Announcement of Classes: Fall 2009

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Early Modern Bogeymen

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Drosdick, Alan
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Kane, T., The Oxford Essential Guide to Critical Writing; Marlowe, C., The Jew of Malta; Massinger, P., A New Way to Pay Old Debts; Middleton, T. and William Rowley, The Changeling; Milton, J., Comus; Shakespeare, W., Richard III, The Tempest, Titus Andronicus

Description

Renaissance drama is rife with what can be called blocking figures—the doddering father who refuses to let his daughter marry her true love, the pesky servant who keeps an overly protective eye on our young hero. These characters are not quite enemies, but rivals, and need not be defeated, but merely overcome. They impede the progress of the plot and, once bypassed, prove entirely forgettable. Proper villains, on the other hand, actively propagate their ill will, usually with great bravado, and hold a stubbornly salient position in our comprehension of the play as a whole, perhaps greater even than the putative protagonist. This class seeks to examine how and why dramatists craft villainous characters so powerful that they can commandeer the plays that contain them.

In order to accomplish this sometimes daunting critical feat, students must develop their analytical instincts in order to articulate the intricacies of their observations in writing. To this end, students shall hone their observational skills by discussing, in the form of short weekly writing assignments, how the author goes about creating in them the reactions they register while reading his text. These short papers will prepare students to write longer essays (4-5 pages), in preparation for which we will hold thesis brainstorming sessions and peer editing workshops; students should expect to become very well acquainted with the writing of their peers.


The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 123Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Mary Karr, The Liar’s Club; Jamaica Kincaid, My Brother; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body; Harry G. Frankfurt, On Bullshit; Eli Claire, Exile & Pride; Diane Hacker, Rules for Writers; a course reader

Description

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration? How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices? How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different kinds of texts? This course will focus on how the self is constructed in literary non-fiction but will also incorporate fiction, poetry, and popular news media. We will examine how different choices made by the author construct specific understandings of both who the author or narrator is and the story being told. Through frequent writing assignments students will be asked to reflect on these issues in relation to the texts and their own lives.

This course is aimed at developing reading and writing skills in a variety of genres. Students will learn and practice strategies for all stages of the writing process, from prewriting to revision, and also work on grammar, syntax, and style. Course assignments will include a minimum of 32 pages of writing divided among a number of short essays, at least two of which will be revised.


American Elegy

English R1A

Section: 10
Instructor: Auclair, Tracy
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader of elegies; Max Cavitch, American Elegy: The Poetry of Mourning from the Puritans to Whitman; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers; Jeffrey A. Hammond, The American Puritan Elegy: A Literary and Cultural Study; Mary Louise Kete, Sentimental Collaborations: Mourning and Middle-Class Identity in Nineteenth-Century America; Gary Laderman, The Sacred Remains: American Attitudes Toward Death, 1799-1883; Jahan Ramazani, Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney; Melissa F. Zeiger. Beyond Consolation: Death, Sexuality, and the Changing Shapes of Elegy

Description

In this class, we will study the American elegy, following its development from the 17th century to the present. Reading poems in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the following question: How did elegiac conventions both reflect and create the conceptual meaning and psychological experience of death and grief in America? Students will pursue this line of inquiry while learning how to write clearly, read critically, and argue persuasively. Emphasizing the development of these skills, this course will teach students how to evaluate authors’ theses, formulate their own positions, and express them in clear sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Over the course of the semester, students will produce approximately 32 pages of writing. This writing will be broken down into three essays which will increase in length as the term progresses.


Green Reading

English R1A

Section: 11
Instructor: Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Henry David Thoreau, Walden; Justin Kaplan, ed., Walt Whitman: Poetry and Prose; Aldo Leopold, Sand County Almanac; Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek; The Birds of Western North America, Jon L. Dunn and Jonathan Alderfer; and, a course reader with excerpts from Thoreau’s Walden, David Owen’s “Green Manhattan,” John Steinbeck’s Sea of Cortez, Wendell Berry, William Cronon, Emily Dickinson, Robinson Jeffers, Juliana Spahr’s Gentle Now, Don’t Add to Heartache, and Wordsworth’s Prelude

Description

The aims of this course are ecological literacy and clear argumentative prose. On a field trip to the UC Botanical Garden, and as homework, you will begin by observing and naming birds, trees, and flowers. You will keep an environmental journal to practice articulating the qualities of these fauna and flora precisely. As exemplars, we will look at what other writers—Thoreau, Leopold, Steinbeck, Dillard—have written about their own environments, and we will go see the Berkeley Art Museum’s exhibition “Human/Nature: Artists Respond to a Changing Planet.” You will learn about the carbon cycle, trophic structures, disturbance regimes, ecosystem services, bioremediation, and the sublime. In the meantime, in a series of short papers, you will practice synthesizing your own observations into ecological hypotheses, and revising and perfecting these arguments in response to peer review and criticism. Ultimately, you will be encouraged to reflect on your own place in nature: at the end of the semester, you will present a final paper on “The Future of Nature” at an in-class conference. The focus of this course will be on writing sentences with ascribable agency and active predication. By the end of the term, you will also be able to tell a Red-Tailed Hawk from a Turkey Vulture from half a mile away.


Modern Selves and Others

English R1A

Section: 13
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis; Sherman Alexie, Ten Little Indians; George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language”; and a course reader containing short stories by Jamaica Kincaid, Carolyn Forche, James Baldwin, Flannery O’Connor, Alice Walker, Louise Erdrich, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and others

Description

Many storytellers have suggested that “our stories tell us who we are.” How, then, do our stories tell us who we are not? How do we create define, and identify ourselves and others? During the twentieth century in particular, creative writers grappled with how we create images of ourselves and others within the maelstrom of modern technology and consciousness. This course will examine a range of prose fiction that represents modern subjectivity, from the captivating surrealism of Kafka to the edgy realism of Baldwin and beyond. Our readings will push us to question what makes us human, how humans tend to imagine themselves through divisions and oppositions, and how language attempts to come to terms with our modern conditions.


America in the 1930s

English R1A

Section: 14
Instructor: Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Nathanael West, Day of the Locust; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; a course reader including work by James Agee, Mike Gold, Langston Hughes, Alan Lomax, Clifford Odets, Muriel Rukeyser, Carl Sandburg, William Saroyan, and others

Description

By the relief office I seen my people;
As they stood there hungry, I stood there asking
Is this land made for you and me?
—Woody Guthrie

In the 1930s, as economic crisis brought new attention to the struggles of working men and women, Americans asked how their country had failed and how it could be fixed. What did—or perhaps, what should—America mean? The Great Depression was an era of stark deprivation, but also of committed idealism, as laborers, artists, and activists tried to reshape society. Americans embraced the promises of progress and change, but they also looked back toward folk cultures that they hoped would help unify the country.

This introduction to college writing and argument will be interdisciplinary in method. We’ll read a good deal of literature alongside proletarian manifestos, dance, photography, music, and film. Our course material will help us ask questions about the relations between “high” and “low” culture, between art, work, and politics, and between race, gender, and nation—themes you will explore in your papers. This is a writing-intensive course, so you will complete and revise four essays, and we’ll spend much of our time discussing how to improve your composition skills.


Work in Progress

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Paul Auster, Man in the Dark; Tony Kushner, Caroline, or Change; Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running; Stephen King, On Writing; a course reader of short stories and articles. Recommended: Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, The Craft of Research.

Film list: Wrestling with Angels: Playwright Tony Kushner (2006), Show Business: The Road to Broadway (2007), Grey Gardens (1975), Grey Gardens: From East Hampton to Broadway (2007), One True Thing (1998), Chess in Concert (2009), Fruit Fly (2009)

Film list: Wrestling with Angels: Playwright Tony Kushner (2006), Show Business: The Road to Broadway (2007), Grey Gardens (1975), Grey Gardens: From East Hampton to Broadway (2007), One True Thing (1998), Chess in Concert (2009), Fruit Fly (2009)

Description

Although our ultimate goal as writers is to finish our work, we can learn a great deal from the process of working through an idea. As Haruki Murakami suggests about his running, sometimes the process of a work is even more meaningful than the end product. This course examines the pleasures and frustrations that people experience while perfecting their work, whether the result is a novel, a film, a musical, or (for those who consider their lives a work in progress) a fulfilled life. What challenges do people face when putting an idea into practice? What can we draw from their examples to apply to our own writing? Students will begin by writing a close reading of one of the texts (2-3 pages), then write and revise two essays (5 and 10 pages) which link close readings together to form a larger argument. The second essay will involve the student’s own research project about the development of a creative work. Through these assignments, students will sharpen two skills: looking closely at evidence and making a claim that matters to them.


Conspiracy Fiction

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Seidel, Matthew
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 151 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Graham Greene, The Ministry of Fear; Franz Kafka, The Trial; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; William Shakespeare, Richard III; a course reader

Description

In his essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Richard Hofstadter identifies the distinguishing feature of a conspiracy theory not in “the absence of verifiable facts,” but rather in the “curious leap in imagination…from the undeniable to the unbelievable.” This course is about how conspiracy fiction reverses this process, imaginatively leaping from the unbelievable to the undeniable.

We will be less concerned with determining the validity of the plentiful conspiracy theories in circulation than examining how they work narratively. What kinds of techniques do conspiracy fictions use, how does information get withheld and transmitted, and how do we describe the experience of reading them? We will begin with selections from Paradise Lost, making the acquaintance of Milton’s Archconspirator Lucifer. From there we’ll enter the realm of mortal scheming: Machiavellian plotting in Richard III, the extended juridical nightmare of Kafka’s The Trial, a World War II spy network in Graham Greene’s The Ministry of Fear, and a playfully ominous history of the postal system in Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49. The texts come at conspiracy fiction from different angles – tragic, epic, allegorical, realistic, stylized, parodic – so following this particular thread will also provide a broad survey of literary form. Though conspiracy tends towards opacity, the aim of this course is to avoid it at all cost in your writing. Writing assignments will build up from a series of shorter exercises and culminate in a final research project.


Apocalyptic and Dystopian Literature

English R1B

Section: 5
Instructor: Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Karel Capek, War With the Newts; Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen; Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual; a course reader including poems, stories, biblical readings, and critical essays. We will also watch at least one film, Children of Men (dir. Alfonso Cuaron, 2006); and listen to the recording of Diamanda Galas’s 1991 performance of her Plague Mass.

