Announcement of Classes: Fall 2014


Reading and Composition: (Self) Portraits in (Post) Modern Literature

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Klavon, Evan
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Carson, Anne: Autobiography of Red; Conrad, C. A.: The Book of Frank; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; Rankine, Claudia: Don't Let Me Be Lonely; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include: Jean Toomer, excerpts from Cane (1923); Langston Hughes, selected poems; Joe Brainard, excerpts from I Remember (1970); John Ashbery, “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror” (1975); Lyn Hejinian, excerpts from My Life (1987); and some secondary readings.

Description

Our topic for this course in critical analysis and essay composition will be literary portraiture in a series of Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary novels, poems, and cross-genre works. During the semester we will encounter a dandy whose looks never alter or fade, the saddest story ever told, early 20th-century London, early 20th-century Harlem, the 16th-century reflection of a 20th-century poet, a teenage winged red monster, and more. Through class discussion and multiple writing assignments, students will explore how literary works offer ways of thinking about how we think about other people and ourselves. Can we separate our judgment of a portrait from the qualities of the person portrayed? What difference does style or genre make? Where does the artist enter the picture? To what extent is an individual a reflection of society? To what degree is it possible to know or understand an other? What about the self? Can a literary encounter with a fictional character change our approach to the real world?


Reading and Composition: (new topic:) "Structures of Feeling": The Individual in Modernity

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Cole, Teju: Open City; Conrad, Joseph: Under Western Eyes; McCarthy, Tom: Remainder; O'Brien, Flann: At Swim-Two-Birds; Woolf, Virginia: Jacob's Room;

Recommended: Lanham, Richard A.: Analyzing Prose; Williams, Joseph M.: Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace

Description

Let's begin with two loose assumptions, that novels register everyday experience and that novels bear witness to large epistemic shifts. As the possibilities of individual and collective life flounder spectacularly under the pressures of modernity (global capitalism, environmental catastrophe, ceaseless state violence--to name just a few cheery examples), this class indulges in a semester-long thought experiment on how the form and the concept of the novel address these changes. We will begin with two curious texts from recent years, working to extract our own set of terms to describe the modes of subjectivity and the linguistic, temporal, and spatial conditions available to the present. We will then put our idioms to the test, shifting back to a smattering of equally curious texts from the Modernist era, a moment of heightened consciousness about the inexorable dissolution of the self in modernity. We will approach the big questions of being and epiphany by parsing the way these works go about their business of registering and witnessing: how they employ the prose poetics of voice, narrative structure, and discursive style.


Reading and Composition: How Taste Matters: Self-Curation, Public Identity, and the Modern Aesthetic Life

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Ciacciarelli, Helen
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Forster, E.M.: Howards End; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings and excerpts:  Pierre Bourdieu, “The Forms of Capital,” Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste; John Ruskin, Unto This Last;  Friedrich Schiller, On The Aesthetic Education of Man; Matthew Arnold, Culture and Anarchy; Karl Marx, Capital: A Critique of Political Economy; Lawrence Levine, Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America

Films:  Terry Zwigoff, Ghost World (2001); Sofia Coppola, Marie Antoinette (2006)

 

Description

In 1862, Ruskin wrote of the state, “Economists usually speak as if there were no good in consumption absolute. So far from this being so, consumption absolute is the end, crown, and perfection of production; and wise consumption is a far more difficult art than wise production.” In an age of consumer culture, in which the things we choose to buy and the brands with which we associate ourselves make a statement about who we are, it seems difficult to understate the prescience of Ruskin’s basic premise that identity rests upon “wise consumption.” Over 150 years after the publication of Ruskin’s Unto This Last, our attachments not only to tasteful consumption (the clothes we wear, the books on our shelves, the music we enjoy, the degrees we earn, the places we’ve traveled) but to how we publish the acts of consumption as information, self-advertise, and arrange data into collections in the digital public domain factors largely into our sense of individuality. This course interrogates the ways in which the construction of our own identities are predicated on the ideology of taste, namely the belief that judicious consumption and personal preference ultimately lead to the creation of a self that projects beyond the sum of its parts. We will locate our own historical moment in a comparative framework, conceptualizing various literary figures as prototypes of the hipster: the fin-de-siecle dandy of English aestheticism, the dilettante elitist in 19th century realist fiction, and the intellectual liberal of the Edwardian novel. Furthermore, the class will apply concepts in discussions from historical discourse and critical theory, such as “commodity fetishism,” “culture,” “cultural capital,” and “highbrow/lowbrow culture,” to explore the emergence of cultural and socio-economic distinctions and their bearings on the contemporary practices of self-making. In deconstructing class myths and the cultural connotations of our tastes, we will also conduct more creative experiments with phenomena of the digital era: Instagram filters, selective Facebook “likes,” public Spotify listens, and reports of our experiences with self-conscious curation. In a word, our aim is to investigate the essentially paradoxical enterprises of modern subject formation: the meticulous everyday fashioning of public personae that are simultaneously real and imaginary, meaningful and precarious.

This course is designed to help students build their skills of argumentation, critical reading, and expository writing. The university requires students in English R1A to compose a total of 32 pages of writing. Students will hone their analytical skills through formal essays, in-class exercises, drafts, peer-review editing, workshops, and shorter response papers. 


Reading and Composition: The First Person, Medieval to Modern

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Strub, Spencer
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Kempe, Margery: Book of Margery Kempe; Prince, Mary: The History of Mary Prince: A West Indian Slave

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with selections from Augustine of Hippo, Geoffrey Chaucer, Thomas Hoccleve, John Donne, Walt Whitman, Junot Díaz, and others. Film screenings to be noted on syllabus.

Description

"I am large, I contain multitudes," Walt Whitman's Song of Myself admits parenthetically. This course takes Whitman's multitudes seriously, investigating change and continuity in six centuries of first-person narration. In order to understand what it means to write a literary work in the first person, we will look across genres and historical periods, examining problems and challenges in the "I" from the fourteenth century to the present. How do autobiography, invention, and convention coexist in the lyric poet's first person? How can we recover the voices of historical autobiographers whose texts have been altered and remade by scribes, editors, and censors? What can we make of the first-person narrator who lies?

This course is intended to teach you to pose analytical questions, develop complex and original arguments supported by textual evidence, and participate in a genuine intellectual conversation with your colleagues. Every reading you do in this class should provide fodder for our in-class conversations. Moreover, as we trace the multitudes in the "I," you will write and revise three major essays, along with several smaller exercises.


Reading and Composition: Temptation and Desire in Renaissance Literature

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Villagrana, José
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Marlowe, Christopher: Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays; Milton, John: The Major Works; Spenser, Edmund: The Faerie Queene: Book One

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings will be published on bCourses.

Description

The great English epics and dramas of the Early Modern period can’t do without temptation. Why not? What makes temptation such a generative concept? Can we define it? Is temptation just an excuse to blame devils, monsters, or women for one’s own shortcomings? Does temptation elucidate virtue? In this class we will interrogate decidedly difficult and weird pieces of literature, closely analyzing how the rhetoric of temptation and desire works and fails on various fictive characters and, indeed, on the reader. We will look at how these texts respond to—and complicate—religious and cultural notions of good and evil, hope and despair, and, perhaps, life and death.

The purpose of this course is to improve your critical reading and writing skills in a way that is helpful regardless of your major. In-class participation will play an important role in developing your critical thinking skills, and we will discuss approaches to crafting mature prose that is argumentative, clear, and nuanced. You will write and revise four short essays during the course of the term.


Reading and Composition: Shakespeare and Film

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Liu, Aileen
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Henry IV, Part 1 ; Shakespeare, William: King Lear ; Shakespeare, William: Much Ado About Nothing ; Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet ; Shakespeare, William: The Taming of the Shrew

Other Readings and Media

Films:

10 Things I Hate About You (1999, dir. Gil Junger), DVD X1044
West Side Story (1961, dir. Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins), DVD 1747
The Hollow Crown (2012, dir. Richard Eyre)
Much Ado About Nothing (1993, dir. Kenneth Branagh), DVD 349
King Lear (2008, dir. Trevor Nunn), DVD X3506

Description

How do filmmakers translate Shakespeare from live theater to screen? How do Shakespeare’s tragedies, versus his comedies, versus his histories, lend themselves to or resist certain types of movie adaptation? Do some genres or plays work better on stage than the screen, and vice versa? (For that matter, do some plays work better on the page?) Do some plays only work on stage—and how would that modify our understanding of film and theater if we decided that were true?

To try to answer these questions, we will consider five of his plays (a sampling from each genre) and their filmic adaptations: The Taming of the Shrew with the teen comedy 10 Things I Hate About You (1999); Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein/Sondheim’s Broadway musical West Side Story (1961); Henry IV, Part 1 with the recent, lavish BBC TV mini-series The Hollow Crown (2012); Much Ado About Nothing and Kenneth Branagh’s rom-com Much Ado About Nothing (1993); and King Lear and the Royal Shakespeare Company’s King Lear (2008), filmed and broadcast by the BBC.

With the exception of King Lear, any solid scholarly edition of Shakespeare will suffice (e.g. Riverside, Pelican, Signet, Folger, Arden, Norton), but having the Oxford Shakespeare editions that I've ordered will make it easier to follow along and reference in class. I require you to purchase the Oxford Shakespeare edition of King Lear, however, since different editions of that play can vary widely. All films are available to screen in the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.


Reading and Composition: The Idea of the West

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Zisman, Isaac
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Johnson, Dennis: Train Dreams; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Robinson, Marilynne: Housekeeping; Wallace, David Rains: The Klamath Knot

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader:  Selections from T.C. Boyle, Joan Didion, Cecil S. Giscombe, Jack London, Jon Raymond, Peter Rock, and Gary Snyder. 

Screenings:  McCabe and Mrs. Miller, Robert Altman; Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock; Twin Peaks (selections from season one), David Lynch.

Description

In this course, we will examine a variety of texts in order to ask the question: what do we mean when we talk about the West? What is it that writers and artists imagine might be possible here at the edge of the American expansion, far from the urban and cultural centers of the older East? This will not be a class about cowboys, though such figures do appear. Rather, we will work through what Wallace Stegner called the response to the West, “the response of eager, dazzled, deluded, often misguided, greedy, spiritually impressionable people to country more overwhelming than they had previously known.” Through the critical activity of close reading, we will consider how these various authors—disparate in backgrounds, eras, and geographies—treat the experience of western landscape and how, in turn, that experience transforms into aesthetic project, a way of seeing the world, an idea.


Reading and Composition: The Literary Character

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Yu, Esther
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre; Milton, John: Paradise Lost

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include selections from the Bible, Virgil's Aeneid, Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare's sonnets, Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress, and Richardson's Pamela; a number of critical readings will also be provided.

Description

How do loose bits of textual material transform into literary characters of heft and substance? The question seems deceptively simple when referred to the poles of cultural habit or of the fluid workings of the reader’s imagination. In this class, we’ll look more closely at the role of literary design, and experiment with a range of analytical terms to bring the construction of character into clearer focus. Before reflecting on the “realistic” characters of novels, we’ll survey a handful of ancient, medieval, and early modern texts to consider alternative models of the literary character. How do the figures of the Bible or the classical epic exceed representational demands on the way to becoming larger than life? How does the artfully imprecise rendering of a figure in, say, Renaissance love poetry enhance its affective power? We will have occasion to consider texts that primarily deploy characters as embodiments of concepts or ideals, and will think critically, too, of the historical shifts that have formed our taste for literary figures of flesh and blood.

Students in this course will frequently be asked to think through writing, and to think self-consciously about their writing. A substantial portion of the class will be devoted to the skills and strategies necessary for writing persuasive argumentative essays. Core assignments include a diagnostic paper and three essays.


