Announcement of Classes: Spring 2015


Reading and Composition: Space, Time, and Narrative in Post-1945 Literature

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Dimitriou, Aristides
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Adiga, Aravind: The White Tiger; Amis, Martin: Time's Arrow; Calvino, Italo: If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; Delany, Samuel R.: Babel-17/Empire Star; Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers, 7th Edition; Plascencia, Salvador: The People of Paper

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings may include short pieces by Virginia Woolf, Octavia Butler, Ursula K. Le Guin, Cecile Pineda, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Description

How does narrative register and reconfigure the coordinates of space and time? How may a literary model of space and time suggest a particular conception of history? What, then, does this concept of history indicate about the logic of “progress” and the field of power in which issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality are played out? In this class, we will explore these questions, while reading texts that allow us to travel backwards through time, decipher the secret contents of a weaponized language, deliver an urgent message across distant galaxies, meet people made of paper, and chat with a homicidal, business-savvy entrepreneur.

It is no coincidence that most of the texts assigned in this course call attention to the processes by which they are crafted; after all, our primary goal in this class will be to develop critical skills for effective argumentative writing. We will, therefore, concentrate on the development of our own rhetorical techniques alongside those that we read, analyze, and discuss. After a brief diagnostic essay, students will produce several papers of increasing length over the course of the semester. These papers will be developed through a gradual process of outlining, drafting, editing, and revising. Additionally, each student will give a brief presentation from our writing handbook on either common mistakes of grammar, style, mechanics, and usage or elements of argumentation and paper-writing.


Reading and Composition: Innocence

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Ding, Katherine
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Blake, William: Songs of Innocence and Experience; Coetzee, J.M: Disgrace; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Mizayaki, Hayao: The Wind Rises (2013 film); Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Russell, Mary Doria: The Sparrow; Shakespeare, William: Othello; de Toro, Guillermo: Pan's Labyrinth (2004 film)

Other Readings and Media

Gerard Manley Hopkins, "Spring and Fall"; Fyodor Dostoyevsky, "The Grand Inquitor" (excerpt from The Brothers Karamazov); additional selections in course reader tba

Description

What does it mean to be innocent? Is innocence simply the lack of knowledge, or the absence of experience—an immature state that is inevitably lost upon self-reflection and understanding? How do those conceptions of innocence relate to the judicial definition of “not guilty” and not thus not culpable?

What does innocence do to us? How do we read it, evaluate it, respond to it? Why does it seem both so problematic and so alluring? How is innocence leveraged and put to use by others (or by oneself?) Rather than positing a single answer to these complex questions, this class traces this shifting concept by focusing on its relation to the term that it is juxtaposed against: innocence/guilt, innocence/experience, innocence/sexuality, innocence/knowledge.

This class will focus on honing close reading and critical analysis skills. We’ll be working with a variety of media: poetry, plays, artworks, novels, movies. We will also be putting these skills to work in writing five close-reading papers through the semester, in addition to turning in reflections every week.


Reading and Composition: "A Reader Is a Beginner"

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Vandeloo, David Conigliaro
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Endgame, Murphy; Conrad, C. A.: A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon; Coolidge, Clark: The Crystal Text; Coolidge, Clark and Bernadette Mayer: The Cave; Robertson, Lisa: Seven walks from the office for soft architecture, The Weather

Description

Each of these books explores some everyday occurrence we are familiar with, although perhaps conditioned to pass over. As we read them throughout the semester, they will ask us to rethink how we imagine spaces beyond our current conditions, and whether such imaginings are always entangled in the world in ways that limit our imaginations and/or open them to new possibilities. To this end, we will look at how these texts attempt to understand, describe, perform or frustrate the conditions we currently occupy. How do they resist stability, coherence and shelter, or demand a reconceptualization of our living conditions? Throughout, we will follow Lisa Robertson's suggestion: "A reader is a beginner." Imagining such spaces beyond our conditions, then, will ask us to become beginners--to rethink what such a reading experience exposes, and sometimes even eludes.

These texts, along with the collaborative endeavors of your fellow students, will provide you with approaches to developing your critical reading and writing skills. You will learn how to write a substantial and compelling argument and how subtlety, complexity and clarity illuminate one another. You will develop these skills step-by-step, both in our conversations and through a series of short writing and rewriting assignments. In addition to the texts listed above, you will also be expected to read and comment on the writings of your fellow students through a series of in-class peer reviews. 


Reading and Composition: Arthurian Legend

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Crosson, Chad Gregory
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Benson, Larry: King Arthur's Death: The Middle English Stanzaic Morte Arthur and Alliterative Morte Arthure; Borroff, Marie: The Gawain Poet: Complete Works; Kibler, William: Arthurian Romances; Malory, Thomas: Le Morte D'Arthur Vol. 1; Malory, Thomas: Le Morte D'Arthur Vol. 2; White, T.H.: The Once and Future King;

Recommended: Hacker, Diana: Rules for Writers

Description

From medieval manuscripts to twentieth-century film, Arthurian legends have undergone various changes as they passed to new generations and cultures.  The content of this course will consider some of these changes, from some of the earliest English presentations to 20th-century revisions.  Along with this investigation of the legends’ history, we will also explore the representation of these tales across the literary spectrum: poetry, episodic tales, and the novel.  We will examine closely how each literary genre shapes these legends: How does the medium and literary form influence the legend’s narrative?  What do changes in the legends and their form tell us?  What do the revisions of these enduring myths say about those telling them?  These are just some of the questions we will consider over the course of the semester.  As we discuss these legends, you will also sharpen your reading, writing, and critical thinking skills.  You will do this by writing a series of progressively longer papers, as well as short weekly writing assignments, which will consider both your readings and class discussion.


Reading and Composition: Magical Engines

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Mead, Christopher
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: The Handmaid's Tale; Euripedes: Medea; Scott Card, Orson: Ender's Game; Shakespeare, William: Coriolanus; Wells, H.G.: The Time Machine; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader with theoretical selections from Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, and Katherine Hayles; poetry/short stories selected from the book of Genesis, Virgil, Ovid, Chaucer, John Donne, Margaret Cavendish, Rudyard Kipling, D.H. Lawrence, William Carlos Williams, Michael Donaghy, and Richard Brautigan.

Films: Georges Méliès: Le Voyage Dans La Lune; Ridley Scott: Blade Runner

 

 

 

Description

This introduction to college writing and argument explores texts about machines--both real and imagined--from Greece through the present day. While writing and theorizing about tools, inventions, and devices seems to have taken on special urgency since the Industrial Revolution, human imagining about machines is at least as old as writing itself. Our course materials will help us formulate questions about the machine’s relationship to nature, cultural change, the body, and literary form. A site of both utopian dreaming and dystopian nightmare, thinking about machines reflects our greatest hopes and fears about the potential of the imagination.

This is a writing-intensive course, and part of the course requirements include drafting and revising three essays. Our constant goal throughout the semester will be to augment our skills as critical readers and enhance our ability to articulate arguments in clear and sophisticated prose.


Reading and Composition: note new topic: US Popular Song & the Problem of Authenticity

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Sullivan, Khalil
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Miller, Karl: Segregating Sounds; Suisman, David: Selling Sounds

Other Readings and Media

Additional essays and various 20th- and 21st-century US American popular songs (handouts to be provided)

Description

Note new course description (and book list and instructor):

While literary scholarship can speak freely about the death of the author, popular music must tread with caution. In popular music, performers stand in for songwriters, imploring audiences to witness and believe. In this course we will examine recent scholarship on the emergence of the popular recording industry in the early 20th century, paying particular attention to how the demands of a capitalist marketplace (mass reproduction, advertising, and distribution) put pressure on the identities and roles performers can exercise. Consequently, debates ensued, and we will spend time examining the discourse around contemporary popular song performance and problems of identity and authenticity. Students will be encouraged to theorize methods for analyzing popular song media, both song lyrics, music videos, and promotional material.

As part of the University's Reading and Composition requirement, this course will help you develop your reading and writing skills, as well as your strategies for making effective arguments. You will write and revise a series of short papers over the course of the term, adding up to a total of 32 pages.

 


Reading and Composition: Rebellion, Revolution, Revision

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: McWilliams, Ryan
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 222 Wheeler


Book List

Crevecoeur, J. Hector St. John de: Letters From an American Farmer; Melville, Herman: Great Short Works of Herman Melville; Melville, Herman: Israel Potter; Paine, Thomas: The Thomas Paine Reader; Poe, Edgar Allan: Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, of Nantucket, and Related Tales; Sansay, Leonora: Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo; Turner, Nat: The Confessions of Nat Turner and Related Documents

Other Readings and Media

A required course reader will contain brief excerpts from authors such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Philip Freneau, Edmund Burke, Washington Irving, William Apess, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, Henry David Thoreau, and Rebecca Harding Davis.

Description

From the British perspective the American colonial uprising was a rebellion, an anarchical break with order. But writers such as Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine called it a revolution, using a term that signified an extension of natural order (akin to the “revolution of the heavenly spheres”). That natural order, they claimed, was the wellspring of equal rights for all (white, male, propertied) citizens. In this course, we will examine how the meaning of the terms rebellion and revolution were subject to debate, censure, and revision not only during the struggle itself, but also until the Civil War. We'll consider texts by authors who feared that the revolution unleashed wild energies on society and yet simultaneously worried that the democratic potential of the revolution might be subject to decay. Additionally, we'll read works by antebellum women, African Americans, and Native Americans who used the rhetoric of rebellion in order to call attention to political actualities, arguing that in some ways, the project of the American revolution was ongoing.

Revision will also be a major element of the writing component of the course. Over the course of the semester, you will refine a series of short essays, producing a total of 32 pages of work. We will also spend a substantial amount of time honing composition practices through short exercises, peer review, and individual meetings. We will focus on both local issues, such as grammar, organization, and structure, and broader questions of academic norms and audience expectations. 

 


Reading and Composition: Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: Gardezi, Nilofar
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Hayden, Robert: Collected Poems

Other Readings and Media

Additional reading materials will be on bCourses.

Description

In this course, we will examine the "lost years" of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African American poetry focus on two key literary and cultural movements: the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s. While these movements were indeed important, I encourage us to investigate and see as equally important what was happening during the "gap years," particularly the 1940s-1960s.  This course will consider what is lost here as well as how and why it matters.

During and after World War II, African Americans migrated in great numbers from the rural South to the urban North in search of better jobs and opportunities, becoming a new and burgeoning urban  population. The recently arrived migrants imagined new black urban selves and created communities in neighborhoods like Chicago's Bronzeville, Detroit's Paradise Valley and New York's Harlem. What were the stories of their lives in the transformed and tranforming postwar cities of the North and how were they represented? African American poets Gwendolyn Brooks, Frank Marshall Davis, Robert Hayden, Langston Hughes, Melvin Tolson, Margaret Walker and others wrote about these figures and communities in their innovative postwar poetry. How did they necessarily experiment with the forms of their poetry in order to tell new black urban stories? The years of the 1940s-1960s were also crucial because they witnessed the birth of the Civil Rights Movement. How were the black poets of this period keenly engaging with and responding to the eddying spirit and rising discourse of civil rights and social change in their creative work? These starting questions and others that we'll discover together will motivate us as we work on critical reading and writing this term.

The primary goal of this class is to improve your writing. We will focus, then, on strengthening close-reading skills as well as the different parts of the writing process (e.g., constructing sentences, developing paragraphs, formulating claims, gathering evidence, honing theses, peer-editing and revising drafts) as you work on creating lucid arguments and persuasive essays from your critical examination of readings. Over the course of the semester, you will produce 32 pages of writing, which will be divided over a number of short essays and their revisions. 


