Announcement of Classes: Spring 2015


Middle English Literature

English 112

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: Note new location: 587 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


English Drama to 1603

English 114A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

The book(s) for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and the three plays that the critics have described as "romances," Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. These are among the most brilliant, corruscating, and magical stories veer imagined into the English language, and some of the most astonishing poetry. Students will be expected to keep up with the reading. There will be discussion sections on Fridays, and the Monday/Wednesday lecture meetings will include some conversation plus some informal staging and a bit of memorization. You'll know, when you're through, the "To be or not to be" speech and the "out, out, brief candle" speech and perhaps a couple of others.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Comedy of Errors; Shakespeare, William: Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays

Description

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  Focusing on a selection of them, we’ll consider the range of Shakespeare's dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dramatic genres in which he wrote affected Shakespeare’s representation of plot and character, as well as the literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophical issues he conceptualized through plot and character.  Finally, we’ll think about Shakespeare’s plays in relation to the range of social types and classes in his mass audience. 


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Milton, John: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton

Description

Probably the most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than the rebel he was. He is also sometimes assumed to be a remote religious poet rather than an independent thinker, who distrusted any passively held faith that was not self-questioning. However, as we follow Milton’s carefully shaped career from the shorter early poems, through some of the controversial prose of the English Civil War era, and at last through the astounding work that emerged in the wake of political defeat (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes), we will discover a very different literary and political figure, known in his time as a statesman as well as a poet, and in both pursuits more an iconoclast than an icon. We will come to understand Milton’s writing in relation to the revolutions that he witnessed and took part in, and we will also think about his experiments in poetic form, his ambivalent incorporations, revisions, and expansions of classical literature and biblical texts alike, the literary dimension of his unorthodox theology, his writings on love, marriage, and divorce, his long preoccupation with vocation – and more.

Our required text will be The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton, eds. William Kerrigan, John Rumrich, and Stephen Fallon (Modern Library; ISBN-13: 978-0679642534).

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. 


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

The books for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with the first gothic horror stories. Poets reckoned with a literary market and tidal wave of printed works that threatened to render all writing mere commodities. They thematized their position as misunderstood guardians of creative spirit, sometimes of a national past, in model of the tortured poet with which we are still familiar. Women writers cannily intervened in the republic of letters, even as their public writing was seen as semi-scandalous. All helped develop a new sense of Literature with a capital “L”—not just writing but imaginative writing that might play a special role in society, from protecting classical values in a modernizing world, to promoting a standard national language and literature, to cultivating sentimental feelings for others in an increasingly anonymous society.

Authors include: David Hume, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Horace Walpole, Jane Austen, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Gray, William Collins, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Romantic Period

English 121

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Blake, W.: Blake's Poetry and Designs; Byron: Major Works; Coleridge, S. T.: Major Works; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Keats, J.: Major Works; Shelley, M.W.G.: Frankenstein; Shelley, P.B.: Major Works; Wordsworth, W.: Major Works

Description

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic writers revolutionized the concept of literature?  What is the relation between Romantic writing and the signal historical and social events of the period: the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the Napoleonic wars, the rise of finance capitalism, the dominion of “the news”?  With so much “happening” on the level of world history, why do Romantic writers sometimes turn to the past, to the provinces, to the everyday? Why, given the increased popularity of the novel, do so many writers turn to poetry-- to evoke nostalgia for the past or to forge an aesthetic avant-garde?  Through extensive reading of major poets (Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, and Keats), novelists (Godwin, Austen, Mary Shelley) and essayists (Lamb, Hazlitt, Burke, Paine) we will explore the event of Romanticism by examining literary events.  What “happens” in Romantic texts:  how do they understand origins, events, and effects?  


The Victorian Period

English 122

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Grace
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Barrett Browning, Elizabeth : Aurora Leigh; Dickens, Charles: Great Expectations; Haggard, H. Rider: She; Lord Tennyson, Alfred,: In Memoriam A. H. H.; Prince, Mary: The History of Mary Prince; Trollope, Anthony: The Warden

Description

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeois life; the investment of culture with the power to effect epochal political change and rearrange readers' sexualities; the invention of vampires, robots, serial killers, and other new forms of monstrosity; the modernization of narrative pornography; and the rejuvenation of bardic poetry. At the same time British authors were trying and failing to manage the largest empire in history, both devising new ways to dominate the world through writing and interrupting the violence that imperialism – the so-called "final phase of capitalism" – produced.