Reading and Composition: Writing and Rights: Literature and the Fight against Oppression in Nineteenth-Century America

English R1A

Section: 9
Instructor: Sirianni, Lucy
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Keller, Helen: The World I Live In; Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom's Cabin

Other Readings and Media

A course reader containing works by Lydia Maria Child, Mary L. Day, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Frances E. W. Harper, E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), Lydia Sigourney, James Whitfield, Zitkala-Sa, and others

Description

"The artist ...  is the holiest reformer of them all, for she is creating."-- Paulina Wright Davis, The Una, 1854

"Polemics ...  are not likely to be epics.  They are likely to be pamphlets, even when they are disguised as stories and plays."-- Albert Murray, The Omni-Americans, 1970

Nineteenth-century America witnessed a blossoming of reformist zeal.  A diverse array of activists fought for such disparate causes as temperance, free love, and the expansion of missionary work.  In our course, we will take up four of the most galvanizing and far-reaching social movements of the era: the battles for the rights of Native Americans, slaves, women, and individuals with disabilities.  More specifically, we will take up a variety of novels, short stories, and poems produced by and for these movements, asking how literature transformed and was transformed by the reformist projects considered.  How can the act of turning from the "real" to the fictional render the author or artist "the holiest reformer of them all?" Are the categories of "polemic" and "epic"--activism and artistry--truly mutually exclusive? In short, what kind of change could literature hope to create, and what kind of literature would be created by the hope of social change?

Throughout the course, we will be attuned not only to the role of writing in the nineteenth century but also to its importance for you as students and thinkers.  Over the course of the semester, you will outline, draft, workshop, write, and rewrite three papers, refining along the way your ability to read closely and write persuasively.


Reading and Composition: Making American Literature

English R1A

Section: 10
Instructor: Ramirez, Matthew Eric
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Atwan, Robert: Best American Essays; Doyle, Brian: The Thorny Grace of It; Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Nature; Frost, Robert: Collected Poems, Prose, and Plays; Melville, Herman: Billy Budd and Other Stories; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass

Description

What does it take to write American literature? What in the history of the United States distinguishes the culture, texture, and style of American letters?

In this course we'll explore highly effective strategies in American literary writing. We will look at the composition processes of many leading American writers, including Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, and Brian Doyle.

The goals of the course are as follows: 1) to study American literature at the level of the line and 2) to write analytically and compellingly about the strategies and structural choices that authors design. You will write and revise four short papers over the course of the term.  


Reading and Composition: Modern Minds

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Abramson, Anna Jones
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Gilman, Charlotte Perkins: The Yellow Wallpaper; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

In this writing- and research-intensive course we will consider how late nineteenth and early twentieth century writers both responded to and helped shape modern  conceptions of the human mind. Our readings and discussions will focus on the bidirectional relationship between innovations in literary form and shifting ideas about time, memory, madness, and trauma. By drawing on supplementary reading in history, psychology, and philosophy, we will gain a richer sense of where narrative converges with and diverges from contemporary models of the mind and brain. We will also investigate how psychological accounts themselves rely on specific narrative practices and literary devices.

Building on the strategies you learned and practiced in R1A, this course will further develop your reading, writing and research skills.  Significant class time will be devoted to pre-writing, peer-review, and developing research skills.  You will produce at least 32 pages of writing—including pre-writing, drafts and revision, and culminating in a rigorously researched paper on a topic of your own design.


Reading and Composition: American Transience in the 20th Century

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Miller, Christopher Patrick
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Agee and Evans, James and Walker: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; Cather, Willa: O Pioneers!; Johnson, James Weldon: Autiobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Kerouac, Jack: On the Road; O'Hara, Frank: Meditations in a Time of Emergency; Robinson, Marilyn: Housekeeping

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the book list, we will read a series of shorter essays to help situate us culturally and historically that will be made available online.

Description

Since the imperious dream of Westward expansion, notions of American autonomy, power, and identity have often been caught up with living in motion.  But of course, motion also involves exposure: to displacement, to homelessness, to precarious labor conditions, etc.  How do we then talk about both the possibility and costs of remaining in motion?  And how is motion experienced across the constructions of race, class, and national borders? 

This class will take up a series of questions about the uneven experiences of living in motion through a variety of narratives and cultural documents.  We will look at not only popular representations of vagrants, hobos, migrants, and modes of transit but also more indirect representations of personalities or communities for whom movement is an integral part of their existence.    

Building on what you have already learned in the first of the Reading and Composition courses, this second course will use the questions that this material poses of us, as well as those we pose of it, to develop your critical reflection as well as your writing and research skills that will culminate in a larger research paper at the end of the semester.


Reading and Composition: Note new topic: War, Empire, and Asian American Cultural Critique

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Lee, Amy
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Ghosh, Amitav: Sea of Poppies; Hagedorn, Jessica: Dogeaters; Hwang, David Henry: M. Butterfly; Okubo, Miné: Citizen 13660; Park, Yongsoo: Boy Genius

Other Readings and Media

A short selection of short stories, poems, and critical essays will be made available online.

Screenings:  A Little Pond (Lee Sang-woo, 2009) 

Description

Dubbed the "American Century," the 20th century bore witness to the rise of the United States as a global superpower, the outcome of American involvement in World War II and the Cold War. From the Philippine-American War to the Pacific War to the Korean and Vietnam Wars, America's strategic accumulation of global power was largely staged at the site of the Asia-Pacific.  In this course, we will survey a wide range of Asian American cultural texts--novels, graphic novels, short stories, plays, essays, and films--that elucidate America's imperial and military engagement with Asia.  We will pay attention to the representational strategies deployed in these texts to narrate and historicize America's encounter with Asia from the varied standpoints of those who bore its consequences.  In addition to the ramifications of war and empire on cultural production, we will learn about the ways in which cultural texts both facilitated and contested received narratives of US incursions into Asia.  Finally, we will consider how Asian American writers have shaped the canon of American literature by inflecting the language of war and empire within American aesthetic practices.

In addition to developing our critical thinking and close-reading skills through in-class discussions and exercises, we will spend a significant amount of time honing our research and writing skills.  Students will learn how to effectively gather research materials and incorporate secondary sources in their writing to strengthen their argumentative positions.  Assignments include short writing exercises, two research papers (including drafts) and class presentations.

 


Reading and Composition: Obsession

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: McWilliams, Ryan
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick; Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Orlean, Susan: The Orchid Thief; Poe, Edgar Allan: The Essential Tales

Other Readings and Media

A course reader may include excerpts from Bill Brown, Sigmund Freud, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Henry James, Thomas Mann, Karl Marx, Michael Pollan, Thomas Pynchon, and others. We will also watch and discuss two or three films during the semester. 

Description

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can’t stop thinking about anyway. Throughout the semester, we’ll pay attention to the role of monomania as a coping strategy for a world bewilderingly overburdened with significance. We will ask how and why the seemingly random or arbitrary interest—a flower, a particular girl, a sperm whale—consumes the attention of literary characters and readers. We will consider why certain objects, hobbies, and texts tend to cause monomaniacal absorption while others do not. We'll look into ways that obsessions have been theorized: as signs of madness, creative brilliance, or both; as addictions; as fixations, fetishes, and projections; as commodities, collections, and collations; and as “possessions” that own or inhabit us even while we think we control them.

Gradually, we will turn our attention to the question of academic obsession, asking what differentiates research from monomania. As we refine our own investigative projects, we will keep in mind Barbara Tuchman’s observation that “research is endlessly seductive, but writing is hard work.” Eventually, we'll use our insights into the nature of obsession to help manage the transition from investigation to application.


Reading and Composition: Note new topic: Theorizing the Popular Song

English R1B

Section: 5
Instructor: Sullivan, Khalil
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Davis, Angela Y.: Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday; Miller, Karl Hagstrom: Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow; Suisman, David: Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music

Other Readings and Media

Also, texts I will provide:

Matt Callahan, "When Music Mattered."  Ten Years that Shook the City, 1968-1978: City Lights: San Francisco (Handout)

Zoe Chance, "How Much Does It Cost to Make a Hit Song?"  NPR: All Things Considered. June 30, 2011 3:58 PM ET  http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2011/07/05/137530847/how-much-does-it-cost-to-make-a-hit-song  (Handout)

Tressie McMillin Cotton, "When Your (Brown) Body is a (White) Wonderland."  http://tressiemc.com/2013/08/27/when -your-brown-body-is-a-white-wonderland/ (Handout)

Peter C. Muir, Long Lost Blues: Popular Blues in America, 1850-1920. Chapter 3. (Handout)

Description

In this course we will examine recent scholarship on the emergence of the popular recording industry in the early 20th century, paying particular attention to how the demands of a capitalist marketplace (mass reproduction, advertising, and distribution) put pressure on songwriting, authorship, performance, and audience receptivity. Students will be encouraged to theorize methods for conducting popular song research and contribute their knowledge of contemporary song performance and recordings. In addition to historical scholarship, we will also examine long and short-form music videos, recordings of live performcances, audio recordings, song lyrics, and blues poetry.


Reading and Composition: Sincerity & Honesty

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Ding, Katherine
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Mansfield Park; Coetzee, J. M.: Disgrace; Moliere: Tartuffe; Plato: Hippias Minor; Shakespeare, William: Othello; Sophocles: Philoctetes

Other Readings and Media

Additional selections in course reader:  Aristotle, selections from The Nicomachean Ethics; Niccolo Machiavelli, selections from The Prince; Jean-Jacques Rousseau, selections from Revelries of a Solitary Walker or Confessions; Friedrich Nietzsche, “On Truth and Lying in the Extra-Moral Sense”; Fyodor Dostoevsky, selections from Notes from Underground; Hannah Arendt, “Truth and Politics”; George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language”

Description

What does it mean to be sincere or honest? How does one even define honesty, and how has that definition changed over time? What are the prerequisites for truth-speaking to take place? Is sincerity even possible? What is the cost of honesty, and who pays for it? We will be reading a wide selection of philosophy and literature that wrestle with these questions and arrive at very different answers.

This class is structured as a workshop to hone close reading skills and to guide students through the critical tools needed to write a research paper. To that effect, students will write four formal papers: a short diagnostic essay, a close reading paper, a research summary paper, and a final research paper that combines research and close reading. In addition, students will be turning in informal reflections based on the readings every week in which no paper is due.


Reading and Composition: Sorrow Songs: Aural Poetry in Nineteenth-Century America

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Osborne, Gillian K.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Allen, Garrison, & Ware, eds.: Slave Songs of the United States: The Classic 1867 Anthology; Dale, Robert, Ed.: Changing is Not Vanishing: A Collection of Indian Poetry to 1930; Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth: The Song of Hiawatha and Other Poems; Whitman, Walt: The Complete Poems

Description

In this introduction to college composition and research, we will develop skills of close-attention to literary texts and analytic argument through readings of songs, poems, and critical essays, and we will investigate how literary texts (or other objects of attention) invite compelling research questions. In particular, our readings will investigate the relationships between Native American and African American oral poetic traditions and dominant (printed and white) poetic practices of the period. Our conversations will be guided by such questions as: As these oral traditions began to be transcribed for the first time in the nineteenth-century, what poetic expectations shaped their transcriptions? What poetic traditions did Native American poets and black lyricists later draw on? How did they extend or subvert these traditions? What is the relationship between poetry and song? What made poetry such a successful cultural form in the nineteenth-century and what does it mean to study this form as history today? What does it mean to be an author? And what does it mean to read a text whose author, or authors, has been lost to history? 

Writing assingments will include a diagnostic essay, a brief "position" paper geared at developing an argument, and a longer research paper. Students will practice reading, argument founded in textual evidence, and developing essayistic structure and style through composition and revision of their own assignments and by responding to one another's work. During the second half of the semester, one session a week will be devoted entirely to locating and working with historical texts beyond our primary reading materials, and to developing library research skills.


Reading and Composition : Life Stories

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 79 Dwinelle


Book List

Gaskell: Life of Charlotte Brontë ; Gosse: Father and Son; Graff and Birkenstein: They Say/I Say ; Mill: Autobiography ; Thompson: Lark Rise to Candleford

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings on course website including selections from D. Wordsworth, Newman, Dickens, C. Brontë.

Description

This course will examine how authors born in nineteenth-century Britain shaped lived experience into nonfictional narrative, turning their own lives and the lives of those around them into stories. We’ll consider autobiography, biography, memoir, and diaries, noting the ways in which literary technique translates “real life” to the page. Addressing the fraught relationship between life writing and the novel, we’ll ask how authors turn their biographical or autobiographical subject into a protagonist, what kinds of closure are available to the memoirist, and how time is distorted by life writing. We’ll also interrogate our own fascination with life writing, attempting to understand what aspects of biography and autobiography appeal to readers, and to find the line between healthy interest and unhealthy obsession.

