Announcement of Classes: Fall 2015


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Leitch, Vincent, gen ed: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies the Group 1 requirement (problems in the study of literature).


History of Literary Criticism

English 202

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been postponed until Spring 2016.


Graduate Readings: Poetic Meter

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: W 2-5
Location: 214 Haviland


Book List

See below.

Description

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of poetic meter rooted in generative linguistics.  Taking the "strict" iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets, the "loose" iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's plays, and the "Sprung Rhythm" of Hopkins' lyrics as representatives of three distinct but overlapping meters, we will explore the structural properties of stress, syllable count and caesura placement in these forms, the ranges of variation they allow, their different manifestations in closely related forms and in the practice of other poets, their aesthetic effects in particular poems, their formal relationships to their Romance, Old English and Classical Latin and Greek influences, and their relationships to the rhythmic structure of language itself. 

The principal text for the course will be a draft of a book intended as an introduction to the subject; we will use it and the poetry on which its claims are based to establish a common foundation.  The principal task for each student will be to explore the metrical practice of a poet or poets of his or her own choosing.

No prior background in either metrics or linguistics is required. 

This course satisfies the Group 6 (non-historical) requirement.

 


Graduate Readings: Henry James and After

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

See below.

Description

This course will have two parts: in the first, we will read across the range of Henry James’s career, from its American beginnings to the achievements of his major phase; in the second, we will discuss a series of figures directly or indirectly influenced by James’s signature aesthetic and stylistic innovations. We will be especially interested in the development of James’s “realism,” and how it provides, for himself and others, a language for examining the shape of modern life from the late-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. Readings by James will include Washington Square, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, The Golden Bowl, The Wings of the Dove, and various shorter works. After James, we will read texts by Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein, Elizabeth Bowen, Lionel Trilling, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth. We also will screen films by Roberto Rossellini and Vittorio De Sica.

This course satisfies the Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) or Group 5 (Twentieth Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Victorian Literature from Hegel to Freud

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Lavery, Grace
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 204 Wheeler


Book List

Barrett Browning, E.: Aurora Leigh; Bronte, C.: The Professor; Carlyle, T.: Sartor Resartus; Du Bois, W. E. B. : The Souls of Black Folk; Freud, S.: The Wolfman and Other Case Studies; Hegel, G. W. F.: Preface to the Phenomenology of Spirit (ed. Y. Yovel); Swinburne, A. C. : Major Poems and Selected Prose (ed. J. McGann); Wilde, O.: De Profundis and Other Prison Writings

Description

This course embarks from the premise that “Victorian” names neither a period of time (1837 – 1901) nor the body of a British sovereign (Alexandrina Victoria Hanover) but a spatially and temporally mobile set of stylistic practices and formal principles. We will survey a range of literary and theoretical works from the nineteenth century in order to locate the seductive, pervasive, and periodically pernicious trope of the “Victorian” within its broader intellectual context, and to explore the problems it continues to encounter: the social and cultural transformations wrought by the industrial and financial phases of capitalism; the subjectively disorienting effects of imperialism, globalization and urbanization; the political and aesthetic afterlives of Romantic ideology; the ethical and aesthetic challenges of realism; the competing necessities of individuation and collectivization; and the troubling differences between desire, sex, and love. Our inquiries will be guided by the signal philosophical interventions of Hegel and Freud, an early and a belated Victorian; these contexts will ground discussion of classical debates over Victorian-ness in the work of Gyorgy Lukács, Theodor Adorno, Michel Foucault, and Gilles Deleuze, as well as more recent work in Victorian studies by Catherine Gallagher, Fredric Jameson, the “historical poetics collective,” and others.

In addition to the core texts listed above, we will read some of the critical essays of Matthew Arnold, Charles Dickens, and George Eliot, and some poetry by Robert Browning, Rudyard Kipling, Christina Rossetti, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. We may also consider paintings by J. A. M. Whistler, John Everett Millais, and J. M. W. Turner, and operas by Michael Balfe and Gilbert and Sullivan. These multimedia commitments will return us to the specificity of the literary, and help us to form research questions over the viability and vitality of “Victorian” as a category of analysis, and perhaps prompt us to generate new names and categories with which we might escape the gravitational force it exerts.