Reading and Composition: The Renaissance Sonnet and Epigram

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Villagrana, José
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Graff and Birkenstein: "They Say / I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing; Rumrich and Chaplin, eds.: Seventeenth-Century British Poetry, 1603-1660; Shakespeare, William: The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Sonnets and Poems

Other Readings and Media

Additional materials will be posted on bCourses.

Description

When we think of Renaissance poetry, we think of love. There's more to that story, though. This class will examine two poetic forms that enjoyed immense popularity in the English Renaissance. First, the sonnet (It. ‘a little sound/song’) is a work of introspection and individual expression, but it also can address another person – it can delight, instruct, lament, and plead. A sonnet can stand on its own or be read, in a larger sequence, as part of a dramatic narrative. The epigram (Gk. ‘inscription’) is defined by its brevity. It amuses with wit and delivers satiric jabs. But the imagination of an epigram often surprises, outgrowing its few lines.

Taken together, our readings and research will raise questions about humiliation, deceit, conceit, performance, belief, and much more. How can a poem seem to be mired in tired clichés and yet simultaneously rich in singular fancies and wit? How do emblems, images, and symbols intersect with poetic art? We will consider problems of faith, sexuality, and political anxiety to enrich our understanding of often familiar poems.

The purpose of this course is to develop critical reading, writing, and research skills in a way that is applicable across disciplines. In-class participation will play an important role in developing your critical thinking skills, and we will discuss approaches to crafting prose that is argumentative, clear, and nuanced. As part of the university’s Reading and Composition program, this research-focused course will guide students through the acquisition and evaluation of secondary sources and their incorporation into argumentative essays. The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers (2-3 pages, 6-8 pages, 8-10 pages), combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work (and feedback) at the prewriting and draft stages of composition.


Reading and Composition: Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Hsu, Sharon
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Forster, E.M.: Howards End; Shakespeare, William: Twelfth Night; Smith, Zadie: On Beauty

Other Readings and Media

Films: Twelfth Night: Or What You Will (1996); She's the Man (2006); Clueless (1995)

Additional critical essays and secondary readings will be made available via bCourses.

Description

"Beauty brings copies of itself into being. It makes us draw it, take photographs of it, or describe it to other people. Sometimes it gives rise to exact replication and other times to resemblances and still other times to things whose connection to the original site of inspiration is unrecognizable." -- Elaine Scarry, On Beauty and Being Just

What does it mean to re-imagine the opening of a Modernist novel as a series of e-mails? Or to put the words of a beloved Jane Austen heroine into the mouth of a teenage Valley Girl? And why do so many film versions of Shakespeare's plays take place in high schools? In this course, we will explore a series of texts and what we might call their counter-texts -- novels, films, and essays that speak back to or against the original work by reimagining its themes, characters, or settings in a significant way. In doing so, we will ask questions such as: Why do some texts lend themselves to this kind of counter-textuality more than others? How does a counter-text comment on, critique, or subvert its original? And is it ever possible to read a counter-text apart from its original text?

The purpose of this course is to refine comprehension and analytical skills, improve writing, and broaden the scope of your essays to include research. To that end, we will devote considerable class time to learning how to find and analyze secondary sources and critical essays about texts (another form of counter-textuality, if you will) and how our own writing responds to texts and their counter-texts. The efforts of this class will culminate in a larger research paper of the student's own design.


Reading and Composition: Drama's Function in Literature, Philosophy, and the Visual Arts

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Jeziorek, Alek M
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Brecht, Bertolt: Threepenny Opera; Woolf, Virginia: Between the Acts

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with selected short texts from the following writers: Plato, Diderot, Oscar Wilde, Stéphane Mallarmé, Charles Baudelaire, Robert Browning, Richard Wagner, W.E.B. Du Bois, Mina Loy, Zora Neale Hurston, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, F.T. Marinetti, André Breton, Judith Butler, Peter Brook, Philip Auslander. 

A selection of paintings.

Description

This class takes its cue from the etymological connection between theater, spectator, and theory in ancient Greek. The shared root for theater (theatron, or “place of seeing”), spectator (theōros) and theory (theōria, “contemplation or speculation”) suggests that the theater offers a venue for the spectator to see the performance of a dramatic text, to frame it visually within the architecture of the theater, and to produce theory. Investigating the theater’s unique capacity to perform and absorb other discourses and artistic media, this class will examine how specifically dramatic philosophy, visual art, poetry, and politics manifest the limits of each medium and create the possibility of integrating them into live experience.

Second in the series of Reading and Composition courses, this class asks students to extend the lessons of R1A toward writing a research paper: students will read closely and re-read, ask fruitful questions, develop several perspectives on a question through research, write and revise. This class intends to demystify what appears to be the daunting task of writing a long research-driven paper by focusing on writing as a process with many small steps. To that end, the assignments will consist of writing proposals and essays that work up to the length of a research paper, revising extensively, peer editing, building an annotated bibliography, and planning a working outline, among other smaller assignments. There will also be a diagnostic essay, as well as a creative project wherein students will be asked to adapt a non-theatrical text from class or from their respective disciplines for performance.


Reading and Composition: Lost Literature: Recovering and (Re)discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: Sirianni, Lucy
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: A Long Fatal Love Chase; Bennett , Paula Bernat: Nineteenth-Century American Women Poets: An Anthology; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Other Readings and Media

A course reader containing primary texts by Lydia Maria Child, Rebecca Harding Davis, Emily Dickinson, Phillis Wheatley, Constance Fenimore Woolson, and others, as well as a selection of critical readings.

Description

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and practice literary criticism as a dynamic process of discovery.  In order to explore this notion of discovery, we'll consider the phenomenon of literary recovery.  We will look, that is, at a number of texts that have long been ignored by literary scholars but that are now coming to be seen as deserving of critical attention.  Some of these texts were at first wildly popular, out-selling the works we read and remember today only to be relegated to obscurity in later eras.  Others were never allowed the chance to be appraised at all as they languished unread in attics and private collections before finding their way into the hands of appreciative scholars.  Some have been denigrated, some have been suppressed, and many contain a perceived element of danger, troubling the status quo in ways that have kept them from attaining an uncontested place in the so-called "canon" of universally admired literary works.  Though we will begin with a group of late eighteenth-century texts and end with a recent murder mystery that dramatizes the pleasures and perils of recovery-based literary research, our primary focus will be on the American nineteenth century, a period in which both forgotten bestsellers and newly-found manuscripts abound.  We will read works by marginalized and silenced figures ranging from early feminists to fugitive slaves, and as we do so, we will consider, with the help of leading critics, the aesthetic and political forces that led them to be first overlooked and subsequently (re)discovered.

As we consider this array of texts and the scholars who have resuscitated their critical reputations, students, too, will engage in exciting critical projects.  The course is designed to help you prepare for future writing and research at Berkeley and beyond, so over the course of the semester, you will outline, draft, workshop, write, and rewrite a series of papers, refining along the way your ability to read meticulously and write persuasively.  Your work will culminate in the writing of a substantial research paper based on the issues central to the course as they relate to your own interests.

 


Reading and Composition: Composite-Composition

English R1B

Section: 5
Instructor: Acu, Adrian Mark
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Danielewski, Mark: House of Leaves; Dorst, Doug: S.; Howe, Susan: My Emily Dickinson; Jones, David: In Parenthesis

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings will be provided on bCourses.

Description

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor):

Most research paper classes promote a divide between the object of study and work done by others on the object of study.  But this depiction of primary and secondary material as distinct tends to obscure the organic unity between them that good research papers demand.  Instead, this class will encounter texts that emphatically gesture towards their impact on and interaction with their scholarship.  The various innovative approaches to constellating creative and analytic work will afford you rich source material for your own research papers and more effective models for integrating the work of others into your own original thinking.

 


Reading and Composition: The Art of Conscience

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Yu, Esther
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders; Dickens, Charles: Hard Times; Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include selections from the Bible and Shakespeare's sonnets; additional critical readings will also be provided.

Description

What kind of knowledge, or science, does the conscience impart, and how does it make this knowledge manifest? What evidentiary standards apply to this kind of knowledge? This course will examine such questions through the lens of the literary imagination. For all its associations with the cognitive faculties, the conscience has often been endowed with a peculiar responsiveness to fiction. The conscience, given its ability to fire the imagination, might even be figured as a creative principle of fiction itself. In the course of the semester, we'll acquaint ourselves with the conscience in its various guises, from the relentless prosecutor who induces paranoia to the silent companion who stirs in the twilight of life. Along the way, we'll reflect upon its shifting locus (from external to internal and back again), and consider its relationship to consciousness. The entanglement of conscience in both the arts and the sciences will further suggest avenues for reconciling our literary pursuits with the work of other disciplines.

The critical writing skills which are the focus of R1A will be supplemented in this course with training in research methods. Students in this course will produce at least two essays and one longer, research-based paper.

 

 


Reading and Composition: Research Methods

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Ramirez, Matthew Eric
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Damer, T. Edward: Attacking Faulty Reasoning; Jeffrey, Richard: Formal Logic; Joseph, Sister Miriam: Shakespeare's Use of the Arts of Language; Wheelan, Charles: Naked Statistics; Zola, Emile: Therese Raquin

Other Readings and Media

Natural Language Processing with Python (online resource)

Style at the Scale of the Sentence by Stanford Literary Lab (online resource)

Description

In this course we’ll study and apply research methods from a variety of fields. We will discover what it means to be rigorous inside and outside a humanistic context. We will look at many methods of interpretation, from rhetorical to discourse analysis; from formal semantics, using first order and modal logics; from statistical models in the social sciences; and from computational approaches such as natural language processing. You will write three progressively longer papers (2-3 pages, 6-8 pages, 8-10 pages), combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. As part of these assignments, we will focus on strategies for drafting, revising, and polishing your work.
  


Reading and Composition: Other Worlds

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Strub, Spencer
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Alighieri, Dante: Inferno; Chaucer, Geoffrey: Dream Visions and Other Poems; Shakespeare, William: The Tempest

Other Readings and Media

Please purchase the Hollander translation of Inferno, the Armitage translation of Sir Gawain, and the Norton Critical edition of The Tempest. Further readings, both primary and critical texts, to be posted on bCourses. Film screenings to be noted on syllabus.

Description

What does it mean to imagine another world? Is it an opportunity for unvarnished fantasy, or for critical reflection on your own society? Can you tell the truth when writing about an invented place? By way of an answer, this course considers the journeys narrated during a particularly fertile period of otherworldly imagination: the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The writers we will read in this course map the architecture of hell, the landscape of dreams, and the laws of fairyland. We will move from these imagined places to the narratives that emerged out of the cataclysmic encounter between two real worlds: the European colonization of the Americas. Throughout the course, we will examine the contexts – historical, political, literary, religious, and scientific – that help us to better understand these works.

This course is intended to teach you to pose analytical questions, develop complex arguments supported by evidence, and build research skills that will be applicable in your college writing and in your future career. To that end, you will complete drafts and revisions of three substantive essays, culminating in a long paper supported by original research. A number of shorter exercises will supplement and help prepare for these major writing assignments.


Reading and Composition: Victorian Literature of Evolution

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Darwin, C.: On the Origin of Species; Gosse, E.: Father and Son; Kingsley, C.: Water-Babies; Otis, L.: Literature and Science in the Nineteenth Century; Tennyson, A.: In Memoriam

Description

This course will examine British literature related to the evolutionary theories emergent in the nineteenth century. We will read a combination of scientific writing, literary fiction, and poetry, attending both to the scientific discoveries made during the Victorian period and to the influence these discoveries had on the imagination of contemporary authors and the public. The focus of our class will be on evolution as it was understood – and misunderstood – in the nineteenth century; however, for the sake of clarity and comparison, we will also briefly review the currently accepted model of evolution in the biological sciences.