Description

War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life—we’ve learned to live with it. But a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to the horrors of these regrettably familiar aspects of life in the twenty-first century. This course will provide a brief tour through this blasted literary landscape. Due to budget constraints, radiation suits will not be provided. The primary goal of this course is to teach you how to conduct and present research in a clear and compelling way. With this in mind, the readings are designed to guide students in their own research about the social functions of apocalyptic thinking. Your final project will be a literary research paper on a topic of your own design. We will devote a considerable amount of class time to learning about the basic tools and techniques for writing a college research paper.


Seeing Double

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White; Nella Larsen, Passing; Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers; and a course reader

Description

Although cases of mistaken identity often result in comedy, the figure of the “double” or “doppelgänger” tends to have more sinister associations. As a literary motif, the double can be an omen of doom, a deliberate exercise in role playing, or a psychological symptom of self-consciousness, dissociation, or repression. On the level of language, the double entendre is a mischievous figure of speech that nonetheless encapsulates the often ambiguous quality of words.

In this course, we will explore how novels, dramas, stories, and nonfictional texts explore the idea of “doubling” and its implications in characterization, plot, structure, and style. Even as students cultivate the ability to “see double” and interpret texts in various ways, they will also be developing their writing skills toward clear exposition and argumentation of their specific interpretations. In order to expand and integrate these arguments within a larger intellectual context, the class will learn and deploy methods of research through periodic assignments. Students will ultimately apply these practices in writing and revising three research papers of increasing length, ranging from four to ten pages.


Contemporary American Narrative

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zachary
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers 6 th edition; Norman Mailer, The Armies of the Night; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (volumes I and II); a course reader with selections from Jean Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin, Theresa Cha, Joan Didion, George Orwell, and Helena María Viramontes.

Description

This course will focus on strengthening your critical reading and writing skills through the study of contemporary American narrative. While the overarching thematic concerns of the course will be our texts’ self-conscious engagements with history, identity formation, and the limits of verbal and visual representation, we’ll also be exploring the formal features particular to each of these works and developing strategies for building claims around these features. How, for instance, does the ordering of events or their mediation by a narrator influence our reading of a text? How does a text work with or undercut our assumptions about how stories are constructed in order to achieve a particular effect? At what point does a historical narrative or autobiography become fictional?

Writing requirements: three longer essays, the last of which will incorporate independent research, and substantial revisions.


Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Sonnets

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Time: M 12-1
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.:  Shakespeare's Sonnets and a Lover's Complaint

Description

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, we will read all 154 sonnets, at the rate of approximately ten per week. All students will be expected to participate actively in seminar discussions, and present both informal and formal oral reports.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Hamlet

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton D.
Time: W 2-4 (Aug 26 to Oct. 14 only)
Location: Rm L45, Res Hall Unit III on Durant between Telegraph & Dana


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.: Hamlet

Description

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consider questions of interpretation, motivation, staging, and poetics, among others. Some questions we’ll address are:

Does Hamlet think the flesh is “sullied” or “solid”?

Did Gertrude know about Claudius’ murder of old Hamlet?

When Hamlet tells Ophelia “get thee to a nunnery,” does he mean a brothel?

Is Polonius’ advice to Laertes sage or silly?

Does Hamlet delay? Does he have an Oedipus complex? How old is he?

How do we go about answering questions like these?

The only requisite for enrollment is that you be a freshman. No previous knowledge of Shakespeare is expected.

During the course of our half-semester, each of you will do a short (10-15 minute) seminar presentation. (Or, if you wish, a 20-30 minute presentation in collaboration with another student).  There’ll be a list of possible subjects for you to choose from, and we’ll have a conference beforehand. Then you’ll do a 1-page write-up of what you presented, and I’ll return it to you with written comments. By meeting 6 you’ll write a short (1500 word essay). It may grow out of your initial presentation, or be on an entirely different subject. There will be ample time for you to confer with me on this. I’ll return your essay with my comments at meeting seven.

Please bring the text with you every time.

This seminar will meet the first eight weeks of the semester, beginning August 26, 2009 and ending October 14, 2009.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Animal Rights and Disability Studies

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan and Taylor, Sunaura
Time: M 5-6
Location: 202 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Required texts: See below.

Description

This seminar will examine the intersections between two concepts and two movements: animal rights and disability rights. Exploring work done in gender and women's studies, critical race studies, disability studies, and thinking on animal rights, we will trace some philosophical and historical connections between two seemingly separate fields. From protesting the views held by controversial philosopher (and major animal rights advocate) Peter Singer to making uncomfortable parallels between human and pet "euthanasia," disability advocates have had a tenuous relationship with the animal rights movement. But is this tension inevitable, or is there more common ground to be had? On what basis, and with what consequences, do notions of disability rights and/or human rights found themselves in a moral and ethical philosophy that justifies excluding other species? Can that exclusion be upheld? This seminar will provide a survey of some key points in both disability studies and work on animal rights. We will explore definitions of and questions and controversies regarding some basic terms: "disability," "animality," "rights," "human." Readings will include excerpts of work by Peter Singer, Harriet McBryde Johnson, Simi Linton, Gary Francione, Carol Adams, Bob and Jenna Torres, and Ruth O'Brien. We will also follow two podcasts and watch some films together. Writing: journal entries due in each class with questions and comments on the day's reading, gathered together and expanded into a portfolio at the end of term. Grading will largely be based on participation in class discussions. Debate welcome and expected! No background in these issues is needed or expected. This seminar is part of the Food for Thought Seminar Series. Food for Thought Dining arrangements will be discussed in class.

Susan Schweik is a Professor of English and Co-Director of the Disability Studies Minor at UC Berkeley. She has a strong interest in disability and accessibility issues. Sunaura Taylor (MFA, Berkeley 2008) currently writes for various blogs on the subject of animal rights and is co-editing a book on the relationship between disability studies and animal rights.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: The Mystery of Edwin Drood

English 24

Section: 4
Instructor: Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Time: M 3-5 (Sept 14 to Nov. 2 only)
Location: Room L20 of Unit II (2650 Haste St.)


Other Readings and Media

Dickens, C.: The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Description

Dickens's last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, is the most successful mystery story ever written. Dickens died before finishing it or solving the mystery. Unlike other mystery stories, it fails to reassure us that justice is done, and forces us to accept the absence of closure. We must move beyond reassurance into the larger mysteries of motivation and behavior that lie behind any crime. Dickens is writing a new kind of novel, in which the imaginative process and its translation into writing become the central subject. At the peak of his powers, Dickens is exploring his own motivations as a writer, and the geography of his own imagination. Please read chapters 1-4 for the first class meeting.

This course will meet from September 14 through November 2 only.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: California and Ethnicity -- Fiction and Film

English 24

Section: 5
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Time: Wed. 4-6 (Aug. 26 to Oct. 14 only)
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Description

We will read and view a group of narratives (in fiction and film) that delineates the California experience across ethnicity, race, gender, and class. This seminar is part of the Food for Thought Seminar Series.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan H.
Time: MW 9-10 + Discussion F 9-10
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. I; Chaucer, G.: The Canterbury Tales; Milton, J.: Paradise Lost

Description

This course will concentrate on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faery Queene (Book I), and Milton’s Paradise Lost; additional works in the Norton Anthology will be read for the sake of historical context. If this course has a thesis, it is that English authors, far from being content with native traditions, tended to look to ancient Greece and Rome, and to modern Italy and France for inspiration and approval. Written work for the semester will consist of several quizzes, one midterm exam, several short papers, and a final exam. Students must be prepared to attend lectures and discussion sections faithfully, as accumulated absences without a viable excuse, especially for section, will result in a severe reduction in the final grade.


Literature in English through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 12-1 + Discussion F 12-1
Location: 60 Evans


Other Readings and Media

Chaucer, G.: Canterbury Tales ; Spenser, E.: Edmund Spenser’s Poetry; Marlowe, C.: Doctor Faustus; Donne, J.: John Donne's Poetry; Milton, J.: Paradise Lost

Description

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: the Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, Donne's lyrics, and Paradise Lost. Each of these texts reflects differently on the ambition of poetry to encompass the range of a culture’s experience. We will focus particularly on the relationships of different genres to different kinds of knowledge, to see how different ways of expressing things make possible new things to express, as English culture and English poetry transform each other from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries.


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Century

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: MW 11-12 + Discussion F 11-12
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Norton Anthology : The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century; Norton Anthology: The Romantic Period; Norton Anthology: American Literature 1820-1865; George Eliot: Middlemarch; William Wycherly: The Country Wife.  All are paperbacks and there will be a reader.

Description

This course will provide a survey of many of the most important imaginative writings in Britain and the U.S. from about 1680 to 1860. My primary interest is in providing the critical and social frameworks that will help you not only enjoy what you are reading but see why it has claims to greatness. In general this period can be characterized as the time when secular empiricism comes to dominate cultural life, and to produce a great deal of imaginative searching for ways of life less like what will come to be our own. But it is also important for the range of styles and sensibilities which it fostered.


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3
Location: 101 Morgan


Other Readings and Media

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 2 (8th edition); Austen, J.: Emma; Equiano, O., The Interesting Narrative; Franklin, B.: Autobiography; Melville, H.: Billy Budd and Other Tales; Shelley, M., Frankenstein; Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey

Description

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, and others) and think about how politics, aesthetics, the everyday, race, gender, and identity all find expression in a number of different literary forms. We'll especially consider the material and symbolic roles played by the idea and practice of revolution in the period.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, C. Namwali
Time: MW 1-2 + Discussion F 1-2
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Tentative book list: Conrad, J.: Heart of Darkness; Eliot, T. S.: The Waste Land ; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse ; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Nabokov, V.: Lolita ; Beckett, S.: Endgame ; Morrison, T.: Beloved ; McEwan, I.: Atonement; a course pack with a few poems and short stories

Description

Some works of literature this professor believes you absolutely must read before you graduate, also known as a survey of British and American literature in the last century. We will investigate forms, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextuality. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—what is beautiful? how do we know? what ought we do?—as they develop in the West during the course of the twentieth century.


Mid 19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4
Location: 160 Kroeber


Other Readings and Media

Ramazani, J, et al: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry (2 volumes); Stein, G.: Three Lives and Q.E.D.; James, H.: Turn of the Screw; Williams, W. C: Imaginations; Woolf, V.: Mrs. Dalloway; Mullen, H: Sleeping with the Dictionary; Ngugi Wa Thiong’o: The River Between; Locke, A., ed.: The New Negro. In addition to these texts, a required reader will be available.