This course satisfies the Group 4 (Nineteenth Century) requirement. 


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: note new time: W 3-6
Location: note new location: 233 Dwinelle


Book List

No texts.

Description

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar. The workshop will provide a collaborative critical community in which to try out successive versions of your dissertation project and to learn how your peers are constructing theirs. Weekly writing assignments will structure points of entry into these projects. Beginning with exercises to galvanize your thinking, the assignments will map increasingly onto the specific components of the prospectus. We will also review a range of prospectuses from the past to demystify the genre and to gain a better understanding of its form and function. The goal is to insure that by the end of the semester, every member of the workshop will have submitted a prospectus to his or her committee. For students who complete a draft of the prospectus early in the semester, we will reserve time to consider it fully and to structure assignments relevant to the writing of the first chapter (including the question of which chapter should be written first). We will also discuss the dissertation in relation to the job market, conference papers, scholarly journals, and publishable articles.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course will not be offered in 2015-16, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes.


Literature in English: 1945 to the Present

English 246L

Section: 1
Instructor: Lye, Colleen
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Research Seminar: Literature of the English Revolution

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Time: M 2-5
Location: 115 Barrows


Book List

See below.

Other Readings and Media

All readings will be made available electronically.

Description

We will track the controversies that dominated public life in the generation before the outbreak of war (with particular emphasis on the Martin Marprelate phenomenon and the furor excited by the "Book of Sports"), explore the textual remains of social movements made possible by the abolition of monarchy (with emphasis on the Diggers and the Levellers), and closely read the first books of poetry written in the aftermath of the invention of the newspaper. We will also read a fair amount of secondary literature. Each student will give a brief in-class presentation and produce a research paper. 

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Medieval Literary Thought

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time: Tuesdays 9:30-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Copeland and Sluiter: Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: Language Arts and Literary Theory, AD 300-1475; Minnis and Scott: Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism c. 1100-c. 1375: The Commentary Tradition

Other Readings and Media

Much material online and in the library.

Description

The medieval volume of the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism begins by saying that the years from the 1980s until their present (2005) has been "a golden age" for the study of medieval "literary theory and criticism." That is about right: whole bodies of sources in the grammatical, rhetorical, and exegetical traditions, sources unknown or too little and crudely known to literary scholarship, have been discovered, edited, placed, and cited: more wealth than you can easily manage or know what to do with. And the field has not, in fact, shown clear signs of knowing what to do with it. 

This makes a golden opportunity for both research and ideation. (a) For research, because there is a massive corpus of materials and scholarly tools ripe for investigation but too little deployed, a circumstance in which real discovery is possible. The materials are not very systematic, and some of the tools are not obvious or well known. So one job of this seminar is to give you a handle on the materials and, especially on the research tools. (b) For ideation, because most of the big intellectual questions they raise have scarcely been broached--beginning with the question what it means to call this material "theory and criticism." So another job of this seminar will be to start finding and articulating these questions, and working out angles of approach. 

This will be a genuine research seminar, not a reading course. The first weeks will offer an intensive introduction to research tools new and (mostly) old, and to scholarship old and (mostly) new, and it will begin to crack open the question of describing and understanding the premises and goals of rhetoric and of commentary. In those weeks, we will read in translation some of the most suggestive primary sources and get a sense of what scholarship has and has not done. We will probably use Dante's Vita nuova and/or Convivio as a heuristic point of literary reference. But the students will have begun the semester choosing a work (presumably a medieval one, and presumably one on which they have a settled interest in working) and an initial question, in relation to which they will be using this material and an initial idea for research. As the semester proceeds, our agenda will be set increasingly by the developing research of the participants.