As part of the university’s Reading and Composition requirement, this course develops reading, writing, and research skills that are applicable across the curriculum. We will focus on how to find, evaluate, and make effective use of research tools and resources for analytic writing. The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work and feedback at the prewriting and draft stages of composition.  


Reading and Composition: Regions: Revising the Lay of the Land

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: Chow, Juliana H.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Anzaldua, Gloria: Borderlands/La Frontera (1987); Niedecker, Lorine: Lake Superior (1969); Robinson, Marilynne: Housekeeping (1980); Sebald, W. G.: The Rings of Saturn (1995); Toomer, Jean: Cane (1923)

Other Readings and Media

Films by Agnes Varda, Patricio Guzman, and Grant Gee, as well as a course reader.

Description

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor):

Region is an area ruled, from regere, 'to rule or direct'; it is an area measured and surveyed so that its boundaries depend on and change with its rulers. In considering regions, we will think about what forms of knowledge underlie the measuring and surveying of land and, in turn, shape the lay of the land: where border lines are drawn, what appears and disappears as visible and legible, within and without. In particular, how does the attention to lines--of poetry or prose, of itineraries and tours, of color/race, of sight, and of time--inform our sense of the environment, the land, and the working of the land? How does the organization and revision of a composition--diurnal, seasonal, topographical, archaeological, or elemental--bring together history, place, and language in regional writing? We will explore the environmental, political, and racial implications of these lines through a selection of literary texts and criticism.

In this course, you will continue to build upon your reading and writing skills through the craft of literary criticism and through extending the inquiries from that criticism into your own research project. As a class, we will develop the skills needed to read closely and critically; generate a research question; find, evaluate, and analyze sources; develop a nuanced and complex argument; peer edit and respond to each other's work; and write and revise two analytical essays. As part of the university's Reading and Composition requirement, you will produce 32 pages of written work over the course of the semester through assignments leading us through the research process step-by-step.


Reading and Composition: School Stories

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Brontë, C.: Jane Eyre; Dickens, C.: David Copperfield; Edgeworth, M.: Practical Education; Hughes, T.: Tom Brown's Schooldays; Newman, J. H.: Idea of a University

Description

This course will survey the educational principles and strategies common in nineteenth-century Britain and the depiction of domestic and institutional education in contemporary novels. We will examine the influential educational theories of the period, with particular attention to the work of Maria and Richard Lovell Edgeworth and the continuing legacy of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. With this framework, we will explore the educational experiences of boys and girls of the upper, middle, and lower classes, and the training, or lack of training, of their teachers. The course will also address Victorian developments in higher education, including the growing emphasis on liberal education.

As part of the university’s Reading and Composition requirement, this course develops reading, writing, and research skills that are applicable across the curriculum. We will focus on how to find, evaluate, and make effective use of research tools and resources for analytic writing. The primary writing assignments for the course will be three progressively longer papers combining analysis of primary texts with research from secondary sources. Strategies for revision will form another major focus of the course, and the second and third papers will include substantial work and feedback at the prewriting and draft stages of composition. 


Reading and Composition: The Rom Com: Shakespeare & Hollywood

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Liu, Aileen
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Shakespeare, William: As You Like It; Shakespeare, William: The Merchant of Venice; Shakespeare, William: Twelfth Night

Other Readings and Media

Required Films
City Lights (1931, dir. Charlie Chaplin), DVD 217; Swing Time (1936, dir. George Stevens), DVD 4254; The Lady Eve (1941, dir. Preston Sturges), DVD 864; Roman Holiday (1953, dir. William Wyler), DVD 7377; The Apartment (1960, dir. Billy Wilder), DVD 1758; Annie Hall (1977, dir. Woody Allen), DVD 56; The Birdcage (1996, dir. Mike Nichols), DVD 1614; You’ve Got Mail (1998, dir. Nora Ephron), DVD 3016
 

Description

What makes the genre of romantic comedy so pleasurable, when it is often critically maligned as being so formulaic? What defines a romantic comedy? What has persisted in romantic comedy throughout the centuries, from Shakespeare to 20th-century Hollywood, and what has not?

To think about these questions, we’ll look at four of Shakespeare’s romantic comedies and eight Hollywood rom coms from the ‘30s to the ‘90s. Along the way, we’ll explore issues surrounding genre, convention, plotting, taste, gender, ethnicity, and class. Our tools for exploration and inquiry are rereading, rewriting, research, and discussion, so we will practice these skills inside and outside of class. Over the course of the semester, you will write and rewrite two papers of progressively increasing length (for a total of four papers), combining analysis of primary works with research from secondary sources.

Note about our required books and films: Any solid scholarly edition of Shakespeare will suffice (e.g. Riverside, Pelican, Signet, Folger, Arden, Norton), but having the Oxford Shakespeare Series editions that I’ve ordered will make it easier to follow along and reference in class. No e-books. All films are available to screen in the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.
 


Freshman Seminar: The Arts In and Around Berkeley

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: W 11-1 (January 21 to March 4 only)
Location: 346 Kroeber


Other Readings and Media

A Reader

Description

In this seminar (that will meet the first seven Wednesdays of the semester from 11:00 to 1:00) we will explore the diverse practices of art in and around Berkeley. We will visit local galleries and artists’ studios as well as arts programs and departments across campus, attend exhibit openings, see a performance, and listen to artists’ talks. Be prepared to experience a variety of venues, to write briefly about those encounters, and to engage in discussion about the contemporary practice of the arts.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Madame Bovary

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Time: Tues. 4-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Flaubert, Gustave: Madame Bovary

Description

Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as one of the world’s classic novels, but that acclaim does not get at what’s uniquely weird about it.  Read the novel fast and you’ll find a compelling story that is a pleasure to follow.  Read it slow and you’ll find a strange, disturbing, and even more compelling style that is always interfering with the narrative flow.  Do both—and that is what we’ll be doing in this seminar—and you’ll discover that “off” relation between story and style which inaugurates modernism in fiction.

For consistency’s sake, students are asked to read the novel only in Lydia Davis’ excellent new translation (Penguin, 2011).

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: The Arts and Culture at Berkeley and Beyond

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: W 4-5
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Description

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets; study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum; attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall; see and discuss films at the Pacific Film Archive (PFA) on campus; and, hopefully, we will plan a visit to the Oakland Art Museum and perhaps one of the art museums in San Francisco. My aim is quite simply to introduce first-year students to the astonishing range of cultural production on the campus and in the Bay Area.

Many, if not most, of the musical, film, and theater events take place in the evening; so, I will ask that you keep many of your Wednesday and Thursday, and some weekend, evenings open for attending performances. I can't schedule our events until I see what is offered for the spring, and probably won't be until later in the fall semester.

We will engage in discussion based on short response papers by the students in the seminar. Admission to the on-campus art events included in this course will be provided at no cost to students. I expect students who enroll in the course to commit themselves to evening performances that will be the basis of discussion at the Wednesday afternoon seminar.

There are no texts for this class.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: California Detectives in Fiction and Film

English 24

Section: 4
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time: W 10-11
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

Corpi, Lucha: Black Widow's Wardrobe; Hammett, Dashiell: The Maltese Falcon; MacDonald, Ross: The Zebra-Striped Hearse

Other Readings and Media

Films:  Devil in a Blue Dress, Chinatown, and Chan is Missing

Description

For a variety of reasons, both San Francisco and Los Angeles have been great places for the work of crime and detection. Certain theorists of detective fiction have noted that such works of art are especially committed to the invocation and experience of places. Crimes and their detection/solution take place in concrete places. And California demography also allows for a variety of ethnic detectives. I plan to read three novels, Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, Ross MacDonald’s The Zebra-Striped Hearse, and Lucha Corpi’s Black Widow’s Wardrobe, and screen three films: Devil in a Blue Dress, Chinatown, and Chan is Missing. I have Anglo, Chicana, African American and Chinese detectives—whose ethnicity allows them to enter different populations and areas to solve crimes or mysteries.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Campus Onomastics

English 24

Section: 5
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: F 2-3
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

University of California, Berkeley: A Campus Guide. An Architectural Tour and Photographs by Harvey Helfand; Pelfrey, Patricia: A Brief History of the University of California

Description

"Onomastics," from the Greek onoma, 'name,'  is a minor branch of linguistics that studies proper names. In this course we will study the names of the buildings, spaces, institutions, scholarship funds and so forth that shape our daily lives here at UC Berkeley, as a window into the history of these resources. In the early part of the semester we will read together a book about that history, and then as the days brighten, students will prepare presentations on names of places of their own choosing, and we will stroll around to hear them at those places. We'll begin with Wheeler Hall, named for Benjamin Ide Wheeler, a linguist.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to the Study of Poetry

English 26

Section: 1
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: note new location: 219 Dwinelle


Book List

Wordsworth, William and Coleridge, Samuel Taylor: Lyrical Ballads; Ramazani, Jahan ed.: Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, Volume 1

Description

This course aims to do two things: 1) serve as an introduction to the variety of forms, modes and styles of poetry written in English; 2) provide a survey of the historical transformation of poetry in English over the last 200 years. We will begin with a reading of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s defining collection of poems, Lyrical Ballads (1798), whose examples of poetic form and thinking remain influential today. We will then analyze a few key works from the 19th century before dedicating the bulk of the course to an examination of 20th-century experiments with poetic form and the new ideas about poetry that accompanied them. Along the way, there will be focused attention to the essential elements of poetic technique (meter, rhyme, the line, metaphor, allegory, irony) as well as the various modes, genres, and styles in which poetry is written.

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to understand poetry and learn how to write about it critically. Students should leave the course able to produce a cogent analysis and interpretation of nearly any poem put before them.


Introduction to the Study of Fiction

English 27

Section: 1
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Bronte, Charlotte: Jane Eyre; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

A course reader including secondary criticism and short stories by Poe, Hemingway, O'Connor and others. 

Description

A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research corroborates the truism that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand the emotional states of other people. Even without the blessing of the sciences, it is undeniable that fiction and the “real world” have a mutually influential relationship. This course will approach the question of how to define and analyze fiction and its unique appeal through the field of literary criticism. We will read short stories and novels in a variety of genres and explore the structure of fiction through plot, story, narrative point of view and focalization, setting, character, and discourse. In addition to writing two 5-8 page interpretative papers on the assigned reading, students will participate in an ongoing project of recording their own responses while reading fiction, and experiment with “re-writing” particular fictional passages by altering one of the author’s stylistic choices. 

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to study fiction and learn how to write about it critically.


Introduction to the Study of Fiction

English 27

Section: 2
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights; Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Welsh, Irvine: Trainspotting; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Description

The title of the course is “Introduction to the Study of Fiction,” but, more specifically, the course will be an introduction to analytic critical writing about fiction. We will work on close reading, on learning how to read with a mind open to and curious about the writer’s choices, about the motives for and consequences of those choices. Our discussions will loosely divide into two areas of emphasis, narrative—what is it about the plot that is designed to draw our interest, and how is it arranged or structured?—and narration—the tone and character of the telling of the story. I will be particularly interested in the question of how narrative and narration are related to one another in each of the works we read. The goal of the discussions will be to help you decide upon and formulate theses for essays, and then to develop plausible and well-evidenced explorations of those theses, so several class sessions will be devoted to essay-writing rather than to discussion of the literary works. Two five-page and one seven-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion, with occasional brief (less than a page) writing assignments to facilitate discussion.

This will be a reading- and discussion-intensive course designed for prospective majors and transfer students looking to study fiction and learn how to write about it critically.


