Announcement of Classes: Spring 2016

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Here, Queer, and Chicana/o

MWF 10-11

We’ve heard the slogan “We’re here, we’re queer, get used to it!”  But what weight do “here” and “queer” hold when a person identifies as Chicana/o? Does this identity change what it might...(read more)

Trevino, Jason Benjamin

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Waking the Ghosts of Tom/ás Joad

MWF 11-12

In this course we will think about what cultural historian Michael Denning has called the "lowercase grapes of wrath narrative," which emerged during the Great Depression. In John Steinbeck's 1939 novel, this was a story about econom...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: Travel and Translation

MWF 1-2

Note new instructor, course description, and book list:
 
"If we walk far enough," Dorothy says in L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz, "we shall sometime come to someplace."&nbs...(read more)
Wyatt, Gabriella

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Characters

MWF 2-3

We tend to take it for granted that literary works have characters. But what is a character, and what is its relation to a real-world human? What are the stakes of that relationship? Our readings, which range in time from ancient Greece to almost ...(read more)

Wilson, Evan

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Adventure in the Eighteenth Century

TTh 9:30-11

The eighteenth century witnessed Britain’s rise to the status of world superpower.  As the newly United Kingdom expanded its colonial holdings and extended its imperial power around the globe, its writers imagined traversing that globe ...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Work and Play

TTh 11-12:30

(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Conversation

TTh 12:30-2

How can we best listen to literature? How is literature like or unlike a conversation? If a text is speaking to us, how might we respond? Do we believe what it tells us, and in what way? This course will examine a variety of twentieth-century Brit...(read more)

Neal, Allison

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Nothing Doing

TTh 3:30-5

What would lead an author to create a 'leading' character who does not seem to want to move forward in life? Why might such characters attract readers, and what's so funny--or depressing--about their everyday lives? In this class we wi...(read more)

Kelly, Tyleen Louise

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
You Say You Want A Revolution*: From Independence Hall and the Bastille to Tahrir Square

MWF 9-10

Etymologically, the word “revolution” (from the Latin revolvere) signifies a “turning back.”  However, the word has come to take on quite a different meaning: the overthrow of the existing order and the birth ...(read more)

Albernaz, Joseph

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Living Photographically

MWF 9-10

This course examines the increasingly central role of photography in capturing and constituting events in our everyday lives. We will conduct a broad survey of critical essays on photography from its inception to the present day, tracking not only...(read more)

Yoon, Irene

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

MWF 11-12

This class will look at a variety of works--comics, graphic novels, chidren's books, advertisements, political cartoons--that combine images with text to tell stories. How, we will ask, do words and images play with, against, or off of one a...(read more)
Clark, Rebecca

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Black Radical Thought, From David Walker to Kendrick Lamar

MWF 12-1

In this course, we’ll consider the origins and concerns of a radical African American intellectual tradition. Working with a variety of texts, including slave narratives, poetry, music, and film, we’ll trace the debates that structure ...(read more)

Muhammad, Ismail

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Grant Writing, Renaissance to Modern

MWF 12-1

In this class we will read a small selection of letters and poems by English Renaissance poets William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Samuel Daniel, and John Donne written for the purpose of obtaining patronage. These letters and poems were typicall...(read more)

Villagrana, José

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Queer in Nature

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will consider how we think about and how others have thought about the relationship between humans and nature, focusing in particular on ideas about human sexuality. We will read two novels which ask us to ...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
"Those Other Times Are Running Elsewhere": Contemporary British Fictions

MWF 2-3

This course explores the investment of contemporary British culture in multiple, imaginative, and alternative concepts of time, from historical novels to speculative fictions, from London’s punk rock scene to its dubstep moment, from live co...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing About Television

MW 4-5:30

Writing about television constitutes one of the most popular forms of literary criticism outside of academic circles today. TV critic Lili Loofbourow argues that episode recaps and their in-depth analysis of our favorite shows fulfill our need for...(read more)

Chamberlain, Shannon

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Record Keeping

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore the ways in which we attempt to capture, preserve, and convey our experiences.  We will trace how these forms—or media—structure our memories, and how they may also obscure or distort past experience.&nbsp...(read more)

Lewis, Rachel Thayer

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Modernity and Objectivity

TTh 8-9:30

“On or about December, 1910, human character changed.” With this remarkable claim, Virginia Woolf tells us that in the modern world knowledge, consciousness, and emotional experience have transformed. She implies that, somehow, human s...(read more)

Rodal, Jocelyn

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
What Is Literature?

