Announcement of Classes: Spring 2016


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


History of Literary Criticism

English 202

Section: 1
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: note new time: F 2-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Arendt, Hannah: Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy; Aristotle: Poetics; Augustine: On Christian Doctrine; Kant, Immanuel: Critique of Judgment; Longinus: On Sublimity; Plato: Phaedrus; Plato: Republic; Sidney: Defense of Poetry

Description

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the discourse of the sublime. Readings in Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Augustine, Sidney, Erasmus, Kant, Adorno, and Arendt. The syllabus is designed to be particularly helpful to students in English, but students from other departments are welcome and may write their final paper on a primary text or texts in other languages.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: George Eliot and Victorian Science

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: MW1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Darwin, Charles: The Descent of Man; Darwin, Charles: On the Origin of Species; Dickens, Charles: Our Mutual Friend; Eliot, George: Daniel Deronda; Eliot, George: Middlemarch; Eliot, George: Selected Essays, Poems, and Other Writings

Description

A study of the Victorian novel in relation to nineteenth-century theories of natural and aesthetic form, focused on major writings by George Eliot and Charles Darwin. We will read two novels -- Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda – by Eliot, the novelist most attuned to contemporary developments in the natural and human sciences, together with selections from Eliot’s essays, reviews, and translations; a third novel expressing a rival aesthetic, Charles Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend; the two major works, On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man, Darwin wrote for a general public as well as for specialists, along with excerpts from his Beagle journal and other writings; and selections from writings on aesthetics and the philosophy of science by Friedrich Schiller, William Whewell, G. H. Lewes, T. H. Huxley, John Tyndall, F. Max Müller, and E. B. Tylor.

This course satisfies the Group 4 (19th Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Adorno, T.: Aesthetic Theory; Burke, E.: Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful; De Man, P. : Ideology of the Aesthetic; Derrida, J.: The Truth in Painting; Kant, I.: Critique of the Power of Judgment; Rancière, J.: Aesthetics and Its Discontents; Scarry, E.: On Beauty and Being Just; Schiller, F. : On the Aesthetic Education of Man

Description

This introduction to aesthetics will navigate between the following quotations: 1) “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have to approach it through the problem of the aesthetic, because it is only through Beauty that man makes his way to Freedom” (Schiller); 2) “Poetry makes nothing happen” (Auden).  For historical sources, we will focus on the eighteenth-century aesthetic discourses developed by Burke, Kant, and Schiller (supplemented by a few readings in British Romanticism).  For developments in aesthetic theory, we will read a range of twentieth- and twenty-first-century elaborations, including, among others, Adorno, Bourdieu, Clark, Derrida, De Man, Lyotard, Rancière, Scarry, Terada, and Ngai.  If time permits we may take up arguments related to today’s new formalisms and new materialisms. 

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Edmund Spenser

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Landreth, David
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 201 Wheeler


Book List

Spenser, Edmund: A View of the Present State of Ireland; Spenser, Edmund: The Faerie Queene; Spenser, Edmund: The Shorter Poems

Description

Sidney wrote that a poet's task was to "grow in effect another nature." No poet in English has fulfilled that charge more luxuriantly than Spenser. The plan of the semester will be to roam around in the leisurely, delight-filled capaciousness of The Faerie Queene, with the aim that each of us find herself at home somewhere in this alienated version of our own world. The tension between delight and didacticism, leisure and urgency, is central to any such accommodation; I'm also interested in questions of materiality and of landscape in the fiction, and I expect our inquiries will be shaped by your preoccupations as well. We'll take some detours into the shorter poems along the way, and we will try too to reckon with the genocidal despair by which Spenser articulates the project of making a home in the alien terrain of Ireland.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through 16th Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with the Postcolonial?

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 201 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

This course considers the relationship between the development of critical theory and the colonized and postcolonial worlds. It will ask how and where histories, cultures, and philosophies of the global south appear and intersect with continental philosophy. Rather than pursue this question genealogically, this course is invested in producing a nexus of inquiry through three sites of (post)coloniality – North Africa, the Indian Subcontinent, and East Asia – and a variety of reading practices and methodologies. If, as Tim Brennan has argued, “The telos of the imperial project is reached when the third-world subject is able to deconstruct the epistemic violence of colonialism only by way of Continental theory,” what are the politics and epistemologies that emerge from this consideration? What are its pitfalls? And what alternate ways of reading and thinking about literature, culture, politics, and affect might develop from thinking together the continental tradition and the colonial world?