The two books ordered for the course do not really represent the work we will be doing, but we will use them a fair bit. They are two recent anthologies of sources in translation, both based on exemplary scholarship. (Their footnotes and bibliographies will prove invaluable.) Unfortunately, both are expensive; I'll make sure that all library copies are on reserve. Most of our work will be with materials made available online and in the library, and with the participants' developing projects.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Black + Queer

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: Thursdays 3:30-6:30
Location: 31 Evans


Book List

Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Cliff, Michelle: No Telephone to Heaven; Hemphill, Essex: Ceremonies; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Lorde, Audre: Zami; Nugent, Thurman, et al: Fire!! A Quarterly Devoted to Negro Artists; Salkey, Andrew: Escape to an Autumn Pavement;

Recommended: McKay, Claude: Home to Harlem

Other Readings and Media

Films:  Jackson, Shirley, dir.: Portrait of Jason; Julien, Isaac, dir.: Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Mask; Julien, Isaac, dir.: Looking for Langston; Frears, Stephen, dir.: My Beautiful Laundrette; Frears, Stephen, dir.: Sammy and Rosie Get Laid

Critical works by, amongst others: M. Jacqui Alexander; Judith Butler; Cathy Cohen; Roderick Ferguson; Frantz Fanon; Jose Munoz; Christina Sharpe; Vincent Woodward.

Description

Co-taught by Professors Nadia Ellis (English) and Darieck Scott (African American Studies); African American Studies 240 section 1 is the course number for the latter component of the course.

This graduate seminar surveys the intersections between black and queer literatures, cultures, and theories. The course serves both as an introduction to black queer studies and as a way to deepen an already established research interest in the field. We will study classics of 20th-century black queer literature and culture—including James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, and Marlon Riggs—as well a wide variety of contemporary criticism and culture that engages and extends this tradition.

The seminar is a joint offering of the Departments of English and African American Studies and it works in tandem with The Black Room, a Working Group presented by both Departments and supported by the Institute of International Studies. The Black Room will sponsor the public lectures and seminar visits of critics Daphne Brooks and Tavia Nyong’o.

Students will make presentations, write brief response papers, and produce a significant final research paper.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) (English Department) requirement.


Research Seminar: John Donne and T.S. Eliot: Lyric Poetry and Society

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: Thursdays 3:30-6:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

See below.

Description

“Permit me to repeat,” Adorno writes in his celebrated essay on lyric poetry’s relationship to its context, “that we are concerned not with the poet as a private person, not with his psychology or his so-called social perspective, but with the poem as a philosophical sundial telling the time of history.” In this course, we read the poetries of John Donne and T. S. Eliot to see how (or indeed whether) they tell the time of history. To raise the stakes of this exercise, we will focus on Donne’s Holy Sonnets and Eliot’s Four Quartets, ie. poems that share an investment in religion but were written under markedly different circumstances. How does a religious poem that is the product of a religious culture differ from a religious poem written in a predominantly secular society? How do poems express, resist, or ignore their immediate contexts? How do they transpose themselves in other, real of fictional contexts? And what critical tools best enable us to articulate and answer such questions? In addition to spending ample time on the poems, we will read Eliot on early modern poetry, modern critics on Donne and Eliot, and representative critical essays on lyric poetry.

(Note: This course description was altered slightly on April 23.)

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: T. B. A.
Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counyed to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Xin, Wendy Veronica
Time: Thursdays 10:30-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Recommended: Davis, B.: Tools for Teaching (e-text available through UCB library website); Rosenwasser, D. and Stephen, J.: Writing Analytically (Cengage Learning, 7th ed., 2012)

Other Readings and Media

All required readings will be posted on bCourses and/or available in a Course Reader.

Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections linked to English 45 and select upper-division courses, as well as R1A and R1B, and beyond. At once a seminar and a hands-on practicum, the class will cover topics such as strategies for leading discussion, teaching critical reading skills and the elements of composition, responding to and evaluating student writing, developing paper topics and other exercises, and approaching the other responsibilities that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere. The course will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the discovery of each member’s pedagogical style. We hope to pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A or R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes besides their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed teaching and to receive feedback during the term.

This course satisfies the Pedagogy Requirement.