Announcement of Classes: Fall 2015

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Reading and Writing the City

MWF 10-11

The city can be many different things in literature. As a plot device, the city is often a place of danger and opportunity, a place where characters make their way or lose themselves in the attempt. As setting, the city may be open or closed; it m...(read more)

Wilson, Mary

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Marginalia

MWF 12-1

This course will begin with the request (and the requirement) that you read with pen in hand. But we'll quickly move from the idea of taking notes in the margins of material, printed pages to thinking of images, mov...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Thinking ‘Bout Forever: Poetry and Pop Music

MWF 2-3

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Literature of Environmental Instability and Hazard

MW 4-5:30

Wordsworth famously wrote, “Nature never did betray/ The heart that loved her.”  What then of storms and natural disasters – moments when our environment becomes disordered, disruptive...(read more)

Lewis, Rachel Thayer

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
The Art of Persuasion

TTh 8-9:30

Every author must face the problem of what constitutes persuasive speech. From Plato and Aristotle in fourth century B.C.E. Greece to the twentieth-century philosopher Kenneth Burke, theorists have struggled to understand rhetoric: what is it? How...(read more)

Mansky, Joseph

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
We, Myself, and Why: Individuals, Communities, and Outsiders

TTh 9:30-11

“I celebrate myself, and sing myself,

And what I assume you shall assume,

For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you”

-Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself”

 

What does it mean to...(read more)

Albernaz, Joseph

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
"Something about the light": Urban Subjectivity in Los Angeles Film and Literature

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we’ll explore the political, economic, cultural, and social histories that have culminated in Los Angeles's distended geography, smog-filtered light, and barely connected enclaves. We’ll learn how writers and filmmakers...(read more)

Muhammad, Ismail

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
The Ick Factor

TTh 12:30-2

How does ickiness work? What makes something grotesque? Why, so often, are we also laughing? This course will examine various texts that have that special something that turns our tummies. We will look at novels, stories, and films that generate d...(read more)

Clark, Rebecca

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Writing About Television

TTh 3:30-5

Writing about television constitutes one of the most popular forms of literary criticism outside of academic circles today. TV critic Lili Loofbourow argues that episode recaps and their in-depth analysis of our favorite shows fulfill our need for...(read more)

Chamberlain, Shannon

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Work and Play

MWF 11-12

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class:)

Work and play regulate the rhythm of living, but when was the last time you saw them represented as you experience them? Realistic novels may mention both t...(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Nineteenth-Century Monsters

MWF 1-2

What is a monster?  Why do we fear it?  What role does it play in our conception of ourselves and our world?  Our work in this class will focus on the figure of the monster, especially as it appears in the literature of nineteenth-c...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Post-1945 Deserts

MW 4-5:30

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class:)

In this course, our primary focus will be the cultural representation of the American desert in the post-1945 period. From the first detonation of the ...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
Break-Ups and Other Formal Ruptures

TTh 9:30-11

While a break-up may (in theory) end a relationship, it rarely ends a novel. This course will take its cue from novels and poems that dramatize the break-up in all of its obsessive, playful, and melancholy permutations in order to get a better gli...(read more)

Neal, Allison

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Language and Power

TTh 11-12:30

Language is a tool for expression, but also for manipulation and the exercise of power. In this class, we will be looking at a wide variety of the ways in which power makes itself felt through language, ranging from subtle and ostensibly honest pe...(read more)

Wilson, Evan

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Houses and Homes

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will consider the multiple forms the house and home can take, as well as the relationship between the individual house, apartment, dorm room, etc. and its surrounding environs. We will use a range of texts to help us theori...(read more)

Young, Rosetta

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Waking the Ghosts of Tom/ás Joad

TTh 2-3:30

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class.)

In this course we will think about what cultural historian Michael Denning has called the "lowercase grapes of wrath narrative," which emerged dur...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Human Variability and the Idea of Progress

TTh 3:30-5

Many of us tacitly surrender to the belief that “social progress is driven by technological innovation, which in turn follows an inevitable course.” Quite often, we encounter this idea of progress through variously coded ...(read more)

Dimitriou, Aristides

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
What Is Literature?

