Announcement of Classes: Spring 2015

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Space, Time, and Narrative in Post-1945 Literature

MWF 10-11

How does narrative register and reconfigure the coordinates of space and time? How may a literary model of space and time suggest a particular conception of history? What, then, does this concept of history indicate about the logic of “progress” and ...(read more) Dimitriou, Aristides

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Innocence

MWF 12-1

What does it mean to be innocent? Is innocence simply the lack of knowledge, or the absence of experience—an immature state that is inevitably lost upon self-reflection and understanding? How do those conceptions of innocence relate to the judicial d...(read more) Ding, Katherine

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
"A Reader Is a Beginner"

MWF 2-3

Each of these books explores some everyday occurrence we are familiar with, although perhaps conditioned to pass over. As we read them throughout the semester, they will ask us to rethink how we imagine spaces beyond our current conditions, and wheth...(read more) Vandeloo, David Conigliaro

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Arthurian Legend

TTh 9:30-11

From medieval manuscripts to twentieth-century film, Arthurian legends have undergone various changes as they passed to new generations and cultures.  The content of this course will consider some of these changes, from some of the earliest English p...(read more) Crosson, Chad Gregory

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Magical Engines

TTh 11-12:30

This introduction to college writing and argument explores texts about machines--both real and imagined--from Greece through the present day. While writing and theorizing about tools, inventions, and devices seems to have taken on special urgency sin...(read more) Mead, Christopher

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: US Popular Song & the Problem of Authenticity

TTh 12:30-2

Note new course description (and book list and instructor): While literary scholarship can speak freely about the death of the author, popular music must tread with caution. In popular music, performers stand in for songwriters, imploring audiences t...(read more) Sullivan, Khalil

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Rebellion, Revolution, Revision

TTh 3:30-5

From the British perspective the American colonial uprising was a rebellion, an anarchical break with order. But writers such as Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine called it a revolution, using a term that signified an extension of natural order (akin...(read more) McWilliams, Ryan

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine the "lost years" of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African American poetry ...(read more) Gardezi, Nilofar

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Renaissance Sonnet and Epigram

MWF 9-10

When we think of Renaissance poetry, we think of love. There's more to that story, though. This class will examine two poetic forms that enjoyed immense popularity in the English Renaissance. First, the sonnet (It. ‘a little sound/song’) is a work of...(read more) Villagrana, José

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold

MWF 10-11

"Beauty brings copies of itself into being. It makes us draw it, take photographs of it, or describe it to other people. Sometimes it gives rise to exact replication and other times to resemblances and still other times to things whose connection to ...(read more) Hsu, Sharon

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Drama's Function in Literature, Philosophy, and the Visual Arts

MWF 11-12

This class takes its cue from the etymological connection between theater, spectator, and theory in ancient Greek. The shared root for theater (theatron, or “place of seeing”), spectator (theōros) and theory (theōria, “contemplation or speculation”) ...(read more) Jeziorek, Alek M

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Lost Literature: Recovering and (Re)discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

MWF 12-1

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and practice literary criticism as a dynamic process of discovery.  In order to ...(read more) Sirianni, Lucy

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Composite-Composition

MWF 1-2

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor): Most research paper classes promote a divide between the object of study and work done by others on the object of study.  But this depiction of primary and secondary material as dist...(read more) Acu, Adrian Mark

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The Art of Conscience

MWF 2-3

What kind of knowledge, or science, does the conscience impart, and how does it make this knowledge manifest? What evidentiary standards apply to this kind of knowledge? This course will examine such questions through the lens of the literary imagina...(read more) Yu, Esther

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Research Methods

MW 4-5:30

In this course we’ll study and apply research methods from a variety of fields. We will discover what it means to be rigorous inside and outside a humanistic context. We will look at many methods of interpretation, from rhetorical to discourse analys...(read more) Ramirez, Matthew Eric

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Other Worlds

TTh 9:30-11

What does it mean to imagine another world? Is it an opportunity for unvarnished fantasy, or for critical reflection on your own society? Can you tell the truth when writing about an invented place? By way of an answer, this course considers the jour...(read more) Strub, Spencer

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Victorian Literature of Evolution

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine British literature related to the evolutionary theories emergent in the nineteenth century. We will read a combination of scientific writing, literary fiction, and poetry, attending both to the scientific discoveries made dur...(read more) Browning, Catherine Cronquist

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Regions: Revising the Lay of the Land

TTh 12:30-2

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor): Region is an area ruled, from regere, 'to rule or direct'; it is an area measured and surveyed so that its boundaries depend on and change with its rulers. In considering regions, we...(read more) Chow, Juliana H.