TTh 8-9:30

In What is Literature?, Jean-Paul Sartre claims that the prose writer “is in a situation in language; he is invested with words. They are prolongations of his meanings, his pincers, his antennae, his spectacles. He manoeuve...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Literary Festivity

TTh 9:30-11

In this class we will look at many dimensions of a deceptively simple question: what can a party mean? We’ll study celebrations as mechanisms both of radical freedom and total social control, including the legacy of medieval Church feast-day...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Literary Cartography

TTh 11-12:30

Maps exist in the divide between reality and representation. They are metaphors of space and place, and the allure of the map is grounded in its ability to produce a controlled abstraction of distance, time, space, and location. Cartogr...(read more)

Gillis, Brian

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Documentary Poetry and Immaterial Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

“Poetry’s not made of words,” writes Ariana Reines in her recent book Mercury (2012). This course considers that claim. Can literature be reduced to the words that make it up, or is there a surplus that a materialistic v...(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Have You Lost Your Mind? Contesting Impressions in Literature, 1873-1973

TTh 2-3:30

Virginia Woolf famously wrote that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” In her view, the exciting and experimental works of modernism—written by authors like T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Woolf herself—came ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Reading and Writing the City

TTh 2-3:30

The city is many different things in literature. As a plot device, the city is often a place of danger and opportunity, a place where characters make their way or lose themselves in the attempt. As a setting, the city may be open or closed; it may...(read more)

Wilson, Mary

R1B/18

Reading and Composition: Life Writing

TTh 3:30-5

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one’s life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life?  T...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Graphic Poetics

TTh 3:30-5

This course takes its inspiration from two very recent works of poetry: Caroline Bergvall’s Drift (2014) and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen, both of which rely on a vast array of contemporary multimedia, printing, and pe...(read more)
Le, Serena

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Masterpieces of World Cinema: Federico Fellini's La dolce vita

M 2-3

Though over 55 years old, La dolce vita (“The Sweet Life,”1960) is still trending, with its famous images circulating in visual media more widely than ever.  This continued ebullience is probably owing to two things.&nbsp...(read more)

Miller, D.A.

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we’ll read poems together, intensively, across a long historical span, a variety of contexts (cultural, philosophical, political), and a wide range of modes, forms, genres, styles and techniques. We’ll respond to poems, ...(read more)

Schweik, Susan

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

MW 4-5:30

What can poems do, and how do they do it? This course will explore how we as poets engage with the world through our writing, and how we as readers find value in poems. Our goal will be to develop an expansive sense of possible poetic acts, and to...(read more)

Klavon, Evan

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 12-1; discussion sections F 12-1

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earli...(read more)

Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 1-2; discussion sections F 1-2

This is a story of discovering, then forgetting, then discovering again the fact that a particular language can be used not only for communication but also for creation. At the beginning of our story Caedmon, a shepherd, is called upon in his drea...(read more)

Marno, David

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11; discussion sections F 10-11

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose fiction, autobiography, and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotlan...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3; discussion sections F 2-3

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly beco...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will involve close readings of texts by those whom I consider indispensable authors who define significant parameters for literature in England and in the US from about 1870-1950, with a final novel by the South African write...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19th through the 20th Century

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

Note that the instructor, book list, and course description of this section of English 45C have changed (as of Nov. 9, 2015).

This course will provide an overview of the aesthetic shifts captured by such terms as realism, modernism, and pos...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Woody Allen

W 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film ...(read more)

Bader, Julia

101/1

History of the English Language

TTh 11-12:30

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, and up to its different forms in use throughout the world today. Topics include changes in its core grammatical...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

111/1

Chaucer

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, extravagantly beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touc...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

117S/2

Shakespeare

MW 1-2; discussion sections F 1-2

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  Focusing on a selection of them, we’ll consider the range of Shakespeare's dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dram...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 12-1

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourge...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

MW 10-11; discussion sections F 10-11

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.”  In this cou...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945:
The Modernist Novel

TTh 2-3:30

The British novel in the first half of the twentieth century was a site of massive formal experimentation. Time, space, narrators, characters, and language were dismantled and reconfigured in startling new ways. In this survey, we will look at nov...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

128/1

Modern Drama

MWF 2-3

This course will be a survey of Modern Drama, mostly in Europe and in the US from about 1880 to 2000.  We will read about 30 plays, and we will watch at least a couple of them.  Dramatists studied will include Ibsen, Chekhov, P...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

MWF 1-2

I will lecture on several of the primary literary texts of the antebellum period. Two ten-page essays, a final exam, and regular attendance will be required.