Description

Intended as a general survey of imaginative responses to the not always positive progress of modernity, this course will examine works produced by an array of prominent figures and representatives of some of the principal Modernist and Postmodern movements, and / or events. We will begin with the rise of Realism in the mid 19th century and finish the course with works in experimental modes of the almost immediate present. The Armory Show, Imagism, Surrealism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Movement, the Black Arts Movement, and Language Writing are among the cultural moments we will experience along the way.


Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Garrison
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion per week
Location: 100 GPB


Other Readings and Media

The required books for the course will be available exclusively at Analog Books, located just one block up Euclid Avenue from the North Gate entrance to the Berkeley campus. The Course Reader, Introduction to Environmental Studies, will be available exclusively from Copy Central, 2483 Hearst Avenue, right across the street from the North Gate entrance. There will also be a required environmental science textbook (possibly provided as an eBook).

Description

This integrative course, taught by a humanities professor and a science professor, surveys current global environmental issues; introduces the basic intellectual tools of environmental science; investigates ways the human relationship to nature has been imagined in literary and philosophical traditions; and examines how tools of scientific and literary analysis, scientific method, and imaginative thinking can clarify what is at stake in environmental issues and ecological citizenship.

This course is cross-listed with E.S.P.M. C12 and U.G.I.S. C12.


Children's Literature

English 80K

Section: 1
Instructor: Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 126 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

The book list has not yet been finalized, but the texts will be in the bookstore by the time classes begin.

Description

This introductory course looks at children's literature in several genres, historically and culturally.  Readings will include fairy tales, The Princess and the Goblin, Charlotte's Web, and other novels, as well as picture books and poetry.  There will also be critical readings, exams, and papers.


Sophomore Seminar: Food and Film

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: W 6-9 PM
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Turner, Graeme, FILM as Social Practice

Description

We will examine the representation of food and meals in the setting and narrative structure of films in contemporary cinema in various genres from comedy to horror, looking at Woody Allen, Bunuel, Ang Lee, Hitchcock and others. Connections to ethnic identity, eroticism, aggression and communal regulation will be explored with a range of critical approaches from close analysis to psychoanalytic and reception studies.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: Contemporary Native American Short Fiction

English 84

Section: 2
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Sweet Wong, Hertha
Time: Tues. 3:30-5:30 (Sept. 1 to Oct. 20 only)
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Wong, H., et. al, Reckonings: Contemporary Short Fiction by Native American Women;  Reader (available at Copy Central, 2560 Bancroft Way)

Description

Contemporary Native American stories are survival stories, reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences: they calculate indigenous positions, settle overdue accounts, note old debts, and demand an accounting. These are the stories, says Joy Harjo, that “keep us from giving up in this land of nightmares, which is also the land of miracles.” Focusing on the short fiction of a select number of contemporary Native North American writers from within the U.S., we will examine how these Native writers convey: cultural survival in the wake of colonization; struggles for sovereignty; rejuvenations of ceremonial healing; retellings of myth and history; experiments with orality and literacy; and articulations of a geocentric epistemology and land-based narrative. In addition, we will examine the literary, cultural and regional influences on these writers and place their work in the context of Native American literatures specifically and U.S. literatures and global indigenous literatures, generally.

NOTE: This class meets 2 hours per week for the first 8 weeks of the semester.

This one-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: Socrates as a Cultural Icon

English 84

Section: 3
Instructor: Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Time: F 12-2
Location: 101 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Four Texts on Socrates: Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito and Aristophanes' Clouds

Description

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. We read Aristophanes' comic send-up of Socrates in Clouds and the Platonic dialogues purporting to tell the story of Socrates' trial and death (Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, Crito, and selections from Phaedo) attempting to trace the construction of the Socratic icon and assess its relevance to contemporary issues. Weekly meetings are devoted to class discussion of one or another such issue, led by a team of two or more students who are to prepare for it in office-hour consultation with the instructor. The object is to provoke lively debate. The course is intended to appeal especially to students who are desirous of getting in on the intellectual conversation of our time and curious about its cultural antecedents.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


English Bible as Literature

English C107

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 4 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

New Oxford Annotated Bible, College Edition ; Oxford Dictionary of the Bible; Alter, R.:  Genesis

Description

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them through many interpretive lenses, but not as divine revelation. We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask historical, political, and theoretical questions of a text that is multi-authored, thoroughly fissured, and deeply sedimented. Among other topics, we will pay special attention to how authority is established and contested in biblical texts; how biblical authors negotiate the ancient Hebrew prohibition against representing God in images; and how the gospels are socially and historically poised between the original Jesus movement that is their source and the institutionalization of the church that follows. Assignments will include two take-home midterms and a final exam.

This course is cross-listed with Religious Studies C119.


Medieval Literature: The Alliterative Line, Tradition and Innovation

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Ecke, Jeremy S
Ecke, Jeremy
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

J. R. Tolkien trans.: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo; Seamus Heaney trans.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation; Andrew and Waldron eds.: The Poems of the Pearl Manuscript; Michael Alexander trans.: The Earliest English Poems

Description

This course will explore the poetic, political, and cultural significance of writing in, adapting, or alluding to the alliterative tradition. We will trace the ancestry of the alliterative line through Old, Middle, and Modern English, challenging the nostalgic and often nationalistic narrative that imagines the alliterative line as a native and rural tradition embattled by the invasion of foreign and courtly French forms. Focusing on the development and “loosening” of the alliterative constraints and the “freedom” of the natural rhythms of alliterative verse, we will compare the Elizabethan, Victorian, and Modern adaptations and continuations of the alliterative line with the innovations of the rhymed, alliterative verse in the Harley and Pearl manuscripts. The majority of our reading will be in Middle English, with excerpts and translations of Old English, Latin, and French alliterative composition. In examining the modern adaptations, continuations, and translations of Shakespeare, Spenser, Hopkins, Swinburne, Tennyson, Pound, Tolkien, and Heaney, we will consider the degree to which the literary and linguistic style of the alliterative tradition fosters a conscious use of archaic diction and formulaic collocations that uphold the myth of an authentic alliterative line.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Adelman, Janet
Adelman, J.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 120 Latimer


Other Readings and Media

Greenblatt, S., et al, eds.:  The Norton Shakespeare

Description

In this course we will analyze a selection of Shakespeare's plays, arranged both by genre and chronologically, in order to explore not only what is peculiar to each play but also what links the plays to each other and to the culture and the psyche that produced them. In addition, we will think about the uses to which "Shakespeare" is put by our own culture/s. My lectures will tend to emphasize Shakespeare’s reworkings of race, gender, sexuality, and the family in these plays, but I hope that the classroom will be a place of lively exchange, in which you feel free to challenge my ideas and to develop your own interests. In addition to a final exam and several required papers of varying lengths (probably two or three very short papers, followed by an extended revision/amplification for a final paper), you will be asked to complete two or three ungraded acting exercises in small groups to help you understand some aspects of Shakespeare’s verse and his theatrical medium.


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J.: Complete Poems and Major Prose (ed. Merritt Y. Hughes), Hackett Publishing Company

A note on texts: I am very concerned about the rising prices of textbooks and the serious burden these can place on student budgets; however, each member of the class must have his or her own copy of the (actual, not virtual) book required for this class. The good news: there is only one required text, and I have looked for the least expensive available collection. Keep in mind, too, that heavily discounted copies of this edition are available for purchase at Amazon.com, and other sites. The ASUC bookstore and Ned’s will be ordering and offering used copies as well.

Description

John Milton has too often been represented as the mainstay of an entrenched canon, a “required” author. However, as we follow Milton’s carefully orchestrated career, from the shorter and earlier work, through some of the controversial prose of the English civil war era (Areopagitica, The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates, and a few others), to the astounding work that emerged in the wake of political defeat (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes), we will discover a very different poet and political thinker, more an iconoclast than an icon. We will come to understand Milton’s writing in relation to the two revolutions that he witnessed and took part in—one political; the other scientific—and we will also think about his experiments in literary form, his ambivalent incorporations, revisions, or expansions of both classical literature and biblical texts, the function of his often unorthodox theology, his writings on marriage and divorce, his long preoccupation with vocation, and more.

Course requirements will probably include two short essays, a midterm, and a final, as well as quick reading quizzes to assess your preparation of the readings by (not after) their assigned dates. Attendance of all lectures is a necessity for each member of the class.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Victorian Period

English 122

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, C.D.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 20 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Arnold, Matthew, Culture and Anarchy; Brontë, Emily, Wuthering Heights; Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, Aurora Leigh; Browning, Robert, Robert Browning’s Poetry; Carlyle, Thomas, Sartor Resartus; Carroll, Lewis, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; Pater, Walter, The Renaissance: Studies in Art and Poetry; Tennyson, Alfred, Selected Poems; a course reader

Description

A survey of and introduction to the writing produced in the years between 1837 and 1901, when Victoria presided over the apparent apogee of British cultural power and (formally at least) over a very large portion of the planet. We will explore this long and occasionally strange era by paying particular attention both to some of its deepest contradictions (between turbulence and apparent stability, headlong progress and intense nostalgia, doubt and faith, political freedom and social constraint, license and propriety) and to the variety of literary forms and critical arguments with which the Victorians met them. To that end, we will devote most of our time to the period’s voluminous efforts in poetry and non-fiction prose, though we will also read couple of texts that might (or might not) be novels.

Other likely figures include: Charles Darwin, George Eliot, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Thomas Babington Macaulay, John Stuart Mill, John Henry Newman, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4
Location: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Haywood, E: Love in Excess; Defoe, D: Roxana; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H. Shamela and Joseph Andrews; Lennox, C.: The Female Quixote; Walpole, H.: The Castle of Otranto; Austen, J.: Northanger Abbey; Scott, W.: The Bride of Lammermoor

Description

As we read a variety of novels from the period credited with the “rise of the novel,” we shall consider what it was that might have been new about this form of writing. We shall be especially interested in tracking what it was that some found quite dangerous about it. Like surfing the internet, novel reading wasn’t something you wanted the ldquo; impressionable”—from teenagers to women—to do alone, or maybe at all. Might the perceived threat have had something to do with early novels’ connection to romance and the erotic and then with what one critic calls the “narrative transvestitism” of the early novel—in which men write books featuring female heroines who will describe, in an innovative, frank prose style, how a woman really feels? Highly conscious of these debates, eighteenth-century writers responded to them in their texts, while an emerging set of women writers also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public market. Some of these texts suggest rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating novel writing, appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.