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
School Stories

TTh 2-3:30

This course will survey the educational principles and strategies common in nineteenth-century Britain and the depiction of domestic and institutional education in contemporary novels. We will examine the influential educational theories of the perio...(read more) Browning, Catherine Cronquist

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Rom Com: Shakespeare & Hollywood

TTh 3:30-5

What makes the genre of romantic comedy so pleasurable, when it is often critically maligned as being so formulaic? What defines a romantic comedy? What has persisted in romantic comedy throughout the centuries, from Shakespeare to 20th-century Holly...(read more) Liu, Aileen
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts In and Around Berkeley

W 11-1 (January 21 to March 4 only)

In this seminar (that will meet the first seven Wednesdays of the semester from 11:00 to 1:00) we will explore the diverse practices of art in and around Berkeley. We will visit local galleries and artists’ studios as well as arts programs and depart...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Madame Bovary

Tues. 4-5

Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as one of the world’s classic novels, but that acclaim does not get at what’s uniquely weird about it.  Read the novel fast and you’ll find a compelling story that is a pleasure to follow.  Read it ...(read more) Miller, D.A.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts and Culture at Berkeley and Beyond

W 4-5

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets; study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum; attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall; see and discuss films at the Pacific Film ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
California Detectives in Fiction and Film

W 10-11

For a variety of reasons, both San Francisco and Los Angeles have been great places for the work of crime and detection. Certain theorists of detective fiction have noted that such works of art are especially committed to the invocation and experienc...(read more) Hutson, Richard

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Campus Onomastics

F 2-3

"Onomastics," from the Greek onoma, 'name,'  is a minor branch of linguistics that studies proper names. In this course we will study the names of the buildings, spaces, institutions, scholarship funds and so forth that shape our daily lives here at ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

MWF 10-11

This course aims to do two things: 1) serve as an introduction to the variety of forms, modes and styles of poetry written in English; 2) provide a survey of the historical transformation of poetry in English over the last 200 years. We will begin wi...(read more) Bernes, Jasper

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 2-3

A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research corroborates the truism that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand the emotional states of other people. Even without the blessing of the sciences, it is undeniable that fiction...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios

27/2

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

The title of the course is “Introduction to the Study of Fiction,” but, more specifically, the course will be an introduction to analytic critical writing about fiction. We will work on close reading, on learning how to read with a mind open to and c...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 2-3:30

By attending to the triangulation of politics, prosody, and history within poetry of the last four hundred years, we will build a rigorous foundation for our own poetic experiments. Together, we will ask: What practical skills does one need in order ...(read more) Stancek, Claire Marie

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

We will study the changing nature of creative writing “through” Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. 45 is a lower-division course, a pre-required gateway to the English major...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

What is the English literary tradition?  Where did it come from? What are its distinctive habits, questions, styles, obsessions? This course will answer these and other questions by focusing on five key writers from the Middle Ages and the Renaissanc...(read more) Nolan, Maura
110 Barrows

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

"Check back later for more information!"

Puckett, Kent

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

A survey of British and American literature from 1688 through the mid-nineteenth century.  We will look at how literary genres evolve alongside new kinds of knowledge and understanding, with particular attention to the changing place of literature in...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
213 Wheeler

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modern...(read more) Falci, Eric

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

In this course, we will read and discuss a broad range of British and American literary writing spanning well over a century, with a primary focus on early twentieth-century modernist fiction and poetry. Topics for discussion will include the role of...(read more) Snyder, Katherine

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 12:30-2

This course has two principal aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children's literature in English from the eighteenth century to the present; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, and aesthetic questions such lite...(read more) Lavery, Grace

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Woody Allen

W 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Arc...(read more) Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

112/1

Middle English Literature

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  Focusing on a selection of them, we’ll consider the range of Shakespeare's dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dramatic genres in which he wrote affe...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey

118/1

Milton

TTh 9:30-11

Probably the most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than the rebel he was. He is also sometimes assumed to...(read more) Goodman, Kevis

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with th...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic writers revolutionized the concept of literature?  What is the relation ...(read more) Langan, Celeste

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 3:30-5

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeois...(read more) Lavery, Grace

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 9:30-11

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of m...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

125A/2

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most was published anonymously and purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so stren...(read more) Starr, George A.

