Announcement of Classes: Spring 2015


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Graduate Readings: Erotic Renaissance

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: MW 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Aretino, Pietro: Dialogues (Ragionamenti); Labé, Louise: Complete Works; Vignali, Antonio: La Cazzaria (The Book of the Prick); d'Aragona, Tullia: Dialogue on the Infinity of Love

Description

A sampling of sixteenth-century discourses of sexuality, theories of Eros, artworks and writings about the erotic in art, from Italy, France and England. The aim is to test the hypothesis of my recent research – that an “erotic revolution” transformed Italian art and art writing – and to explore how far it applies to other literatures. For a brief period, after 1500 and before the Counter-Reformation, arousal could be interpreted as a positive experience that yielded new ways of seeing and producing art, at the center rather than the margins of the culture. Some of the texts we will read are openly libertine or obscenely explicit, others develop the amorous sonnet and the philosophical love-treatise in more elevated language, but all manifest the “corporeal turn” away from strict Petrarchanism and Neoplatonism. Authors include Pietro Aretino, Marsilio Ficino, Antonio Vignali, Baldessare Castiglione, Tullia d’Aragona, Veronica Franca, François Rabelais, Louise Labé, Michel de Montaigne, Pierre de Brantôme, Philip Sidney, Thomas Nashe, John Donne and William Shakespeare.

The first half of the semester will focus on art and writing in Italy, typified by the range of Aretino’s letters, poems and dialogues – from high aesthetics to (literal) pornography. The emphasis will be on primary texts and images, but to frame the conversation I will also designate passages from my recently completed book manuscript Eros Visible, which I describe as “a broad, synthetic history of this ‘sex-positive’ phase of the Renaissance, when lascivious became a neutral or endearing term, when sculpture was valued for ‘filling every viewer’s mind with libido’ (Aretino) and beauty was discovered in earthly rather than ‘celestial’ love. Even more than beauty artists strove for the living quality of the image, ‘awakening’ and reanimating the Classical models they studied, and erotic response was the best guarantee of vitality. In this stimulating moment artists’ discoveries and writers’ ideas fed each other. Patrons and critics who valued ‘profane’ Eros more highly also encouraged sensuous intensity and sexual subject-matter. Recovering libertine art is only one element in this revolution, however. I explore the increasing emphasis on erotic passion in Renaissance art theory, which challenged artists to depict states of intense feeling and to evolve sensuous techniques that ‘melt’ or ‘penetrate’ the viewer likewise. My subject is not so much sex in the explicit sense as Eros in general – the evocation of desire in and for art.”

All texts will be taught in English, with originals in Italian or French on hand. 203-series courses are designed as exploratory “proseminars” or “readings” and may be taken by specialists and non-specialists, either as a survey (with paper topics on core texts or images from the syllabus) or as a research seminar. Course materials will mostly be available in electronic form for download, and include high-resolution images of the erotic engraving series I Modi and The Loves of the Gods, together with paintings by Titian, Parmigianino, Bronzino and Michelangelo. Extensive listings of secondary reading will be available, including the full text of Eros Visible, which can be mined electronically for figures and bibliographic references.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Readings in Chicano/Latino Narrative

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: F 12-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

In this graduate reading course we will survey Chican@/Latino narrative, art and some drama/film from the 1960s through more recent cultural and aesthetic formations.

The seminar will open with a survey of a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano/Latina communities that led to publication/performance of politically spirited and unifying poetry, art, novels and documentary film. Needless to say, we will be touching on the cultural production of many Latin@ communities: Mexican/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican, Dominicano, Cubano,

­We will think about the convergence of a political aesthetic in the work of these novelists, poets, painters/sculptors, filmmakers, and we will try to account for the contrasts and connections with the wider spheres of art and politics that influenced their work.  To help situate and ground our thinking, we will outline the historical and political backgrounds of this period and press these up against a cultural  subjectivity that articulated resistance to the U.S. hegemony just as it often restated the patriarchal, homophobic, and nationalist /identitarian problematic that confronted the Chican@/Latin@ community in the first place. We will think about social and political content, of course, but I also want to look at the formation of a distinct aesthetic experiment with language and form/genre and audience.

Although I haven’t yet fully decided on the book list, we will definitely be reading Tomas Rivera  (y no se lo trago la tierra/and the earth did not devour him), Oscar Zeta Acosta (The Revolt of the Cockroach People), Ana Castillo (So Far From God and selected essays), Gloria Anzaldua (Borderlands/La Frontera),  Julia Alvarez (In the Time of the Butterflies), Juno Diaz (The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao, maybe That’s the Way you Lose Her), Sandra Cisneros (Woman Hollering Creek, maybe Caramelo), maybe Salvador Plascencia (The People of Paper), and then we will read selections from the poetry, drama, prose of writers like Alurista,  Sandra María Esteves,  Lorna Dee Cervantez, Gary Soto, Tato Laviera, Miguel Pinero, Josefina López,  Gustavo Pérez-Firmat.  I hope also to look at and discuss the Chican@/Latin@ art scene in New York and Los Angeles.