This course engages the major theoretical questions posed by Victorian literature, questions which emerge from the unprecedented global suffusion of British imperial influence. How might the enormity of this new world be meaningfully represented in language? What new accounts of personhood, ethics, sexuality, ethnicity, evolution, and art are required? Dealing with these and related questions, we will perhaps come to understand the enduring power of Victorian literature to speak to our own moment of globalization and crisis – our perennial return to the unanswered questions and open wounds of the nineteenth century.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The books for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of mind challenged old ways of knowing, of ordering society, and of interacting socially. How did experiments in fiction writing enable new ways of knowing and new ways of acting virtuously in a society in which such things were open for debate? Haunted by fiction’s connection to “lower” forms of writing, writers—many of them women--also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public print market. We shall examine their rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating their writing--appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.

Authors will include Eiza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Jane Austen.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 2
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Beckford, W.: Vathek; Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Burney, F.: Evelina; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Scott, W.: Bride of Lammermoor; Smollett, T.: Humphry Clinker

Description

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most was published anonymously and purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so strenuously disavowed their status as romances or novels, and why they disguised themselves as they did.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 


The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

English 125B

Section: 1
Instructor: Christ, Carol T.
Christ, Carol
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


The Contemporary Novel: The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Fiction

English 125E

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10
Location: 2060 Valley LSB


Book List

Diaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Egan, Jennifer: A Visit from the Goon Squad; Harding, Paul: Tinkers; Johnson, Adam: The Orphan Master's Son; McCarthy, Cormac: The Road; Strout, Elizabeth: Olive Kittredge; Tartt, Donna: The Goldfinch

Other Readings and Media

Reader.

Description

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the seven most recent (2007-2014) Pulitzer Prize-winning novels (actually, one of them is a collection of short fiction). In addition to examining narrative form and literary style, we will consider cultural and historical contexts and thematic resonances. We will discuss the trends in types of topics and styles selected for the Pultizer as well.

Note: Many of these are lengthy and/or dense novels, so start reading soon.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Porter, Carolyn
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady

Description

This course will survey major works of early twentieth-century American literature by Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Zora Neale Hurston, Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, and Frank Norris, with the goal of understating how their writings respond to the experience of modernity.   The twentieth century was marked during its first half by a string of ups and downs (many of which no doubt feel familiar to us at the dawn of the twenty-first): two wars, gilded age excess, broad economic privation, and, as W.E.B. DuBois predicted for it, a dogged “problem of the color line.”  We will explore how the modern American novel grapples with issues of moral ambiguity, anomie, belonging, and the attraction and antipathy toward blackness.  My lectures will focus on the formal concerns of point of view, frames of reference, and the representation of time, all with the goal of understanding how these authors’ experiments in the novel form produce a reality rather than reflect it.   Regarding this last, I will be keen to foreground the ways in which the modernist novel comes into its own during “the age of mechanical reproduction,” and thus often in dialogue with the emerging technologies of cinema, camera, and phonograph (not to mention television, radio, and telephone).

Two ten-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Lerner, Ben: Mean Free Path; Rankine, Claudia: Don't Let Me Be Lonely

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than cover all major figures briefly, we’ll spend extended time with the work of a few: poets considered will include Paul Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, T. S. Eliot, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, Charles Olson, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Claudia Rankine, and Ben Lerner. Along the way we’ll consider renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter, the task and materials of the long poem, seriality, citationality, who and what counts as a poetic subject, and how U.S. poetries have imagined community over and against their actual Americas. In addition to the two required books, primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a Course Reader. There will be a take-home midterm, a term paper, and a final exam.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Black Internationalism

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 101 Wheeler


Book List

Baldwin, J.: Another Country; Childress, A.: A Short Walk; DuBois, W.E.B.: Dark Princess; Hughes, L.: I Wonder as I Wander; Lorde, A.: Zami; McKay, C.: Banjo; Reed, I.: Flight to Canada; Robeson, P.: Here I Stand

Description

Throughout the twentieth century, African American authors used international travel to see beyond the limits of racial discrimination in the U.S.  Traveling abroad allowed these authors to imagine new configurations of race, gender, and class back at home.  This course will trace the vibrant, ongoing tradition of black internationalism, focusing on its often utopian undercurrents—in particular, its frequent crossing of racial and sexual hierarchies.  We will see how W.E.B. DuBois’ time in Germany bolstered his understanding that “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line.”  We will see how Langston Hughes’ Soviet travels prompted him to tie African American struggles to international socialism.  We will also explore efforts to make black internationalism more inclusive—as seen, for example, in Alice Childress’ feminist critique of Marcus Garvey’s “Back to Africa” movement.  Finally, we will explore how black internationalism enables us to articulate new understandings of race in our purportedly “post-racial” present.