As part of the university’s Reading and Composition requirement, this course develops reading, writing, and research skills that are applicable across the curriculum. We will focus on how to find, evaluate, and make effective use of research tools and resources for analytic writing. The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers (2-3 pages, 6-8 pages, 8-10 pages), combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work (and feedback) at the prewriting and draft stages of composition.  


Reading and Composition : Wild Child

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 250 Dwinelle


Book List

Barrie: Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens and Peter and Wendy ; Burroughs: Tarzan of the Apes; Eliot: The Mill on the Floss; Gaiman: The Graveyard Book; Graff and Birkenstein: They Say/I Say ; Kipling: The Jungle Books

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings on course website including selections from Rousseau, Blake, Maria and Richard Lovell Edgeworth, D. Wordsworth, W. Wordsworth, Darwin, Sendak, Jean Craighead George, Sally Shuttleworth, and more.

Film (to be shown in class, no need to order/buy): L’enfant sauvage (dir. Truffaut, 1970).

Description

This course will explore the literary depiction of the “wild child” and the association of childhood with “primitive,” “savage,” or “natural” conditions. We’ll consider a broad spectrum of wild child characters, including abandoned and orphaned children who become “feral,” children raised in deliberate seclusion or a “state of nature,” children who opt out of civilized society, and children who simply behave ferociously. Our primary focus will be on the function of the wild child as a literary trope, particularly in the nineteenth century, but we will also attend to the real-life phenomenon of neglected and abused children who grow up without normative socialization. Throughout the course, we’ll ask what’s at stake when childhood is figured as the antithesis of civilization, why the figure of the “feral child” is so threatening, and how innocence and primitivism are interrelated.

As part of the university’s Reading and Composition requirement, this course develops reading, writing, and research skills that are applicable across the curriculum. We will focus on how to find, evaluate, and make effective use of research tools and resources for analytic writing. The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers (2-3 pages, 6-8 pages, 8-10 pages), combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work (and feedback) at the prewriting and draft stages of composition.  


Freshman Seminar: Reading Art Spiegelman's MAUS

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: Tues. 2-4 (Sept. 2-Oct. 14 only)
Location: 346 Kroeber Hall


Book List

McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Spiegelman, Art: Maus: Vols. I and II

Description

Art Spiegelman has been called “one of our era’s foremost comics artists” and “perhaps the single most important comic creator working within the field.” In this seminar we will devote ourselves to a close reading of his Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic memoir, Maus, informed by a small dose of comics criticism. The required texts for this seminar are 1) Maus. Volume I:  A Survivor’s Tale, My Father Bleeds History; 2) Maus. Volume II: A Survivor’s Tale, And Here My Troubles Began; and 3) Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Students should be prepared for active involvement and at least six pages of informal writing. 

Please note: This class will meet September 2 through October 14 only.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Crime and Punishment

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Time: Mon. 3-5 (Sept. 8-Oct. 27 only)
Location: Room L20 of Unit I (2650 Durant Ave.)


Book List

Recommended: Dostoevsky, Fyodor (translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky): Crime and Punishment

Description

In Crime and Punishment (1866), the main characters are two intelligent young men (temporarily college drop-outs because they cannot afford the tuition) and two remarkable young women, in St. Petersburg, Russia, about the time of the American Civil War. There are two murders, an astute detective, a “holy fool,” a young prostitute, and a villain. Dostoevsky’s characters are as fully developed as those of Dickens, but at the same time they are walking/talking ideas; the conflict between murderer and detective is also a conflict between “Western” ideas and “Russianness.” This seminar will examine the conflict of ideas, but will equally focus on how to read a serious and complex psychological novel. We will be looking at WHAT Dostoevsky does with his characters, actions, and ideas, but also HOW he does it—how he sets scenes, manipulates characters and plot. I am hoping for close readers, and while I expect we will all reach the last page (551), I am primarily interested in your response to the book’s ideas, and your understanding of how Dostoevsky used the devices of a novelist to dramatize those ideas.

This is an interactive seminar, not a lecture course. Reading assignments are intended to provoke discussion among seminar participants. I expect you to come to class prepared to talk about what you have read, and urge you to start reading. Please read Crime and Punishment Part 1, chapters 1 and 2, before our first meeting.

Please note: This class will meet Sept. 8 through Oct. 27 only.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: FSM

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Paley, Morton D.
Time: Fridays 10-12 (Sept. 19 to Nov. 7 only; no meeting Oct. 24)
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Cohen, Robert: Mario Savio

Description

Every fall semester, The College of Letters and Science “On the Same Page” program introduces a subject for discussion that, it is hoped, will involve many of us. The subject for 2014 is the Free Speech Movement, on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary.

There will be seven 2-hr meetings, starting on Sept 19. There will be no meeting on October 24. The last meeting will be on November 7.

Text: Mario Savio, by Robert Cohen. (You have, or should have, received this book as a gift from L & S.)

In this course we’ll study the aims, history, rhetoric, and degree of success of FSM, along with the ways in which it was presented by the media and perceived by the public. For this purpose we have at our disposal the Free Speech Archive at the Bancroft Library and recordings and videos in our Media Resources Center. Using these and other collections, we will try to reconstruct the main events that took place from September 29, 1964 to January 4, 1965.

For our first meeting, please read two speeches by Mario Savio in the Cohen book: Bodies Upon the Gears” (pp. 326-328) and “An End to History” (pp. 329-332), and bring the text to class (or photocopies if you don’t want to carry the book). In addition, please look at the Free Speech timeline at http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/FSM/chron.html

Seminar requirements are: regular attendance and participation, a limited archival project resulting in a 15-minute seminar presentation,
and a written 500-word summary of your presentation, and at the end of the course a one thousand word essay on a related subject of your choice.

Note: Usually when I teach a course, students have the option of seeing my credentials as a scholar in the Oski catalog. This time it’s different. (Something that could have been said about FSM itself). I have not published anything on this subject. My credentials here are experiential. After the mass arrests at Sproul Hall, Mario Savio asked to speak on behalf of FSM. I and two other faculty members did so, sustained by the presence and singing of Joan Baez, before an enormous audience. You can see me in the attached image (I am the man wearing dark glasses behind he REE of “Free”). I went on supporting the movement publicly, and I also was a participant in or a witness to a number of FSM events.

Note:  This class will meet Sept.19 to Nov. 7 only; there will be no meeting on October 24.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

 


Introduction to the Study of Poetry

English 26

Section: 1
Instructor: Gardezi, Nilofar
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 101 Wheeler


Book List

Ramazani , Jahan (Ed.): The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry: Volumes 1 & 2; 3rd Edition

Description

This course is designed to develop students’ ability and confidence in reading, analyzing, and understanding poetry. Through the course of the semester, we will read a wide range of modern and contemporary poets, beginning with Walt Whitman and ending with Rita Dove. We will work as “curious readers,” letting our interest unencumber us of notions of what the study of poetry is or should be. Instead, we will proceed with questions—e.g., What does the poem’s title tell or promise us? Who is the speaker and what does s/he know or feel? What sounds are active in the poem? Does the poem use any strange words?—and pay particular attention to poetic form, rhythm and sound, figurative language, and imagery. In this way, we will cultivate our own readerly technique and come into close conversation with the poems that we read.

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to understand poetry and learn how to write about it critically. 


Introduction to the Study of Poetry

English 26

Section: 2
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

How can we become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry, and at the same time better writers of prose? This course attends to the rich variety of poems written in English, drawing on the works of poets from William Shakespeare to Elizabeth Bishop, John Keats to Gwendolyn Brooks, Emily Dickinson to Wallace Stevens. We will read songs, sonnets, odes, villanelles, and ballads. By engaging in thorough discussions and varied writing assignments, we will explore some of the major periods, modes, and genres of English poetry, and in the process expand the possibilities of our own writing.

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to understand poetry and learn how to write about it critically.


Introduction to the Study of Fiction

English 27

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Introduction to the Study of Drama

English 28

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Grace
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Brook, Peter: The Empty Space: A Book About the Theatre; Churchill, Caryl: Plays: 1; Kane, Sarah: Complete Plays; Miller, D. A. : Place for Us: Essay on the Broadway Musical; Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Description

The dramatic arts confound most of the certainties we generally hold about literary writing. Although there are playwrights, each performance is necessarily social and collaborative. Although the printed playscript can last indefinitely on the shelf, plays require the physical presence of living bodies – a presence that may be intimate, distancing, banal, violent, exhausting. And unlike a book, which can be picked up and put down at leisure, the play stipulates the time and place at which it is to be consumed. Yet drama is also distinct from other types of live performance: its medium is literary, and its ritual forms are both long established and surprisingly enduring. Recognizing these particularities as stimuli for critical insight – and for our own forms of play – this course offers students tools for answering some of the most fundamental questions concerning the meaning and purpose of drama. How and why do we identify with characters in plays – and with what effect for drama without characters? How does drama challenge us to think beyond the figure of the author, and to imagine new relationships between text and speech? And perhaps most importantly of all: how can an understanding of the forms of dramatic performance enable us to think in new ways about the performances that govern our everyday lives?

In addition to discussion of some major figures from the canon of dramatic writing in English – Shakespeare, Wilde, Beckett, Sarah Kane, among others – we will read excerpts from some of the major theorists of dramatic performance, from Aristotle through Artaud to D. A. Miller. Writing assignments will be many and short: students will be asked to develop their own repertoire of critical responses to the plurality of works studied, to be submitted as a portfolio at the end of the course.  Navigating a broad array of subject matter over time, space, and genre, our guiding principle will be close textual analysis. We will risk the impossible act of reading a playscript – not as a relic of a lost performance, but as a living invitation to act, a spur to performance. Close reading drama, we may well come to suspect, generates unique insights into the politics, the social vitality, of language itself.

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to study drama and learn how to write about it critically.


Literature of American Cultures: Immigrant Inscriptions

English 31AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi: Americanah; Diaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Kincaid, Jamaica: Lucy; Lee, Chang-Rae: Native Speaker

Other Readings and Media

Short works by: Angel Island poets; Jhumpa Lahiri; Theresa Hak Kyung Cha; Jonathan Lethem; Edwidge Danticat.

Movies: The Jazz Singer (1927); Gentlemen's Agreement (1947); West Side Story (1961); and early short films by Steve McQueen (1993-1997).

Description

A few miles from UC Berkeley’s campus, positioned in the San Francisco Bay near Alcatraz, sits Angel Island, site of a California State Park and one-time “processing center” (1910-1940) for migrants crossing the Pacific into the United States. In 1970 a California Parks Ranger discovered a series of stunning inscriptions on the center’s walls. As it transpires Angel Island had housed thousands of immigrants who, due to several race-based immigration laws (the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 chief amongst them), were detained in a dormitory purgatory between citizenship and immigration. During their detention on Angel Island several of these inmates had carved into the walls poems expressing their rage, terror, boredom, and befuddlement at the turn of events in their travel plans.

If Ellis Island figures in the popular imagination as the symbolic portal through which diverse migrants “became American,” Angel Island is something else again. An equally crucial symbol of America’s fraught relationship to immigration and race, the Angel Island poetry inscriptions register migrants’ responses to the arbitrariness of racial discrimination and the underside of the American dream of a migrant melting pot. These inscriptions are potent metaphors: signs that migrants would not remain invisible, even as they were hidden away; testimonies to the powerful relationship between writing and migration.

To live between cultures, to experience confounding processes of racialization, to labor to translate one’s deepest interiority into a foreign language—all these aspects of migration are rich for literary exploration.

This course explores the relationship between literature and racial formation in the 20th- and 21st-century United States. Through close readings of a diverse set of writers—either themselves migrants to the United States or US-born who reflect on the processes and implications of migration—we will think through the meanings and experiences of race in America. One thing that the history of immigration to the United States makes very clear is that race is not a natural, stable, or fixed phenomenon. Instead, as laws changed to include, exclude, or diminish certain populations in the US, so too did ideas of who or what made up a “race.” 