...(read more)
Breitwieser, Mitchell

132/1

The American Novel

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

A survey of major American novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on realism, naturalism, and modernism. Rather than trace a single history of the novel in this period, we will explore a range of genres—includin...(read more)

Goble, Mark

133B/1

African American Literature and Culture Since 1917:
The African American Essay

TTh 12:30-2

Readers of James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Ralph Ellison, and Zora Neale Hurston have often turned to these authors' essays with a mind to better understanding their literary work.  In this course we will consider the African American ess...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Great Exhaling: American History, Culture and Politics, 1946-1952

MW 4-5:30 + discussion sections

1948 was the year that America–after the Great Depression, after the Second World War, after sixteen year of the all but revolutionary experiment in national government of the New Deal–let out its collective breath. Finally, that great...(read more)

Moran, Kathleen and Marcus, Greil

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910

This course has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Chicana/o Novel

MWF 12-1

This course on Chicana/o and Latina/o novels complements a Chicana/o literature course I taught in the fall entitled “Migrant Narratives.”  But whereas the fall course included works that represented various literary genres (the n...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Postcolonial Sex

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the intersection of theories of gender and sexuality and the postcolonial world. We will consider how gender and nation are shaped and represented in literature and film. Why are nations routinely imagined as women, and im...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Varieties of Creative Writing

MW 4-5:30

We’ll study some of the ways that fiction writers, essayists, story-tellers, and poets have responded to the worlds that their cultures have built.  We’ll look at “high” forms and “low” forms and write in b...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop.  We will discuss the stories in the assigned anthology and writing by students in the class.  Assignments will include three short writing exercises, two new short stories, and critique...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

143A/3

Short Fiction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A fiction workshop in which students will be expected to turn in material approximately every third week, to be edited and discussed in class.

Emphasis will be upon editing and revising. Quality rather than quantity is the ideal, but each s...(read more)

Oates, Joyce Carol

143B/1

Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-li...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 3:30-5

At a pivotal moment in the development of her practice, the experimental composer Maryanne Amacher is said to have conducted a notebook-based self-analysis that revolutionized her relationship to composition. In this course, parallel to the writin...(read more)

Moschovakis, Anna

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing/ Travelers' Tales

MW 1:30-3

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, In Theory

TTh 11-12:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech, as moral value or political right, informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  W...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

165/1

Special Topics:
Arthurian Medievalisms

MW 9-10:30

This course will focus on medievalism, i.e., the representation and conceptualization of the Middle Ages, in order to analyze how ideas about the past are used in literature and the arts, in both "high" and popular culture. The point of ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

165/2

Special Topics:
21st-Century U.S. Poetry

MW 12-1:30

In this course we’ll review the U.S. poetry of the present, reading representative poems from the last 15 years or so in relation to a number of formal concerns, poetic subjects, and debates within the social field (and its media), including...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

165/3

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 4-5:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially ho...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

165/4

Special Topics: Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

TTh 12:30-2

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the ...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

165/5

Special Topics:
Is It Useless to Revolt?: Literature of Revolt

TTh 2-3:30

“Is it useless to revolt?”  Our course borrows its title from an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979.  Foucault urges us to suspe...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

165/6

Special Topics:
Queer Lifestyles in Literature and Theory

TTh 3:30-5

Before the twentieth century, "queer" usually just meant strange or peculiar; it suggested an unusual way of living or being. The word gradually became a slur to describe someone sexually different, and we have now rehab...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J

165/7

Special Topics:
Later 17th-Century Nonfictional Prose

TTh 6-7:30 P.M.

Reading, discussing, and writing about British prose of the later 17th century. Among the genres to be considered will be representative samples of the “character” (of places as well as human types); the essay (controversial as well as...(read more)

Starr, George A.

165/8

Special Topics:
Arts of Writing: Academic Writing, Grant Writing, Food Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course for juniors and seniors will help students develop writing skills through intensive focus on the demands of three very different modes: academic argument, popular and creative food writing (essay, poetry, travel, memoir, manifesto), an...(read more)

Schweik, Susan
Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam

165/9

Special Topics:
Ovid and the English Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5

Her bosom was wrapped in smooth thin bark; her slender arms were changed to branches and her hair to leaves; her feet but now so swift were anchored fast in numb stiff roots; her face and head became the crown of a green tree. -- Ovid, Metamor...(read more)

Landreth, David

166/2

Special Topics:
Elizabethan Renaissance: Art, Culture, and Visuality

MW 4-5:30 + discussion sections

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills.

Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female mona...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Literature and Music

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will investigate the strangely vital links between literature and music. Beginning in the early 19th century, we’ll track a series of crossings, conjunctions, and fissures.  We’ll think about the place of music,...(read more)

Falci, Eric

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literature and the Brain

TTh 3:30-5

What can the scientific study of mind tell us about literature? And what can literature tell us about the ways our minds and brains do—and do not—work? Looking at literature, philosophy, and the sciences of mind from the past three hun...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Hidden Hitchcock

MW 11-12:30 + film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.