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don’t buy books until after the first class.

 


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Race, [Creative] Writing, and Difference

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 130 Wheeler


Description

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing.

The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public language on one hand and personal (meaning specific) observations and experiences on the other.  The purpose of writing is not to come up with answers to the truly vexing problems of racism and economic and political disparity.  The purpose here is to pursue consciousness.  How one refers to race (one’s own as well as the races of others) is of paramount importance; the fact that there are ways in which American cultural institutions typically quantify and refer to race is of at least equal importance.

The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay.  It’s a peculiar form related to fiction and to autobiography and to poetry. 

Writing assignments: several micro-essays, two 5-7 page essays, a final of 12-14 pages.

We’ll likely read Kenji Yoshino's Covering and selections from Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family and Audre Lorde’s Zami; we’ll read essays and stories by James Baldwin, Tess Schlesinger, Richard Ford, Jean Toomer, etc.  We’ll lean on Philip Lopate’s Art of the Personal Essay.

Writing assignments will broad; that is, they will allow for a variety of responses.

This course is open to English majors only.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Writing Fiction Across Genres

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Tranter, Kirsten
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 20 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Chandler, Raymond: The Big Sleep; French, Tana: In The Woods; Miéville, China: The City and The City

Other Readings and Media

A course reader including short stories, extracts and essays will be available before the start of classes.

The required texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, located on Bancroft Way (a little west of Telegraph Avenue).

Description

This course will explore modes of creative writing in several distinct contemporary genres of fiction: crime, fantasy & SF, and romance, with the goal of learning to engage creatively with key conventions that define each genre, while developing foundational aspects of craft such as voice, characterization, dialogue, setting, conflict and plot. The division of literature into different kinds of writing is an ancient practice, yet genre conventions are not fixed and immutable rules or distinctions. Students should be prepared to read widely, with a view to exploring how authors approach genre as a set of protocols that invite engagement in creative, playful, and critical ways, from influential classics to contemporary experiments with genre boundaries. We will aim to develop a critical perspective on the place of genre fiction in general, and these genres in particular, in contemporary literary culture. Students will produce their own creative writing in different genres through regular short exercises, and will share and discuss their writing in small groups, developing tools for editing and revision. In addition to a final short story, assignments will include providing feedback on other students’ work, including one formal response paper.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing, 2138 University Ave. (between Shattuck Ave. & Walnut St.), (510) 704-9700

Description

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Students will write two short stories, a number of shorter exercises, weekly critiques of their peers’ work, and be required to attend and review two fiction readings.  The course will be organized as a workshop and attendance is mandatory. All student stories will be edited and critiqued by the instructor and by other students in the class.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Strout, E.: Best American Short Stories, 2013

Description

This course is a creative writing workshop.  Students will write 3 short exercises and 2 short stories (approximately 50 pages over the whole semester).  We will discuss the stories in the anthology as well as work produced by students in the workshop. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 8-10 (double-spaced) pages of your fiction (no poetry, drama, screenplays, or academic writing), by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Description

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry.  Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing done under extreme formal constraints.  In addition, there’ll be regular commentary on other students’ work and two instances of recitation. All readings will be drawn from a course reader.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Expository and Critical Writing : Crafting the Critical Essay

English 143D

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All assigned texts will be in a Course Reader.

Description

This course is designed to prepare and support students who are planning to write a critical research essay as part of the English major.  We will begin by discussing various kinds of literary critical essays in order to identify models and methods to support our own practice.  Through short readings and writing exercises, we will work through the stages of the literary critical project: from formulating a question, to gathering and organizing evidence, to structuring an argument, to writing clear prose, to learning the value of revision.  Much of our class time will be devoted to workshops, in which students will read and respond to each other’s work at each stage in the writing process.  By offering as well as receiving detailed feedback, students will learn how to engage productively with the challenges of producing critical work that is complex, clear, and relevant.   A twenty-page paper will be due at the semester’s end. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your essay/expository writing by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragaph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Time: W 3-6
Location: 106 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

No texts.