Throughout the semester we will spend time thinking through the implications of the mutability of racial categories by focusing on how race is “inscribed” in narrative fiction, in social discourses, and onto actual human bodies. And we will examine the way literary form provides unique insight into these processes of racialization.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

English 43A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

.Strout, Elizabeth: The Best American Short Stories 2013

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction, and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course.  To be considered for admission, please electronically submit ten pages or less (double-spaced) of fiction you have written, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file.  The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 2 Le Conte


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales; Donne, John: The Complete English Poems; Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Spenser, Edmund: Edmund Spenser's Poetry

Description

This course will focus on three extraordinary works of late medieval and early modern English literature:  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Spenser's Faerie Queene, and Milton's Paradise Lost.  We'll consider the works in themselves and as parts of a developing literary tradition.  We'll also discuss poems by John Donne, Sir Philip Sidney, Lady Mary Wroth, and George Herbert.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 213 Wheeler


Book List

Chaucer, G.: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Jill Mann; Dickson, Donald R.: John Donne's Poetry; Heaney, S.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation (Bilingual Edition); Marlowe, C.: Doctor Faustus, ed. David Scott Kastan; Milton, John: Paradise Lost, ed. Gordon Teskey

Description

In this course you will explore some of the great foundational works of English literature, ranging from the very earliest period up to Milton's Paradise Lost. In the process, you will learn to understand--and even speak!--the forms of early English, and to appreciate genres ranging from epic to lyric verse. You will practice the close analysis of language, and will also consider how literature engages with--and shapes--the historical circumstances in which it was produced. Our goal is to understand how and why the texts we will read created the landscape of English literature.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 101 Barker


Book List

Austen, J.: Emma; Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Defoe, D.: Moll Flanders; Equiano, O.: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Pope, A.: The Rape of the Lock; Wordsworth, W. & Coleridge, S.: Lyrical Ballads

Description

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in England), political revolution (English, French, American), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse wants to view them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation--including debates about what constitutes "proper" language itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups--British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, and men and women--use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices--from linguistic register to generic conventions--and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term, a final, and occasional quizzes.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion secctions F 3-4
Location: 213 Wheeler


Description

On the face of it, English 45B seems like a “neither/nor” course; neither a course in the great English "originals" (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton) nor a course in “modern(ist)” literature. It represents neither the supposed “origin” nor the putative “end” of literature in English; it’s only the middle, and a peculiarly defined middle at that: from the “Glorious Revolution” that legitimated an extra-national monarch for Great Britain to the end of a Civil War in that former British colony, “America.” But it's also the age of democratic revolutions, and students electing to take this course will discover that the writers in this (middle) period defined or redefined—in their practices as well as in their prefaces—virtually every idea that governs our attitudes toward “literature” and literacy. We’ll examine how Alexander Pope makes English into an artificial language that “belongs” to no particular class; we’ll see how letters are the means by which former “nobodies”—women and slaves—exercise a measure of freedom and autonomy.  We'll consider the "strange power of speech" that informs revolutionary "declarations," and how that power is theorized in the work of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley. But we’ll also see the supposedly liberatory, democratizing power of letters and of literature challenged—by Dickens, in Bleak House, and Melville, in “Bartleby the Scrivener.” As we consider Romantic attempts to redefine poetry and Emerson’s and Thoreau’s attempt to write new kinds of prose, we’ll also ask more general questions: what constitutes the “novelty” of literature; if novelty or “originality” is a value, what is the point of reading literature of the past?

Tentative reading list:  Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Richardson, S., Pope, A.: The Rape of the Lock; Swift, J.: Gulliver's Travels (Book IV); Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey; The Norton Anthology of American Literature, volumes A and B; The Norton Anthology of English Literature, volume C; Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads; Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Dickens, C.: Bleak House

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 105 North Gate


Book List

Conrad, J.: Heart of Darkness; Joyce, J.: Dubliners; Morrison, T.: Beloved; Nabokov, V.: Pnin; Pynchon, T.: The Crying of Lot 49; Wilde, O.: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse; le, t.: The Gangster We Are All Looking For

Description

This course provides an overview of the many literary innovations now grouped under the term “modernism,” as well as their relations to the historical and social disruptions associated with the term “modernity.”  After providing a firm grasp of these terms, the course will emphasize both literary form and historical context.  How does literature respond to the pressures of industrialization, revolution, and empire, as well as to an ever-growing awareness of a diverse, interconnected world?

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: note new location: 160 Dwinelle


Book List

Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady; Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Poems and other supplementary texts by Walt Whitman, T. S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, Langston Hughes, Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank O'Hara, and Sylvia Plath will be made available on bCourses.

Description

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovations that show us some of the most provocative ways that literature operated as a means of cultural response in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will also consider modernism alongside other literary modes and styles (realism, naturalism, postmodernism) that look to different strategies for representing the experience of the modern world--and of finding a place for literature within it. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and questions of literary form even as we think about such larger issues as the relationship between reading and entertainment, the changing status of art in respect to new technologies of information and representation, and the challenges to traditional conceptions of the self posed by new languages of psychological, national, and racial identity. Assignments will likely include two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discusssion section per week
Location: note new location: 2040 Valley LSB


Other Readings and Media

The required books for the course will be available at University Press Books, and the Course Reader, Introduction to Environmental Studies, will be sold exclusively at Metro Publishing; both of these establishments are located on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Ave. There will also be a required envornmental science textbook (possibly provided as an eBook).

Description

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the basic science of the environment, an introduction to environmental literature, philosophy, and policy issues, and analytic tools to evaluate a range of environmental problems. The course requires some time spent outdoors in observation as well as a lot of reading and writing.

This course is cross-listed with E.S.P.M. C12.


Sophomore Seminar: The Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Lahiri, J.: Interpreter of Maladies

Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fiction and attend events at the Pacific Film Archive and Cal Performances. This seminar may be used to satisfy the Arts and Literature breadth requirement in Letters and Science.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to Old English

English 104

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: Note new location: 155 Kroeber


Book List

Baker, Peter S.: Introduction to Old English: Third Edition; Marsden, Richard: The Cambridge Old English Reader

Description

Hwæt! Leorniaþ Englisc!

In this class, you will learn to read, write, and even speak the language of Beowulf. Once you have completed it, you will be able to understand—and will have read!—a wide range of texts, from comic riddles and love-laments to King Alfred’s educational policy. Because Old English is the grandparent of modern English, success in this course will also help you understand the grammar of today’s language from the inside out.

This course does not assume any previous experience learning languages at the college level, or any prior knowledge of Old English. Work will include translation in and out of class; quizzes; daily participation, and exams.

Note:  Graduate students may enroll in this class, and will be expected to do additional intensive work for graduate credit.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Greenblatt, Stephen: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition, Volume B: The Sixteenth and the Seventeenth Century; Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Description

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture would elevate human beings above their natural state. Many of our authors supported the project; some opposed it fervently. But willingly or not, everyone we read during the semester contributed to it, if only by virtue of recording their impressions, thoughts, feelings, and fancies in writing. Our aim in the course is to understand both the project of the Renaissance and the beliefs behind it by looking at the works of Francis Petrarch, Thomas Wyatt, Mary Sidney, William Shakespeare, and John Donne, among others.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (17th century)

English 115B

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 160 Dwinelle


Book List

Bunyan, John: Pilgrim's Progress; Edited by Alan Rudrum, Joseph Black & Holly Faith Nelson : The Broadview Anthology of Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose: vol 1

Description

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature (poetry, prose, and drama), focusing on works by King James I, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Cavendish, Hutchinson, Halkett, and Bunyan. We will discuss the relationship between literature and the court of James I, the explosion of pamphlet literature during the English civil war, the controversy over gender roles, the texts surrounding the regicide of Charles I, and the political, religious, and sexual radicalism of dissenting literary culture.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 130 Dwinelle


Book List

Bevington, David: The Necessary Shakespeare, Student Edition

Description

This course will be a basic introduction to the major plays of Shakespeare.  It will include Midsummer Night 's Dream, probably Merchant of Venice, Richard II, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, Antony and Cleopatra, Winter's Tale, and Tempest.  The instructor is not a specialist in Shakespeare and is not very interested in historicist approaches of any kind.  The aim of this course is to develop a full vocubulary for the appreciation of the plays, the characters, how they handle their situations, and how Shakespeare handles that handling.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 2
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 101 Barker


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Norton Shakespeare

Description

Shakespeare's poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone--indeed, something like an obsession--for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to George Eliot to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Sarah Kane and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Kristeva to Zizeck. We will be especially concerned with five large issues: compassion; political representation and its discontents; the nature of identity and subjectivity; colonialism; and the relation between the ways Shakespeare's plays make meaning and the ways they produce emotional experience. Our readings will include Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.

I have ordered the second edition of The Norton Shakespeare (ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al.). If you already own another complete Shakespeare (e.g., The Riverside, The Pelican, the first edition of The Norton Shakespeare, etc.), you are welcome to use it for this course. Good single-play editions--Signet, Folger, Arden, Oxford World Classics, Pelican--would also serve you well.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held unitl Friday, September 5.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been postponed from fall 2014 to spring 2015.


Literature of the Restoration & the Early 18th Century

English 119

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 210 Wheeler


Book List

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume C: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century

Other Readings and Media

A few texts will be available to download, including William Wycherley's sex-farce The Country Wife (ebook that comes free with the Norton Anthology)

Description

The period from the "Restoration" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the most influential novels, the most amusing comedies, and the most outrageous obscenity. London (already the largest city in the world) burned to the ground - we will begin the course by reading contemporary accounts of this catastrophe - but within a few generations had developed all the benefits of modern civilization: a stock market, a scientific revolution, an insurance industry, a colonial empire based on slavery. This course will try to convey not only the abundance and brilliance of this period, but its contrasts and contradictions. Canonical figures like Hobbes, Dryden, Congreve, Pope and Swift will be juxtaposed to scandalous and/or marginal authors: women writers like Aphra Behn, Mary Astell and Mary Wortley Montagu, Puritan outlaws like John Bunyan, and renegade aristocrats like the Earl of Rochester. Dominant themes, always treated with devastating wit and skeptical realism, include sexuality and identity, the politics of gender as well as nation, and the representation of “other” cultures (Surinam, West Africa, Ottoman Turkey).

Our readings come from a single book, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition, Volume C, The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century – plus a few extra texts available to download.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The 20th -Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Gibson, William: Neuromancer; Mann, Thomas: The Magic Mountain; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Zola, Emile: La Bete Humaine

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics--history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narratiion within the novel; how has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel; and lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?


British Literature: 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Watt; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Green, Henry: Party Going; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Woolf, Virginia: Jacob's Room; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves

Description

A survey of the modernist period in British and Irish writing, concentrating on the development of the novel as both an artistic medium and a mechanism of social representation. Students should be prepared to read adventurously and to read a lot. We will attempt about a work per week, making a central exception for Joyce’s Ulysses, which will slow us to about a chapter per day.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections will not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Modern Poetry

English 127

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 103 Moffitt


Book List

Ramazani, Johan, ed.: Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, Vol. 1

Description

This course will survey the work of major American and British poets who flourished in the twentieth century.  Poets will include W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden,  Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens, W.C. Williams, Lorine Neidecker. Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and John Ashbery.  The focus will be on close reading to establish how poets compose modes of attention to the world by their control of language.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Baym, Nina: The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Seventh Edition), Vol. A: Beginnings to 1820; Brown, Charles Brockden: Edgar Huntly; Miller, Perry: The American Puritans: Their Prose and Poetry; Rowson, Susanna: Charlotte Temple

Other Readings and Media

Photocopied course reader

Description

This course will offer a survey of the literature in English produced in North America before 1800: competing British versions of settlement; Puritan history, sermons, and poetry; conversion, captivity, and slave narratives; diaries, journals, essays, and oratory; and eighteenth-century political debate, poetry, and novels. Authors will include William Bradford, John Winthrop, John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, Susanna Rowson, and Charles Brockden Brown. Two midterms and one final examination will be required.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 180 Tan


Book List

Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass ; Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Nature and Selected Essays ; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter ; Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick; Thoreau, Henry David: Walden and Civil Disobedience ; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass: The First (1855) Edition

Description

In the mid-nineteenth century, the U.S., a nation that had barely come together, was splitting apart. The fission helped to produce the remarkably energetic works we will be studying over the course of the semester. I will focus primarily on questions of freedom, cruelty, desire, and loss in my lectures, attempting to understand the relation between these abstract human experiences and the particular historical situation framing them. I will also emphasize the striking, baroque, often bizarre formal innovations attempted in these works.