Few film styles have more successfully courted mass-audience understanding and approval than Hitchcock’s.  In the overstated lucidity of his narrative communication, nothing deserves our attention that his camera doesn’t go out of...(read more)

Miller, D.A.

177/1

Literature and Philosophy

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be organized around three questions that have been of perennial concern to literary writers and philosophers: who are we? What can we know? How should we live? We’ll read a wide range of texts that respond to these questions ...(read more)

Zhang, Dora

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine autobiography as a literary genre. We will survey the history of the genre and consider such questions as: How is reading autobiography like/unlike reading fiction? How do the truth claims made by autobiographies shape rea...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180E/1

The Epic: Legends of Troy

TTh 2-3:30

Homer’s Iliad was composed in the eighth century BCE. Both the story that it narrated (the conflict between the Greeks and the Trojans) and the particular form that the story took (the genre of the epic) would become foundational bu...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

180N/1

The Novel:
The Novel as "The Book of Other People"

TTh 12:30-2

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,&rd...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

180Z/1

Science Fiction

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Jones, Donna V.

190/1

Research Seminar:
The Sixties

MW 10:30-12

This class will explore the literature, film, and art of the 1960s in America, with a particular focus on the complex interactions between various forms of modernism and the social movements whose politics, aesthetics, and cultural ambitions most ...(read more)

Goble, Mark

190/2

Research Seminar:
Through a Future Darkly: Global Crisis and the Triumph of Dystopia

M 3-6

At what past moment did the future grow so dark? Formal liteary dystopia has been with us prominently since at least 1726, with the arrival of Swift's Gulliver. But the tendency to critique the present by imagining a darkly extrapolated future...(read more)

Danner, Mark

190/3

Research Seminar:
Late Henry James

MW 4-5:30

Close readings of Henry James' notoriously difficult final novels. This will be a very demanding class, but a rewarding one too, I hope. Two ten-page essays will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in class discussion....(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/4

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

MW 4-5:30

In this seminar we will explore recent issues in postcolonial studies by focusing on cities. Moving through a diverse set of texts and very different cities—London and Lagos, Kingston and Mumbai, New York and Johannesburg, New Orl...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/5

Research Seminar:
Contemporary British Literature and Culture

MW 4-5:30

In this course, we will investigate the literary and cultural landscape of contemporary Britain.  After several introductory sessions on the postwar period (1945-1979), we'll spend the bulk of our time working our way from the 1980s to th...(read more)

Falci, Eric

190/6

Research Seminar:
Classical and Renaissance Drama

MW 4-5:30

In a poem for the first edition of Shakespeare’s collected works, Ben Jonson expressed a characteristic ambivalence about classical drama.  On the one hand, he praised it as the standard by which all subsequent playwriting sh...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

190/7

Research Seminar:
Materiality: How the Physical World Is Made to Mean

TTh 9:30-11

We might think of physical matter as being simply present, but the stuff of the world is and has been understood very differently in different times and cultures. This research seminar will explore a broad range of understandings of matter, from t...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

190/8

Research Seminar:
Vital Texts: Literature and the Discourse of Life

TTh 11-12:30

If the romantic trope of “organic form” naturalizes literature by likening literary texts to living organisms, it equally suggests that man-made forms can be "alive." In this course, our task will be to trace the trope of &qu...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca

190/9

Research Seminar:
Medieval and Renaissance Lyric

TTh 2-3:30

From drinking songs and poems of seduction to works of religious meditation and devotion, the lyric reflects a variety of subjects and concerns.  This course serves as an extensive introduction to lyric poetry from the twelfth to the sixteent...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory

190/10

Research Seminar:
Purcell and Handel: Their Art in Setting English Texts to Music

TTh 3:30-5

In the early 1600s, in England Shakespeare was exploring new ways of creating drama through language, with music often playing an important role, but a mostly distinct one.  In those same years, in Italy Monteverdi was exploring new ways of c...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

190/11

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Lee, Steven S.

190/12

Research Seminar:
Daniel Defoe and the Rise of the 18th-Century Novel

TTh 3:30-5

Reading, discussing, and writing mainly about the fictional works of Daniel Defoe, and (depending on student interests) about contemporary writing on some of Defoe’s subjects, such as overseas commerce, colonies, and piracy; the predicaments...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/13

Research Seminar:
Keats and Literary Tradition

TTh 5-6:30 P.M.