MWF 10-11

In What Is Literature?, Jean-Paul Sartre claims that the prose writer "is in a stuation in language; he is invested with words. They are prolongations of his meanings, his pincers, his antennae, his spectacles. He ...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Life Writing

MWF 12-1

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one's life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life? This cour...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Under Constructions

MWF 2-3

One of the key questions that critical writers ask about literature is "how"? How does the writer build the first sentence and finally end a scene, chapter, or stanza? How are the material surroundings of the characters rendered? How can...(read more)

Kelly, Tyleen Louise

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Modernity and Objectivity

MW 4-5:30

The early twentieth century was peculiarly preoccupied with its own modernity. While science and technology made great strides forward, two World Wars left devastation, and writers struggled to portray the tumult of a swiftly changing social lands...(read more)

Rodal, Jocelyn

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Living Photographically

MWF 11-12

This course examines the increasingly central role of photography in capturing and constituting events in our everyday lives. We will conduct a broad survey of critical essays on photography from its inception to the present day, tracking not only...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

M 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they have caused puzzlement and delight since their second edition, published in 1640. Over the course of th...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry:
The Reading of Poetry

MWF 12-1

How can we become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry and at the same time better writers of prose? How do poems use language differently than other forms of expression? How do they know how to say things without actually saying t...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 1-2

This section of English 27 has been canceled.

...(read more)
T. B. A.

27/2

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

This section of English 27 has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

27/3

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

The title of the course is “Introduction to the Study of Fiction,” but more specifically the course will be an introduction to analytic critical writing about fiction. We will work on close reading, on learning how to read with a mind ...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Immigrant Inscriptions

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will consider a variety of texts—contemporary fiction, classic and new film, journalism, history, and cultural criticism—that help us explore the possibilities for writing the migrant self and experience. The shifting...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 2-3; discussion sections F 2-3

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings ...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

This course will concentrate on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faerie Queene(Book I), and Milton’s Paradise Lost; additional works from the Norton Anthology will be read for literary and h...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1; discussion sections F 12-1

This course has two fundamental purposes. The first is to provide a broad working overview of the development of literature in English, from the end of the 17th century, in the wake of civil war, revolution, and restoration in England, to the mid-...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 1-2; discussion sections F 1-2

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century....(read more)

Puckett, Kent

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 10-11; discussion sections F 10-11

This course will provide an overview of the aesthetic shifts captured by such terms as realism, modernism, and postmodernism, with an emphasis on the relation between literary form and historical context. We will explore how literature responds to...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12; discussion sections F 11-12

This course will survey a range of English-language works spanning more than a century, examining the upheavals in literary forms during this period in relation to their historical and socio-political contexts. We will give prominence to the moder...(read more)

Zhang, Dora

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

W 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fictio...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Hwæt! Leorniað Englisc!

In this all-new version of the introduction to Old English, you will begin to read and write Old English from your first day in class, while also learning fundamental principles of grammar and historical la...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

C107/1

The Bible as Literature

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read the Bible in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

MWF 12-1

A survey of England's "century of revolution," focusing on relationships between literature, religion, and politics. 

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Picciotto, Joanna M

117A/1

Shakespeare:
Shakespeare before 1600

MW 11-12; discussion sections F 11-12

English 117A studies the first half of Shakespeare's career in depth. We'll focus on eight plays--a tragedy, three major comedies, and the great four-play "Lancastrian" cycle of histories--and on the Sonnets. And we will acquaint...(read more)

Landreth, David

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular&quot...(read more)

Marno, David

118/1

Milton

MW 4-5:30

Intensive reading in the poetry and prose of John Milton (1608-1674), written during a period of dramatic historical change, and including the most influential single poem in the English language, Paradise Lost. Our goal is to get under t...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

125B/1

The English Novel:
Dickens through Conrad

MW 4-5:30

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to the poe...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

125C/1

The European Novel:
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel

TTh 3:30-5

A close reading of selected works of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels resemble one another, differ from one another, and respond to one another, especially in their trea...(read more)

Paperno, Irina

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 9-10

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 1-2

How did the form, content, circulation, and ambitions of British literature change over the first half of the twentieth century? How did writers contend with historical upheavals such as World War I, suffrage, and the wane of empire? With the adve...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

130A/1

American Literature:
Before 1800

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald

130B/1

American Literature:
1800-1865

MW 1-2; discussion sections F 1-2

Reading Longfellow, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Jacobs, Fern, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson, we will pay particular attention to literary form and technique, to social and political context, and to the ideologic...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

130C/1

American Literature:
1865-1900

MW 4-5:30

A survey in United States literature from the Civil War to the beginning of the twentieth century. Course requirements include weekly reading responses, two essays, midterm, and final exam.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

131/1

American Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

134/1

Contemporary Literature

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Saha, Poulomi

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Mark Twain and the Gilded Age

TTh 11-12:30

Mark Twain’s and Charles Dudley Warner’s collaborative novel of 1873, The Gilded Age, has given a name to the American historical period of the post-Civil War era (roughly 1865 to 1890).  It is a period of great changes i...(read more)

Hutson, Richard

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Migrant Narratives

TTh 11-12:30

The topic of this course is “migrant narratives,” referring both to narratives about migrants and narratives that cross boundaries of one kind or another.  We’ll read a cluster of Chicana/o literary works published between 1...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Literature of The Great War

