, Barthes, Girard, Genette, Booth, Bakhtin, Bhabha and Spivak.  James's What Maisie Knew and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God will serve as test cases.   Elizabeth Costello, J.M. Coetzee's metafictional engagement with the theory of the novel, will provide a view of the tradition from century's end.  

Two short papers (10 pages each) will facilitate the work of theoretical analysis and discussion.  An oral presentation and postings on bspace are also course requirements.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course will not be offered in 2014-15, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), this fall in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. 


Chaucer

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Shakespeare

English 217

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, W,: Titus Andronicus and Timon of Athens; Shakespeare, W.: Antony and Cleopatra; Shakespeare, W.: Coriolanus; Shakespeare, W.: Four Great Tragedies; Shakespeare, W.: Henry IV, Part 1; Shakespeare, W.: Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3; Shakespeare, W.: Julius Caeser; Shakespeare, W.: Measure for Measure; Shakespeare, W.: The Merchant of Venice; Shakespeare, W.: The Tempest

Description

Instead of pursuing a master problematic, we will take up a wide range of issues: when I read Shakespeare these days, I am interested in his representations of citizenship, compassion, artificial persons (political representatives, diplomats, surrogates, actors), poverty, the Roman Republic, false consciousness, and slavery; and I expect that other participants will bring many more concerns to the table. This capacious approach will allow us to take full advantage of Shakespeare's unique importance to the evolution of literary criticism and to the philosophy of art. If Shakespeare studies have in recent decades been most closely associated with the new historicism, the plays and sonnets have been a touchstone for almost every kind of literary criticism (Marxist, psychoanalytic, deconstructionist, postcolonial, feminist, and on and on). We will read seminal articles by Cixous, Derrida, Lacan, Greenblatt, C.L.R. James, Pat Parker, and others. We will also spend some time with the many major philosophers, theorists, and artists--among others, Hegel, Schlegel, Marx, and Freud--who make Shakespeare the cornerstone of a post-classical, modern theory of art and society.

This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement (for English Ph.D. students).


Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

English 243N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Renaissance

English 246C

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: W 3-6
Location: note new location: 202 Wheeler


Book List

Bevington and Maus, eds.: English Renaissance Drama; Castiglione: Book of the Courtier; Machiavelli: The Prince; More: Utopia; Shakespeare: 1 Henry IV; Shakespeare: Hamlet; Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice; Sidney: Arcadia; Sidney: Defense of Poetry; Spenser: Edmund Spenser's Poetry, 4th ed.

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This survey course will focus on the poetry, drama, and prose literature of sixteenth-century England.  We'll also read key works from the past fifty years of literary scholarship on the period.

Whenever possible, readings will be uploaded to bSpace.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through 16th-century) requirement.


Literature in English 1900-1945: The Modernist Novel

English 246K

Section: 1
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: The Unnameable; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim; Ford, Ford Madox : The Good Soldier; Forster, E.M.: Howards End; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Rhys, Jean: Wide Sargasso Sea; Stein, Gertrude: Selected Writings of Gertrude Stein; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Secondary readings by Adorno, Jameson, Lucretius, Nietzsche, Moretti, Winfried Menninghaus, Serres, and Stanford Friedman.

Description

In this seminar, we will read ten modernist novels. We will consider the strangeness of their modes of narrative and characterization as they respond to challenges such as the destabilizing of traditional social hierarchies and gender roles, the forces of empire and global capitalism, and the demands of the city as a site of consumer capitalism. As part of foregrounding the innovative nature of these texts, we will ask how each of them constructs—or refuses to construct—the boundaries of a person. What textual features establish or undo these boundaries? What makes these characters and, or, unmakes them? What forms of subjectivity result?
 
(The syllabus will include Wyndham Lewis' The Revenge for Love, which is out of print; secondhand copies can be ordered from bookstores and online.)

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th-century) requirement.


Research Seminars: Comintern Modernisms

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: W 3-6
Location: 204 Wheeler


Book List

Clark, Katerina: Moscow, The Fourth Rome; Malraux, Andre: Man's Fate; Platonov, Andrei: Soul: And Other Stories

Description

It has long been common practice to see Western metropolises like Paris and New York as competing centers of global modernism, as capitals of a "world republic of letters."  The aim of this seminar is to posit an alternate mapping of world culture, one that decenters the West through an emphasis on the realms of “really existing socialism,” a.k.a. the Communist Bloc, a.k.a. the Second World.  More specifically, the seminar seeks to reassemble cultural and political circuits that once connected, for example, Moscow, Beijing, Hanoi, Havana, and indeed, Paris and New York.  The common thread here is a shared encounter with leftist vanguards and avant-gardes—that is, artists and writers committed both to modernist experimentation and revolutionary politics.  We will see how Lenin’s Communist International (or Comintern) and interwar Soviet culture inspired such luminaries as Walter Benjamin, Langston Hughes, Lu Xun, Andre Malraux, and Diego Rivera.  We will also trace the decline of these leftist circuits amid Stalinist repression and the emergence of socialist realism.  However, though our focus will be on the interwar years, the seminar will also emphasize how this alternate imaginary persisted and transformed after World War II, and still circulates through such cultural forms as the postcolonial and magical realist novels.  