Description

Like & Love: an upper-division creative nonfiction writing workshop, open to continuing undergraduate and graduate students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three literary nonfiction 5-10 page pieces. Each will take as point of departure the words and emotions like or love. What’s liked or loved (or not) and so described may include people, places, things. Each week, students will also turn in one-page critiques of the two or three student pieces being work-shopped as well as a 1-page journal entry on prompts assigned (these entries may be used as part of the longer pieces). Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques:  60-70. Class attendance required.

Note: Students accepted to this fall's English 243N, which had to be cancelled at the last minute, are welcome to enroll in this class; please apply electronically as usual, but you can consider yourself admitted.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 pages of your creative nonfiction or fiction by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Special Topics: American Modernism

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Description

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a range of responses to such events as World War I and the Great Migration, while also reflecting on some of the subtler transformations that made everyday life in these decades feel "modern." Our readings will be accompanied by a look at the period's visual culture, including painting, photography, and film. Texts by William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot, and more.

This class is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Fathers and Sons

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Isenberg, Steven
Isenberg, Steven
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Ackerley, J. R.: My Father and Myself; Amis, Martin: Experience; Buckley, Christopher: Losing Mum and Pup; Gosse, Edmund: Father and Son; Miller, Arthur: Death of a Salesman; Morrison, Blake: And When Did You Last See Your Father?; Roth, Philip: Patrimony; Turgenev, Ivan: Fathers and Sons; Waugh, Alexander: Fathers and Sons; Wolff, Tobias: A Boy's Life

Description

We will explore the burdens and blessings, affections and alienation of the father-son relationship through the novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and a play by American, British, and Russian writers.

Their works take us to how sons look back on the ways and means of how they achieved their course and identity, and the centrality of their father. In doing so, matters of married life, family structure and dynamics, religious belief, politics, sexuality, professional careers, and education all come to the fore.

At the center of our readings, from childhood to the death of the father, are some of the strongest forces that shape lives and destinies, and reveal the deepest emotions, and these memories, deliberations, testimony and imaginings have given us compelling literature.

There will be four six- to eight-page essays required, which will comprise 80% of the class grade. 20% will take into account class participation. There will be no final exam.

 


Special Topics: Scotland and Romanticism

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Book List

Burns, Robert : Selected Poems and Songs; Hogg, James: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Johnson, Samuel and Boswell, James: Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland and Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides; Momus: The Book of Scotlands; Scott, Walter: Rob Roy; Smollett, Tobias: Humphry Clinker; Stevenson, Robert Louis: Kidnapped; Stevenson, Robert Louis: The Master of Ballantrae; Wordsworth, Dorothy: Recollections of a Tour Made in Scotland

Other Readings and Media

A course reader featuring additional readings by James Macpherson, Margaret Oliphant, and others.

Description

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms for cultural movements and historical periods that were invented later): social history, anthropology, political economy, the indigenous epic, the poetry of popular life, and the historical novel. Scotland also became a notable place within the symbolic geography of Romanticism – a site of lost worlds of tradition and allegiance, of ghosts and heroes – an imaginary role it still holds today: although debates around the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence have drawn sparingly on the nostalgic appeal of Romantic Scotland, to the surprise of some. Our course will consider the production of Romanticism by Scottish writers and institutions as well as its consumption in tourist itineraries and media fantasies. We will discuss the problem that Scotland poses for the definition of Romanticism: on one hand, it's the original Romantic nation, and on the other (according to the critical orthodoxy of the past sixty years) it's the locus of an untimely, inauthentic or pathological Romanticism. We will read works from the key Scottish innovations in poetry and fiction (James Macpherson's "Poems of Ossian"; Robert Burns and the vernacular poetry revival; Walter Scott, James Hogg, and historical fiction) in the long eighteenth century; consider the versions of Scotland discovered (and constructed) by English literary visitors (Samuel Johnson, William and Dorothy Wordsworth); and we will look at the legacy of Romantic Scotland in the current rethinking of Scotland’s status within the British state, in Victorian and contemporary Scottish fiction, poetry and critical writing.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Special Topics: Literature in the Century of Film

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 126 Barrows


Description

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts that are concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays which not only help us better understand the social implications of media technologies, but also show how literature itself tries to understand its new place as one medium among many. The class will consider such topics as the status of reading in a culture of looking, the politics of the extremely popular, celebrity as a way of life, and the commercial origins of the modern work of art. Of particular interest will be texts that address directly the mythology of Hollywood, as well as writers who borrow liberally from film technique as an aesthetic resource.