Introduction to the Writing of Verse

English 43B

Section: 1
Instructor: Stancek, Claire Marie
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Adams, Stephen: Poetic Designs: An Introduction to Meters, Verse Forms, and Figures of Speech; Gregory, Jane: My Enemies; Hejinian, Lyn: My Life; Notley, Alice: The Descent of Alette; Philip, M. NourbeSe: Zong!

Other Readings and Media

A course reader including selections from Shakespeare, Milton, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Shelley, Mary Robinson, Charlotte Smith, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka, Gil Scott-Heron, R. Kelly.

Description

By attending to the triangulation of politics, prosody, and history within poetry of the last four hundred years, we will build a rigorous foundation for our own poetic experiments. Together, we will ask: What practical skills does one need in order to speak in poetry’s enchanted chants? What historical background must one understand in order to engage in the subversive conversations of poetry now? This course attends to such fundamental prerequisites by combining an intense training in meter and rhythm, schemes and tropes, stanzaic forms and free verse, with a broad survey of poetry written in English, with ongoing workshops in which we will share and discuss our own writing—all the while, exploring the ways in which politics imbues our words and works. We will immerse ourselves in the rich Bay Area poetry scene by attending poetry readings, and by hosting our own end-of-the-semester poetry festival. Over the semester, students will write and revise a chapbook, due in three progressively longer stages.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 pages of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further infomration regarding enrollment in such courses.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 213 Wheeler


Book List

Greenblatt, S., gen. ed.: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1 ; Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

Description

We will study the changing nature of creative writing “through” Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. 45 is a lower-division course, a pre-required gateway to the English major; you can return to explore the texts that interest you more thoroughly, at a higher level. This will not be a strict chronological survey but more a sampling of key themes, as they are constructed in different genres and in different periods across a thousand years of turbulent history. What makes a hero or heroine that we can take seriously (epic and tragedy)? what makes us fall in love (desire and the lyric, including desire for God)? what makes us smile or nod in recognition (satire and comedy)? Larger, overarching questions will concern us throughout: what is the status of literature, and how does fiction relate to emotion? Along the way we will gain a sense of the evolving conception of art and the deep roots of English as a world language, a resource for every modern writer.

Our readings are all contained in just two books: the ninth edition of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, and Shakespeare's Hamlet. No formal preparation is required, but I would strongly recommend brushing up on Hamlet before term begins, as we will start and finish the course with this play, probably the most famous ever written.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
110 Barrows
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location:


Book List

Dickson, D., ed.: The Poetry of John Donne; Howe, N., ed.: Beowulf: A Prose Translation; Mann, J., ed.: Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales; Marlowe, C.: Dr. Faustus; Milton, J.: Paradise Lost; Niles, J., ed.: Beowulf: An Illustrated Edition

Description

What is the English literary tradition?  Where did it come from? What are its distinctive habits, questions, styles, obsessions? This course will answer these and other questions by focusing on five key writers from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance:  the anonymous Beowulf poet; Geoffrey Chaucer; Christopher Marlowe; John Donne; and John Milton. We will start with the idea that the English literary tradition is a set of interrelated texts and problems that recur over the course of several centuries.  Some of these relationships are formal; we will pay special attention to the genres, techniques, and styles that poets use to create their works.  Some of these relationships are linguistic; students will learn to read Middle English (out loud, too!) and explore the significance of linguistic change as the Middle Ages becomes the Renaissance.  Other relationships are historical; we will explore not only the pressure of contemporary events on literature, but also literature's role in creating both historical continuity and change over time. And some of these relationships are cultural, as poets reflect upon, seek to change, furiously criticize, or happily embrace a variety of human behaviors, from religious practices to love relationships to debates about gender to death and dying.   

Throughout the semester, students will work on developing their skill at close reading.  We will work on close reading during lectures and in your discussion sections.  You will do close readings at home.  You are welcome to come to office hours to practice close reading!  No one can be a literary critic who cannot perform a close reading of a literary text.  We will work on learning the tools of the trade, the literary terms and generic distinctions necessary for close reading.  Expect to write three papers and to take a final exam.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 60 Evans


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Equiano, O.: The Interesting Narrative; Franklin, B.: Autobiography; Melville, H.: Billly Budd and Other Tales; Sterne, L.: A Sentimental Journey

Other Readings and Media

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Swift, Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, and others) and think about how politics, aesthetics, the everyday, race, gender, and identity all find expression in a number of different literary forms. We'll especially consider the material and symbolic roles played by the idea and practice of revolution in the period. 


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
213 Wheeler
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location:


Book List

Austen, Jane: Persuasion; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Equiano, Olaudah: The Interesting Narrative of the Life; Franklin, Benjamin: The Autobiography; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Man and Other Poems; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Wordsworth, William: Selected Poems

Description

A survey of British and American literature from 1688 through the mid-nineteenth century.  We will look at how literary genres evolve alongside new kinds of knowledge and understanding, with particular attention to the changing place of literature in the private, social, and political lives of its readers.  We especially will consider literary responses to an age of revolution on both sides of the Atlantic.  Authors include Defoe, Pope, Franklin, Equiano, Jefferson, Austen, M. Shelley, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Poe, Melville, and Whitman.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 50 Birge


Book List

Eliot, T.S.: Selected Poems; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modernity as we closely investigate a selection of the major texts from this sprawling period. At times the lectures will zoom in on particular features of texts, and at other times they will zoom out to cultural conditions and aesthetic tendencies. In addition to the books listed, there will be a small reader with texts by Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Stein, Stevens, Moore, Hughes, Auden, and Beckett. There will be two essays, and a final exam.

 


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 213 Wheeler


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Hamid, Mohsin: The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Larson, Nella: Passing; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Please note that the readings for the course have not yet been finalized. Please do not purchase books before attending the first class.

A selection of short fiction, poetry, and critical essays will also be available online in PDF form and for purchase as a photocopied packet. 

Description

In this course, we will read and discuss a broad range of British and American literary writing spanning well over a century, with a primary focus on early twentieth-century modernist fiction and poetry. Topics for discussion will include the role of high art in an era of mass culture; the influence of literary tradition and the meanings of formal innovation; the implications of expatriatism and multiculturalism for national identity; and the politics of canon formation, that is, which authors and literary texts are regularly read, how they are read, and by whom.

Written work for the course will consist of three 5- to 6- page essays; frequent informal written responses in lecture; and a final exam. Regular attendance at lecture and vigorous participation in section are also required.


Children's Literature

English 80K

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Grace
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 105 North Gate


Book List

Barrie, J. M. : Peter and Wendy; Gaiman, Neil: Sandman: The Doll's House; Kingsley, Charles: The Water Babies; Kipling, Rudyard: Kim; Morrison, Grant: All-Star Superman; Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Nesbit, E.: Five Children and It; Seuss, Dr.: Green Eggs and Ham; Thompson, Kay: Eloise: A Book for Precocious Grown-Ups; Winnicott, Donald: The Piggle: An Account of the Psychoanalytic Treatment of a Little Girl

Description

This course has two principal aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children's literature in English from the eighteenth century to the present; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, and aesthetic questions such literature has posed – of, for example: the purpose of education; infantile sexuality; the mechanisms of language acquisition; the ethical nature of innocence; the family romance; violence and violent desire; child labor; didactic and fantastical modes of address; the infant-animal relationship; embodied differences of gender, race, sexuality, and (dis)ability; peer pressure. We will treat as axiomatic the notion that the "child" is a contingent and constructed object, always reinvented to suit the needs of its historical moment. From Rudyard Kipling's idealized cosmopolitan boychild to the morally compromised extra-judicial violence of Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy, children's literature and culture relays to its charges the best ways of serving the interests of the powerful. We will not, then, make generalizations about what children are, what children like, or what children know. But we will wonder together whether the inverse is true too, and that something in the infantile attachments we feel towards children's literature might also resist conscription into the normative mechanisms of maturity. 


Sophomore Seminar: Woody Allen

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Allen, Woody: The Insanity Defense

Description

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Archive.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Middle English Literature

English 112

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: Note new location: 587 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


English Drama to 1603

English 114A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

The book(s) for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

English 117B is a course in the last ten years or so of Shakespeare's career. It is a chance to read the tragedies: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra; at least one of the problematic late comedies, Measure for Measure; and the three plays that the critics have described as "romances," Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. These are among the most brilliant, corruscating, and magical stories veer imagined into the English language, and some of the most astonishing poetry. Students will be expected to keep up with the reading. There will be discussion sections on Fridays, and the Monday/Wednesday lecture meetings will include some conversation plus some informal staging and a bit of memorization. You'll know, when you're through, the "To be or not to be" speech and the "out, out, brief candle" speech and perhaps a couple of others.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 159 Mulford


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Comedy of Errors; Shakespeare, William: Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays

Description

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  Focusing on a selection of them, we’ll consider the range of Shakespeare's dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dramatic genres in which he wrote affected Shakespeare’s representation of plot and character, as well as the literary, social, sexual, religious, political, and philosophical issues he conceptualized through plot and character.  Finally, we’ll think about Shakespeare’s plays in relation to the range of social types and classes in his mass audience. 


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Goodman, Kevis
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Milton, John: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton

Description

Probably the most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than the rebel he was. He is also sometimes assumed to be a remote religious poet rather than an independent thinker, who distrusted any passively held faith that was not self-questioning. However, as we follow Milton’s carefully shaped career from the shorter early poems, through some of the controversial prose of the English Civil War era, and at last through the astounding work that emerged in the wake of political defeat (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes), we will discover a very different literary and political figure, known in his time as a statesman as well as a poet, and in both pursuits more an iconoclast than an icon. We will come to understand Milton’s writing in relation to the revolutions that he witnessed and took part in, and we will also think about his experiments in poetic form, his ambivalent incorporations, revisions, and expansions of classical literature and biblical texts alike, the literary dimension of his unorthodox theology, his writings on love, marriage, and divorce, his long preoccupation with vocation – and more.

Our required text will be The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton, eds. William Kerrigan, John Rumrich, and Stephen Fallon (Modern Library; ISBN-13: 978-0679642534).

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. 


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

The books for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others experimented with the first gothic horror stories. Poets reckoned with a literary market and tidal wave of printed works that threatened to render all writing mere commodities. They thematized their position as misunderstood guardians of creative spirit, sometimes of a national past, in model of the tortured poet with which we are still familiar. Women writers cannily intervened in the republic of letters, even as their public writing was seen as semi-scandalous. All helped develop a new sense of Literature with a capital “L”—not just writing but imaginative writing that might play a special role in society, from protecting classical values in a modernizing world, to promoting a standard national language and literature, to cultivating sentimental feelings for others in an increasingly anonymous society.

Authors include: David Hume, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Horace Walpole, Jane Austen, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Gray, William Collins, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Romantic Period

English 121

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Blake, W.: Blake's Poetry and Designs; Byron: Major Works; Coleridge, S. T.: Major Works; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Keats, J.: Major Works; Shelley, M.W.G.: Frankenstein; Shelley, P.B.: Major Works; Wordsworth, W.: Major Works

Description

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic writers revolutionized the concept of literature?  What is the relation between Romantic writing and the signal historical and social events of the period: the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the Napoleonic wars, the rise of finance capitalism, the dominion of “the news”?  With so much “happening” on the level of world history, why do Romantic writers sometimes turn to the past, to the provinces, to the everyday? Why, given the increased popularity of the novel, do so many writers turn to poetry-- to evoke nostalgia for the past or to forge an aesthetic avant-garde?  Through extensive reading of major poets (Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, and Keats), novelists (Godwin, Austen, Mary Shelley) and essayists (Lamb, Hazlitt, Burke, Paine) we will explore the event of Romanticism by examining literary events.  What “happens” in Romantic texts:  how do they understand origins, events, and effects?  