Two ten-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance.


African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

English 133A

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 246 Dwinelle


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles: The Conjure Woman; Franklin, John Hope: Three Negro Classics; Gates, Henry Louis: The Classic Slave Narratives; Walker, David: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens

Description

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; and yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an embrace of literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and literary impulses in an exploration of selected works from the canon of African American literature. We will concern ourselves not only with the conceptual distinctions between orality and literacy, but also with how those distinctions gather force within debates over the power of language in politics and history: Rather than a teleological progression from orality to literacy, why does one find in much African American literature a promiscuous coupling of the two? What particular role does speech (e.g., confession, testimony) play in the formation of the subject? What are the politics of speaking, reading, and writing in early America? How might slaves have apprehended the power of orality – rhetoric, eloquence, performative speech – at a time when magnificent effects seemed to follow from the act of “declaring” independence?


African American Literature and Culture\nSince 1917

English 133B

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new room: 160 Dwinelle


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Jones, Edward: The Known World; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand & Passing; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye; Walker, Alice: The Third Life of Grange Copeland; Wright, Richard: Native Son

Description

An examination of some of the major 20th-century African American novels.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: The Fiction of Toni Morrison

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 174 Barrows


Book List

Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: Desdemona; Morrison, Toni: Home; Morrison, Toni: Love; Morrison, Toni: Paradise; Morrison, Toni: Playing in the Dark; Morrison, Toni: Song of Solomon; Morrison, Toni: Sula; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye

Description

A sequential examination of Toni Morrison’s fiction.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture

English 133T

Section: 2
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time:
Location:


Other Readings and Media

.

Description

This section of English 133T has been canceled.


Literature of American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in American Cinema

English 135AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 50 Birge


Other Readings and Media

Films will include Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, The Jazz Singer, The Searchers, Touch of Evil, Imitation of Life, West Side Story, Night of the Living Dead, The Godfather, and Apocalypse Now.

There are no required screenings in this course. Films can be streamed through commercial outlets or checked out from Moffitt Library.

There will also be a course reader with essays in political theory and social history. 

 

Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced between the 1910s and the 1970s. Themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impersonation.

There will be weekly writing assignments, one short essay, and one long essay.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.

Please note that this class will first meet on Wednesday, September 3; discussion sections wil not start being held until Friday, September 5.


Topics in American Studies: Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: Little Women; Aldrich, Thomas Bailey: The Story of a Bad Boy; Alger, Horatio: Ragged Dick; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Wiggin, Kate Douglas: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Description

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This is a period in which ordinary citizens felt that an economic and social revolution was taking place with the rise of industrial capitalism and urban transformations, creating a crisis of major cultural/political/economic rapid change.  Such a historical trauma seemed to demand difficult and painful reconsiderations and redefinitions. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity in the period, there  developed a problem about children and adolescents. Questions about boys and girls might be not only about gender definitions but also about the development of an ethical consciousness, what might be called everyday ethical coping.  Children seemed to represent either a last vestige of a world that was being lost or a promise of the future.  In the aftermath of the elevation of the importance of children in the Romantic era earlier in the century, in the U.S., the narratives of boys and girls gave artists the opportunity to observe, scrutinize, critique, and entertain.

There will be two papers and a final exam.  

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E.


Studies in World Literature in English: Partitioned States/Partitioned Selves

English 138

Section: 1
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi
Time: note new time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new location: 179 Dwinelle


Book List

Buttalia, Urvashi: The Other Side of Silence; Cao, Lan: Monkey Bridge; Kanafani, Ghassan : Men in the Sun; Lee, Chang-rae: The Surrendered; Ninh, Bao: The Sorrow of War; Rushdie, Salman: Midnight's Children; Said, Edward: The Question of Palestine; Shelach, Oz: Picnic Grounds; Shin, Kyung-Sook: Please Look After Mom

Description

Territorial division has long been used as a means of political reorganization, especially in the face of ethnic or ideological conflict. This course examines the relationship between territorial splitting, or partition, and empire in the twentieth century. We will take a comparativist approach to two historical moments in which four major partitions took place: the 1947 partitions of India and Palestine, and the 1954 partitions of Korea and Vietnam. Taking seriously the historical contexts of decolonization and Cold War conflicts, this course considers literary and cinematic reflections on these geopolitical ruptures. After the lines have been drawn, making two states where there was once one, how do people imagine these new nations? How do they imagine themselves in relationship to what exists on the other side of that new border? Does partition make possible new kinds of nation-states and new kinds of national feeling? What is the relationship between the splitting of territory and psychic trauma?

We will examine novels, short stories, memoirs, and films alongside theories of psychoanalysis to consider the affective afterlives of partition, on nations and on individuals. 


Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 122 Barrows


Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  Please note that although Melanie Abrams will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Professor Robert Hass and Lecturer Melanie Abrams will actually team-teach the two sections of the course.  Students will enroll in one section and spend five weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams, and five weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass.  Both instructors will collaborate for two weeks to teach playwriting.

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

This course is open to English majors only.  


Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: B0005 Hearst Annex


Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.  Please note that although Robert Hass will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Lecturer Melanie Abrams and Professor Robert Hass will actually team-teach the two sections of the course.  Students will enroll in one section and spend five weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass, and five weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams.  Both instructors will collaborate for two weeks to teach playwriting.

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Furman, Laura: The O. Henry Prize Stories 2013

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing.

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction, and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course.  To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file.  The deadline for completing this application process in 4 P.M. FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Tranter, Kirsten
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

La Plante, A.: The Making of a Story: A Norton Guide to Creative Writing

Other Readings and Media

Also a course reader

Description

This class is a workshop in short fiction. It is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of narrative style and structure, and to encourage a model of constructive critique in a workshop setting. Our readings will include short stories across a variety of literary genres, as well as essays and critical pieces on the writing process. Students will write at least two short stories as well as shorter writing and response exercises, and will be expected to share their work with the class and critique the work of others on a regular basis.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadine for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Blanchfield, Brian: A Several World; Hamilton, Peggy: Questions for Animals; Holiday, Harmony: Go Find Your Father; Saloy, Mona Lisa: Second Line Home

Other Readings and Media

A course reader to be available from Zee Zee Copy.

 

Description

What I take as a given is that poetry (and by implication, all "creative writing") is a public activity, one with the job of disrupting the status quo, the "interested" discourse of TV and advertising, the endless double-talk of politics. This semester I'm wanting us to emphasize poetry as a public site, as an event that necessarily takes place in public. We do shape poetry for our own purposes--some of these are classic (advancing art, e.g., or doing violence to language) and some are tawdry (use your imagination) and many fall inbetween--and I'm asking that this fall, as part of the work of this course, we work toward one or two public (open to the public) events involving poetry.

Reading, weekly writing expectations, interrogation, argument, field trips, public events, "workshopping," "woodshedding," etc.

From an essay:  I find [form] interesting as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment. Sonnets can be navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to get it right but to see how it feels to get involved in it, that and to look at what the poem (or the essay or joke or speech) does and at the ways the world presses on it, and at how it presses back on the world . . . . The point here being that both [Gwendolyn] Brooks and [Bernadette] Mayer tangle awkwardly and repeatedly with the [sonnet] form, with the received pattern of lines and syllables and turns, the daily order of arrival. Of course it's the wrestling that's important, the labor there, not the form so much. The form allows us to talk in class about the wrestling; it's a thing, a topic, a place or place-holder in the never-ending conversation.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 pages of your poems (any combination of long or short poems or fragments of poems, the total length not exceeding five pages), by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader from Krishna Copy.

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second, and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision. Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, with an eye and ear to renovating traditions. I have no "house style" and only one precept: you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we'll discuss four or so in rotation (I'll respond to every poem you write). On alternate days, we'll discuss illustrative poems in our course reader. If the past is any guarantee, the course will make you a better poet.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: Roberson, Edwin
Roberson, Ed
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

A Poet's Guide to Poetry

Description

A seminar in writing poetry.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Lopate, P.: The Art of the Personal Essay

Description

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate’s anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments will include 3 short writing exercises (2 pages each), two new essays (8-20 pages each), written critiques of classmates' work, and a final revision project. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your literary nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

Within a workshop setting, we will read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction, with special attention to the essay as a literary genre.  Students will express their understanding and appreciation of this literary form in a series of well-crafted essays.  The primary texts will be the participants’ own prose.  We will also explore contemporary essays as well as the exquisite traditions within which they emerge.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 8-10 double-spaced pages of your writing (I am especially interested in reading your creative nonfiction rather than your academic prose) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new location: 110 Wheeler


Book List

Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction; James, Henry (ed. Peter Beidler): The Turn of the Screw; Leitch, Vincent, ed, et al: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism;

Recommended: Culler, Jonathan: Structuralist Poetics; Felman, Shoshana: Jacques Lacan and the Adventure of Insight; Lentricchia, Frank, et al: Critical Terms for Literary Study; Norris, Christopher: Deconstruction: Theory and Practice

Other Readings and Media

Required readings are available in the course reader produced by Odin Readers (841-7323 or <www.odinreaders.com>).

Description

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical schools: formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, identity politics, and post-colonialism.  We will examine the differences in value and method that define these approaches and also consider the ways critical traditions retool themselves in response to internal or external debate and critique.  Our abiding concern will be to ask what counts as “the literary” for each theorist and what is the role and function of literature in each argument.  Sometimes the literary will be defined explicitly; other times it will be represented by the exemplary literary texts each school enlists in its theoretical enterprise. 

To develop skills as close readers of theory, students will write two short papers (7-8 pages each).  Students will also complete a take-home final, which will give the opportunity for synthetic thinking.


Special Topics: Critical Influences in Contemporary Culture

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Campion, John
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Beaudrillard, Jean: Simulacra and Simulation; Chomsky, Noam: Necessary Illusions; Deleuze, G. and Guattari, F, Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari: A Thousand Plateaus; Foucault, Michel: Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison; Reich, Wilhelm: The Mass Psychology of Fascism

Description

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments of this course are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of difficult and important texts concerning the concepts of freedom, knowledge, and political practices in contemporary democratic (and other) societies. Along the way, the course will introduce a number of critical issues connected to these themes, including: agency, selfhood, ecology, psychotherapy, economics, gender, race, and literature.

 


Special Topics: Freedom and the University: The 1960s and Its Afterlives

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Anzaldua, Gloria, et al.: This Bridge Called My Back; Aptheker, Bettina: Intimate Politics; Bloom, Aexander: Takin' it to the Streets: A Sixties Reader, 2nd edition; Bloom,, Joshua, et al.: Black Against Empire; Charter, Ann: The Portable Sixties Reader; Cohen, Robert: Freedom's Orator; Davis, Angela: Angela Davis: An Autobiography; Edufactory Collective: Toward a Global Autonomous University; Freire, Paulo: Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Marcuse, Herbert: One-Dimensional Man; Newfield, Christopher: Unmaking of the Public University

Description

The sixties represent a period in which the university became for the first time a central locus of struggles for freedom—for civil rights, Black Power, Third World self-determination, and women’s and gay liberation, and against imperialism and colonialism, militarism and war, capitalism and heterosexist patriarchy. The result was that conceptions of what higher education should be and whom it should be for were also profoundly changed. This course is being offered in coordination with next Fall’s commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement (FSM), which in 1964 put Berkeley on the “World Sixties” map. Instead of dichotomizing the “good” early sixties from the “bad” late sixties, this course will be interested in locating productive encounters between liberal ideals and radical quests for freedom and equality. Examining the intellectual and material legacies of that era in light of today’s precarious public university, this course will trace the historical dialectic between “Cultural Revolution” and Ethnic Studies, and between the counterculture and cyberculture. The course will geographically emphasize the San Francisco Bay Area, so that students may pursue final research projects if they choose on topics rich in local archives. Course readings will include a wide range of media and genres: biography, history, memoir, poetry, manifesto, fiction, anthology, theory, film, drama. As such, students should expect that though this is an English-listed course, it will be taught as an interdisciplinary cultural studies, history and theory course. Students should attend the first day of class before purchasing any books, as there may be adjustments to the book list.