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

This course has been canceled....(read more) Christ, Carol T.
Christ, Carol

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Fiction

MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the seven most recent (2007-2014) Pulitzer Prize-winning novels (actually, one of them is ...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

This class has been canceled....(read more) McQuade, Donald

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 12-1

This course will survey major works of early twentieth-century American literature by Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Zora Neale Hurston, Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, and Frank Norris, with...(read more) Porter, Carolyn

131/1

American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than co...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Black Internationalism

TTh 3:30-5

Throughout the twentieth century, African American authors used international travel to see beyond the limits of racial discrimination in the U.S.  Traveling abroad allowed these authors to imagine new configurations of race, gender, and class back a...(read more) Lee, Steven S.

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Race, [Creative] Writing, and Difference

TTh 3:30-5

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing. The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public language on ...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.

141/2

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Writing Fiction Across Genres

MWF 1-2

This course will explore modes of creative writing in several distinct contemporary genres of fiction: crime, fantasy & SF, and romance, with the goal of learning to engage creatively with key conventions that define each genre, while developing ...(read more) Tranter, Kirsten

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 11-12:30

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Students will write tw...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a creative writing workshop.  Students will write 3 short exercises and 2 short stories (approximately 50 pages over the whole semester).  We will discuss the stories in the anthology as well as work produced by students in the worksho...(read more) Kleege, Georgina

143B/1

Verse

M 3-6

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry.  Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing ...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

143D/1

Expository and Critical Writing :
Crafting the Critical Essay

TTh 2-3:30

This course is designed to prepare and support students who are planning to write a critical research essay as part of the English major.  We will begin by discussing various kinds of literary critical essays in order to identify models and methods t...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

W 3-6

Like & Love: an upper-division creative nonfiction writing workshop, open to continuing undergraduate and graduate students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students wil...(read more) Farber, Thomas

165/1

Special Topics:
American Modernism

TTh 2-3:30

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a range of responses to such events a...(read more) Goble, Mark

165/2

Special Topics:
Fathers and Sons

TTh 2-3:30

We will explore the burdens and blessings, affections and alienation of the father-son relationship through the novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and a play by American, British, and Russian writers. Their works take us to how sons look back on the w...(read more) Isenberg, Steven
Isenberg, Steven

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

MWF 11-12

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms for cultural movements and historical pe...(read more) Duncan, Ian

166/2

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts that are concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays...(read more) Goble, Mark

166/3

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 9:30-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After begin...(read more) Naiman, Eric

174/1

Literature and History:
The Seventies

TTh 12:30-2

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. "The '70s" routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when "it seemed like nothing happened." Yet we can see now that the decade of t...(read more) Saul, Scott

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture

This class has been canceled....(read more) McQuade, Donald

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 11-12:30

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through exploration of whether and if so how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme an...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 3:30-5

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists however, often criticize these tex...(read more) Kleege, Georgina

180H/1

The Short Story

TTh 3:30-5

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…                                                                   -- Chaucer This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on re...(read more) Chandra, Vikram

180N/1

The Novel:
The Novel as a Literary Genre

Note new time: MW 2:30-4

Henry James, writing in 1888, describes his cultural moment as a time of remarkable transformation in the production and reception of the English language novel.  At the beginning of the century, James observes, “there was a comfortable, good-humoure...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While sc...(read more) Jones, Donna V.

190/1

Research Seminar:
The Temporality of Faulkner's Novels

MW 12:30-2

Jean-Paul Sartre has famously compared Faulkner’s sense of time to “a man sitting in a convertible and looking back.”  From this perspective, Sartre contends, the only view is that of the past, made “hard, clear and immutable” in its isolation.  Yet ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.

190/2

Research Seminar:
Metamorphosis, Monsters, and the Supernatural Everyday

M 3-6

We dream of becoming something other than what we are. To be human is to be in love with transformation. That love of becoming something other, of transforming ourselves from one thing to another, infuses our literature since the first artists took u...(read more) Danner, Mark

190/4

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 was canceled (1/14/15)....(read more) Gardezi, Nilofar

190/5

Research Seminar:
Materialism--Ancient and Modern

TTh 9:30-11

“As human beings we inhabit an ineluctably material world. We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions and on p...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature and Revolution

TTh 11-12:30

This course will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Our starting point will be t...(read more) Lee, Steven S.