The Victorian Period

English 122

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Grace
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new location: 123 Wheeler


Book List

Barrett Browning, Elizabeth : Aurora Leigh; Dickens, Charles: Great Expectations; Haggard, H. Rider: She; Lord Tennyson, Alfred,: In Memoriam A. H. H.; Prince, Mary: The History of Mary Prince; Trollope, Anthony: The Warden

Description

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeois life; the investment of culture with the power to effect epochal political change and rearrange readers' sexualities; the invention of vampires, robots, serial killers, and other new forms of monstrosity; the modernization of narrative pornography; and the rejuvenation of bardic poetry. At the same time British authors were trying and failing to manage the largest empire in history, both devising new ways to dominate the world through writing and interrupting the violence that imperialism – the so-called "final phase of capitalism" – produced.

This course engages the major theoretical questions posed by Victorian literature, questions which emerge from the unprecedented global suffusion of British imperial influence. How might the enormity of this new world be meaningfully represented in language? What new accounts of personhood, ethics, sexuality, ethnicity, evolution, and art are required? Dealing with these and related questions, we will perhaps come to understand the enduring power of Victorian literature to speak to our own moment of globalization and crisis – our perennial return to the unanswered questions and open wounds of the nineteenth century.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 100 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The books for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Avenue.

Description

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies of mind challenged old ways of knowing, of ordering society, and of interacting socially. How did experiments in fiction writing enable new ways of knowing and new ways of acting virtuously in a society in which such things were open for debate? Haunted by fiction’s connection to “lower” forms of writing, writers—many of them women--also negotiated the tricky new terrain of writing for a public print market. We shall examine their rhetorical and thematic means of legitimating their writing--appealing to (and sometimes transforming) moral discourse, creating hybrids of new and classical writing, deploying authorized genres of writing, such as history. Yet all of them resist easy divisions between legitimate and illegitimate, offering instead complex new forms of writing and, some would argue, consciousness; our work will be to identify and analyze some of these.

Authors will include Eiza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Jane Austen.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

English 125A

Section: 2
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Beckford, W.: Vathek; Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Burney, F.: Evelina; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Scott, W.: Bride of Lammermoor; Smollett, T.: Humphry Clinker

Description

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most was published anonymously and purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so strenuously disavowed their status as romances or novels, and why they disguised themselves as they did.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

 


The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

English 125B

Section: 1
Instructor: Christ, Carol T.
Christ, Carol
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


The Contemporary Novel: The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Fiction

English 125E

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10
Location: 2060 Valley LSB


Book List

Diaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Egan, Jennifer: A Visit from the Goon Squad; Harding, Paul: Tinkers; Johnson, Adam: The Orphan Master's Son; McCarthy, Cormac: The Road; Strout, Elizabeth: Olive Kittredge; Tartt, Donna: The Goldfinch

Other Readings and Media

Reader.

Description

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the seven most recent (2007-2014) Pulitzer Prize-winning novels (actually, one of them is a collection of short fiction). In addition to examining narrative form and literary style, we will consider cultural and historical contexts and thematic resonances. We will discuss the trends in types of topics and styles selected for the Pultizer as well.

Note: Many of these are lengthy and/or dense novels, so start reading soon.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Porter, Carolyn
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 88 Dwinelle


Book List

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady

Description

This course will survey major works of early twentieth-century American literature by Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Zora Neale Hurston, Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, and Frank Norris, with the goal of understating how their writings respond to the experience of modernity.   The twentieth century was marked during its first half by a string of ups and downs (many of which no doubt feel familiar to us at the dawn of the twenty-first): two wars, gilded age excess, broad economic privation, and, as W.E.B. DuBois predicted for it, a dogged “problem of the color line.”  We will explore how the modern American novel grapples with issues of moral ambiguity, anomie, belonging, and the attraction and antipathy toward blackness.  My lectures will focus on the formal concerns of point of view, frames of reference, and the representation of time, all with the goal of understanding how these authors’ experiments in the novel form produce a reality rather than reflect it.   Regarding this last, I will be keen to foreground the ways in which the modernist novel comes into its own during “the age of mechanical reproduction,” and thus often in dialogue with the emerging technologies of cinema, camera, and phonograph (not to mention television, radio, and telephone).

Two ten-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Lerner, Ben: Mean Free Path; Rankine, Claudia: Don't Let Me Be Lonely

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than cover all major figures briefly, we’ll spend extended time with the work of a few: poets considered will include Paul Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, T. S. Eliot, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, Charles Olson, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Claudia Rankine, and Ben Lerner. Along the way we’ll consider renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter, the task and materials of the long poem, seriality, citationality, who and what counts as a poetic subject, and how U.S. poetries have imagined community over and against their actual Americas. In addition to the two required books, primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a Course Reader. There will be a take-home midterm, a term paper, and a final exam.

 


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Black Internationalism

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 101 Wheeler


Book List

Baldwin, J.: Another Country; Childress, A.: A Short Walk; DuBois, W.E.B.: Dark Princess; Hughes, L.: I Wonder as I Wander; Lorde, A.: Zami; McKay, C.: Banjo; Reed, I.: Flight to Canada; Robeson, P.: Here I Stand

Description

Throughout the twentieth century, African American authors used international travel to see beyond the limits of racial discrimination in the U.S.  Traveling abroad allowed these authors to imagine new configurations of race, gender, and class back at home.  This course will trace the vibrant, ongoing tradition of black internationalism, focusing on its often utopian undercurrents—in particular, its frequent crossing of racial and sexual hierarchies.  We will see how W.E.B. DuBois’ time in Germany bolstered his understanding that “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line.”  We will see how Langston Hughes’ Soviet travels prompted him to tie African American struggles to international socialism.  We will also explore efforts to make black internationalism more inclusive—as seen, for example, in Alice Childress’ feminist critique of Marcus Garvey’s “Back to Africa” movement.  Finally, we will explore how black internationalism enables us to articulate new understandings of race in our purportedly “post-racial” present.

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don’t buy books until after the first class.

 


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Race, [Creative] Writing, and Difference

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 130 Wheeler


Description

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing.

The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public language on one hand and personal (meaning specific) observations and experiences on the other.  The purpose of writing is not to come up with answers to the truly vexing problems of racism and economic and political disparity.  The purpose here is to pursue consciousness.  How one refers to race (one’s own as well as the races of others) is of paramount importance; the fact that there are ways in which American cultural institutions typically quantify and refer to race is of at least equal importance.

The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay.  It’s a peculiar form related to fiction and to autobiography and to poetry. 

Writing assignments: several micro-essays, two 5-7 page essays, a final of 12-14 pages.

We’ll likely read Kenji Yoshino's Covering and selections from Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family and Audre Lorde’s Zami; we’ll read essays and stories by James Baldwin, Tess Schlesinger, Richard Ford, Jean Toomer, etc.  We’ll lean on Philip Lopate’s Art of the Personal Essay.

Writing assignments will broad; that is, they will allow for a variety of responses.

This course is open to English majors only.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Writing Fiction Across Genres

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Tranter, Kirsten
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 20 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Chandler, Raymond: The Big Sleep; French, Tana: In The Woods; Miéville, China: The City and The City

Other Readings and Media

A course reader including short stories, extracts and essays will be available before the start of classes.

The required texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, located on Bancroft Way (a little west of Telegraph Avenue).

Description

This course will explore modes of creative writing in several distinct contemporary genres of fiction: crime, fantasy & SF, and romance, with the goal of learning to engage creatively with key conventions that define each genre, while developing foundational aspects of craft such as voice, characterization, dialogue, setting, conflict and plot. The division of literature into different kinds of writing is an ancient practice, yet genre conventions are not fixed and immutable rules or distinctions. Students should be prepared to read widely, with a view to exploring how authors approach genre as a set of protocols that invite engagement in creative, playful, and critical ways, from influential classics to contemporary experiments with genre boundaries. We will aim to develop a critical perspective on the place of genre fiction in general, and these genres in particular, in contemporary literary culture. Students will produce their own creative writing in different genres through regular short exercises, and will share and discuss their writing in small groups, developing tools for editing and revision. In addition to a final short story, assignments will include providing feedback on other students’ work, including one formal response paper.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing, 2138 University Ave. (between Shattuck Ave. & Walnut St.), (510) 704-9700

Description

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Students will write two short stories, a number of shorter exercises, weekly critiques of their peers’ work, and be required to attend and review two fiction readings.  The course will be organized as a workshop and attendance is mandatory. All student stories will be edited and critiqued by the instructor and by other students in the class.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Strout, E.: Best American Short Stories, 2013

Description

This course is a creative writing workshop.  Students will write 3 short exercises and 2 short stories (approximately 50 pages over the whole semester).  We will discuss the stories in the anthology as well as work produced by students in the workshop. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 8-10 (double-spaced) pages of your fiction (no poetry, drama, screenplays, or academic writing), by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Description

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry.  Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing done under extreme formal constraints.  In addition, there’ll be regular commentary on other students’ work and two instances of recitation. All readings will be drawn from a course reader.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Expository and Critical Writing : Crafting the Critical Essay

English 143D

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

All assigned texts will be in a Course Reader.

Description

This course is designed to prepare and support students who are planning to write a critical research essay as part of the English major.  We will begin by discussing various kinds of literary critical essays in order to identify models and methods to support our own practice.  Through short readings and writing exercises, we will work through the stages of the literary critical project: from formulating a question, to gathering and organizing evidence, to structuring an argument, to writing clear prose, to learning the value of revision.  Much of our class time will be devoted to workshops, in which students will read and respond to each other’s work at each stage in the writing process.  By offering as well as receiving detailed feedback, students will learn how to engage productively with the challenges of producing critical work that is complex, clear, and relevant.   A twenty-page paper will be due at the semester’s end. 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your essay/expository writing by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragaph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Farber, Thomas
Time: W 3-6
Location: 106 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

No texts.

Description

Like & Love: an upper-division creative nonfiction writing workshop, open to continuing undergraduate and graduate students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three literary nonfiction 5-10 page pieces. Each will take as point of departure the words and emotions like or love. What’s liked or loved (or not) and so described may include people, places, things. Each week, students will also turn in one-page critiques of the two or three student pieces being work-shopped as well as a 1-page journal entry on prompts assigned (these entries may be used as part of the longer pieces). Probable semester total of written pages, including critiques:  60-70. Class attendance required.

Note: Students accepted to this fall's English 243N, which had to be cancelled at the last minute, are welcome to enroll in this class; please apply electronically as usual, but you can consider yourself admitted.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 pages of your creative nonfiction or fiction by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Special Topics: American Modernism

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Description

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a range of responses to such events as World War I and the Great Migration, while also reflecting on some of the subtler transformations that made everyday life in these decades feel "modern." Our readings will be accompanied by a look at the period's visual culture, including painting, photography, and film. Texts by William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot, and more.

This class is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Fathers and Sons

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Isenberg, Steven
Isenberg, Steven
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Book List

Ackerley, J. R.: My Father and Myself; Amis, Martin: Experience; Buckley, Christopher: Losing Mum and Pup; Gosse, Edmund: Father and Son; Miller, Arthur: Death of a Salesman; Morrison, Blake: And When Did You Last See Your Father?; Roth, Philip: Patrimony; Turgenev, Ivan: Fathers and Sons; Waugh, Alexander: Fathers and Sons; Wolff, Tobias: A Boy's Life

Description

We will explore the burdens and blessings, affections and alienation of the father-son relationship through the novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and a play by American, British, and Russian writers.