Requirements including willingness to engage in discussion, reading quizzes, a mid-term, two long papers.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The European Novel

English 125C

Section: 1
Instructor: Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Jane Austen, Emma (1816), Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (1856), Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (1877), Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925)

Description

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian, literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th- to the early 20th century. The texts are chosen to allow us to follow a specific thread: the novel’s engagement with the problems of family and home. As we read Emma, Madame Bovary, Anna Karenina, and Mrs Dalloway, we will examine the novel’s use of marriage and adultery as models of social order and disorder and consider the representation of consciousness in narrative.

Lectures will emphasize strategies of close reading and concepts from theories of the novel. In comparing novels from different national traditions, we will explore the interplay between genre and culture. (All readings in English.) There will be regular reading quizzes, an in-class midterm, a take-home essay, and a final examination.

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 133.


The 20th Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 101 Moffitt


Other Readings and Media

Émile Zola:  La Bête Humaine; Theodor Dreiser:  Sister Carrie; Virginia Woolf:  Mrs. Dalloway; Amos Tutuola:  My Life in the Bush of Ghosts; Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart; William Gibson:  Neuromancer; Kazuo Ishiguro:  Never Let Me Go

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics, history, modernism and empire. Some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity lead to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel; how have modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel and lastly how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope and influence of fictive milieu.


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 242 Hearst Gym


Other Readings and Media

James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers; Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature and Selected Essays; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Henry David Thoreau, Walden and Civil Disobedience; Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass: The First (1855) Edition

Description

In the mid-nineteenth century, the U.S., a nation that had barely come together, was splitting apart. The fission helped to produce the remarkably energetic works we will be studying over the course of the semester. I will focus primarily on questions of freedom, cruelty, desire, and loss in my lectures, attempting to understand the relation between these abstract human experiences and the particular historical situation framing them. I will also emphasize the striking, baroque, often bizarre formal innovations attempted in these works.

Two ten-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance.


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Lehmann, David: The Oxford Anthology of American Poetry; Oppen, George: Collected Poems; Brown, Sterling: Collected Poems

Description

A survey course in the history of American poetry, we will look at the beginnings, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, the modernists, two middle generation poets (George Oppen & Sterling Brown), the surge of post WWII poets including the Beat Generation & the New York School, the emergence of a women's poetry in the 1970's and 1980's, and have a glimpse at the contemporary scene.


American Novel

English 132

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 60 Evans


Other Readings and Media

Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (1850); Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884); Henry James, Daisy Miller (1878); Abraham Cahan, Yekl: A Tale of the New York Ghetto (1896); Theodore Dreiser, Sister Carrie (1900); W.E.B. DuBois, Dark Princess (1928); Nathaniel West, The Day of the Locust (1939); Vladimir Nabokov, Pnin (1957); Maxine Hong Kingston, China Men (1980); Toni Morrison, A Mercy (2008); separate course reader: short works by Washington Irving, Herman Melville, Gertrude Stein, and John Dos Passos

Description

Rather than define a canon, this survey will trace how the novel has contributed to nation-formation in the U.S. How has the novel helped to define what it means to be American, starting from the country’s fledgling days as an outpost of Europe? To what extent has the novel been able to incorporate the diversity of American experiences—and to what extent has it promoted exclusions of race, gender, and class? What are the limitations of both novel and nation—and how has the American novel expressed these limitations?


Topics in American Studies: The Literature and History of Mexican American Farm Workers

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 160 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

(Literature) Rose Castillo Guilbault, Farmworker’s Daughter: Growing Up Mexican in America; Elva Treviño Hart, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Girl; Cherríe Moraga, Watsonville: Some Place Not Here; Tomás Rivera, The Complete Works; Simón Silva, Small-Town Browny: Cosecha de la Vida; Gary Soto, Jesse; Helena María Viramontes, Under the Feet of Jesus. (History) Ernesto Galarza, Spiders in the House and Workers in the Field; Gilbert G. González, Mexican Consuls and Labor Organizing: Imperial Politics in the American Southwest; Randy Shaw, Beyond the Fields: the UFW, and the Struggle for Justice in the 21st Century; Devra Weber, Dark Sweat, White Gold: California Farm Workers, Cotton and the New Deal.

(Note: The reading list for the course may change slightly by the start of the fall semester so please wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your books, or send an email to the instructor in August to request an updated reading list.)

Description

In this course we will study the social movements, political aspirations and cultural expressions of Mexican farm workers in the U.S. during the twentieth century, focusing on the period from 1930-1980. The methodological approach will be interdisciplinary as our reading list will include both history and literature. We will also watch some films and examine photographic essays. The social movements of Mexican farm workers in the U.S. hold a symbolically significant place in Chicano history and literature. We will strive to understand these movements not as romanticized stories of the downtrodden, but as narratives of class conflict and strategic class positioning in both local and global settings. The history of Mexican farm worker struggles in the U.S. links the formation of Chicano and Chicana subjectivity to the profit needs of transnational agricultural corporations, immigration law, state repression, racialization, and class power—in short, to the building of empire and global capitalism. The works studied in this course document or dramatize these links from various perspectives. The amount of reading will be substantial. Required assignments will include a paper, a midterm, a class presentation, and a final.

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E, Section 1.


Topics in American Studies: A Gallery of Wonders, Curiosities, Spectacles, Cynics, and Suckers: Consumer Culture in Post-Civil War America

English C136

Section: 2
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

This course will focus on the interrelations of the rise of consumerism and the culture industry in post-Civil War America. We will examine a wide range of materials, including advertisements (especially patent medicine ads), trade cards, commercial art and photography, dime novels, other best sellers as well as literary works, popular magazines, amusement parks and large-scale exhibitions. The course will begin with the remarkable and long-lived career of P. T. Barnum, at times a moral reformer, a habitual hoaxer, an insightful critic, a savvy expert at “puffery,” a master of images, and an impresario who transcended local cultural markets to cultivate a powerful and profitable presence on the national and global stage. We will end with The Columbian Exposition, a World's Fair held in Chicago to observe the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World as well as to celebrate America’s belief in its exceptionalism and its industrial and cultural optimism. Along the way, we will read generous selections from The Colossal P. T. Barnum Reader as well as novels by Horatio Alger (Ragged Dick, Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot-Blacks), Mark Twain (A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court), Orison Swett Marden (Pushing to the Front), and Edward Bellamy (Looking Backward), as well as such texts as Russell Conwell’s “Acres of Diamonds” (one of the most successful “sermons” on the sanctity of wealth), and selections from Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth, Charles Sheldon’s In His Steps, and Elbert Hubbard’s “A Message to Garcia,” among others. Throughout the course, we will consider the ways in which consumerism sponsored major economic, political, social, and cultural changes in the everyday lives of Americans in the late-nineteenth century.

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E, Section 2.


Modes of Writing

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Abrams Chandra, Melanie
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 200 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Zee Zee Copy

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students will write in each of these genres and will partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.

Note: This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2009, ed. Laura Furman

Description

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester, and write a short report about each reading they attend. Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction. Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources, and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life. The intent of the course is to have the students engage with the problems faced by writers of fiction, and discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing representation of reality on the page.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 10-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 p.m., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, Bharati)
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

(eds. Salman Rushdie & Heidi Pitlor):  Best American Stories of 2008

Description

This limited-enrollment workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of short fiction.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 12-15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Mukherjee's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, by 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: M 3-6
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Texts may include Bernadette Mayer’s Sonnets, Michael Ondaatje’s Collected Works of Billy the Kid, Gwendolyn Brooks’ Selected Poems. This list is tentative. Students should come to class before buying books.

Description

I’ll ask students to be interested in form as a site, as a point of disembarkation for talking about that other stuff, for the ongoing work of investigation and experiment. Poems can be formally navigated but the point, in all my classes, is not to get it right but to see how it feels to get involved in it, that and to look at what the poem (or the essay or joke or speech) does and at the ways the world presses on it, and at how it presses back on the world. What’s the relationship of poetry to public iconography, to issues of the public representation of race and class and gender?

       Can poetry challenge the way we look at culture and language? The argument of this course is that it can and must. (And who is this “we”?)

        Workshop. Discussions. Reading. Weekly writing assignments. All students will participate in a public, out-of-class poetry as intervention project; the nature and scope of this project will depend on class interests.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, by 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse: Poetry in Practice and in Theory

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Bouvier, Geoff
Bouvier, Geoff
Time: W 3-6
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke; The Necessary Angel by Wallace Stevens; A Test of Poetry by Louis Zukovsky; The New Sentence by Ron Silliman; ABC of Reading by Ezra Pound

Description

Poets can’t just write their poetry. Ever since the beginnings of Western thought, poets have had to defend themselves and their art form, both explicitly and implicitly – yet almost always evasively. It was Plato, two millennia ago, who charged the poets, asking, “What do you contribute to the Republic, Poet?!” This class is designed for poets who wish to take up that charge and interrogate themselves and their art form, hopefully for the good of both. (Ah, the necessary poison that is “theory.”) What is poetry? And what isn’t it? When and how did it begin (long before Plato and “Western thought”)? And what are its traditions? And now, in the 21st century, where does poetry “need” to go? (In other words, what is the duty of the poet?) Also, what is a poem? (A very different kind of question.) And where did you get your ideas about what a poem is and can be? Class time will be divided between these philosophical discussions and the workshopping of the students’ own poems. Please note: this class will be supplemented by a literary salon (which is open to all) at the Josephine Miles House, one evening per week (dates and times T.B.D.).

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Bouvier’s mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List (recommended): Jahan Ramazani, ed.: The Norton Anthology of Modern & Contemporary Poetry, vol 2

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today – aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems; image & figure; graphics & textual space; cultural translation; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second, third, and no person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry. Our emphasis will be placed on recent possibilities, but with an eye & ear always to renovating traditions. I have no "house style" and only one precept: you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we'll discuss six or so in rotation (I'll respond to every poem you write). On alternate days, we'll discuss pre-modern and modern exemplary poems drawn from the Norton Anthology and from our course reader. It will be delightful

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems, along with an application form, to Professor Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, by 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!