This research seminar focuses on the poems and letters of John Keats. We will read his work in relation to some of his predecessors (Shakespeare, Milton) and near contemporaries (Wordsworth, Hazlitt) while addressing questions of the burdens of cu...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

H195B/1

Honors Course

MW 4-5:30

This course is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Samuel Otter in Fall 2015. No new students will be admitted, and no new application needs to be submitted. Professor Otter will give out CECS (class entry codes) in class in November.(read more)

Otter, Samuel

H195B/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Scott Saul in Fall 2015. No new students will be admitted, and no new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Saul will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November....(read more)

Saul, Scott

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

note new time: F 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the discourse of the sublime. Readings in Plat...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

203/1

Graduate Readings:
George Eliot and Victorian Science

MW1:30-3

A study of the Victorian novel in relation to nineteenth-century theories of natural and aesthetic form, focused on major writings by George Eliot and Charles Darwin. We will read two novels -- Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda &nda...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

TTh 9:30-11

This introduction to aesthetics will navigate between the following quotations: 1) “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have to approach it through the problem of the aesthetic, because it is only through Bea...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Edmund Spenser

TTh 11-12:30

Sidney wrote that a poet's task was to "grow in effect another nature." No poet in English has fulfilled that charge more luxuriantly than Spenser. The plan of the semester will be to roam around in the leisurely, delight-filled capa...(read more)

Landreth, David

203/4

Graduate Readings:
What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with the Postcolonial?

TTh 12:30-2

This course considers the relationship between the development of critical theory and the colonized and postcolonial worlds. It will ask how and where histories, cultures, and philosophies of the global south appear and intersect with continental ...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

205B/1

Old English:
Late Old English

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we will explore the curious phenomenon of Old English after the Norman Conquest. Although English’s status as a language of power was overturned in 1066, the vernacular lived on in many guises—most remarkably as recogni...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Anne Boyer, Graham Foust, Fred Moten, Chris Nealon, Ed Roberson, Juliana Spahr, Simone White,  and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berk...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

W 9-12

In this survey of British writing from 1740 to the end of the century, we will read a wide range of genres, many of them innovated or undergoing major transformations at this time, from periodical essays, novels, and georgic poem...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

250/1

Research Seminar:
Capitalist Crisis and Literature

M 3-6

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-08 and the onset of the “Great Recession,” a small but growing number of literary scholars have strived to theorize the relation between capitalist crisis and literary studies. Two short articl...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

250/2

Research Seminar:
The Limits of Historicism

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Fredric Jameson famously enjoined critics to “Always historicize!,” and while many responded by committing to ideology critique and the project of demystification, of late a number have sought to satisfy the imperative by “practi...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

250/3

Research Seminar:
How It Strikes a Contemporary: Reading the Novel in the 21st Century

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

As a generic term, the “novel” has always been entangled with the new, the up-to-the-moment, the contemporary. If the weft of the genre of the novel is fiction, then its warp is modernity. So what might distinguish our own conte...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katie

250/4

Research Seminar:
Modernism's Metaphysics

F 9-12

Over recent decades, we have become accustomed to speaking of the ‘cultural logic’ of modernism, using a periodizing term to delineate a larger complex of historical effects, while also insinuating its availability to the integrated de...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists on Tele-BEARS. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please log on to Info-BEARS (http://infobears.berkeley.edu) to check your advancing status on the wait list.

ENGLISH R1A AND R1B: Note that the book lists and course descriptions for individual sections of English R1A and R1B will be posted on the web and also on the SOUTHERN-most bulletin board in the hall across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler Hall) as of Monday, October 12.

BERKELEY CONNECT (previously designated "The Chernin Mentoring Program"): Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, 143N, AND 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only lower-division students should apply for 43B; only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, and 143N; and only graduate students (and upper-division students with considerable writing experience) should apply for 243B.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, November 5. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 5, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER CLASS ENTRY CODE (CEC) FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES ON TELE-BEARS BEFORE THE FIRST DAY THESE CLASSES MEET IN THE SPRING. ADMITTED STUDENTS WILL NEED TO LOG ON TO TELE-BEARS SOON AFTER CLASSES HAVE STARTED TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE COURSES.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. Only already-declared fourth- and third-year majors may enroll directly on Tele-BEARS. Upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list for the section of 190 they are interested in, and they will be admitted if and when there is space for them. Due to space limitations, students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II Tele-BEARS appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2015 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give you a Class Entry Code (CEC) for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2016 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the October 29 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available in the racks outside 319 Wheeler Hall. Completed applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the drop box inside 319 Wheeler Hall. Students will be emailed a course control number they will use to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.