Serious question:  Who and what am I leaving out?  If you are thinking about taking this class, please feel free to contact me at gpadilla@berkeley.edu if you have suggestions, questions, or ideas for other figures of study we should consider.

Most of the readings are in English and/or in translation.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Judgment in Early Medieval Literature

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: W 11-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Arendt, Hannah: Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy; Kant, Immanuel: Critique of Judgment;

Recommended: Hall, J.R. Clark: A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary

Other Readings and Media

A photocopied course pack.

Description

Judgment--alternately or simultaneously a mental faculty, abstract entity, virtue, void, or threat--pervades medieval literature and thought. Focusing particularly (though not exclusively) on Anglo-Saxon England, in this seminar we will attempt to understand judgment's varied forms in the early Middle Ages, and will work toward developing a critical discourse adequate to the topic and period. Our investigations will include aesthetic judgment; wisdom and ideas of kingship; hermeneutics; and judgment’s role in joining the individual and the communal. We will be reading modern critical and philosophical works alongside medieval ones; primary texts will include Juliana; Daniel; the Solomon and Saturn and Soul and Body dialogues; Maxims I; Judgment Day poems in Old English and Latin, including Christ III; and the Fonthill Letter. Work for the course will entail in-class translation, as well as presentations and a final conference-length paper.

Prerequisite: strong reading knowledge of Old English.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: The Anglophone Novel

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Rhys , Jean: Voyage in the Dark ; Beukes, Lauren: Zoo City; Ghosh, Amitav: Calcutta Chromosome; Kincaid, Jamaica: Lucy; Lamming, George: In The Castle Of My Skin; Saro-Wiwa, Ken: Sozaboy: A Novel Written In Rotten English; Tutuola, Amos: My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts; Welsh, Irvine: Trainspotting

Description

Anglophone fiction is a capacious term. Simply put, Anglophone fiction refers to fiction written in English; however, in the context of postwar canon formation, Anglophone refers specifically to literature written in English from former British colonies (excluding the United States)— known at one point by the anodyne term Commonwealth literature. This course will trace the changing definition of Anglophone fiction from Commonwealth literature to contemporary designations of “global” or “world literature”, and “planetary fiction”. In addition to our novels, we will read a selection of critical works from the fields of world literature, translation theory, and speculative fiction. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Egan, Jennifer: The Best American Short Stories, 2014

Description

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about writing from various sources. Students will write and revise at least 40 pages of fiction over the course of the semester.

Undergraduates are welcome to apply.  Class attendance is mandatory.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

NourbeSe Philip, M.: Zong!; Ondaatje, Michael: Collected Works of Billy the Kid; Taylor, Catherine: Apart

Description

Poet Erica Hunt, writing about the “pleasure of cultural resonance” and “Black sources of a radical aesthetic” described “an aesthetics whose goals are critical, investigative, disruptive [and] which aims to wear its thinking process on its sleeve, where method is performative and material.”  This spring I’d like for us to think about and respond to ideas about mixture and source and resurgence; I’d like for us to think about poetry as an investigative process, but one not separated from the visionary, not cut off from song or from particular obsession.  The idea is for our work as poets to interact some with material from worlds—technical, gossipy, historical, music-based, visual, sociological, etc.—beyond the familiar page in the anthology.  The idea will be, simply, for us to actively explore the sources of our various interests. 

My interest is in opening things up rather than excluding.  Projects that are creative and have vista (to paraphrase poet Walt Whitman), even if they do not seem to fit exactly the description above, are welcome. 

Weekly writing deadlines, field trips, public performance.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Graduate Proseminar: Renaissance (17th Century)

English 246D

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Bacon, Francis: Essays; Donne, John: Poems; Herbert, George: Poems; Hobbes, Thomas: Leviathan; Jonson, Ben: Poems; Marvell, Andrew: Poems; Milton, John: Political Writings

Description

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature, focusing on works by Francis Bacon, John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, Robert Herrick, Lucy Hutchinson, and Anne Halkett. We will discuss the relationship between literature and the court of James I, the explosion of pamphlet literature during the English civil war, the controversy over gender roles, the texts surrounding the regicide of Charles I, and the political, religious, and sexual radicalism of dissenting literary culture. We will also take up the question of the different ways in which Renaissance humanism and the literary culture of the Reformation contributed to the flowering of vernacular literature in seventeenth-century England, and will read widely in recent and not-so-recent secondary literature.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Proseminar: Romantic Period

English 246G

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Blake, W.: Complete Poetry and Prose; Burke, E.: Reflections on the Revolution in France; Byron: Major Works; Clare, J.: Later Poems; Coleridge, S.T.: Major Works; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Keats, J.: Major Works; Shelley, M.W.G.: The Last Man; Shelley, P.B.: Major Works; Wordsworth, W.: Major Works

Description

“Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal/ Large codes of fraud and woe…”.