190/7

Research Seminar:
Toni Morrison

TTh 12:30-2

We will read as many of Toni Morrison’s novels as we can in the time we have. Most class meetings will be organized around discussion of the assigned daily reading, though I will intrude with brief lectures when I feel that doing so will help the dis...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/8

Research Seminar:
Shakespeare’s Versification

TTh 3:30-5

This course will explore Shakespeare's artistic use of the formal resources of verse, especially meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism, as well as, by way of contrast, some of his use of music.  We will consider what defines these form...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

190/9

Research Seminar:
Mass Entertainment in Classical Hollywood Film

TTh 3:30-5

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in Hollywood from the birth of talking pictures to the start of W.W. II.  Among the films we'll discuss are The Jazz Singer, Public Enemy, Footlight Parade, The Lady Eve, City Lights, Th...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey

190/10

Research Seminar:
Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Tues. 7-10 P.M.

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers to try to r...(read more) Starr, George A.

190/11

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 5:30-7 P.M. + films W 7-10 P.M.

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will c...(read more) Bader, Julia

190/12

Research Seminar:
The Oversexed Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar

TTh 2-3:30 + films W 7-10 P.M.

Tabloid, soap opera, camp, porn, classicism, citation, stories-within-stories, films-within-films—these are some of the styles and devices that Pedro Almodovar mixes together to render a subject matter typically consisting of exorbitant and often tab...(read more) Miller, D.A.

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Sam Otter in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Otter will give out CECS (class entry codes) in class in November. There will be no ...(read more) Otter, Samuel

H195B/2

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Katherine Snyder in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Snyder will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. There wil...(read more) Snyder, Katherine

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Erotic Renaissance

MW 9:30-11

A sampling of sixteenth-century discourses of sexuality, theories of Eros, artworks and writings about the erotic in art, from Italy, France and England. The aim is to test the hypothesis of my recent research – that an “erotic revolution” transforme...(read more) Turner, James Grantham

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Readings in Chicano/Latino Narrative

F 12-3

In this graduate reading course we will survey Chican@/Latino narrative, art and some drama/film from the 1960s through more recent cultural and aesthetic formations. The seminar will open with a survey of a particularly fertile period during which t...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Judgment in Early Medieval Literature

W 11-2

Judgment--alternately or simultaneously a mental faculty, abstract entity, virtue, void, or threat--pervades medieval literature and thought. Focusing particularly (though not exclusively) on Anglo-Saxon England, in this seminar we will attempt to un...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.

203/4

Graduate Readings:
The Anglophone Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Anglophone fiction is a capacious term. Simply put, Anglophone fiction refers to fiction written in English; however, in the context of postwar canon formation, Anglophone refers specifically to literature written in English from former British colon...(read more) Jones, Donna V.

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 12:30-2

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about writing f...(read more) Chandra, Vikram

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

TTh 11-12:30

Poet Erica Hunt, writing about the “pleasure of cultural resonance” and “Black sources of a radical aesthetic” described “an aesthetics whose goals are critical, investigative, disruptive [and] which aims to wear its thinking process on its sleeve, w...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.

246D/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Renaissance (17th Century)

Tues. 3:30-6:30

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature, focusing on works by Francis Bacon, John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, Robert Herrick, Lucy Hutchinson, and Anne Halkett. We will discuss...(read more) Kahn, Victoria

246G/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Romantic Period

TTh 2-3:30

“Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal/ Large codes of fraud and woe…”. Taking these lines from Shelley’s “Mont Blanc” as a point of departure, we will read widely in literature from 1789 to 1830, considering the relation between voice and the...(read more) Langan, Celeste

246I/1

Graduate Proseminar:
American Literature to 1855

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will read widely in U.S. fiction and other narrative forms in the first half of the nineteenth century, bringing together the old and the new, the canonical and the peripheral, the long-in-print and the recently rediscovered. We wi...(read more) Otter, Samuel

250/1

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled.  ...(read more) Best, Stephen M.

250/2

Research Seminar:
The Grammar of Poetry, the Poetry of Grammar

M 11-1

I want to try a course that explores what Wittgenstein calls philosophical grammar, on the assumption that poets are the most likely characters to develop the full conceptual implications of how we deploy grammatical elements in our structuring of ex...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.

250/3

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

W 3-6

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and fo...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

250/4

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled.  ...(read more) Falci, Eric

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Monday, October 13.

BERKELEY CONNECT (previously designated "The Chernin Mentoring Program"): Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, 143D, 143N, 243A, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only lower-division students should apply for 43B; only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143D, and 143N; and only graduate students (and upper-division students with considerable writing experience) should apply for 243A and 243B.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 6. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 6, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2014 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2015 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 30 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available in the racks outside 319 Wheeler Hall. Completed applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the drop box inside 319 Wheeler Hall. Students will be emailed a course control number they will use to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.