Their works take us to how sons look back on the ways and means of how they achieved their course and identity, and the centrality of their father. In doing so, matters of married life, family structure and dynamics, religious belief, politics, sexuality, professional careers, and education all come to the fore.

At the center of our readings, from childhood to the death of the father, are some of the strongest forces that shape lives and destinies, and reveal the deepest emotions, and these memories, deliberations, testimony and imaginings have given us compelling literature.

There will be four six- to eight-page essays required, which will comprise 80% of the class grade. 20% will take into account class participation. There will be no final exam.

 


Special Topics: Scotland and Romanticism

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Book List

Burns, Robert : Selected Poems and Songs; Hogg, James: Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Johnson, Samuel and Boswell, James: Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland and Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides; Momus: The Book of Scotlands; Scott, Walter: Rob Roy; Smollett, Tobias: Humphry Clinker; Stevenson, Robert Louis: Kidnapped; Stevenson, Robert Louis: The Master of Ballantrae; Wordsworth, Dorothy: Recollections of a Tour Made in Scotland

Other Readings and Media

A course reader featuring additional readings by James Macpherson, Margaret Oliphant, and others.

Description

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms for cultural movements and historical periods that were invented later): social history, anthropology, political economy, the indigenous epic, the poetry of popular life, and the historical novel. Scotland also became a notable place within the symbolic geography of Romanticism – a site of lost worlds of tradition and allegiance, of ghosts and heroes – an imaginary role it still holds today: although debates around the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence have drawn sparingly on the nostalgic appeal of Romantic Scotland, to the surprise of some. Our course will consider the production of Romanticism by Scottish writers and institutions as well as its consumption in tourist itineraries and media fantasies. We will discuss the problem that Scotland poses for the definition of Romanticism: on one hand, it's the original Romantic nation, and on the other (according to the critical orthodoxy of the past sixty years) it's the locus of an untimely, inauthentic or pathological Romanticism. We will read works from the key Scottish innovations in poetry and fiction (James Macpherson's "Poems of Ossian"; Robert Burns and the vernacular poetry revival; Walter Scott, James Hogg, and historical fiction) in the long eighteenth century; consider the versions of Scotland discovered (and constructed) by English literary visitors (Samuel Johnson, William and Dorothy Wordsworth); and we will look at the legacy of Romantic Scotland in the current rethinking of Scotland’s status within the British state, in Victorian and contemporary Scottish fiction, poetry and critical writing.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Special Topics: Literature in the Century of Film

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 126 Barrows


Description

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts that are concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays which not only help us better understand the social implications of media technologies, but also show how literature itself tries to understand its new place as one medium among many. The class will consider such topics as the status of reading in a culture of looking, the politics of the extremely popular, celebrity as a way of life, and the commercial origins of the modern work of art. Of particular interest will be texts that address directly the mythology of Hollywood, as well as writers who borrow liberally from film technique as an aesthetic resource.


Special Topics: The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Naiman, Eric
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 56 Barrows


Book List

Nabokov, V.: Laughter in the Dark; Nabokov, V.: Lolita; Nabokov, V.: Pnin; Nabokov, V.: The Gift; Nabokov, V.: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight

Description

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beginning with several short stories, we will examine some of the fiction of his European period, before turning our attention to Lolita and Pnin. Competing interpretations of Nabokov will be considered, but our emphasis will be on metafiction, the theme of perversity and Nabokov's cultivation of a perverse reader.

"Curiously enough, one cannot read a book: one can only reread it." Students should expect to devote a considerable amount of time to reading and rereading and should come to class prepared to discuss the assigned texts. Participants in the class should anticipate reading (and then, in a perfect world, curiously rereading) 150 pages per week. Written work will consist of two papers (5 to 10 pages) on topics to be chosen in consultation with the professor. Penalties will be assessed for late papers. There will be a midterm and a final examination.

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 134F.


Literature and History: The Seventies

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 205 Dwinelle


Book List

Didion, Joan: The Book of Common Prayer; Herr, Michael: Dispatches; Kingston, Maxine Hong: The Woman Warrior; LeGuin, Ursula K.: The Dispossessed; Roth, Philip: The Ghost Writer

Other Readings and Media

In addition to the novels and nonfiction listed above, we will be examining a number of films, such as Medium Cool, The Godfather, Taxi Driver, and Saturday Night Fever.

Description

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. "The '70s" routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when "it seemed like nothing happened."

Yet we can see now that the decade of the '70s was two things at once. On the one hand, it was a time of cultural renaissance—the era that sponsored the New Hollywood of Scorcese, Coppola, et al.; the music of funk, disco, punk and New Wave; the postmodern theater of Saturday Night Live, Sam Shepard and others; the sci-fi boom represented by Ursula LeGuin, Samuel Delany and others; and the quite variously innovative fictions of Philip Roth, Maxine Hong Kingston, Walter Abish, and so many more. On the other hand, it was a period of intense political realignments—for instance, the shock of the oil crisis; the fall of Nixon and the fall of Saigon; the advent of women's liberation, gay liberation, and environmentalism as mass grassroots movements; the rise of the Sunbelt and the dawning of the conservative revolution. One might even say that the '70s were the most interesting decade of the post-WWII era: the period when the dreams of the '60s were most intensely, if achingly, fulfilled.

It may also be the decade closest to our own contemporary moment. In this class, we will consider how the roots of our current predicament lie in the earlier decade--with its uncertainty about the oil supply, its stagnant economy, its alarm at Islamic fundamentalism, its fetish for self-fulfillment, its reality TV and its fascination with the appeal of instant and often empty celebrity. We will, in turn, reflect on how Americans in the '70s struggled with many of the dilemmas that we face now.


Literature and Popular Culture

English 176

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Literature and Linguistics

English 179

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Book List

Heaney, Seamus: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation: Bilingual Edition; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%200%205%200%200%200%200%200%200%200%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-unhide%3Ano%3B%0A%09mso-style-qformat%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%7D%0A.MsoChpDefault%0A%09%7Bmso-style-type%3Aexport-only%3B%0A%09mso-default-props%3Ayes%3B%0A%09font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-ansi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-language%3AJA%3B%7D%0A%40page%20WordSection1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.WordSection1%0A%09%7Bpage%3AWordSection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E--> A reader containing most required articles and literary texts will be available from University Copy.  Core articles included in it are by Roman Jakobson, Paul Kiparsky and Ann Banfield; core English literary texts are by Shakespeare, Bob Dylan, Dylan Thomas, W.B. Yeats, Robert Pinsky, William Blake and Walt Whitman; and other languages represented in it include French, Italian, Chinese, Finnish, Galician and Garifuna.

Description

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%200%205%200%200%200%200%200%200%200%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A3%200%200%200%201%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-unhide%3Ano%3B%0A%09mso-style-qformat%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3APalatino%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%7D%0A.MsoChpDefault%0A%09%7Bmso-style-type%3Aexport-only%3B%0A%09mso-default-props%3Ayes%3B%0A%09font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-ansi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-size%3A10.0pt%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-language%3AJA%3B%7D%0A%40page%20WordSection1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.WordSection1%0A%09%7Bpage%3AWordSection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E-->

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through exploration of whether and if so how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and alliteration; syntactic parallelism; formulas of oral composition; and special narrative uses of pronouns, tenses and other subjective features of language to express point of view and represent speech and thought.  The emphasis will be on literature in English, but comparisons with literature in other languages will also be drawn.  No knowledge of linguistics will be presupposed, but linguistic concepts will be introduced, explained and used.


Autobiography: Disability Memoir

English 180A

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 141 Giannini


Book List

Bauby, J.-D.: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly; Cheney, T.: Manic: A Memoir; Danquah, M.: Willow Weep for Me; Galloway, T.: Mean Little Deaf Queer; Guest, P.: One More Theory About Happiness; Hathaway, K.: The Little Locksmith; Keller, H.: The World I Live In; Kingsley, J. and Levitz, M.: Count Us In; Laborit, E.: The Cry of the Gull; Simon, R. : Riding the Bus with My Sister

Description

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists however, often criticize these texts for the ways they can reinforce the notion that disability is a personal tragedy that must be overcome through superhuman effort rather than a set of cultural conditions that could be changed to improve the lives of many individuals with similar impairments. Are these texts agents for social change or just another form of freak show? This course will examine a diverse range of disability memoirs to develop an understanding of autobiography as a literary form.    

 


The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 277 Cory


Other Readings and Media

Course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing, 2138 University Avenue, Berkeley.

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                                                                  -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artefacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty – how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories.  So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


The Novel: The Novel as a Literary Genre

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: Note new time: MW 2:30-4
Location: Note new location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Eliot, George: Middlemarch; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady; Robbe-Grillet: Jealousy; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Description

Henry James, writing in 1888, describes his cultural moment as a time of remarkable transformation in the production and reception of the English language novel.  At the beginning of the century, James observes, “there was a comfortable, good-humoured feeling abroad that a novel is a novel, as a pudding is a pudding, and that our only business with it could be to swallow it.”  But in the wake of Dickens and Thackeray, and propelled by George Eliot, the English novel has taken on, James believes, a new seriousness as a literary form.  The novel now has, he declares, a “theory, a conviction, a consciousness of itself behind it.”

This course explores the relation between the novel’s developing self-consciousness as a literary form and the theories of the novel that help provide the terms for generic description.  Our study moves in reverse chronological order: by beginning with twentieth-century novelists and theorists, we can better appreciate the nineteenth-century realist project as a distinctive aesthetic practice and type of cultural work.

Our study of the novel will focus on Jealousy, by Robbe-Grillet; To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf; The Portrait of a Lady, by Henry James; Middlemarch, by George Eliot; and Bleak House, by Charles Dickens.  A course reader includes theoretical readings from Auerbach, Lukács, Bakhtin, Moretti, Williams, Watt, Trilling, Lanser, Cohn, Robbe-Grillet and others. 

 


Science Fiction

English 180Z

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 102 Wurster


Book List

Dick, Philip K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Hoffman, E.T.A.: The Sandman; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Strugatsky , Arkady and Boris: Roadside Picnic; Wells, H.G.: The Island of Doctor Moreau; Whitehead, Colson: Zone One

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature's encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation lie the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of 'being', a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. You may of course bring others.


Research Seminar: The Temporality of Faulkner's Novels

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Faulkner, W.: Absalom, Absalom!; Faulkner, W.: As I Lay Dying; Faulkner, W.: Light in August; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby; Toomer, Jean: Cane; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader available from Odin Readers.

Description

Jean-Paul Sartre has famously compared Faulkner’s sense of time to “a man sitting in a convertible and looking back.”  From this perspective, Sartre contends, the only view is that of the past, made “hard, clear and immutable” in its isolation.  Yet if Faulkner writes with a gaze fixed on the Southern past, his historical consciousness has been shaped by the experience of time in the modern moment—an idea Sartre nicely conveys through the figure of the convertible ride.

This seminar explores the complex registers of time in Faulkner’s major novels.  Special attention is given to the relationship between the social experience of time represented in Faulkner’s story worlds and the readerly experience of narrative time created through Faulkner’s innovative handling of narrative.  To gain a better sense of the literary models that influenced Faulkner, we will also read a few key works by other modernist writers. 