Special Topics: The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Naiman, Eric
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Nabokov, V.: Laughter in the Dark; Nabokov, V.: Lolita; Nabokov, V.: Pnin; Nabokov, V.: The Gift; Nabokov, V.: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight

Description

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beginning with several short stories, we will examine some of the fiction of his European period, before turning our attention to Lolita and Pnin. Competing interpretations of Nabokov will be considered, but our emphasis will be on metafiction, the theme of perversity and Nabokov's cultivation of a perverse reader.

"Curiously enough, one cannot read a book: one can only reread it." Students should expect to devote a considerable amount of time to reading and rereading and should come to class prepared to discuss the assigned texts. Participants in the class should anticipate reading (and then, in a perfect world, curiously rereading) 150 pages per week. Written work will consist of two papers (5 to 10 pages) on topics to be chosen in consultation with the professor. Penalties will be assessed for late papers. There will be a midterm and a final examination.

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 134F.


Literature and History: The Seventies

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 205 Dwinelle


Book List

Didion, Joan: The Book of Common Prayer; Herr, Michael: Dispatches; Kingston, Maxine Hong: The Woman Warrior; LeGuin, Ursula K.: The Dispossessed; Roth, Philip: The Ghost Writer

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the novels and nonfiction listed above, we will be examining a number of films, such as Medium Cool, The Godfather, Taxi Driver, and Saturday Night Fever.

Description

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. "The '70s" routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when "it seemed like nothing happened."

Yet we can see now that the decade of the '70s was two things at once. On the one hand, it was a time of cultural renaissance—the era that sponsored the New Hollywood of Scorcese, Coppola, et al.; the music of funk, disco, punk and New Wave; the postmodern theater of Saturday Night Live, Sam Shepard and others; the sci-fi boom represented by Ursula LeGuin, Samuel Delany and others; and the quite variously innovative fictions of Philip Roth, Maxine Hong Kingston, Walter Abish, and so many more. On the other hand, it was a period of intense political realignments—for instance, the shock of the oil crisis; the fall of Nixon and the fall of Saigon; the advent of women's liberation, gay liberation, and environmentalism as mass grassroots movements; the rise of the Sunbelt and the dawning of the conservative revolution. One might even say that the '70s were the most interesting decade of the post-WWII era: the period when the dreams of the '60s were most intensely, if achingly, fulfilled.

It may also be the decade closest to our own contemporary moment. In this class, we will consider how the roots of our current predicament lie in the earlier decade--with its uncertainty about the oil supply, its stagnant economy, its alarm at Islamic fundamentalism, its fetish for self-fulfillment, its reality TV and its fascination with the appeal of instant and often empty celebrity. We will, in turn, reflect on how Americans in the '70s struggled with many of the dilemmas that we face now.


Literature and Popular Culture

English 176

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Literature and Linguistics

English 179

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Book List

Heaney, Seamus: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation: Bilingual Edition; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%200%205%200%200%200%200%200%200%200%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-unhide%3Ano%3B%0A%09mso-style-qformat%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%7D%0A.MsoChpDefault%0A%09%7Bmso-style-type%3Aexport-only%3B%0A%09mso-default-props%3Ayes%3B%0A%09font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-ansi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-language%3AJA%3B%7D%0A%40page%20WordSection1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.WordSection1%0A%09%7Bpage%3AWordSection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E--> A reader containing most required articles and literary texts will be available from University Copy.  Core articles included in it are by Roman Jakobson, Paul Kiparsky and Ann Banfield; core English literary texts are by Shakespeare, Bob Dylan, Dylan Thomas, W.B. Yeats, Robert Pinsky, William Blake and Walt Whitman; and other languages represented in it include French, Italian, Chinese, Finnish, Galician and Garifuna.