 


Special Topics: Greek Tragedy in Translation

English 165

Section: 3
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 103 Wheeler


Book List

Aeschylus, ed. Grene, Lattimore, et al.: Aeschylus II: The Oresteia--Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides I : Medea, Alcestis, The Children of Heracles, Hyppolytus; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides II: Andromache, Hecuba, The Suppliant Women, Electra; Euripides, ed. Griffith et al.: Euripides V: Bacchae, Iphigenia in Aulis, The Cyclops, Rhesus; Sophocles, ed. Griffith et al.: Sophocles I: Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone

Description

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students' ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early sources and how they raised critical questions that concern western societies up to the present day. The class will look at their concepts of individuality, family, freedom, will, meaning, knowledge, mind, God, and political practice. Along the way, the course will consider some connecting tissue, such as psychotherapy, economics, gender, literary theory, and ecology.

 


Special Topics: The Graphic Memoir

English 165

Section: 5
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Barry, Lynda: One! Hundred! Demons!; Bechdel, Alison: Are You My Mother? A Comic Drama; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Gloeckner, Phoebe: A Child's Life: And Other Stories; McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Sacco, Joe: Palestine; Satrapi, Marjane: Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; Spiegelman, Art: Maus, Vols I & II; Yang, Gene Luen: American Born Chinese

Description

The graphic novel is often defined as "a single-author, book-length work meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes."  Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term as a pretentious and disingenuous attempt to rebrand comics in order to elevate their cultural status.  We will explore the definitions, history, and diverse forms of graphic narratives with an emphasis on the graphic memoir or autobiography or personal narrative.  Along the way, we will develop a critical vocabulary to help us articulate the special blend of visual and verbal narrative as well as notions of subjectivity.

This course is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: The End of the Poem: Poetic Closure

English 165

Section: 6
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All primary and secondary readings will be in a course reader, available at Metro Publishing on Bancroft.

Description

This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem’s entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which a poem generates itself, deferring then delivering (or thwarting) the sense of an ending. In addition to the question I.A. Richards poses in his essay “How Does a Poem Know When It is Finished?” we’ll ask some versions of the following: Can a poem end without concluding? What comes after the last line of the poem? Why do so many poems close by recalling their beginnings? How have closural strategies in English poetry changed over time? We’ll pair theoretical accounts of closure with test-cases from across the history of poetry in English, acquiring along the way some facility with its prosodies, its use of figures from classical rhetoric (especially figures of repetition), and its major and minor formal environments.

Update (on June 26):  We were previously not sure whether this section of English 165 would be offered or not, but now we know that it WILL be offered.

 


Special Topics: Chicano Literature and History

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 104 Barrows


Book List

Acosta, Oscar Zeta: The Revolt of the Cockroach People; Baca, Jimmy Santiago: Martin and Meditations on the South Valley; Bardacke, Frank: Trampling Out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers; Blackwell, Maylei: Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement; Cisneros, Sandra: House on Mango Street; Corpi, Lucha: Eulogy for a Brown Angel; Lopez, Ian Haney: Racism on Trial: The Chicano Fight for Justice; Montejano, David: Quixote's Soldiers: A Local History of the Chicano Movement; Rivera, Tomas: ... y no se lo trago la tierra/...and the earth did not swallow him

Description

The Chicano Movement of the late sixties and early seventies was a social movement that reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the Mexican American community. It represented a political challenge to inequality and racism as well as a cultural renaissance that expressed itself in literature, art, and music. In this class, co-taught by Professor David Montejano of Chicano Studies, we will explore the politics and culture generated by the Chicano Movement. Our readings will illustrate the various tendencies and perspectives of the activists and artists who led, informed, and inspired the movement.

This class is cross-listed with Chicano Studies 180 section 2.


Special Topics: Black Science Fiction

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 12 Haviland


Book List

Butler, Octavia E.: Lilith's Brood; Delany, Samuel R.: Babel-17; Díaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Okarafor, Nnedi: Lagoon; Schuyler, George: Black No More; Whitehead, Colson: The Intuitionist;

Recommended: Butler, Octavia E.: Bloodchild, and Other Stories; Delany, Samuel R.: Aye, and Gomorrah; Poe, Edgar Allen: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

Other Readings and Media

Movies:  Franklin J. Schaffner, Planet of the Apes; John Sayles, The Brother From Another Planet; Neill Blomkamp, District 9

Description

This course considers two specific genres—black fiction and science fiction—to explore how they inflect each other when they blend. Under the umbrella “black,” we include fictions that issue out of and/or purport to describe the African, the Caribbean, and the African-American experience. The category of “science fiction” will comprise stories, novels, films, and television shows that speculate about wild, hybrid, alternative, cosmic, neo-ecological, dystopian, and ancient technologies of human experience. Overlapping—and mutually transforming—concepts include: genetics, race, diaspora, miscegenation, double consciousness, time, memory, history, futurity, and, of course, the alien.


Special Topics: Global Cities

English 166

Section: 4
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Boo, Katherine: Behind the Beautiful Forevers; Buekes, Lauren: Zoo City; Cole, Teju: Open City; Mpe, Phaswane: Welcome to Our Hillbrow; Rushdie, Salman: The Moor's Last Sigh; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth; Theroux, Paul: Kowloon Tong

Description

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives--fictional and otherwise--that live in those cities, the stories those cities give birth to. Our itinerary will take us to five global cities: New York, London, Johannesburg, Mumbai, and Hong Kong. At each stop we will consider representations of these cities and their inhabitants from above and from below, from theories of transnational capital to narratives of the dispossessed. Are these cities sites of interconnection and aspiration, or do they indicate a world increasingly unequal and divided? How do the local and the foreign intersect in these global urban spaces? What do they tell us about globalization, its histories, and the literary and cultural forms it now takes?

 

 


Literature and Sexual Identity: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

English 171

Section: 1
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 9 Evans


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood ; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Cunningham, Michael: The Hours; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Fiction; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Toibin, Colm: The Master; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando

Other Readings and Media

An electronic reader of poetry, short fiction, and critical essays will be available on b-space, and a selection of key critical works will be on reserve at Moffitt. During the semester, we will also screen several films, including Brokeback Mountain, Boys Don't Cry, and Looking for Langston.

Description

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel: and on the other as the freeing of desire from the burden of reproduction, and of language from the burden of reference. Sexual and literary experimentation went hand in hand, but their intersections varied considerably. At the turn of the twenty-first century, a different phase of the sexual revolution produced a spectrum of intensive cultural production, political action, and theoretical debate about the construction of gender and sexuality. In this course, we will read back and forth across the twentieth century to stage a series of encounters between the cultural practices of modernism and those of contemporary queer theorists and communities.

This course is cross-listed with L.G.B.T. 100 section 1.


The Language and Literature of Films: British Cinema

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + films Tues. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 56 Barrows for lectures; 166 Barrows for films


Other Readings and Media

In addition to regular film screenings, we'll look at a number of essays, which will all be available on our course site.

Description

This course will look at the British cinema from the 1930s to the present from a number of different angles. First, we will consider British cinema as a national industry and ask how the economic and social conditions under which British films have been made, distributed, and received have affected their form, their content, and their relation to other national cinemas. What, if anything, makes British films different from what was and is happening in France, Hollywood or Mumbai? In order to answer these questions we will pay special attention to genre films: the war film, the romance, the spy film, the gangster film, etc. Second, we will look at different ways (both kind and unkind) in which the British cinema has represented Britishness at home and abroad. How does a national cinema respond to, help, or hinder shifts in the way national identity is understood and experienced? We'll look at films about the preservation of Britishness as a form of heritage, nostalgia about the passing of Britishness "as it was," and the presentation of other stories about Britishness that run against the grain of the first two. Finally, we will treat these British films as films and look very closely at them in order to develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze and describe film at the level of form and content.


Literature and History: The French Revolution

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 110 Wheeler


Description

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contradictory.  Yet both statements underscore the difficulty of conceptualizing revolution as an event.  Emphasizing its radical novelty, Edmund Burke declared the French Revolution “the most astonishing thing that has hitherto happened in the world,” whereas William Hazlitt described it as “the remote but inevitable result of the invention of the art of printing.”  Is revolution a consequence or a cause--or a rupture of causality? What is the relation between the revolutionary event and liberation, between acts or episodes of violent unmaking and the unleashing of a discourse and praxis of human rights that continues to reverberate?

This course is designed to consider that literature of and about the French Revolution is peculiarly adapted to illuminate the problem of historical eventfulness (and human freedom) insofar as it yokes the temporality of revolution to fictive (dramatic, poetic, and novelistic) utterance.  Texts will include “eye-witness” accounts and documents of the French Revolution; its representation in poetry, drama, novel, letters, painting, film, and “history”; philosophies of history (Rousseau, Marx, Arendt) and theories of writing (Derrida, Barthes) in which the French Revolution operates as a central (if absent) figure.  Because the discourse of civil rights will figure prominently in our discussion, it's a course of particular relevance to students considering a human rights minor.

Partial book list:  Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man; Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Helen Maria Williams, Letters from France; W. Wordsworth, The Prelude; Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution (selections); Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities;  Peter Weiss, The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat.  Films:  Marat/Sade; Danton.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Barker, P.: Regeneration; Finger, A.: Call Me Ahab; Friel, B.: Molly Sweeney; Lewis, V.: Beyond Victims and Villains; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III; Simon, R.: The Story of Beautiful Girl

Description

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group presentation project, and a take-home final examination.  (This is a core course for the Disability Studies Minor). 


Autobiography

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


The Novel

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Research Seminar: American Captivities

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Baepler, P.: White Slaves, African Masters; Derounian, K. Z.: Women's Indian Captivity Narratives; Gates, H. L.: The Classic Slave Narratives; Rowson, S.: Slaves in Algiers; Tyler, R.: The Algerine Captive

Other Readings and Media

Course reader.

Description

The Indian captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.”  Its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, but American captivity narratives also related the captivities of sailors and pirates at sea, Christians and Muslims on the Barbary Coast, and Africans enslaved and transported throughout the Atlantic world. 

Captivity is always a middle ground, a testing ground, and a proving ground.  In these narratives, the captive’s plight stands in for a host of historical contests imbued with political crisis, personal danger, warring ideologies, and the promise of deliverance.  The captive’s position is necessarily liminal, and thus offers an exceptional opportunity to observe how race, gender, and religion function in the constrained space of bondage.

In this course, we will study a range of Indian, pirate, and slave captivities, from the period of colonial settlement through the early nineteenth century. We will also pursue research in secondary sources, tracing and critiquing traditions of literary criticism around the issue of captivity.  Finally, you will learn the research methods and writing skills to complete an original research paper connected to the themes of our course.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Recent African American Literature

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: MW 3-4:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Butler, Octavia: Wild Seed; Hopkinson, Nalo: Midnight Robber; Jones, Edward P.: The Known World; Mackey, Nathaniel: From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Mullen, Harryette: Recyclopedia; Philip, Nourbese: Zong!; Rankine, Claudia: Citizen; Roberson, Ed: Voices Cast Out to Talk Us In

Description

A seminar focused on poetry and prose published by African Americans in the last 25 years. One short essay, one group presentation, and one long essay due at the end of the semester.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: James Joyce

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Joyce, James: Finnegans Wake; Joyce, James: Ulysses

Description

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the transformation of Joyce's style and concerns as well the surprising return of phrases and themes in his major works, from the Dubliners collection of short stories through the autobiographical novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, to the spectacular innovations of Ulysses and the Wake. We will also ask what Joyce was trying to achieve in works that have been dismissed as failures, such as his collection of poetry titled Chamber Music and his play, Exiles. Throughout the course, we will think about the different contexts of Joyce’s writing: turn-of-the century Dublin, Paris of 1902, pre-war Trieste, wartime Zurich, and Paris in the 1920s and 1930s.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Victorian Masculinities

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, C.: David Copperfield; Haggard, H.: King Solomon's Mines; Stevenson , R.: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Wilde, W. : The Importance of Being Earnest

Description

The Queen for whom the Victorian era was named defines the period’s cultural reputation in more ways than one; the stereotypes of Victorianism—moral constraint, prudery, repression—are almost always associated with women. This course seeks to explore how the Victorians defined masculinity, both in relation to femininity and on its own terms. What were the Victorian ideals of maleness, the counterparts to the female “Angel in the House”? When Thomas Carlyle wrote “On Heroes,” what kind of men was he envisioning, and how was the image of the hero shaped by different literary forms as well as historical events? We will examine new ideas of boyishness and development, from schoolroom ethics to muscular Christianity, and delve into the complex and intersectional subcategories of Victorian masculinity: the gentleman, the professional, the adventurer, the citizen, the voter, the dandy, and the degenerate. Over the course of the semester, we will also question the rigidity of these classifications, and trace their fluctuations throughout the century.