 


Prose Nonfiction: Traveling, Thinking, Writing

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Students should come to class before buying books. The list below is tentative. But, that said, it will likely include some of the following: Basho’s Back Roads to Far Towns (translated by Cid Corman); Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; Tete- Michel Kpomassie’s An African in Greenland; Joanne Kyger’s Strange Big Moon; Eddy Harris’s Mississippi Solo; Linda Niemann’s Boomer; Robert Michael Pyle’s Where Bigfoot Walks. We’ll also read excerpts from Travel Writing: 1700-1830 (Ian Duncan and Elizabeth Bohls); Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing (Farrah Griffin and Cheryl Fish); and items from the popular press.

Description

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adventures in Europe and Africa; Canadian writer Gladys Hindmarch takes on Melville with her Watery Part of the World and Zora Neale Hurston travels to Haiti in Tell My Horse and through the American south in Mules and Men. 

The point of this course is multiple and full of inquiry.

The 
familiar question, “Is this trip necessary?”, is joined to “What makes this trip important enough to 
celebrate?” 

Another field is the role of Americans and/ or Westerners—“subjectivity” in the vernacular—as travelers in the world. (I’d note that the world is both within and beyond our national boundaries.) What things are we heir to? What are our responsibilities and blindnesses? What’s the relation between the imperial West (of Conrad’s writing) and our current situation? The point in this—and any writing—is to write consciously and to be mindful of the political import of our writing. 

A third field is the defining of the relation between travel and place (and imagination). Place is “hot” 
right now, as a topic. What are the elements of the sentimental here and what assumptions?



Workshop. Discussions. Reading. Writing assignments. Field trips. The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay (with some forays outward into hybrid prose/ poetry forms).

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5-10 photocopied pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing), along with an application form, to Professor Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler, by 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Special Topics: Scotland and Romanticism

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Best Laid Schemes: Selected Poetry and Prose of Robert Burns, ed. Crawford and Maclachlan; Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland and Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides; Tobias Smollett, The Expedition of Humphry Clinker; Dorothy Wordsworth, Recollections of a Tour Made in Scotland; Walter Scott, Rob Roy and Old Mortality or The Bride of Lammermoor (with Gaetano Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor); James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Robert Louis Stevenson, Kidnapped or The Master of Ballantrae or Weir of Hermiston; Margaret Oliphant, “The Library Window”. Readings in other poetry (A. Ramsay, R. Fergusson, Macpherson, the ballad revival, W. Wordsworth) and Scottish Enlightenment philosophy will be made available in a course reader, along with relevant critical and historical selections.

Description

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the generative centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of both the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms for cultural movements and historical periods that were invented later): social history, anthropology, political economy, the indigenous epic, the poetry of popular life, the historical novel. Scotland also became a notable place within the symbolic geography of Romanticism – a site of lost worlds of tradition and allegiance, of ghosts and heroes, an imaginary role it continues to hold today. Our course will consider the production of Romanticism by Scottish writers and institutions as well as its consumption in tourist itineraries and literary fantasies. We will discuss the problem that Scotland poses for the definition of Romanticism: on one hand, it is the original Romantic nation, and on the other, according to the critical orthodoxy of the past sixty years, the locus of an untimely or inauthentic Romanticism. Topics to be explored include: the idea of a national literature and its relations to history, religion, language, culture, region, origins, the past, the people; the idea of modernity (civil society, commerce, liberalism, enlightenment) and its ideological and political adversaries (Jacobites, Covenanters; the primitive, the fanatic); the Highlands as a site of historical catastrophe and trauma, of tourism and adventure. We will read works from the key Scottish innovations in poetry and fiction (James Macpherson’s “Poems of Ossian”; Robert Burns and the vernacular poetic revival; Walter Scott, James Hogg, and historical fiction); we will also look at the discourses of history, sentiment, the imagination and primitivism in the Scottish Enlightenment human sciences (Hume, Smith, Ferguson, Blair, Monboddo). We will consider the versions of Scotland discovered (and constructed) by English literary visitors (Samuel Johnson, William and Dorothy Wordsworth); and, if we have time, we’ll look at some late-Victorian revisitations of Scottish Romanticism, by Margaret Oliphant and Robert Louis Stevenson.

This section of English 165 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Special Topics: American Postmodernism--Olson and the Black Mountain School

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Campion, John
Campion, John
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Maximus Poems of Charles Olson; class handouts

Description

This course will look at the development of American Postmodernism (in poetry, painting, music, dance, etc.), focusing on the artistic and institutional influence of one of its founding figures: the poet, Charles Olson.

In many ways Charles Olson provided the essential elements of a genuine American Postmodernism. His view of the individual and its relationship to the universal offered a unified field of meaning and coherence--profoundly contrasting with the existentially alienated humanity exposed by European schools of thought. Through his leadership at Black Mountain College, he brought together and provided the intellectual context of some of the most influential thinkers and artists of our time, John Cage, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Walter Gropius, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, Buckminster Fuller, Robert Motherwell, Denise Levertov, Robert Creeley, among many others).

The class will examine Olson’s understanding of a ‘Human Universe’ and the nature of ‘reality’ itself coupled with his attempt to unify the philosophical rupture between theory and praxis and the artistic split between form and content. We’ll see how his technique of projective verse helped register ideas about geography, knowledge, economics, myth, ecology, politics, the hermetica, and the self. Since his thought was informed by so many sources and contexts, it necessarily opens this course up to many diverse areas of consideration and of student orientation.

We’ll try to experience and understand how Charles Olson’s phenomenological work in poetry was made as a living thing and not merely a map showing us how to see and how to do it--although it does.


Special Topics: The Global South: Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Morrison, and Cisneros 


English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose David
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 220 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Agee, T.: Let us Now Praise Famous Men; Cisneros, Sandra: Caramelo or Puro Cuento, The House On Mango Street; Dubois Shaw: Seeing the Unspeakable; Garcia Marquez, G.: Collected Stories, Living to Tell the Tale, One Hundred Years of Solitude; Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom!, Go Down, Moses; Morrison, T.: Beloved, Sula, A Mercy

Description

A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Sandra Cisneros, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the South and the Global South. Topics include the significance of Faulkner's "The Bear" and Absalom, Absalom! for modern and post-contemporary writers from across the Americas. Readings also include Sandra Cisneros’ Caramelo or Puro Cuento, The House On Mango Street; Garcia Marquez's "Big Mama's Funeral," One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Living to Tell the Tale, and Morrison's Beloved, Sula, and A Mercy. Our course will also look at the photographs of the US South by Walker Evans, and the Global South's paintings by Kara Walker and Fernando Botero, among others. Throughout this comparative survey course, we will grapple with the question--do the Americas have a common literature?


Special Topics: Readings for Fiction Writers

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, Bharati)
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 210 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Flaubert, G.: Madame Bovary; Doctorow, E.L.: The March; Fitzgerald, F.S.: The Great Gatsby; Mukherjee, B.: Jasmine; Forster, E.M.: Howards End; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth; Achebe, C.: Things Fall Apart; Rushdie, S.: Midnight’s Children; Hosseini, K.: The Kite Runner

Description

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning.


Special Topics: British Cinema

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 4-5:30 + films Tues. 6-9 P.M. in 300 Wheeler
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Critical readings will be available in a course reader.

Description

François Truffaut once observed “a certain incompatibility between the terms ‘Britain’ and ‘cinema.’” Certainly, in its main traditions, this cinema exhibits a defining tendency to resist its status as cinema, whether by downplaying cinematic specificity in the guise of a literary classic, by hiding cinematic artifice beneath the mask of social realism, or by compensating for cinematic mechanicalness with a vitalizing emphasis on character. In exemplifying these strategies of resistance, we will be interrogating what it is about cinema—and about British culture—that seems to call for them. Remembering, however, that Truffaut made the above observation to a Britisher whose work he regarded as virtually definitive of cinema—namely, Alfred Hitchcock—we will also attend largely to the counter-tradition of cinematic self-consciousness established by Hitchcock and Michael Powell.

Films to be studied may include: Brief Encounter, Oliver Twist, Henry V, Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Lodger, Sabotage. Frenzy, Black Narcissus, Peeping Tom, Room at the Top, This Sporting Life, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Victim, Darling, Hard Day’s Night, If…, Remains of the Day, Trainspotting.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Revision in Early America

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Shakespeare, The Tempest; Anon., The Female American; Maryse Conde, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem; Mary Beth Norton, In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692; Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia; William Wells Brown, Clotel, or the President’s Daughter; Barry Unsworth, Sacred Hunger

Description

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our study will be organized around three early American sites: Jamestown fort, Witchcraft at Salem, and Jefferson’s Virginia. These three sites will function as interpretive nodes, connecting narratives that span from slave resistance on West Indian plantations to Anglo-Indian warfare on the Wabanaki frontier. In each place, African, Native, and European ways of making meaning radically collided and concepts of racial difference were created and concretized. The effect, of course, was never total, and we will study how that slippage and excess de-stabilized these histories, which are still being revised. Readings include Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Marsyse Conde’s I, Tituba, Toni Morrison’s A Mercy, Barry Unsworth’s Sacred Hunger. Expect shipwrecks, deserted islands, revolutions, curses, two midterms and a final.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


The Language and Literature of Films: Meta-Cinema and the Hollywood Novel

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Didion, J.: Play It as It Lays; Fitzgerald, F.S.: The Love of the Last Tycoon; Mamet, D.: Speed-the-Plow; Waugh, E.: The Loved One; West, N.: The Day of the Locust; and a course reader

Films: Altman, R.: The Player; Coen, E. & J.: Barton Fink; Fellini, F.: 8 ½; Jonze, S.: Adaptation; Powell, M.: Peeping Tom; Richardson, T.: The Loved One; Sedgwick, E.: The Cameraman; Truffaut, F.: Day for Night; Wilder, B.: Sunset Boulevard

Description

Hollywood is traditionally conceived as a “dream factory,” the place where common cultural fantasies are articulated. Books and films about filmmaking, however, tend to associate it with superficiality, immorality, and even violence and death. In this course, we will examine film production as a literary and cinematic subject, in an attempt to define its values and to understand how texts themselves “produce” fantasy and identity. When cinematic illusions are exposed and we see actors’ rehearsals, the construction of sets, and the negotiations between writers and producers – still within the context of fiction – is fantasy destroyed or in some way perpetuated? As part of our study of the relationship between literary and filmic representation, we will consider how the word competes with the image as a narrative medium. How are writers, directors, and cameramen, as “artists,” portrayed? How do verbal symbols signify differently from visual ones? We will also learn about some techniques of film production and film analysis, to better understand how they complement and differ from corresponding literary techniques.