Description

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%200%205%200%200%200%200%200%200%200%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-unhide%3Ano%3B%0A%09mso-style-qformat%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%7D%0A.MsoChpDefault%0A%09%7Bmso-style-type%3Aexport-only%3B%0A%09mso-default-props%3Ayes%3B%0A%09font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-ansi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-language%3AJA%3B%7D%0A%40page%20WordSection1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.WordSection1%0A%09%7Bpage%3AWordSection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E-->

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through exploration of whether and if so how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and alliteration; syntactic parallelism; formulas of oral composition; and special narrative uses of pronouns, tenses and other subjective features of language to express point of view and represent speech and thought.  The emphasis will be on literature in English, but comparisons with literature in other languages will also be drawn.  No knowledge of linguistics will be presupposed, but linguistic concepts will be introduced, explained and used.


Autobiography: Disability Memoir

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 141 Giannini


Book List

Bauby, J.-D.: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly; Cheney, T.: Manic: A Memoir; Danquah, M.: Willow Weep for Me; Galloway, T.: Mean Little Deaf Queer; Guest, P.: One More Theory About Happiness; Hathaway, K.: The Little Locksmith; Keller, H.: The World I Live In; Kingsley, J. and Levitz, M.: Count Us In; Laborit, E.: The Cry of the Gull; Simon, R. : Riding the Bus with My Sister

Description

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists however, often criticize these texts for the ways they can reinforce the notion that disability is a personal tragedy that must be overcome through superhuman effort rather than a set of cultural conditions that could be changed to improve the lives of many individuals with similar impairments. Are these texts agents for social change or just another form of freak show? This course will examine a diverse range of disability memoirs to develop an understanding of autobiography as a literary form.    

 


The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing, 2138 University Avenue, Berkeley.

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                                                                  -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artefacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty – how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories.  So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


The Novel: The Novel as a Literary Genre

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: Note new time: MW 2:30-4
Location: Note new location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Eliot, George: Middlemarch; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady; Robbe-Grillet: Jealousy; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Description

Henry James, writing in 1888, describes his cultural moment as a time of remarkable transformation in the production and reception of the English language novel.  At the beginning of the century, James observes, “there was a comfortable, good-humoured feeling abroad that a novel is a novel, as a pudding is a pudding, and that our only business with it could be to swallow it.”  But in the wake of Dickens and Thackeray, and propelled by George Eliot, the English novel has taken on, James believes, a new seriousness as a literary form.  The novel now has, he declares, a “theory, a conviction, a consciousness of itself behind it.”

This course explores the relation between the novel’s developing self-consciousness as a literary form and the theories of the novel that help provide the terms for generic description.  Our study moves in reverse chronological order: by beginning with twentieth-century novelists and theorists, we can better appreciate the nineteenth-century realist project as a distinctive aesthetic practice and type of cultural work.

Our study of the novel will focus on Jealousy, by Robbe-Grillet; To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf; The Portrait of a Lady, by Henry James; Middlemarch, by George Eliot; and Bleak House, by Charles Dickens.  A course reader includes theoretical readings from Auerbach, Lukács, Bakhtin, Moretti, Williams, Watt, Trilling, Lanser, Cohn, Robbe-Grillet and others. 

 


Science Fiction

English 180Z

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 102 Wurster


Book List

Dick, Philip K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Hoffman, E.T.A.: The Sandman; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Strugatsky , Arkady and Boris: Roadside Picnic; Wells, H.G.: The Island of Doctor Moreau; Whitehead, Colson: Zone One

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature's encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation lie the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of 'being', a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. You may of course bring others.


Research Seminar: The Temporality of Faulkner's Novels

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom!; Faulkner, W.: As I Lay Dying; Faulkner, W.: Light in August; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Toomer, Jean: Cane; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader available from Odin Readers.

Description

Jean-Paul Sartre has famously compared Faulkner’s sense of time to “a man sitting in a convertible and looking back.”  From this perspective, Sartre contends, the only view is that of the past, made “hard, clear and immutable” in its isolation.  Yet if Faulkner writes with a gaze fixed on the Southern past, his historical consciousness has been shaped by the experience of time in the modern moment—an idea Sartre nicely conveys through the figure of the convertible ride.

This seminar explores the complex registers of time in Faulkner’s major novels.  Special attention is given to the relationship between the social experience of time represented in Faulkner’s story worlds and the readerly experience of narrative time created through Faulkner’s innovative handling of narrative.  To gain a better sense of the literary models that influenced Faulkner, we will also read a few key works by other modernist writers. 