MWF 11-12

In the years following World War One, European intellectuals debated the implications of the new balance of power and the terms of the peace among the combatant nations, but they were haunted by the prospect of the decline of the West itself. A fo...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

141/2

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 4-5:30

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  St...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143B/1

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-li...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

What I take as a given is that poetry is a public activity, one with the job of disrupting the status quo, the “interested” discourse of TV and advertising, the endless double-talk of politics. This semester I’m wanting us to (read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143C/1

Long Narrative:
The Novel

TTh 2-3:30

The purpose of this course is to begin writing a novel. None of us will finish writing a novel in the three months we spend together. Novels take time, notwithstanding NaNoWriMo. There are some reported exceptions to this—Jack Kerouac wrote ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

MW 9:30-11

This course is a creative writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will read and discuss the essays in the assigned anthology as well as work submitted by students.  Writing assignments will include three ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

165/1

Special Topics:
Contemporary Poetry

MW 4-5:30

In this class we will read seven books of (very) contemporary poetry, which highlight the multiple national and linguistic identities that characterize the poetic subject in an increasingly globalized world. We will investigate different poetic st...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
T. B. A.

165/2

Special Topics

This section of English 165 has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
T. B. A.

165/3

Special Topics

This section of English 165 has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

165/4

Special Topics:
Longing and Belonging in Contemporary Writing

MW 3-4:30

This course will interrogate the possible relationships between desire and social position or identity (what I conceive myself to have and to lack) by reading contemporary literature in which (read more)

Langan, Celeste

165/5

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poems

TTh 2-3:30

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting the term "literature"'s own history and etymology, is relate...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

165/6

Special Topics

This class has been postponed till Spring 2016.

...(read more)
Lavery, Grace

165/7

Special Topics:
Modern California Books and Movies

Tuesdays 6-9 P.M.

Besides discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.

165/8

Special Topics:
Modern Medievalism: A Study of Medieval Poetry and Modern Fantasy

TTh 9:30-11

The medieval period is often swept under broad descriptors, like the "Dark Ages," and with these descriptors come equally vague notions of medieval society. One might, for example, imagine medieval society enveloped by religious hysteria...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

165AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen

166/1

Special Topics:
Epistles: The Letter in Life and Literature

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will explore one of the most intimate, versatile, and surprising of literary forms: (read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

166/2

Special Topics:
Where the Wild Things Are: Empire and Travel Writing

MWF 11-12

This course journeys to the far-flung places where wild things roam. Our itinerary takes us through novels, travel narratives, journalism, and online sources that depict fantastical lands populated by wild beasts, "savage" peoples, and s...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 12:30-2

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist ...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

175/1

Literature and Disability

MWF 12-1

In this course we will think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act theory, fictional utterance is a peculiarly "parasitic" form of s...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will investigate lyric poetry—its complex history, its intricate forms and practices, and some of its philosophical underpinnings and theoretical surround.  We’ll start by thinking about the so-called “roo...(read more)

Falci, Eric

180R/1

The Romance

MW 12:30-2

Everybody thinks they know what “romance” is, but in fact the term is controversial and difficult to define. Does it mean escapist fiction with monsters and enchanters, entertaining but unbelievable? (What makes fiction believable(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

190/1

Research Seminar:
Aesthetics and Enlightenment

MW 9:30-11

The enlightenment was the first great century of modern aesthetics, giving us a critical vocabulary to think about how, as Foucault put it, we construct ourselves as works of art. This course will give the student a taste of some of the foundation...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
T. B. A.

190/2

Research Seminar:
Materialism: Ancient and Modern

MW 11-12:30

“As human beings we inhabit an ineluctably material world. We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

190/3

Research Seminar:
Henry James and Novelistic Aesthetics

MW 2-3:30

This course focuses on the art of the novel as practiced and theorized by Henry James.  James believed that, despite two centuries of novelistic production, the art of the novel was still to be discovered.   During his lifetime and ...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

190/4

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Blanton, C. D.

190/6

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 9:30-11

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attentio...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/7

Research Seminar:
Ethics and U.S. Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

Is reading good for us? Or bad for us? How does literature work as, or against, moral philosophy? What responsibilities do the author and the reader hold with regard to texts? What is the relationship between ethics, aesthetics, and affect? How do...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

190/8

Research Seminar:
Reading Walden

TTh 12:30-2

Thoreau believed that "[b]ooks must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written." That's what we'll try to do, reading Walden twice over the course of the semester, once to get our bearings, then again to...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/9

Research Seminar:
Ideology

TTh 2-3:30

This research seminar will focus on the concept of ideology. We will examine the manner in which ideology has been employed as a category for social analysis, but we will gear our attention especially toward the ways ideology has been useful for l...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