There will be several evening film screenings, so please save Tuesdays 6-9 P.M. in your schedule for them; the location of the screenings is still to be arranged.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barker, P.: Regeneration; Dunn, K.: Geek Love; Haddon, M.: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time; Lewis, V. A. ed: Beyond Victims and Villains: Contemporary Plays by Disabled Playwrights; McCullers, C.: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Medoff, M.: Children of a Lesser God; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III; plus a course packet of short fiction

Description

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama. Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or rehearsed reading from one of the plays.


The Epic: Imagined Communities and the Classical Epic

English 180E

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles and Nolan, Maura
Time: MW F 1-2
Location: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Homer, The Iliad, (Fitgerald Trans.); Homer, The Odyssey (Fitzgerals Trans.); Vergil, The Aeneid (Feagles, trans); Dante, The Inferno (Ciardi trans); Paradiso (Hollander Trans.); Milton, Paradise Lost, Norton Critical editions; Wordsworth, The Prelude: Parallel texts. All paperbacks.

Description

Our fields of expertise are medieval writing and modernism. But we are convinced that the classical epic is crucial for a literary education whatever field you specialize in—for the profound experiences it offers and for the range of influences and challenges it has created for subsequent writers of all periods in Western Literature. Each of us will lecture on half the texts, but we also want to spend a good deal of time in conversation with one another and with the class on the best ways of characterizing what matters in the text and what theoretical and cultural issues the reading raises. We envision this as an exercise in the possibility of informed and not always unironic critical appreciation.

This is a G.R.O.U.P. Townsend Center course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Lyric Verse

English 180L

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 3108 Etcheverry


Other Readings and Media

Poems and essays will be available in a course reader or, whenever possible, electronically. No books will be required.

Description

We will spend much of the semester trying to figure out what the title of this course means. We’ll start by thinking about the so-called “roots of lyric,” not only Sappho and Greek lyric, but other forms and shapes that are deeply buried within the matrices of modern poetry—chants, spells, charms, riddles, curses. Along the way, we’ll revisit some favorites from the English-language canon (Donne, Marvell, Blake, Keats, Hopkins, Dickinson, Stevens, Hughes, Moore, Bishop, Ashbery, Plath) as well as some more recent experiments. We’ll pair various poems with various media (painting, music, movies, dance, video games) and conceptual frames (psychology, ecology, literary theory, cognitive science) in order to tease out the alternate currents running through the texts. Reading assignments will be small, but dense. In addition to a final exam, there will be one short essay (3-5 pages), and one longer essay (7-9 pages) that may be critical, historical, or a hybrid critical-creative piece.


The Romance

English 180R

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 123 Wheeler


Description

For more information on this course, please see professor Miller during her office hours on Fridays from 2-4.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Research Seminar: Close Reading

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

J. Austen, Emma; R. Barthes, S/Z; A.C. Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes; William Empson, Seven Types of Ambiguity; J. Keats, Keats’s Poetry and Prose

Description

It may be argued that close reading is literary criticism. Certainly, it is its only technique and its most widely shared belief. Although it is central to literary criticism, however, close reading is marginal almost everywhere else in the culture, with exceptions to be duly noted. Like all marginal phenomena, it is selectively lionized and massively stigmatized; it has its mythic heroes such as Sherlock Holmes and, more recently, Robert Langdon, and its regular demons, who are usually us, the literature majors and professors who are considered to read too much in. The aim of this course is not to teach students how to close-read—with English majors, I assume both experience and ability in the practice—but to bring them to a more conscious (and self-conscious) understanding of what may be at stake in both the practice and the resistance to it. Accordingly, even as we “do” close reading, we will also engage in assisted reflection on what it is we are doing

Our objects comprise a poem by Keats, a novel by Austen, and a film by Hitchcock, all of which spectacularly lend themselves to close reading, and some mass culture artifacts that categorically do not, but will receive it nonetheless (for the course harbors a certain desire to take close-reading out of the closet of English Literature and into the streets of cultural studies). Our topics include: the institutionalization of close reading, its past, present, and utopian rationales, historicist and other attacks on it, its rules-of-the-game, the problematic of “getting close” (or, the critic’s “intimacy issues”), and, not least, the pleasures of the text.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Avant-Gardes

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, C.D.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The book list for this course has not been finalized, but the books will be at the bookstore by the time classes start.

Description

In the early years of the twentieth century, a generation of young artists began organizing itself under the metaphorically (or perhaps not merely metaphorically) militant sign of an avant-garde: an advance guard or vanguard, dedicated variously to refining, redefining, perhaps even destroying, the notion of art as such. By the time of the first world war, the term had come to embrace a wide range of often contradictory movements, in most of the major European languages and in almost every art. This seminar will not make sense of the avant-garde, but it will explore some of its major incarnations: Futurism, Vorticism, Dada, and Surrealism, among others. We will puzzle over manifestoes and some of the works to which they gave rise, tracing the concept’s nineteenth-century bohemian roots and its place within the larger constellation of aesthetic modernism. We will also weigh some of the most important critical attempts to gauge the aesthetic and historical significance of such avant-garde movements, before turning to the occasionally vexed question of their persistence in more recent decades. Can one conceive of a continuing avant-garde tradition? Or is the mere suggestion simply oxymoronic?

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Film Noir.

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 9:30-11 + mandatory attendance at film screenings on Tuesdays, 5-8, 206 Wheeler.
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Graham Greene, The Third Man; James M. Cain, Double Indemnity; Dashiell Hammet, The Maltese Falcon; Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep; Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye; Alain Silver and James Orsini, Film Noir Reader

Description

An introduction to a gloomy set of films from the late 40s (mostly), set in a dark American (mostly) dream world suffused with war hangover, erotic bewilderment, lethal and uninhibited (but intriguing) menaces, and demented fantasies of innocence. We’ll watch a film every Tuesday evening (including the first one), discuss it briefly as soon as it’s finished, then return on Thursday and the next Tuesday in regular class session to discuss it in greater depth. We will also read five novels upon which three of the films we’ll watch are based, and critical essays from The Film Noir Reader. These will also be discussed during Tuesday and Thursday class sessions. Once a week, a panel of students will present several thoughts and queries concerning that week’s film to get discussion going. Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Contemporary Novel

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Amis, M.: Time’s Arrow; Chamoiseau, P.: Texaco; Houellebecq, M.: The Elementary Particles; Smith, Z.: White Teeth; Ishiguro, K.: Never Let Me Go; O’Neill, J: At Swim Two Boys; Morrison, T.: A Mercy; Adiga, A: The White Tiger

Description

A selection of novels written in the last 20 years. I’ve chosen novels that tend to think of themselves as hugely socially ambitious, interrogating the big questions of our time: the nature of evil; the urbanization of human life; scientific discovery and its consequences for our definition of what is human; slavery, freedom, and liberation.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Fictions of Los Angeles

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles (1994); T. Coraghessen Boyle, The Tortilla Curtain (1996); Nathanael West, Day of the Locust (1939); Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man (1964); Walter Mosley, Little Scarlet (2004); Scott Bukatman, Blade Runner (1997); Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange (1997)

Description

Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a "circus without a tent" (Carey McWilliams), "seventy-two suburbs in search of a city" (Dorothy Parker), "the capital of the Third World" (David Rieff), and "the only place for me that never rains in the sun" (Tupac Shakur). This class will investigate these and other ways that Los Angeles has been understood over the last century—as a city-in-a-garden, a dream factory, a noirish labyrinth, a homeowner's paradise, a zone of libidinal liberation, and a powderkeg of ethnic and racial violence, to name but a few. We will trace the rise of Los Angeles from its origins as a small city, built on a late-19th-century real estate boom sponsored by railroad companies, into the sprawling megacity that has often been taken as a prototype of postmodern urban development; and we will do so primarily by looking at the fiction, film, drama, and music that the city has produced.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Urban Postcolonial

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

C. Abani, Graceland; V. Chandra, Love and Longing in Bombay; H. Kunzru, Transmission; Zakes Mda, Ways of Dying; J. O’Neill, Netherland; Z. Smith, White Teeth; M. Thelwell, The Harder They Come (optional); I. Vladislavic, The Exploded View

Films: D. Boyle, dir., Slumdog Millionaire; P. Henzell, dir., The Harder They Come; S. Frears, dir., Dirty Pretty Things; G. Hood, Tstotsi; M. Nair, dir., Salaam Bombay; Course Reader available on b-Space

Description

In this seminar we will think about recent issues in postcolonial studies by focusing on cities. Moving through a diverse set of texts and very different cities—London and Lagos, Kingston and Mumbai, New York and Cape Town among them—we will wonder: What makes a city postcolonial? (For that matter, what makes a text postcolonial?) Are there postcolonial ways to experience a city? What narrative techniques emerge out of the urban postcolonial? In what sense is the United States postcolonial? The texts, the cities, and readings in recent criticism will help us think about the fate of “the postcolonial” itself, a term we might liken to an elusive discursive urbanite. We shall follow her down streets of globalization, arcades of diaspora, borderlands of one sort and another—including those in two cities close at hand, Oakland and San Francisco.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Flannery O’Connor

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 12:30-2:00
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

O’Connor, Flannery: The Complete Stories, The Violent Bear It Away, Wise Blood, plus a course reader

Description

Many consider Flannery O’Connor to be one of the foremost writers of short fiction in American literature. Though her work is sometimes dismissively categorized as regional, her favorite themes include religion, race, and disability. In this course, we will read all her published fiction in addition to a selection of her essays, reviews and letters. The major writing project for the course will be a twenty-page research paper. Short writing exercises and class presentations will help students compile a bibliography, create a thesis and hone close-reading skills for the final paper.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Chicana Art, Fiction and Film-making

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Description

This research seminar will primarily focus on women’s narratives –novels, poetry,art, film and theory. I am interested in comparing gendered self-representations with (sometimes without) representations of men (and all we stand for) in the work of a group of Chicana writers, filmmakers and artists. Although I haven’t yet decided on all the texts, we will definitely study Ana Castillo (novelist, poet, essayist), Lourdes Portillo (film director), Denise Chavez (novelist), Lorna Dee Cervantes (poet), Sandra Cisneros (fiction, poetry), Gloria Anzáldua (theorist), Alma Lopez (artist), Isis Rodríguez(artist), Delilah Montoya (photographer) and also Chicana critics Tey Diana Rebolledo, Laura Pérez, Rosa Linda Fregoso.