Most readings will be distributed via bCourses. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminars: Victorian Prose Style

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

Arnold, Matthew: Culture and Anarchy; Austen, Jane: Emma; Barthes, Roland: Writing Degree Zero; Carlyle, Thomas: The French Revolution; Carroll, Lewis: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Conan Doyle, Arthur: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Eliot, George: Romola; Mill, John Stuart: Autobiography; Newman, John Henry: Apologia Pro Vita Sua; Pater, Walter: Studies in the History of the Renaissance; Ruskin, John: The Stones of Venice; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Description

In this course, we’ll look at the idea of prose style in a few different ways.  First, we’ll read some key texts on the theory of style (Adorno, Barthes, Pater, Schapiro, Panofsky, etc.) in order to develop a vocabulary with which to talk about prose style.  What makes a sentence distinctly itself?  What makes one writer importantly different from another?  What does it mean to see a style as inherently good or bad?  Second, we’ll look more particularly at British Victorian conceptions of prose style—in fiction, historical writing, art criticism, autobiography, and elsewhere.  What ideas about personal or public style characterize the Victorian period?  Is there an especially Victorian politics of style?  Should Victorian accounts of intellectual, political, and aesthetic history be understood as histories of style?  Finally, using these different accounts of style, we’ll work closely to analyze examples of Victorian prose at the level of the sentence.  Put simply, is there such a thing as a Victorian sentence, and, if so, how does it work?

 

This course satisfies the Group 4 (19th-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminars: Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: M 3-6
Location: 258 Dwinelle


Book List

Stewart, Susan: Fate of the Senses

Description

This comparative seminar in lyric poetry borrows its title from Susan Stewart's Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (University of Chicago Press, 2002), to ask about the relation between poetry and sensory deprivation (or plenitude) and prosthesis. We will fcous on early modern to twentieth-century poetry written in English, French, German, Italian and Japanese, in the age of print culture or what will later become, in Walter Benjamin's terms, the "age of mechanical reproducibility." From the emergence of "haiku" out of haikai no renga (comic linked verse) to modernism's fascination with isolated images, the course will give some attention to the "lyricization" of poetry--the privileging of isolated, individual, brief forms abstracted from once collective practices--as well as to the changing roles--messianic, consolatory, critical, representative--assigned the figure of the "solitary" poet and "autonomous" work of art in the context of industrial capitalism, the rationalization of time and space, and European colonialism. We will also ask about "the fate of the senses" in relation to contemporary ecological crisis and, in particular, to the paradox of simultaneous sensory impoverishment and perpetual stimulation.

Most crucially, however, we will want to ask what happens when we read poetry as a series of substitutions (touch for sight, and sound for touch) and read together poets who, pushing the limits of language as an expressive medium, interrogate the relations of the verbal to the visual and musical arts, of visionary experience to sensory perception, of memory to imagination, and of language to the natural world and/or phenomenal experience. Tracing the meeting of stone and flesh, of the carnal and the transcendent, the transient and eternal, we will compare recurring figures of poetry as the only remaining sign of otherwise irrecoverable, lost, fugitive experiences.

Poems by Petrarch, Shakespeare, Herbert, Milton, Basho, Buson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Dickinson, Hardy, Rilke, Valéry, Stevens, Niedecker, Rankine; primary readings will also be determined by special interests of students. Secondary readings by Adorno, Benjamin, Culler, Jackson, Barbara Johnson, Lessing, Krieger, Prins, Stewart, among others.

The one required text will be Susan Stewart's Fate of the Senses, ordered at University Press Books.

Interested students are encouraged to purchase used editions of individual poets and/or reliable anthologies. Assigned poems will be available on the course website.

This class is cross-listed with Comparative Literature 202B.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and\nLiterature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing both at UC Berkeley (in English 45, R1A, R1B) and beyond.  Designed as both a seminar and a hands-on practicum, English 375 will provide new instructors with strategies for leading discussion, teaching close reading, responding to and evaluating student writing, teaching the elements of composition, managing their time, preparing lectures, designing courses and syllabi, and approaching other elements that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere.  The seminar component of the class will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the invention of each member’s pedagogical style. As part of the practicum component, we hope to pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A/R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes other than their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed and to receive feedback during the term.

This course satisfies the Pedagogy requirement. All readings will be posted on a bSpace site. E-mail questions to: kgoodman@berkeley.edu or ianthomasbignami@berkeley.edu.