Students will write two research papers: an exploratory essay of 5-8 pages and a larger culminating essay of 12-15 pages. Research projects will also be presented to the class. 

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Paradise Lost and the Ancient Epic

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Homer: Iliad; Homer: Odyssey; Milton, John, ed. Kastan: Paradise Lost ; Virgil: Aeneid

Other Readings and Media

If you already own another version of the epics, or another SCHOLARLY edition of Milton (with footnotes good enough to identify the echoes), you can use those. Electronic texts of the ancient epics may also be useful.

Description

“Not less but more heroic” … that is Milton’s claim in his modern epic Paradise Lost, comparing his own Biblical theme to the achievements of ancient epic, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid. Even so, those three mighty works were the foundation of Western literature and the gold standard for literary genius. We will read Milton’s epic book by book, then bring in for comparison the episodes, characters and images from the Classics that he is quoting, recreating or transforming. Your research paper will be developed out of a comparative moment that particularly fascinates you, and will test Milton’s claim by asking what each poet means by “heroic.” Ancient texts will be taught in translation, but I will have the original on hand for reference.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Ecopoetry

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

What is ecopoetry, and what, if anything, distinguishes it from nature poetry? How does ecopoetics differ from another poetics? In this seminar we will explore topics surrounding this question, which include the pathetic fallacy and anthropomorphism; representation and reference (content and imitative form, abstraction and specificity); anthropocentrism and ecocentrism; evolution, ecology and ecopoetics; ecopoetry vs. nature poetry, didacticism vs. aestheticism; feminist ecopoetics; animal cognition and species extinction; global warming; Native American and African American ecopoetry, and so on. We will confine ourselves to poetry written in the United States, from the romantics, while focusing on the present, including Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson; Frost, Stevens, Moore, Jeffers; Bishop, Ammons, Berry, Snyder, Merwin, Hass, Graham, Spahr, Hillman, Alexie, Harjo, Hogan, and Roberson. You will learn how to read and evaluate a poem ecocritically. You will be asked to write a five-page ecocriticism of a single poem, and a fifteen-page research paper on a collection of poems and/or a problem in ecopoetics. Toward this end, we will spend one class in the library learning how to research your particular topics with a research librarian. The seminar will cullminate in a GREEN PARTY, during which you will be encouraged to share your own ecopoems or ecological musings.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-liting for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Virginia Woolf

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 100 Wheeler


Book List

Woolf, Virgiinia: Between the Acts; Woolf, Virginia: A Room of One's Own; Woolf, Virginia: Jacob's Room; Woolf, Virginia: Moments of Being; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves; Woolf, Virginia: The Years; Woolf, Virginia: Three Guineas; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse;

Recommended: Bell, Quentin: Virginia Woolf; Lee, Hermione: Virginia Woolf

Other Readings and Media

An electronic reader of Woolf's most important essays and short fiction, as well as key critical essays about her fiction, will be available on b-space. A range of secondary materials will also be placed on reserve at Moffitt.

Description

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf’s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that movement through a literary oeuvre that has been cherry picked to illustrate a particular turn within it.  As we map the trajectory from Woolf’s apprenticeship works in the teens through the experimental narratives of the twenties to the politically pressured projects of the late thirties, we will explore the textual strategies through which these turns were achieved and the cultural crosscurrents in which they were embedded. We will read Woolf’s critical essays to situate her narrative practice within her commentary on it (as well as within narrative theory generally); we will take advantage of the recently published holograph manuscripts to read published texts in the context of their revisions; we will scrutinize the proliferation of Woolf biographies to interrogate the assumptions and functions of that genre; and we will put pressure on Woolf’s appropriation and revision by various critical schools and contemporary writers. There will be two written assignments: a short five-page paper to jumpstart the research process and a fifteen-page critical paper at the conclusion of the course.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Dialect Literature

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new location: 175 Dwinelle


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles: The Conjure Woman; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Iweala, U.: Beasts of No Nation; James, Marlon: The Book of Night Women; Saro-Wiwa, Ken: Sozaboy

Description

In this seminar we will read works written in what the novelist and human rights activist Ken Saro-Wiwa termed “rotten English,” primarily the work of authors from the African diaspora, though not exclusively.  Our conversations will be focused on developing an account of how black writers turned a badge of dishonor into an occasion for literary experimentation, specifically the technical challenge of figuring character consciousness and illicit community.  (When characters speak in English vernaculars -- whether slangs, cants, dialects, pidgins, or creoles -- their deviant speech is likely to give off a whiff of inferiority even as it provides the illusion of heightened interiority.)  We will address the formal challenges of the works in question, specifically their narratological and linguistic aspects: free indirect discourse and the return of omniscient narration in contemporary literature; grammar and ethics; grammar as thought; dialect as a representation of the secrecy of thought (and of linguistic communities).  Must characters think in the same linguistic register in which they speak?  What makes dialect seem simultaneously like a foreign tongue and the language of the people?  Is there experience that Standard English prose cannot capture?  Does dialect's deformation of words and sentences present a more subtle means of registering shifts in the ethical landscape of a world out of joint (e.g., the topsy-turvy world in which some people can own others, postcolonial African states torn apart by civil war)?

List of authors to include: Junot Diaz, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, Ken Saro-Wiwa, Marlon James, Sapphire, and Uzodinma Iweala.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Contemporary British Culture and Literature

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Churchill, Caryl: Cloud Nine; Evaristo, Bernardine: The Emperor's Babe; Rowling, J.K.: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban; Rushdie, Salman: The Satanic Verses; Welsh, Irvine: Trainspotting

Description

In this course, we will investigate the literary and cultural landscape of contemporary Britain.  After several introductory sessions on the postwar period (1945-1979), we'll spend the bulk of our time in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s.  We’ll read several novels, a clutch of poems, a play or two, and a handful of essays; we’ll watch several films; and we’ll listen to some music.  We’ll sketch a capacious picture of British culture and literature, examining a variety of forms, modes, and genres, and considering a range of issues that emerge from our readings.  You will be responsible for writing 2 essays: a 3-5 page close reading and a 15-20 page research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-liting for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Romantic Novel

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Mansfield Park; Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Godwin, William: Caleb Williams; Hogg, James: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Scott, Walter: Redgauntlet; Scott, Walter: Waverley; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein

Description

Readings in the “novelistic revolution” (Franco Moretti’s phrase) of European Romanticism. With our main focus on the establishment of  “the classical form of the historical novel” in Scott’s Waverley, published two hundred years ago in 1814, we’ll look at a range of novelistic experiments and genres in British fiction between 1794 and 1824, following two interwoven threads:

  • Comedies of national and conjugal union, in the historical and marriage plots of Walter Scott (Waverley, Redgauntlet) and Jane Austen (Mansfield Park, Persuasion)
  • Gothic scenarios of homosocial obsession, persecution, fanaticism, and monstrous secrets, in tales by William Godwin (Caleb Williams), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein), and James Hogg (Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner).

Students will attend the symposium on 1814, taking place at Berkeley on the weekend of September 20, and write a 20-25 research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Manifesto Modernism

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Agee, James and Evans, Walker: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich: The Communist Manifesto; McKay, Claude: Banjo; Williams, W. C.: Spring and All

Description

This course will examine modernist prose and poetry in English from the perspective of a particularly modern genre of writing, the manifesto. By exploring the literary qualities of the manifesto as well as the manifesto-like qualities of modernist literary form, we will think about what these pronouncements and declarations share with the wider intellectual and political culture of the early 20th century. What is the relationship between modernist visions of cultural renewal and the political manifestos and programs of the same period? To what extent might we think of modernism as a form of cultural "planning" analogous to the economic and social planning of the era?

Authors read will include Mina Loy, Claude McKay, Laura Riding, William Carlos Williams, and others.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Rejection of Closure: Slow Readings

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Clark, T. J.: The Sight of Death: An Experiment in Art Writing; Eagleton, T.: How to Read a Poem

Other Readings and Media

Course books will be available from Mrs. Dalloway's (an independent bookstore located at 2904 College Avenue).

Description

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Works by Larry Eigner, Rae Armantrout, Jack Spicer, Ed Roberson, Geoffrey G. O’Brien, Juliana Spahr, and Susan Howe are among those that will be considered. Such works will be read against the backdrop of their historical moment and contextual purport and in conjunction with assigned critical texts, but students will be expected to conduct their own research using primary and secondary sources in the process of coming to relevant, meaningful readings of the poems. Students will be asked to maintain a reading journal and to write two critical papers.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 13
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Time:
Location: 103 Wheeler


Description

 

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: 20th-Century California Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 203 Wheeler


Book List

Chandler, R.: The Big Sleep; Dick, P. : Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Didion, J.: Slouching Towards Bethlehem; Stegner, W.: The Angle of Repose; West, N.: Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the books listed, there will be photocopied readings, e.g. selections from J. Steinbeck's The Pastures of Heaven and The Long Valley, poetry by R. Jeffers, W. Everson, J. Spicer, T. Gunn and R. Hass, essays by J. Cain and E. Wilson, &c.

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Film Noir

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.
Location: note new location: 221 Wheeler


Book List

Kaplan, E.: Women in Film Noir; Krutnik, F.: In a Lonely Street; Martin, R.: Mean Streets and Raging Bull; Osteen, M.: Nightmare Alley; Telotte, J.: Voices in the Dark

Description

We will examine the influence of film noir on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory, and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural background of the 40's, the representation of femininity and maculinity, and the spread of Freudianism.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 24 Wheeler


Book List

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Seventh Edition); Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Booth, Wayne C.: The Craft of Research; Dickinson, Emily: The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition; Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction (Third Edition); Empson, William: The Structure of Complex Words; Foucault , Michel: The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction; Gay, Peter: The Freud Reader; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Tucker, Robert C.: The Marx-Engels Reader (Second Edition); White, Hayden: The Content of the Form

Other Readings and Media

Course reader, available in PDFs.

Description

English 195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. This course gives you the opportunity, training, and time to conduct original research that will enable you to make a scholarly contribution to literary studies. The first semester will prepare you for the research and writing of this long essay (40-60 pages), which will be on a topic and texts of your choosing and will be completed in the second semester (H195B). In the first semester, we will read literary and cultural theory and also exemplary primary texts along with related literary criticism from a variety of perspectives. Through a series of activities and assignments, you will be developing your thesis topic, learning about research methods, preparing a bibliography on your texts and issues, and planning your work for the spring semester. 

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

•  a PDF of your college transcript(s),

• a  PDF of your spring 2014 course schedule, and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality).

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, May 2 (which is later than the original deadline).


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; Booth, Wayne: The Craft of Research; Eagleton, Terry: How to Read a Poem; Richter, David: Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views on Reading Literature

Other Readings and Media

Most of our readings will be available on bSpace in PDF format or collected in a photocopied course reader. Please attend the first class meeting before purchasing books for the course.

Description

This course will guide and accompany you as you undertake the capstone project of your English major: a Heartbreaking (40-60 pages!) Honors Thesis of Staggering Genius. The fall semester will serve as an introduction to literary theory and criticism, beginning with an overview of the origins of English literature as an academic discipline, the rise of the New Criticism, the poststructuralist turn, the burgeoning of ideology-focused and identity-based critique, and the more recent (re)turns to affect, aesthetics, and ethics in contemporary critical studies. We will consider several literary texts—some poetry, a bit of short fiction, a novel, and a film and/or play—in context of their publication history and critical reception, as a way to explore what literary criticism is and what it can do.