There will be a 5-6 position paper due within about three weeks, and a final paper of some 15 pages due in the final week of class. I will expect regular attendance and students will regularly lead discussion.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Seventies

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The book list for this course has not been finalized, but the books will be at the bookstore by the time classes start.

Description

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.”

Yet we can see now that the ’70s was a time of cultural renaissance (e.g. the New Hollywood of Scorcese, Coppola et al; the music of funk, disco, punk and New Wave; the postmodern theater of Saturday Night Live, Sam Shepard and Maria Irene Fornes; the "dirty realism" of Raymond Carver; the sci-fi boom represented by Ursula LeGuin, Samuel Delany et al) and a period of intense political realignments (the shock of the oil crisis; the fall of Nixon and the fall of Saigon; the advent of women’s liberation, gay liberation, and environmentalism as mass grassroots movements; the rise of the Sunbelt and the dawning of the conservative revolution). One might even say that the ’70s were the most interesting decade of the post-WWII era -- the period when the dreams of the ‘60s were most intensely, if achingly, fulfilled.

It may also be the decade closest to our own contemporary moment. In this class, we will consider how the roots of our current predicament lie in the earlier decade -- with its uncertainty about the oil supply, its stagnant economy, its alarm at Islamic fundamentalism, its fetish for self-fulfillment, its reality TV and its fascination with the appeal of instant and often empty celebrity. We will, in turn, reflect on how Americans in the ‘70s struggled with many of the dilemmas that we face now.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Writings of Daniel Defoe

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe, Journal of the Plague Year, Moll Flanders , Roxana, Captain Singleton, and Colonel Jack (the last two in photocopies).  Selections from Defoe's poetry and nonfictional prose will be distributed in photocopy, as will biographical and critical material.

Description

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe’s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and religious as well as literary. Writings with less obvious claims on our attention than the prose fiction will figure prominently, although proportions can be adjusted as the course unfolds.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Visuality, Textuality, and Modernity

English 190

Section: 13
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

James Agee and Walker Evans, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem; Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida; John Berger, Ways of Seeing; Theresa Cha, Dictee; Guy Debord, Society of the Spectacle; Anthony Lee, Picturing Chinatown; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives; W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz; Susan Sontag, On Photography.

Photography books (on bspace): Robert Frank, The Americans; Aaron Siskind, The Harlem Document; Carrie Mae Weems, The Kitchen Table Series; Edward Steichen and Carl Sandburg, The Family of Man

Description

We inhabit image-saturated social and literary worlds. If, as Walter Benjamin predicted in the 1930s, ‘The illiteracy of the future … will be ignorance not of reading or writing, but of photography,” it is a form of illiteracy that urgently solicits remedy. Pursuing what has been called the “visual turn” in literary studies, this course will examine the interplay between verbal and visual modes of representation, with photography (“light writing”) as our central term. Reading a range of literary and visual texts both independently and interdependently, we will examine the deployment of words and images in composite photo-texts, the evocation of imaginary photographs in autobiographical fictions, and the textuality of photographic albums, archives, and narratives. We will analyze photography’s cultural work in composing social categories (race, class, nation, and family) and exposing their contradictions. Informed by readings in semiotics, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and Marxism, we will map some key tensions of twentieth-century cultural theory and production: the relations between subjects and objects of observation, mechanical reproduction and imaginative creation, the legibility of images and the visibility of words, and the codes of verbal and visual meaning. After a few short papers that will hone close reading skills, students will conduct extended research projects on literary or photographic texts of their choice.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Shakespeare's Versification

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Evans, G.B., ed.: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This course will explore Shakespeare's artistic use of the formal resources of verse, especially meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism. We will consider what defines these forms; how they vary across lyric, narrative and dramatic genres; where they come from and how they develop; how they shape performance; and most of all, what they contribute to the emotional power and beauty of his works. The course is a research seminar, so various short papers and oral presentations leading to one long paper will be required.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature of California and the West pre-1920

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 183 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Harte, B.: Stories, Sketches, Poems (photocopy); Browne, J. Ross: “A Peep at Washoe," “Washoe Revisited” (photocopy); Clemens, Samuel L. (“Mark Twain”): "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” “Jim Baker’s Bluejay Yarn,” “How to Tell a Story" (photocopy); Clemens, Samuel L. (“Mark Twain”): Roughing It; Stevenson, Robert L.: The Silverado Squatters; Norris, Frank: McTeague; Austin, Mary: The Land of Little Rain; London, Jack: The Valley of the Moon. (Secondary material to be posted on bSpace or distributed in photocopy)

Description

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Writing will consist of a term paper of 16-20 pages. Depending on enrollment, each student will be responsible for organizing and leading class discussion (probably teamed with another student) once during the semester. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Dystopian Fiction and the Fate of the Body

English 190

Section: 17
Instructor: Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin E.
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Atwood, Margaret: The Handmaid’s Tale; Gibson, William: Neuromancer; Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; More, Thomas: Utopia; Orwell, George: 1984; Wells, H. G.: The Time Machine; a course reader

Films: Children of Men, The Matrix

Description

Dystopian fiction often radically redefines the body, both euphorically imagining its future and registering anxieties about the decline of more traditional bodily forms. The body, redefined through forces such as technology, environmental changes, social power, and evolution, is the site through which dystopian fiction enacts many of its central conflicts. Despite the apparent exoticism of its fictional bodies, however, dystopian fiction asks fundamental questions about what a body is, and how it is produced, altered, and controlled by outside forces. Tracing a course from More’s Utopia through the ascendance of the virtual in more recent fiction, the course will ask how dystopian fiction speculates about the future, but also affords a critical distance from which to engage with contemporary political and social contexts.

English 190 replaces English 100 and 150 as of Fall ’09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or 150 before Fall ’09). Please read the paragraph on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course!

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 121 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Leitch, V., ed.: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; supplementary literary and critical texts made available on bSpace.

Recommended: Gibaldi, J.: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed.; Macey, D.: The Penguin Dictionary of Critical Theory

Description

By the end of the two-semester H195 sequence you will have conceived, designed, and executed a substantial piece of original literary scholarship. The fall semester of the course serves as a staging ground for this task. We will read widely in prominent works of contemporary literary theory, chosen largely from the Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. The idea here is not simply to offer a tasting menu of different approaches. Rather, our reading list will offer a series of occasions for identifying the premises and analyzing the agendas of particular theoretical movements and schools. We’ll aim to think carefully and critically about how these direct the interpretation of literary texts and transform the categories of literary-critical analysis. In the latter half of the semester several of our class sessions will be devoted to readings chosen from the Norton Anthology by student groups, who will also take responsibility for leading class discussion on those days.

Alongside our collective conversation on the readings, each student will move through a sequence of writing exercises intended to develop and hone their plans for the honors thesis, culminating in a prospectus and annotated bibliography due at the end of the fall term. In the spring students will meet regularly in small groups to provide each other with feedback, advice, and encouragement as they move forward with their individual thesis projects.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 21; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory: An Introduction, 3rd edition; Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; selections from Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, eds., Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd edition (optional); a course reader

Description

In the fall semester of this year-long course, we will study a broad range of literary and cultural theories. As the semester progresses, however, we will concentrate on theories of subjectivity and otherness, especially as they relate to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and class. One of our main objectives will be to understand and form opinions about some of the key critical concepts that have been debated (sometimes contentiously) among contemporary literary and cultural critics. These concepts include culture, language, form, ideology, power, hegemony, modernity, postmodernity, post-colonial, class, nation, globalization, racialization, patriarchy, consciousness, identity, and history itself. Our main concern will be to understand the manner in which these concepts and categories have been employed in the interpretation of literature. To test our theoretical investigations, we will read several short works of fiction by a culturally diverse group of contemporary authors. Students will be required to write a prospectus of their planned thesis project, produce an annotated bibliography, and give oral presentations in class based on the course readings. In the spring, students will write an honors thesis of about 50 pages drawing on some of the theories studied in the first semester and on their own independent research.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 21; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 3
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 24 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Leitch, V., ed..: Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

This course is designed to facilitate the writing of a senior honors thesis by deepening students’ engagement with literary theory and critical methodology. To that end we will explore some key critical texts that found and inform various schools of literary criticism: New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, Marxism, Deconstruction, and so on. At the same time, students will refine their particular research interests into a workable thesis topic, come up with a working bibliography of primary and secondary source material particular to their project, and begin the process of writing, revising, and presenting their work (to be completed in the spring semester).

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 21; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


The Strange Career of Jim Crow

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Frances Harper, Iola Leroy; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Jean Toomer, Cane; William Faulkner, Light in August; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Description

Major novels written in the United States between the end of slavery and the start of the Civil Rights Movement. Weekly reading responses, one project on reception history, and one essay.


Graduate Readings: Modernism, Race and Modernity

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

David L. Lewis ed., Harlem Renaissance Reader; Jean Toomer, Cane; E.E Cummings, The Enormous Room; Gertrude Stein, Three Lives; Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Mask, Michael North, The Dialect of Modernism: Race, Language and Twentieth-Century Literature

Description

In this prose seminar we will focus on recent attempts in cultural criticism to shift the study of modernism beyond Anglo-American works and formalism. We will begin with an examination of questions about race and ‘otherness’ in modernist literature, visual culture and aesthetics—how are non-Western cultures used to mediate metropolitan anxieties towards the limits of language and representation? To approach this question we will trace the development and function of primitivism and fetishism in modernist literature and art. We will also examine the transnational dimensions of modernism and the relationship between modernism and the modernization. This is an ideal course for graduate students preparing for their qualifying exams and for those who expect to write on the topics around race and in early 20th century literature.


Graduate Readings: Edmund Spenser

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: M 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Spenser, E., The Faerie Queene, ed. Hamilton; Spenser, E., Shorter Poems; Spenser, E., A View of the Present State of Ireland

Description

Sidney wrote that a poet's task was to "grow in effect another nature." No poet in English has fulfilled that charge more luxuriantly than Spenser. The plan of the semester will be to roam around in the leisurely, delight-filled capaciousness of The Faerie Queene, with the aim that each of us find herself at home somewhere in this alienated version of our own world. The tension between delight and didacticism, leisure and urgency, is central to any such accommodation; I'm also interested in questions of materiality and of landscape in the fiction, and I expect our inquiries will be shaped by your preoccupations as well. We'll take some detours into the shorter poems along the way, and we will try too to reckon with the genocidal despair by which Spenser articulates the project of making a home in the alien terrain of Ireland.