A course reader will include essays by thinkers who helped to shape the modern understanding of time.  Students will be guided through the planning and execution of a fifteen-page paper, due at the end of the term.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Metamorphosis, Monsters, and the Supernatural Everyday

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Danner, Mark
Time: M 3-6
Location: 103 Wheeler


Description

We dream of becoming something other than what we are. To be human is to be in love with transformation. That love of becoming something other, of transforming ourselves from one thing to another, infuses our literature since the first artists took up ochre and charcoal to sketch out a half-man, half-beast on a cave wall. In this seminar we will try to grasp and analyze this urge to transform, metamorphose and transcend, from prehistory to the gaudy metamorphoses of Ovid and Apuleius to the elaborate composite creatures of the medieval and fairy tale bestiary and up through the monsters and misbegottens that populate the Victorian mind (Mary Shelley’s New Prometheus, Stevenson's Mr. Hyde, Stoker's Count Dracula, Wilde's Dorian Gray). Armed with this history, we will take a new look at the teeming ranks of batmen, werewolves, vampires, and X-men that crowd our contemporary popular imagination.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Clsases for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Gardezi, Nilofar
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 190 was canceled (1/14/15).

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Materialism--Ancient and Modern

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Byron: Don Juan; Homer: The Iliad ; Lucretius: The Nature of Things; Melville: Moby-Dick, or The Whale; Weil: The Iliad or The Poem of Force

Description

“As human beings we inhabit an ineluctably material world. We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions and on pitiless cosmic motions, on the material artifacts and natural stuff that populate our environment, as well as on socioeconomic structures that produce and reproduce the conditions of our everyday life. In light of this massive materiality, how could we be anything other than materialist?” So write the editors of a recent collection of essays on New Materialisms (2010). The aim of this seminar is to consider how four monumental literary texts, ancient and modern, reckon with “this massive materiality.” For our purpose, “ancient” means Homer (The Iliad) and Lucretius (The Nature of Things), and “modern” means the nineteenth century: Byron’s comic masterpiece Don Juan and Melville’s anything-but-comical Moby-Dick. Concentrating on these four texts will allow us to examine the possibility of an epic materialism, one that—in the absence of spiritual, divine, or metaphysical principles—minimizes human mastery and instead strives to convey a comprehensive range of worldly forces: bodily, physical, environmental, technical, economic, and political. Some through-lines in our seminar will be: violence (and especially war) as an all-encompassing material condition; the role of empirical observation and description in rendering the material world; the materiality of the literary object, itself subject to copying, piracy, deterioration, and repurposing. As time permits, we will also raise questions about the “new materialisms” in criticism and philosophy, reading essays by Weil, Althusser, Greenblatt, Harman, Bennett, and Morton, among others. Why has materialism become so appealing to recent thinkers? How do these “new materialisms” open windows onto past texts? Perhaps more importantly: can these older texts speak back, altering the way we view current trends?

In addition to informal assignments throughout the semester, students will produce 20 pages of writing, divided into two or three essays, including the option of a longer research paper.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Literature and Revolution

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, C.: A Tale of Two Cities; Hedges, C.: Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt; Malraux, A.: Man's Fate; Marx, K.: The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte; Orwell, G.: Homage to Catalonia; Platonov, A.: The Foundation Pit; Serge, V.: Conquered City; Stoppard, T.: The Coast of Utopia

Other Readings and Media

Films:  October: Ten Days that Shook the World; The Square

Description

This course will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Our starting point will be the French Revolution, our ending point will be the Arab Spring, but our primary focus will be the troubled, international history of twentieth-century communism.  Throughout the semester, we will trace how literary texts allow for multiple ways of theorizing revolution and, more broadly, the flow of history.  How do these texts help us to understand the tendency for revolutionary illusions to give way to disillusion?  How do revolutions both expand and limit creative possibilities?  What does revolution mean in the twenty-first century—long after communism’s collapse and the supposed “end of history”?

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don’t buy books until after the first class.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Toni Morrison

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new location: 122 Wheeler


Book List

Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Morrison, Toni: Jazz; Morrison, Toni: Love; Morrison, Toni: Paradise; Morrison, Toni: Song of Solomon; Morrison, Toni: Sula; Morrison, Toni: The Bluest Eye

Description

We will read as many of Toni Morrison’s novels as we can in the time we have. Most class meetings will be organized around discussion of the assigned daily reading, though I will intrude with brief lectures when I feel that doing so will help the discussion along. We will address whatever the members of the group feel to be interesting or important, but I will try to keep us attentive to the question of the development of Morrison's art over the course of her career, to the ways in which her writing recurs to certain basic issues and questions, but does so in a way that is constantly innovating, to her writing as a dialogue between recursive and progressive movement. Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion, with occasional brief (less than a page) writing assignments to facilitate discussion.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Shakespeare’s Versification

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 121 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This course will explore Shakespeare's artistic use of the formal resources of verse, especially meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism, as well as, by way of contrast, some of his use of music.  We will consider what defines these forms; how they vary across lyric, narrative and dramatic genres; where they come from and how they develop; how they shape performance; and most of all, what they contribute to the emotional power and beauty of his works.  In the past, the course has focused on the Sonnets, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Richard II, Hamlet and The Winter's Tale, but that could change.

The course is a research seminar, so various short papers and oral presentations will be required, all in the service of one long paper exploring some aspect of Shakespeare's works of the student's own choosing through attention to his verse.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Mass Entertainment in Classical Hollywood Film

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new location: 106 Dwinelle


Description

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in Hollywood from the birth of talking pictures to the start of W.W. II.  Among the films we'll discuss are The Jazz Singer, Public EnemyFootlight Parade, The Lady Eve, City Lights, The WesternerSnow White and the Seven DwarfsHis Girl Friday, Meet John Doe, and Citizen Kane.  

Most of these movies are available for rent or purchase from iTunes or Amazon Instant Video.  You may view all of them for free at the Media Resources Center in Moffitt Library.  The only required text will be a Course Reader.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 7-10 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: The Handmaid's Tale; Bellamy, Edward: Looking Backward 2000-1887; Dick, Philip K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Gilman, Charlotte P.: Herland; Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; More, Thomas: Utopia; Morris, William: News from Nowhere; Orwell, George: 1984; Wells, Herbert G.: Three Prophetic Novels; Zamyatin, Yevgeny: We

Description

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers to try to realize the ideal society, most of it has had limited practical impact, yet has managed to provoke readers in various ways--for instance, as a kind of imaginative fiction that comments on "things as they are" indirectly yet effectively, with fantasy and satire in varying doses. Among the critical questions posed by such material are the problematic status of fiction that is not primarily mimetic, but written in the service of some ulterior purpose; the shifting relationships between what is and what authors think might be or ought to be; how to create the new and strange other than by recombining the old and familiar; and so on. Some films (dystopian rather than utopian) will be included in the syllabus and discussed (although probably not shown) in class.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wai-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M. + films W 7-10 P.M.
Location: 225 Wheeler


Book List

Deutelbaum, M. and Pogue, L., eds.: A Hitchcock Reader; Modieski, T.: The Women Who Knew Too Much

Description

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will consider socio-cultural backgrounds, gender problems, and psychological and Marxist readings as well as star studies.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Oversexed Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Time: TTh 2-3:30 + films W 7-10 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Williams, Tennessee: A Streetcar Named Desire

Other Readings and Media

Film texts by Pedro Almodóvar:  All About My Mother; Bad Education; Broken Embraces; The Flower of My Secret; Law of Desire; Pepi, Luci, Bom; The Skin I Live In; Talk to Her; Volver; Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Intertexts for Pedro Almodóvar:  Luis Buñuel, Viridiana; John Cassavetes, Opening Night; Georges Franju, Eyes without a Face; Mel Gibson, The Passion of the Christ; Rainer Werner Fassbinder, The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant; Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo; Joseph Mankiewicz, All About Eve; Roberto Rosselini, Voyage to Italy

Description

Tabloid, soap opera, camp, porn, classicism, citation, stories-within-stories, films-within-films—these are some of the styles and devices that Pedro Almodovar mixes together to render a subject matter typically consisting of exorbitant and often taboo sexual compulsion. The course will ask students to reflect on the interrelation between a heterogeneous form and the aberrancy of desire, and between highly plot-propelled stories and erotic drivenness.

Seminar members are required to write weekly response papers in addition to a final paper.  A willingness to participate in class discussion is also a must.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Sam Otter in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Otter will give out CECS (class entry codes) in class in November.

There will be no texts for this course.

 


Honors Course

English H195B

Section: 2
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Description

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Katherine Snyder in Fall 2014. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Professor Snyder will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November.

There will be no texts for this course.

 

 


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Graduate Readings: Erotic Renaissance

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: MW 9:30-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Aretino, Pietro: Dialogues (Ragionamenti); Labé, Louise: Complete Works; Vignali, Antonio: La Cazzaria (The Book of the Prick); d'Aragona, Tullia: Dialogue on the Infinity of Love

Description

A sampling of sixteenth-century discourses of sexuality, theories of Eros, artworks and writings about the erotic in art, from Italy, France and England. The aim is to test the hypothesis of my recent research – that an “erotic revolution” transformed Italian art and art writing – and to explore how far it applies to other literatures. For a brief period, after 1500 and before the Counter-Reformation, arousal could be interpreted as a positive experience that yielded new ways of seeing and producing art, at the center rather than the margins of the culture. Some of the texts we will read are openly libertine or obscenely explicit, others develop the amorous sonnet and the philosophical love-treatise in more elevated language, but all manifest the “corporeal turn” away from strict Petrarchanism and Neoplatonism. Authors include Pietro Aretino, Marsilio Ficino, Antonio Vignali, Baldessare Castiglione, Tullia d’Aragona, Veronica Franca, François Rabelais, Louise Labé, Michel de Montaigne, Pierre de Brantôme, Philip Sidney, Thomas Nashe, John Donne and William Shakespeare.

The first half of the semester will focus on art and writing in Italy, typified by the range of Aretino’s letters, poems and dialogues – from high aesthetics to (literal) pornography. The emphasis will be on primary texts and images, but to frame the conversation I will also designate passages from my recently completed book manuscript Eros Visible, which I describe as “a broad, synthetic history of this ‘sex-positive’ phase of the Renaissance, when lascivious became a neutral or endearing term, when sculpture was valued for ‘filling every viewer’s mind with libido’ (Aretino) and beauty was discovered in earthly rather than ‘celestial’ love. Even more than beauty artists strove for the living quality of the image, ‘awakening’ and reanimating the Classical models they studied, and erotic response was the best guarantee of vitality. In this stimulating moment artists’ discoveries and writers’ ideas fed each other. Patrons and critics who valued ‘profane’ Eros more highly also encouraged sensuous intensity and sexual subject-matter. Recovering libertine art is only one element in this revolution, however. I explore the increasing emphasis on erotic passion in Renaissance art theory, which challenged artists to depict states of intense feeling and to evolve sensuous techniques that ‘melt’ or ‘penetrate’ the viewer likewise. My subject is not so much sex in the explicit sense as Eros in general – the evocation of desire in and for art.”

All texts will be taught in English, with originals in Italian or French on hand. 203-series courses are designed as exploratory “proseminars” or “readings” and may be taken by specialists and non-specialists, either as a survey (with paper topics on core texts or images from the syllabus) or as a research seminar. Course materials will mostly be available in electronic form for download, and include high-resolution images of the erotic engraving series I Modi and The Loves of the Gods, together with paintings by Titian, Parmigianino, Bronzino and Michelangelo. Extensive listings of secondary reading will be available, including the full text of Eros Visible, which can be mined electronically for figures and bibliographic references.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Readings in Chicano/Latino Narrative

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Time: F 12-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

In this graduate reading course we will survey Chican@/Latino narrative, art and some drama/film from the 1960s through more recent cultural and aesthetic formations.