Taking these lines from Shelley’s “Mont Blanc” as a point of departure, we will read widely in literature from 1789 to 1830, considering the relation between voice and the law broadly conceived. Against the background of the treason trials and Gagging Acts of the 1790s and similarly repressive measures after the end of the Napoleonic wars, we will read novels, poems, dramas, and journalism in which formal and informal laws (“natural” law, the death penalty, the marriage contract, vagrancy, slavery and other forms of “property” law; also genre, meter, grammar, and social rules and conventions) are represented and contested. But we will also pay particular attention to voice as it’s conceived in complex relation to “codes.” (Secondary reading may include essays by Benjamin, Butler, Derrida, Foucault, Lacan, Rancière, and Schmitt.)

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) or Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Proseminar: American Literature to 1855

English 246I

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Bird, Robert Montgomery: Sheppard Lee; Brown, William Wells: Clotel; or, the President's Daughter; Cooper, James Fenimore: The Crater; Crafts, Hannah: The Bondwoman's Narrative; Fuller, Margaret: Woman in the Nineteenth Century; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: Blithedale Romance; Howe, Julia Ward: The Hermaphrodite; Judd, Sylvester: Margaret; Melville, Herman: Pierre; Poe, Edgar Allan: Fall of the House of Usher and Other Writings ; Prince, Mary: The History of Mary Prince; Sedgwick, Catharine Maria: The Linwoods; Simms, William Gilmore: The Partisan; Stoddard, Elizabeth: The Morgesons; Sweat, Margaret Jane Mussey: Ethel's Love Life; Thompson, John: The Life of John Thompson

Other Readings and Media

Course reader including criticism, short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe, and Robert Reed's The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict

Description

In this course, we will read widely in U.S. fiction and other narrative forms in the first half of the nineteenth century, bringing together the old and the new, the canonical and the peripheral, the long-in-print and the recently rediscovered. We will seek to take stock of the differences that such combinations and reorientations make for our understanding of literary studies. In addition, we will read a range of criticism dealing with the texts and with topics established and emerging. 

This course satisfies the Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.

 


Research Seminar: The Grammar of Poetry, the Poetry of Grammar

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: M 11-1
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Ashbery, John: Collected Poems; Bergson, Henri: Time and Free Will; Heidegger, Martin: Introduction to Metaphysics; Husserl, Edmund: Cartesian Meditations; O'Brien, Geoffrey: Sunday in the Park; Robertson, Lisa: The Weather; Shakespeare, William: Sonnets; Stevens , Wallace: Collected Poetry and Prose; Wittgenstein, Ludwig: Philosophical Investigations; Yeats, William Butler: Collected Poems

Other Readings and Media

There will be a lot of material on bcourses.

Description

I want to try a course that explores what Wittgenstein calls philosophical grammar, on the assumption that poets are the most likely characters to develop the full conceptual implications of how we deploy grammatical elements in our structuring of experience.  I have been trying to teach myself linguistics so that I can steer students within its resources.  But the focus of this class will be on how poetic structures define relational possibilities for understanding how we can make significant relationships between language and the world.  Let me give a few examples.  We will read Heidegger’s Introduction to Metaphysics and Bergson’s Time and Free Will, then do one or two classes on the ontological differences between poems relying on “is” and poems relying on “as.”  We will read Wittgenstein to flesh out how “now” introduces subjectivity into the world and can carry exclamatory force.  We will discuss deictics like “here” and “this” under the influence of Lisa Robertson’s work in The Weather.  We will read Husserl in relation to prepositions stressing modes of orienting ourselves toward the world.  ETC.

Students will participate in the course in two ways.  Small groups of students will lead discussions on poems that afford particularly interesting applications of the grammatical form we are discussing.  Or students can write poems which we will discuss for their grammatical impact.  Final papers can concentrate on one poet or one grammatical figure or compare and contrast poets and/or grammatical figures.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) or Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: note new location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Bechdel, Alison: Are You My Mother?; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Cunningham, Michael: The Hours; Foucault, Michel: The History of Sexuality; Freud, Sigmund: Dora; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Stein, Gertrude: The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Toibin, Colin: The Master; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando

Other Readings and Media

Electronic files of critical essays,book chapters, and poetry will be available on bCourses; we will also screen several films.

Description

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and forth across a century (from Oscar Wilde to Alison Bechdel) to stage a series of encounters between the aesthetic practices of modernism and the discourses of queer theory.  As wemap the shifting contours of some key terms (“queer,” “trans,” “modernism”), we will pause to consider (among other things) the mobile dimensions of queer time and space; the historical migration of concepts such as hysteria, inversion, abjection, and shame; the mutual implication of race, gender, and sexuality (from the Harlem Renaissance through the rise of European fascism); the formal attributes of the closet; the legibility of transsexual/transgender bodies; the composition of affective histories; and contemporary queer revisions of modernist fiction. To complement (and complicate) the chronological axis of this inquiry, we will also attend to the metropolitan spaces in which sexual boundaries blurred and subcultures thrived, especially the three urban sites central to the modernist experiment: London, New York, and Paris.  A 20-25 page research paper will be due at the end of the semester.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.
 


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TBA
Location: TBA


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 20. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.