A course reader will include essays by thinkers who helped to shape the modern understanding of time.  Students will be guided through the planning and execution of a fifteen-page paper, due at the end of the term.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Metamorphosis, Monsters, and the Supernatural Everyday

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Danner, Mark
Time: M 3-6
Location: 103 Wheeler


Description

We dream of becoming something other than what we are. To be human is to be in love with transformation. That love of becoming something other, of transforming ourselves from one thing to another, infuses our literature since the first artists took up ochre and charcoal to sketch out a half-man, half-beast on a cave wall. In this seminar we will try to grasp and analyze this urge to transform, metamorphose and transcend, from prehistory to the gaudy metamorphoses of Ovid and Apuleius to the elaborate composite creatures of the medieval and fairy tale bestiary and up through the monsters and misbegottens that populate the Victorian mind (Mary Shelley’s New Prometheus, Stevenson's Mr. Hyde, Stoker's Count Dracula, Wilde's Dorian Gray). Armed with this history, we will take a new look at the teeming ranks of batmen, werewolves, vampires, and X-men that crowd our contemporary popular imagination.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Clsases for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Gardezi, Nilofar
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 190 was canceled (1/14/15).

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Materialism--Ancient and Modern

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Byron: Don Juan; Homer: The Iliad ; Lucretius: The Nature of Things; Melville: Moby-Dick, or The Whale; Weil: The Iliad or The Poem of Force

Description

“As human beings we inhabit an ineluctably material world. We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions and on pitiless cosmic motions, on the material artifacts and natural stuff that populate our environment, as well as on socioeconomic structures that produce and reproduce the conditions of our everyday life. In light of this massive materiality, how could we be anything other than materialist?” So write the editors of a recent collection of essays on New Materialisms (2010). The aim of this seminar is to consider how four monumental literary texts, ancient and modern, reckon with “this massive materiality.” For our purpose, “ancient” means Homer (The Iliad) and Lucretius (The Nature of Things), and “modern” means the nineteenth century: Byron’s comic masterpiece Don Juan and Melville’s anything-but-comical Moby-Dick. Concentrating on these four texts will allow us to examine the possibility of an epic materialism, one that—in the absence of spiritual, divine, or metaphysical principles—minimizes human mastery and instead strives to convey a comprehensive range of worldly forces: bodily, physical, environmental, technical, economic, and political. Some through-lines in our seminar will be: violence (and especially war) as an all-encompassing material condition; the role of empirical observation and description in rendering the material world; the materiality of the literary object, itself subject to copying, piracy, deterioration, and repurposing. As time permits, we will also raise questions about the “new materialisms” in criticism and philosophy, reading essays by Weil, Althusser, Greenblatt, Harman, Bennett, and Morton, among others. Why has materialism become so appealing to recent thinkers? How do these “new materialisms” open windows onto past texts? Perhaps more importantly: can these older texts speak back, altering the way we view current trends?

In addition to informal assignments throughout the semester, students will produce 20 pages of writing, divided into two or three essays, including the option of a longer research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature and Revolution

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, C.: A Tale of Two Cities; Hedges, C.: Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt; Malraux, A.: Man's Fate; Marx, K.: The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte; Orwell, G.: Homage to Catalonia; Platonov, A.: The Foundation Pit; Serge, V.: Conquered City; Stoppard, T.: The Coast of Utopia

Other Readings and Media

Films:  October: Ten Days that Shook the World; The Square

Description

This course will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Our starting point will be the French Revolution, our ending point will be the Arab Spring, but our primary focus will be the troubled, international history of twentieth-century communism.  Throughout the semester, we will trace how literary texts allow for multiple ways of theorizing revolution and, more broadly, the flow of history.  How do these texts help us to understand the tendency for revolutionary illusions to give way to disillusion?  How do revolutions both expand and limit creative possibilities?  What does revolution mean in the twenty-first century—long after communism’s collapse and the supposed “end of history”?