The seminar will open with a survey of a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano/Latina communities that led to publication/performance of politically spirited and unifying poetry, art, novels and documentary film. Needless to say, we will be touching on the cultural production of many Latin@ communities: Mexican/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican, Dominicano, Cubano,

­We will think about the convergence of a political aesthetic in the work of these novelists, poets, painters/sculptors, filmmakers, and we will try to account for the contrasts and connections with the wider spheres of art and politics that influenced their work.  To help situate and ground our thinking, we will outline the historical and political backgrounds of this period and press these up against a cultural  subjectivity that articulated resistance to the U.S. hegemony just as it often restated the patriarchal, homophobic, and nationalist /identitarian problematic that confronted the Chican@/Latin@ community in the first place. We will think about social and political content, of course, but I also want to look at the formation of a distinct aesthetic experiment with language and form/genre and audience.

Although I haven’t yet fully decided on the book list, we will definitely be reading Tomas Rivera  (y no se lo trago la tierra/and the earth did not devour him), Oscar Zeta Acosta (The Revolt of the Cockroach People), Ana Castillo (So Far From God and selected essays), Gloria Anzaldua (Borderlands/La Frontera),  Julia Alvarez (In the Time of the Butterflies), Juno Diaz (The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao, maybe That’s the Way you Lose Her), Sandra Cisneros (Woman Hollering Creek, maybe Caramelo), maybe Salvador Plascencia (The People of Paper), and then we will read selections from the poetry, drama, prose of writers like Alurista,  Sandra María Esteves,  Lorna Dee Cervantez, Gary Soto, Tato Laviera, Miguel Pinero, Josefina López,  Gustavo Pérez-Firmat.  I hope also to look at and discuss the Chican@/Latin@ art scene in New York and Los Angeles.

Serious question:  Who and what am I leaving out?  If you are thinking about taking this class, please feel free to contact me at gpadilla@berkeley.edu if you have suggestions, questions, or ideas for other figures of study we should consider.

Most of the readings are in English and/or in translation.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Judgment in Early Medieval Literature

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: W 11-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Arendt, Hannah: Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy; Kant, Immanuel: Critique of Judgment;

Recommended: Hall, J.R. Clark: A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary

Other Readings and Media

A photocopied course pack.

Description

Judgment--alternately or simultaneously a mental faculty, abstract entity, virtue, void, or threat--pervades medieval literature and thought. Focusing particularly (though not exclusively) on Anglo-Saxon England, in this seminar we will attempt to understand judgment's varied forms in the early Middle Ages, and will work toward developing a critical discourse adequate to the topic and period. Our investigations will include aesthetic judgment; wisdom and ideas of kingship; hermeneutics; and judgment’s role in joining the individual and the communal. We will be reading modern critical and philosophical works alongside medieval ones; primary texts will include Juliana; Daniel; the Solomon and Saturn and Soul and Body dialogues; Maxims I; Judgment Day poems in Old English and Latin, including Christ III; and the Fonthill Letter. Work for the course will entail in-class translation, as well as presentations and a final conference-length paper.

Prerequisite: strong reading knowledge of Old English.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: The Anglophone Novel

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Rhys , Jean: Voyage in the Dark ; Beukes, Lauren: Zoo City; Ghosh, Amitav: Calcutta Chromosome; Kincaid, Jamaica: Lucy; Lamming, George: In The Castle Of My Skin; Saro-Wiwa, Ken: Sozaboy: A Novel Written In Rotten English; Tutuola, Amos: My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts; Welsh, Irvine: Trainspotting

Description

Anglophone fiction is a capacious term. Simply put, Anglophone fiction refers to fiction written in English; however, in the context of postwar canon formation, Anglophone refers specifically to literature written in English from former British colonies (excluding the United States)— known at one point by the anodyne term Commonwealth literature. This course will trace the changing definition of Anglophone fiction from Commonwealth literature to contemporary designations of “global” or “world literature”, and “planetary fiction”. In addition to our novels, we will read a selection of critical works from the fields of world literature, translation theory, and speculative fiction. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Fiction Writing Workshop

English 243A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Egan, Jennifer: The Best American Short Stories, 2014

Description

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about writing from various sources. Students will write and revise at least 40 pages of fiction over the course of the semester.

Undergraduates are welcome to apply.  Class attendance is mandatory.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 15 double-spaced pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

NourbeSe Philip, M.: Zong!; Ondaatje, Michael: Collected Works of Billy the Kid; Taylor, Catherine: Apart

Description

Poet Erica Hunt, writing about the “pleasure of cultural resonance” and “Black sources of a radical aesthetic” described “an aesthetics whose goals are critical, investigative, disruptive [and] which aims to wear its thinking process on its sleeve, where method is performative and material.”  This spring I’d like for us to think about and respond to ideas about mixture and source and resurgence; I’d like for us to think about poetry as an investigative process, but one not separated from the visionary, not cut off from song or from particular obsession.  The idea is for our work as poets to interact some with material from worlds—technical, gossipy, historical, music-based, visual, sociological, etc.—beyond the familiar page in the anthology.  The idea will be, simply, for us to actively explore the sources of our various interests. 

My interest is in opening things up rather than excluding.  Projects that are creative and have vista (to paraphrase poet Walt Whitman), even if they do not seem to fit exactly the description above, are welcome. 

Weekly writing deadlines, field trips, public performance.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Graduate Proseminar: Renaissance (17th Century)

English 246D

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

Bacon, Francis: Essays; Donne, John: Poems; Herbert, George: Poems; Hobbes, Thomas: Leviathan; Jonson, Ben: Poems; Marvell, Andrew: Poems; Milton, John: Political Writings

Description

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature, focusing on works by Francis Bacon, John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, Robert Herrick, Lucy Hutchinson, and Anne Halkett. We will discuss the relationship between literature and the court of James I, the explosion of pamphlet literature during the English civil war, the controversy over gender roles, the texts surrounding the regicide of Charles I, and the political, religious, and sexual radicalism of dissenting literary culture. We will also take up the question of the different ways in which Renaissance humanism and the literary culture of the Reformation contributed to the flowering of vernacular literature in seventeenth-century England, and will read widely in recent and not-so-recent secondary literature.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Proseminar: Romantic Period

English 246G

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Blake, W.: Complete Poetry and Prose; Burke, E.: Reflections on the Revolution in France; Byron: Major Works; Clare, J.: Later Poems; Coleridge, S.T.: Major Works; Godwin, W.: Caleb Williams; Keats, J.: Major Works; Shelley, M.W.G.: The Last Man; Shelley, P.B.: Major Works; Wordsworth, W.: Major Works

Description

“Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal/ Large codes of fraud and woe…”.

Taking these lines from Shelley’s “Mont Blanc” as a point of departure, we will read widely in literature from 1789 to 1830, considering the relation between voice and the law broadly conceived. Against the background of the treason trials and Gagging Acts of the 1790s and similarly repressive measures after the end of the Napoleonic wars, we will read novels, poems, dramas, and journalism in which formal and informal laws (“natural” law, the death penalty, the marriage contract, vagrancy, slavery and other forms of “property” law; also genre, meter, grammar, and social rules and conventions) are represented and contested. But we will also pay particular attention to voice as it’s conceived in complex relation to “codes.” (Secondary reading may include essays by Benjamin, Butler, Derrida, Foucault, Lacan, Rancière, and Schmitt.)

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) or Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) requirement.


Graduate Proseminar: American Literature to 1855

English 246I

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Bird, Robert Montgomery: Sheppard Lee; Brown, William Wells: Clotel; or, the President's Daughter; Cooper, James Fenimore: The Crater; Crafts, Hannah: The Bondwoman's Narrative; Fuller, Margaret: Woman in the Nineteenth Century; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: Blithedale Romance; Howe, Julia Ward: The Hermaphrodite; Judd, Sylvester: Margaret; Melville, Herman: Pierre; Poe, Edgar Allan: Fall of the House of Usher and Other Writings ; Prince, Mary: The History of Mary Prince; Sedgwick, Catharine Maria: The Linwoods; Simms, William Gilmore: The Partisan; Stoddard, Elizabeth: The Morgesons; Sweat, Margaret Jane Mussey: Ethel's Love Life; Thompson, John: The Life of John Thompson

Other Readings and Media

Course reader including criticism, short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe, and Robert Reed's The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict

Description

In this course, we will read widely in U.S. fiction and other narrative forms in the first half of the nineteenth century, bringing together the old and the new, the canonical and the peripheral, the long-in-print and the recently rediscovered. We will seek to take stock of the differences that such combinations and reorientations make for our understanding of literary studies. In addition, we will read a range of criticism dealing with the texts and with topics established and emerging. 

This course satisfies the Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.

 


Research Seminar: The Grammar of Poetry, the Poetry of Grammar

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Time: M 11-1
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Ashbery, John: Collected Poems; Bergson, Henri: Time and Free Will; Heidegger, Martin: Introduction to Metaphysics; Husserl, Edmund: Cartesian Meditations; O'Brien, Geoffrey: Sunday in the Park; Robertson, Lisa: The Weather; Shakespeare, William: Sonnets; Stevens , Wallace: Collected Poetry and Prose; Wittgenstein, Ludwig: Philosophical Investigations; Yeats, William Butler: Collected Poems

Other Readings and Media

There will be a lot of material on bcourses.

Description

I want to try a course that explores what Wittgenstein calls philosophical grammar, on the assumption that poets are the most likely characters to develop the full conceptual implications of how we deploy grammatical elements in our structuring of experience.  I have been trying to teach myself linguistics so that I can steer students within its resources.  But the focus of this class will be on how poetic structures define relational possibilities for understanding how we can make significant relationships between language and the world.  Let me give a few examples.  We will read Heidegger’s Introduction to Metaphysics and Bergson’s Time and Free Will, then do one or two classes on the ontological differences between poems relying on “is” and poems relying on “as.”  We will read Wittgenstein to flesh out how “now” introduces subjectivity into the world and can carry exclamatory force.  We will discuss deictics like “here” and “this” under the influence of Lisa Robertson’s work in The Weather.  We will read Husserl in relation to prepositions stressing modes of orienting ourselves toward the world.  ETC.

Students will participate in the course in two ways.  Small groups of students will lead discussions on poems that afford particularly interesting applications of the grammatical form we are discussing.  Or students can write poems which we will discuss for their grammatical impact.  Final papers can concentrate on one poet or one grammatical figure or compare and contrast poets and/or grammatical figures.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) or Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: note new location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Bechdel, Alison: Are You My Mother?; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Cunningham, Michael: The Hours; Foucault, Michel: The History of Sexuality; Freud, Sigmund: Dora; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels; Larsen, Nella: Quicksand and Passing; Stein, Gertrude: The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Toibin, Colin: The Master; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando

Other Readings and Media

Electronic files of critical essays,book chapters, and poetry will be available on bCourses; we will also screen several films.

Description

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and forth across a century (from Oscar Wilde to Alison Bechdel) to stage a series of encounters between the aesthetic practices of modernism and the discourses of queer theory.  As wemap the shifting contours of some key terms (“queer,” “trans,” “modernism”), we will pause to consider (among other things) the mobile dimensions of queer time and space; the historical migration of concepts such as hysteria, inversion, abjection, and shame; the mutual implication of race, gender, and sexuality (from the Harlem Renaissance through the rise of European fascism); the formal attributes of the closet; the legibility of transsexual/transgender bodies; the composition of affective histories; and contemporary queer revisions of modernist fiction. To complement (and complicate) the chronological axis of this inquiry, we will also attend to the metropolitan spaces in which sexual boundaries blurred and subcultures thrived, especially the three urban sites central to the modernist experiment: London, New York, and Paris.  A 20-25 page research paper will be due at the end of the semester.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.
 


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TBA
Location: TBA


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 20. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.