190/10

Research Seminar:
Contemporary Native American Fiction

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

190/11

Research Seminar:
Poetry and Poetics in the Middle Ages

TTh 2-3:30

This class will explore early England's shifting literary landscape in order to better understand what poetry was and what it was for in the Middle Ages. Juxtaposing our close analyses of individual poems and groups of poems with medieval theo...(read more)

T. B. A.

190/13

Research Seminar:
Race and Rumors of Race in American Prose

TTh 3:30-5

Race in 2015 is still a taboo topic in many literary conversations.  In Race and Rumors of Race in American Prose we’ll take a look back and a look forward.  We’ll start with Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark: Whi...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

190/14

Research Seminar:
Modern Utopian and Dystopian Books and Movies

Thursdays 6-9 PM

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/15

Research Seminar:
Film Noir

MW 5:30-7 PM

We will examine the influence of film noir on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory, and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will als...(read more)

Bader, Julia

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This course, the first part of a two-semester sequence, is designed to prepare you to write an Honors thesis, which you will complete in the spring semester. During the fall semester, we will read literary, critical, and theoretical materials inte...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

English H195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. It is designed to give students the critical tools and practical skills to write a strong essay, in the spring semester, that will have a gr...(read more)

Saul, Scott

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 11-12:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies t...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

This course has been postponed until Spring 2016.

...(read more)
Kahn, Victoria

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

W 2-5

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of poetic meter rooted in generative linguistics.  Taking the "strict" iambic pentameter of Sh...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Henry James and After

TTh 12:30-2

This course will have two parts: in the first, we will read across the range of Henry James’s career, from its American beginnings to the achievements of his major phase; in the second, we will discuss a series of...(read more)

Goble, Mark

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Victorian Literature from Hegel to Freud

TTh 2-3:30

This course embarks from the premise that “Victorian” names neither a period of time (1837 – 1901) nor the body of a British sovereign (Alexandrina Victoria Hanover) but a spatially and temporally mobile set of stylistic practice...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

note new time: W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schol...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2015-16, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in thi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

246L/1

Literature in English:
1945 to the Present

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen

250/1

Research Seminar:
Literature of the English Revolution

M 2-5

We will track the controversies that dominated public life in the generation before the outbreak of war (with particular emphasis on the Martin Marprelate phenomenon and the furor excited by the "Book of Sports"), explore the textual rem...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

250/2

Research Seminar:
Medieval Literary Thought

Tuesdays 9:30-12:30

The medieval volume of the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism begins by saying that the years from the 1980s until their present (2005) has been "a golden age" for the study of medieval "literary theory and cr...(read more)

Justice, Steven

250/3

Research Seminar:
Black + Queer

Thursdays 3:30-6:30

Co-taught by Professors Nadia Ellis (English) and Darieck Scott (African American Studies); African American Studies 240 section 1 is the course number for the latter component of the course.

This graduate seminar surveys the intersections ...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

250/4

Research Seminar:
John Donne and T.S. Eliot: Lyric Poetry and Society

Thursdays 3:30-6:30

“Permit me to repeat,” Adorno writes in his celebrated essay on lyric poetry’s relationship to its context, “that we are concerned not with the poet as a private person, not with his psychology or his so-called social persp...(read more)

Marno, David

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

T. B. A.

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thursdays 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to t...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Xin, Wendy Veronica

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Friday, April 3.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 3, 4, 6, and 9 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 5, 7, and 8 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143C, and 143N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only upper-division students should apply for these particular classes.  (Note that in Spring '16 we plan to also offer both lower-division and graduate-level creative writing workshops, but for Fall '15 we can offer only the above-mentioned upper-division workshops.)  In order to be considered for admission to any of these classes, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 17, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Tuesday, April 28. Please come on or shortly after Tuesday, April 28, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE FALL. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must electronically apply, using the link on the course listing in this "Announcement of Classes"; your submittal will need to include: (a) the on-line application form, along with PDFs of: (b) your college transcript(s); (c) a list of your spring 2015 classes; and (d) a critical paper (in a PDF or Word document) that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality). These applications must be submitted, via the corresponding link, BY 4 P.M., FRIDAY, APRIL 17. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2015 semester, and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, applicants will be contacted by email sometime between late July and late August to be informed if they have been selected for admission, and, if so, to which section. (Since there might be more applicants for one section than the other, some students might end up being placed in the section that was not their first choice.) IF YOU ARE ADMITTED TO ONE OF THE H195A SECTIONS, YOU WILL NEED TO OBTAIN YOUR CEC (CLASS ENTRY CODE) AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR, AND THEN YOU WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS AND ADD THE COURSE SOON AFTER THAT; NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN H195A BEFORE CLASSES START.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2015 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MAY 1. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the May 1 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available in the racks outside 319 Wheeler Hall. Completed applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the drop box inside 319 Wheeler Hall. Students will be emailed a course control number they will use to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.