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The workshop will provide a collaborative critical community in which to try out successive versions of the dissertation project and to learn how one's peers are constructing theirs. Weekly writing assignments will structure points of entry into these projects. Beginning with exercises to galvanize your thinking, the assignments will map increasingly onto the specific components of the prospectus. We will also review a range of prospectuses from the past to demystify the genre and to gain a better understanding of its form and function. The goal is to insure that by the end of the semester, every member of the workshop will have submitted a prospectus to his or her committee. For students who complete a draft of the prospectus early in the semester, we will reserve time to consider it fully and to structure assignments relevant to the writing of the first chapter (including the question of which chapter should be written first). We will also discuss the dissertation in relation to the job market, conference papers, scholarly journals, and publishable articles.


Graduate Readings: British Empiricism, the Novel, and the Science of Man

English 203

Section: 5
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Austen, J., Emma. Scott, W., Redgauntlet. Hugo, V., Notre-Dame de Paris. Dickens, C., Bleak House and A Tale of Two Cities. Eliot, G., Daniel Deronda. Hume, D., A Treatise of Human Nature and Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Smith, A., The Theory of Moral Sentiments; Burke, E., A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of our Ideas on the Sublime and the Beautiful; Malthus, T., An Essay on the Principle of Population; Darwin, C., The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man

Description

The course will examine the conjunction of the novel and the main tradition of philosophical empiricism in Great Britain. In A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) David Hume gave the general project of Enlightenment philosophy the title “the Science of MAN”; in The Descent of Man (1871) Charles Darwin restructured that project under a definitively post-enlightenment science of life. This is also the classical epoch of the English novel, framed at one end by Henry Fielding’s claim that the novel is the modern genre best fitted for the representation of “Human Nature” (Tom Jones, 1749) and at the other by Henry James’s claim that the novel is at once “a direct impression of life” and itself “a living thing, all one and continuous, like every other organism” (“The Art of Fiction,” 1884). We will read a selection of novels written after 1800, as the science of man devolves into a host of competing disciplines, ideologies and theories. Exploring the links between questions of history (the history of man, of the world, of life) and form (aesthetics, taxonomy, “fitness”), we will also consider some major works of the empiricist tradition, in two clusters: around Hume (moral philosophy and aesthetics) and around Darwin (political economy and anthropology).


Graduate Readings: Poetics and Theories of Poetry

English 203

Section: 6
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All readings will be contained in a course reader or available electronically, and probably will include writings by Aristotle, Horace, Dante, Sidney, Puttenham, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Mill, Keats, Arnold, Mallarmé, Hopkins, Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Stein, Stevens, Moore, Olson, Mandelstam, Empson, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Brooks, Valéry, Benjamin, Adorno, de Man, Culler, Riffaterre, Lacoue-Labarthe, Celan, Derrida, Freud, Jakobson, Glissant, Susan Stewart, Virginia Jackson, Yopie Prins, Lyn Hejinian, Charles Altieri, Marjorie Perloff, Robert Kaufman, Giorgio Agamben, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Jerome McGann, and N. Katherine Hayles, among others.

Description

This course will attempt to provide a general introduction to poetics, to sketch a more detailed history of the ways in which poetry has been theorized since the nineteenth century, and to think through some of the more recent trends in scholarship on poetry and lyric theory. We will review some of the formative statements on poetry in the western canon, proceed quickly into the poetics of the romantics, and then move into the twentieth century. We will reconsider the projects of the New Critics alongside of other types of formalist scholarship, the place of poetry within structuralism and deconstruction, and the importance of lyric poetry in several varieties of Marxist aesthetics and psychoanalytic theories. As we come to more recent writings, we’ll investigate poetry’s investments in matters of perception, subjectivity, cognition, technology, ecology, and history, and test out analogues with other media. We will pay close attention to the shapes (formal, spatial, metrical, acoustic, generic) and textures (sonic, graphic, etymological, figural, rhythmic) of specific poems, some of which will be dictated by the theoretical readings, but many of which we will determine as a group at the start of the semester. My hope is that the class will be useful to people who “don’t do poetry” but who want to have a grounding in its terms and tenets as they prepare for orals and teaching, as well as for people who “do poetry” in one way or another and want to get a capacious map of a broad field as they prepare for more specialized research. There will be two conference-length papers (8-10 pages) and one oral presentation in the form of a review/critique of a recent book on poetry and/or poetics.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Baker, Peter S., Introduction to Old English; Liuzza, R. M., ed., Old English Literature: Critical Essays

Description

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the semester, however, students should be capable of reading and translating a variety of Old English prose and verse texts, analyzing these works’ style, and situating them in the context of early medieval culture. Linguistic mastery is emphasized, and much of the in-class work for the course will consist of translation and close reading. However, coursework will also address a range of interpretative and literary-historical issues, as well as the tools and methods essential to scholars in the field of Anglo-Saxon literature. Depending on student interests, we may also consider topics such as palaeography; manuscript context; the interaction of Latin and Old English; and/or modern translations from Old English. 205A is normally a prerequisite for more advanced courses in Old English. No prior knowledge of Old English is assumed, and undergraduates may be admitted with the permission of the instructor.


Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: W 3-6
Location: 202 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Canterbury Tales, edited by Jill Mann; Chaucer: Sources and Backgrounds, edited by Robert Miller

Description

In this course, we will read all of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, along with relevant sources and other contemporary texts. We will also read current scholarship on the Tales, with the goal of attaining a reasonably complete knowledge of the different approaches that have been used to talk about Chaucer's work. Students will learn how to read Middle English aloud and will work on translating Chaucer into idiomatic modern English, a more difficult task than it seems. Indeed, one of the themes of the course will be translation; many of Chaucer's Tales can be called "translations," and Chaucer himself makes several comments about translating and reporting the words of others. To that end, we will also explore how the words in our edited edition of the Tales came to be identified as Chaucer's, given the plethora of manuscript evidence and the many options available to the editor. No prior knowledge of Middle English is required for this course.


Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List: To be arranged

Description

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about writing from various sources. Students will produce at least 40 pages of fiction over the course of the semester.

Undergraduates are welcome to apply. Please note that the class will assume prior experience with workshops, and familiarity with the basic elements of fiction and the critical vocabulary used by writers to analyze narrative. Class attendance is mandatory.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 15 photocopied pages of your fiction, along with an application form, to Professor Chandra’s mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 21, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

English 246F

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Provisional book list: Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H.: Shamela, Joseph Andrews; Burney, F., Evelina; Johnson, S.: selections from his literary criticism, his Dictionary, and Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland; Piozzi, H.: from Johnsoniana; Collins, W., Leapor, M., Cowper, W., Gray. T., Goldsmith, O., Crabbe, G.: selections from the poetry; Smith, A. Theory of Moral Sentiments; Hume, D.: Treatise of Human Nature; Sterne, L., A Sentimental Journey; Walpole, H.: Castle of Otranto; Percy, T.: Reliques of Ancient English Poetry; Macpherson, J., Ossian Poems; Talbot, C.: Imitations of Ossian

Description

In this survey of British literature post 1740, we shall consider the ways in which literature responded to and at times facilitated and shaped major transformations in the period’s print culture and market relationships. This broad organizing principle lends itself to a wide range of possible critical topics. Those we might pursue include: changes in fiction writing that we now associate with the emergence of the genre of the novel—a term rejected by the period’s fiction writers precisely because of its associations with a crass literary marketplace; the institutionalization of criticism as a profession, in part as a means of negotiating new terms of value; the perceived crisis regarding the status of the poet in a literary market; women’s negotiation of the scandalous publicity of authorship; the discourse in sentiment and sympathy that might overcome the social atomization threatened by capital relations; the turn toward history, especially national history, as another means of social consolidation; new epistemological possibilities opened up by and challenging the period’s conceptualizations of print, empiricism, and historicism. Along with the primary texts, readings will include related secondary critical material.


Research Seminar: Postwar British Literary Culture at Mid-Century

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: W 3-6
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The booklist for this course has not been finalized, but is likely to include several of the following texts: Orwell, G.: The Road to Wigan Pier; Warner, R.: The Aerodrome; Greene, G.: The End of the Affair; Waugh, E.: Men at Arms; Wilson, A.: Anglo-Saxon Attitudes; Selvon, S.: The Lonely Londoners; Sillitoe, A.: The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner; Berger, J.: A Painter of Our Time; Lessing, D.: The Golden Notebook; Achebe, C.: Things Fall Apart; Dunn, N.: Up the Junction; Delaney, S.: A Taste of Honey; Osborne, J.: The Entertainer; and a course reader

Description

1945 continues to serve as the central periodizing marker of twentieth-century literary history, separating the long arc of high modernism from a sprawling expanse of time loosely understood as “contemporary.” This course will attempt to develop a more fine-grained analysis of British literary culture in the roughly 15 years following the end of the Second World War. The course will commence with a small grouping of works from the 1930s and early 40s that anticipate the postwar future. We’ll then move through a series of significant post-1945 works, aiming to explore a set of linked concerns: literary registrations of the ascendancy of social democracy and the welfare state; the reckoning with the legacies of prewar modernism; the widespread preoccupation during these years with questions of realist representation; and the emergence of the nascent literary formation we now call “postcolonial literature.” Our reading list will center upon the novel, with some attention to work in other genres. The course reader will give extensive play to the vibrant, often volatile critical debates of the time, while also featuring more recent works of theory and criticism by an eclectic range of figures (including Denning, Esty, Gilroy, Hardt and Negri, Hebdige, Offe, Samuel, Sinfield, Steedman, and Williams).


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 302

Section: 1
Instructor: Beam, Dorri
Infante-Abbatantuono, Jhoanna
Beam, Dorri and Infante, Jhoanna
Time: Thurs. 3:30-5:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

To be arranged

Description

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching close reading; running a section of a lecture course; responding to student papers; teaching writing (argumentation, organization, grammar, style) in the classroom; time management; grading; and the work of teaching.  The course enrolls English graduate students teaching their first course as of Spring or Fall 2009.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing (tutoring for credit through the Student Learning Center)

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP. Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 6. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.