At the same time, you will be actively engaged in the preliminary stages of your thesis project: establishing a research topic, preparing an annotated bibliography of secondary materials, performing an initial analytical close reading of your primary text, and writing and presenting a 6-8 page thesis proposal. In the spring, students will meet regularly with me in individual conferences, and also together in small writing groups, to discuss their work in progress; we will also have several full group meetings to discuss finer points of critical writing including introductions and conclusions, footnotes, and abstracts. 

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

• a PDF of your college transcript(s),

• a PDF of your spring 2014 schedule, and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality).

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., FRIDAY, May 2 (which is later than the original deadline).


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Readings to be provided.

Description

Approaches to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory and practice.

This course satisfies the Group 1 (problems in the study of literature) requirement. Restricted to entering doctoral students in English.


Graduate Readings: Allegories of Late Capitalism and the Writing of Everyday Life

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 202 Wheeler


Book List

Benjamin, W.: The Arcades Project; Brainard, J.: I Remember; Gladman, R.: Newcomer Can't Swim; Harvey, D.: Spaces of Hope; Kennedy, E.: Terra Firmament; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: Foundations for a Sociology for the Everyday; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: From Modernity to Modernism; Lefebvre, H.: Critique of Everyday Life: Introduction; Mayer, B.: Midwinter Day; Silliman, R.: Revelator; Spahr, J.: This Connection of Everyone With Lungs; Ward, D.: This Can't Be Life

Other Readings and Media

Course books will be available from Mrs. Dalloway’s (an independent bookstore located at 2904 College Avenue)

Description

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, location, historical awareness, resistance, language, etc., with reference to a range of theoretical works read in parallel with some recent (and largely “experimental”) literary texts. In addition to keeping up with the readings, each student will be required to undertake a daily writing project of his or her own that is capable of querying the conditions and character of dailiness, within the contexts of postmodern subjectivity, global precarity, and the ubiquity of “late” capitalism.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th[-21st]-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: The Novel in Theory

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Coetzee, J.M.: Elizabeth Costello; Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction; Genette, Gerard: Narrative Discourse; Hale, Dorothy: The Novel: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory; Hurston, Zora: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, Henry: What Maisie Knew; Lukacs, George: The Theory of the Novel;

Recommended: Abbott, H. Porter: The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative; Cohn, Dorrit: Transparent Minds; Culler, Jonathan: Structuralist Poetics

Other Readings and Media

Some of the required course reading will either be available in a course reader or posted on bspace.

Description

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools have made novels the privileged object of critical attention.  Topics of discussion include the difference between narrative and the novel; the location of novelistic difference in the representation of time and space; the definition of subjectivity in terms of vision and voice; the valorization of grammatical structures; the search for a masterplot; the historicization of genre; the confusion of realism and reality; and the belief in a politics of form.  Readings will be drawn from, but not limited to, works by H. James, Shklovsky, Lukács, Jameson, Barthes, Girard, Genette, Booth, Bakhtin, Bhabha and Spivak.  James's What Maisie Knew and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God will serve as test cases.   Elizabeth Costello, J.M. Coetzee's metafictional engagement with the theory of the novel, will provide a view of the tradition from century's end.  

Two short papers (10 pages each) will facilitate the work of theoretical analysis and discussion.  An oral presentation and postings on bspace are also course requirements.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course will not be offered in 2014-15, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), this fall in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. 


Chaucer

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Shakespeare

English 217

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, W,: Titus Andronicus and Timon of Athens; Shakespeare, W.: Antony and Cleopatra; Shakespeare, W.: Coriolanus; Shakespeare, W.: Four Great Tragedies; Shakespeare, W.: Henry IV, Part 1; Shakespeare, W.: Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3; Shakespeare, W.: Julius Caeser; Shakespeare, W.: Measure for Measure; Shakespeare, W.: The Merchant of Venice; Shakespeare, W.: The Tempest

Description

Instead of pursuing a master problematic, we will take up a wide range of issues: when I read Shakespeare these days, I am interested in his representations of citizenship, compassion, artificial persons (political representatives, diplomats, surrogates, actors), poverty, the Roman Republic, false consciousness, and slavery; and I expect that other participants will bring many more concerns to the table. This capacious approach will allow us to take full advantage of Shakespeare's unique importance to the evolution of literary criticism and to the philosophy of art. If Shakespeare studies have in recent decades been most closely associated with the new historicism, the plays and sonnets have been a touchstone for almost every kind of literary criticism (Marxist, psychoanalytic, deconstructionist, postcolonial, feminist, and on and on). We will read seminal articles by Cixous, Derrida, Lacan, Greenblatt, C.L.R. James, Pat Parker, and others. We will also spend some time with the many major philosophers, theorists, and artists--among others, Hegel, Schlegel, Marx, and Freud--who make Shakespeare the cornerstone of a post-classical, modern theory of art and society.

This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement (for English Ph.D. students).


Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

English 243N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Renaissance

English 246C

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: W 3-6
Location: note new location: 202 Wheeler


Book List

Bevington and Maus, eds.: English Renaissance Drama; Castiglione: Book of the Courtier; Machiavelli: The Prince; More: Utopia; Shakespeare: 1 Henry IV; Shakespeare: Hamlet; Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice; Sidney: Arcadia; Sidney: Defense of Poetry; Spenser: Edmund Spenser's Poetry, 4th ed.

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This survey course will focus on the poetry, drama, and prose literature of sixteenth-century England.  We'll also read key works from the past fifty years of literary scholarship on the period.

Whenever possible, readings will be uploaded to bSpace.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through 16th-century) requirement.


Literature in English 1900-1945: The Modernist Novel

English 246K

Section: 1
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: The Unnameable; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim; Ford, Ford Madox : The Good Soldier; Forster, E.M.: Howards End; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Rhys, Jean: Wide Sargasso Sea; Stein, Gertrude: Selected Writings of Gertrude Stein; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Secondary readings by Adorno, Jameson, Lucretius, Nietzsche, Moretti, Winfried Menninghaus, Serres, and Stanford Friedman.

Description

In this seminar, we will read ten modernist novels. We will consider the strangeness of their modes of narrative and characterization as they respond to challenges such as the destabilizing of traditional social hierarchies and gender roles, the forces of empire and global capitalism, and the demands of the city as a site of consumer capitalism. As part of foregrounding the innovative nature of these texts, we will ask how each of them constructs—or refuses to construct—the boundaries of a person. What textual features establish or undo these boundaries? What makes these characters and, or, unmakes them? What forms of subjectivity result?
 
(The syllabus will include Wyndham Lewis' The Revenge for Love, which is out of print; secondhand copies can be ordered from bookstores and online.)

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th-century) requirement.


Research Seminars: Comintern Modernisms

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: W 3-6
Location: 204 Wheeler


Book List

Clark, Katerina: Moscow, The Fourth Rome; Malraux, Andre: Man's Fate; Platonov, Andrei: Soul: And Other Stories

Description

It has long been common practice to see Western metropolises like Paris and New York as competing centers of global modernism, as capitals of a "world republic of letters."  The aim of this seminar is to posit an alternate mapping of world culture, one that decenters the West through an emphasis on the realms of “really existing socialism,” a.k.a. the Communist Bloc, a.k.a. the Second World.  More specifically, the seminar seeks to reassemble cultural and political circuits that once connected, for example, Moscow, Beijing, Hanoi, Havana, and indeed, Paris and New York.  The common thread here is a shared encounter with leftist vanguards and avant-gardes—that is, artists and writers committed both to modernist experimentation and revolutionary politics.  We will see how Lenin’s Communist International (or Comintern) and interwar Soviet culture inspired such luminaries as Walter Benjamin, Langston Hughes, Lu Xun, Andre Malraux, and Diego Rivera.  We will also trace the decline of these leftist circuits amid Stalinist repression and the emergence of socialist realism.  However, though our focus will be on the interwar years, the seminar will also emphasize how this alternate imaginary persisted and transformed after World War II, and still circulates through such cultural forms as the postcolonial and magical realist novels.  

Most readings will be distributed via bCourses. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminars: Victorian Prose Style

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

Arnold, Matthew: Culture and Anarchy; Austen, Jane: Emma; Barthes, Roland: Writing Degree Zero; Carlyle, Thomas: The French Revolution; Carroll, Lewis: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Conan Doyle, Arthur: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Eliot, George: Romola; Mill, John Stuart: Autobiography; Newman, John Henry: Apologia Pro Vita Sua; Pater, Walter: Studies in the History of the Renaissance; Ruskin, John: The Stones of Venice; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Description

In this course, we’ll look at the idea of prose style in a few different ways.  First, we’ll read some key texts on the theory of style (Adorno, Barthes, Pater, Schapiro, Panofsky, etc.) in order to develop a vocabulary with which to talk about prose style.  What makes a sentence distinctly itself?  What makes one writer importantly different from another?  What does it mean to see a style as inherently good or bad?  Second, we’ll look more particularly at British Victorian conceptions of prose style—in fiction, historical writing, art criticism, autobiography, and elsewhere.  What ideas about personal or public style characterize the Victorian period?  Is there an especially Victorian politics of style?  Should Victorian accounts of intellectual, political, and aesthetic history be understood as histories of style?  Finally, using these different accounts of style, we’ll work closely to analyze examples of Victorian prose at the level of the sentence.  Put simply, is there such a thing as a Victorian sentence, and, if so, how does it work?

 

This course satisfies the Group 4 (19th-century) or Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminars: Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: M 3-6
Location: 258 Dwinelle


Book List

Stewart, Susan: Fate of the Senses

Description

This comparative seminar in lyric poetry borrows its title from Susan Stewart's Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (University of Chicago Press, 2002), to ask about the relation between poetry and sensory deprivation (or plenitude) and prosthesis. We will fcous on early modern to twentieth-century poetry written in English, French, German, Italian and Japanese, in the age of print culture or what will later become, in Walter Benjamin's terms, the "age of mechanical reproducibility." From the emergence of "haiku" out of haikai no renga (comic linked verse) to modernism's fascination with isolated images, the course will give some attention to the "lyricization" of poetry--the privileging of isolated, individual, brief forms abstracted from once collective practices--as well as to the changing roles--messianic, consolatory, critical, representative--assigned the figure of the "solitary" poet and "autonomous" work of art in the context of industrial capitalism, the rationalization of time and space, and European colonialism. We will also ask about "the fate of the senses" in relation to contemporary ecological crisis and, in particular, to the paradox of simultaneous sensory impoverishment and perpetual stimulation.

Most crucially, however, we will want to ask what happens when we read poetry as a series of substitutions (touch for sight, and sound for touch) and read together poets who, pushing the limits of language as an expressive medium, interrogate the relations of the verbal to the visual and musical arts, of visionary experience to sensory perception, of memory to imagination, and of language to the natural world and/or phenomenal experience. Tracing the meeting of stone and flesh, of the carnal and the transcendent, the transient and eternal, we will compare recurring figures of poetry as the only remaining sign of otherwise irrecoverable, lost, fugitive experiences.

Poems by Petrarch, Shakespeare, Herbert, Milton, Basho, Buson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Dickinson, Hardy, Rilke, Valéry, Stevens, Niedecker, Rankine; primary readings will also be determined by special interests of students. Secondary readings by Adorno, Benjamin, Culler, Jackson, Barbara Johnson, Lessing, Krieger, Prins, Stewart, among others.

The one required text will be Susan Stewart's Fate of the Senses, ordered at University Press Books.

Interested students are encouraged to purchase used editions of individual poets and/or reliable anthologies. Assigned poems will be available on the course website.

This class is cross-listed with Comparative Literature 202B.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and\nLiterature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing both at UC Berkeley (in English 45, R1A, R1B) and beyond.  Designed as both a seminar and a hands-on practicum, English 375 will provide new instructors with strategies for leading discussion, teaching close reading, responding to and evaluating student writing, teaching the elements of composition, managing their time, preparing lectures, designing courses and syllabi, and approaching other elements that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere.  The seminar component of the class will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the invention of each member’s pedagogical style. As part of the practicum component, we hope to pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A/R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes other than their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed and to receive feedback during the term.

This course satisfies the Pedagogy requirement. All readings will be posted on a bSpace site. E-mail questions to: kgoodman@berkeley.edu or ianthomasbignami@berkeley.edu.