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don’t buy books until after the first class.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Toni Morrison

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new location: 122 Wheeler


Book List

Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: Jazz; Morrison, Toni: Love; Morrison, Toni: Paradise; Morrison, Toni: Song of Solomon; Morrison, Toni: Sula; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye

Description

We will read as many of Toni Morrison’s novels as we can in the time we have. Most class meetings will be organized around discussion of the assigned daily reading, though I will intrude with brief lectures when I feel that doing so will help the discussion along. We will address whatever the members of the group feel to be interesting or important, but I will try to keep us attentive to the question of the development of Morrison's art over the course of her career, to the ways in which her writing recurs to certain basic issues and questions, but does so in a way that is constantly innovating, to her writing as a dialogue between recursive and progressive movement. Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion, with occasional brief (less than a page) writing assignments to facilitate discussion.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Shakespeare’s Versification

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This course will explore Shakespeare's artistic use of the formal resources of verse, especially meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism, as well as, by way of contrast, some of his use of music.  We will consider what defines these forms; how they vary across lyric, narrative and dramatic genres; where they come from and how they develop; how they shape performance; and most of all, what they contribute to the emotional power and beauty of his works.  In the past, the course has focused on the Sonnets, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Richard II, Hamlet and The Winter's Tale, but that could change.

The course is a research seminar, so various short papers and oral presentations will be required, all in the service of one long paper exploring some aspect of Shakespeare's works of the student's own choosing through attention to his verse.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mass Entertainment in Classical Hollywood Film

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new location: 106 Dwinelle


Description

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in Hollywood from the birth of talking pictures to the start of W.W. II.  Among the films we'll discuss are The Jazz Singer, Public EnemyFootlight Parade, The Lady Eve, City Lights, The WesternerSnow White and the Seven DwarfsHis Girl Friday, Meet John Doe, and Citizen Kane.  

Most of these movies are available for rent or purchase from iTunes or Amazon Instant Video.  You may view all of them for free at the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.  The only required text will be a Course Reader.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 7-10 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: The Handmaid's Tale; Bellamy, Edward: Looking Backward 2000-1887; Dick, Philip K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Gilman, Charlotte P.: Herland; Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; More, Thomas: Utopia; Morris, William: News from Nowhere; Orwell, George: 1984; Wells, Herbert G.: Three Prophetic Novels; Zamyatin, Yevgeny: We

Description

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers to try to realize the ideal society, most of it has had limited practical impact, yet has managed to provoke readers in various ways--for instance, as a kind of imaginative fiction that comments on "things as they are" indirectly yet effectively, with fantasy and satire in varying doses. Among the critical questions posed by such material are the problematic status of fiction that is not primarily mimetic, but written in the service of some ulterior purpose; the shifting relationships between what is and what authors think might be or ought to be; how to create the new and strange other than by recombining the old and familiar; and so on. Some films (dystopian rather than utopian) will be included in the syllabus and discussed (although probably not shown) in class.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wai-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M. + films W 7-10 P.M.
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Deutelbaum, M. and Pogue, L., eds.: A Hitchcock Reader; Modieski, T.: The Women Who Knew Too Much

Description

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will consider socio-cultural backgrounds, gender problems, and psychological and Marxist readings as well as star studies.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Oversexed Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Time: TTh 2-3:30 + films W 7-10 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Williams, Tennessee: A Streetcar Named Desire

Other Readings and Media

Film texts by Pedro Almodóvar:  All About My Mother; Bad Education; Broken Embraces; The Flower of My Secret; Law of Desire; Pepi, Luci, Bom; The Skin I Live In; Talk to Her; Volver; Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Intertexts for Pedro Almodóvar:  Luis Buñuel, Viridiana; John Cassavetes, Opening Night; Georges Franju, Eyes without a Face; Mel Gibson, The Passion of the Christ; Rainer Werner Fassbinder, The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant; Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo; Joseph Mankiewicz, All About Eve; Roberto Rosselini, Voyage to Italy

Description

Tabloid, soap opera, camp, porn, classicism, citation, stories-within-stories, films-within-films—these are some of the styles and devices that Pedro Almodovar mixes together to render a subject matter typically consisting of exorbitant and often taboo sexual compulsion. The course will ask students to reflect on the interrelation between a heterogeneous form and the aberrancy of desire, and between highly plot-propelled stories and erotic drivenness.

Seminar members are required to write weekly response papers in addition to a final paper.  A willingness to participate in class discussion is also a must.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Sam Otter in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Otter will give out CECS (class entry codes) in class in November.

There will be no texts for this course.

 


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Katherine Snyder in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Snyder will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

There will be no texts for this course.