Readings may include texts from Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, GWF Hegel, Walter Benjamin, Karl Marx, Mahasweta Devi, Ranajit Guha, and Jacques Derrida.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) or Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Old English: Late Old English

English 205B

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 115 Barrows


Book List

Recommended: Clayton, Mary, and Hugh Magennis: The Old English Lives of St. Margaret; Swan, Mary, and Elaine Treharne, ed.: Rewriting Old English in the Twelfth Century; Treharne, E.: Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, c. 1020-1220

Other Readings and Media

Material on bCourses (also available for photocopying)

Description

In this course, we will explore the curious phenomenon of Old English after the Norman Conquest. Although English’s status as a language of power was overturned in 1066, the vernacular lived on in many guises—most remarkably as recognizably Old English works copied by speakers of early Middle English. We will focus on texts in several important post-Conquest manuscripts, including saints’ lives from Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 303, and works of religious philosophy (including the Old English Soliloquies) from London, British Library, Cotton Vitellius A.xv(2). We will examine networks of transmission through the lens of a homily by Ælfric, and we will also consider the changes to the English language and the poetic metre through texts including Durham, The Grave, and the metrical prayer in Cotton Julius A.ii. At the end of the course, students will present their research in a conference-length paper.

Most material will be available via the bCourses site; however, we will also be reading Elaine Treharne’s recent Living Through Conquest; Clayton and Magennis' Old English Lives of St. Margaret; and the whole of the essay collection Rewriting Old English in the Twelfth Century.

Prerequisites: a strong reading knowledge of Old English (A- in English 104 or the equivalent).

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through 16th Century) requirement.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: W 3-6
Location: 102 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

All readings will be in a Course Reader.

Description

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Anne Boyer, Graham Foust, Fred Moten, Chris Nealon, Ed Roberson, Juliana Spahr, Simone White,  and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 4 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

English 246F

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: W 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

In this survey of British writing from 1740 to the end of the century, we will read a wide range of genres, many of them innovated or undergoing major transformations at this time, from periodical essays, novels, and georgic poems, to ballad collections, supposed translations of ancient poems, dictionaries and anthologies of “great Literature.” Critical questions we might address include: What new epistemological challenges did writers believe they faced, and how did the discourses of empiricism and moral philosophy contribute to or attempt to resolve them? How did new formal strategies in imaginative writing develop those discourses? How did obscurity figure in these strategies? How did sentimental literature propose to overcome the social atomization threatened by capital relations? How did historicism, especially a new interest in literary history, offer another means of social consolidation? This course will include both primary texts and important secondary scholarship to help introduce ongoing critical conversations in eighteenth-century studies.

Possible texts include: <!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A78%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A-536870145%201791491579%2018%200%20131231%200%3B%7D%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0A%09mso-generic-font-family%3Aauto%3B%0A%09mso-font-pitch%3Avariable%3B%0A%09mso-font-signature%3A-536870145%201107305727%200%200%20415%200%3B%7D%0A%20%2F*%20Style%20Definitions%20*%2F%0Ap.MsoNormal%2C%20li.MsoNormal%2C%20div.MsoNormal%0A%09%7Bmso-style-unhide%3Ano%3B%0A%09mso-style-qformat%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-style-parent%3A%22%22%3B%0A%09margin%3A0in%3B%0A%09margin-bottom%3A.0001pt%3B%0A%09mso-pagination%3Awidow-orphan%3B%0A%09font-size%3A12.0pt%3B%0A%09font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-ascii-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-ascii-theme-font%3Aminor-latin%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-hansi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-hansi-theme-font%3Aminor-latin%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-theme-font%3Aminor-bidi%3B%7D%0A.MsoChpDefault%0A%09%7Bmso-style-type%3Aexport-only%3B%0A%09mso-default-props%3Ayes%3B%0A%09mso-ascii-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-ascii-theme-font%3Aminor-latin%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-font-family%3A%22%EF%BC%AD%EF%BC%B3%20%E6%98%8E%E6%9C%9D%22%3B%0A%09mso-fareast-theme-font%3Aminor-fareast%3B%0A%09mso-hansi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-hansi-theme-font%3Aminor-latin%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-font-family%3A%22Times%20New%20Roman%22%3B%0A%09mso-bidi-theme-font%3Aminor-bidi%3B%7D%0A%40page%20WordSection1%0A%09%7Bsize%3A8.5in%2011.0in%3B%0A%09margin%3A1.0in%201.25in%201.0in%201.25in%3B%0A%09mso-header-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-footer-margin%3A.5in%3B%0A%09mso-paper-source%3A0%3B%7D%0Adiv.WordSection1%0A%09%7Bpage%3AWordSection1%3B%7D%0A%2D%2D%3E--> David Hume, Treatise; Samuel Johnson, Samuel Richardson, Pamela; Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey; Edmund Burke, Inquiry; Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Horace Walpole, Castle of Otranto; Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho; James Macpherson, Ossian Poems; Thomas Percy, Reliques of Ancient English Poetry; Robert Burns, Janet Little, William Falconer, William Collins, William Cowper.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (18th Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Capitalist Crisis and Literature

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: M 3-6
Location: 205 Wheeler


Book List

Carchedi, G.: Behind the Crisis: Marx’s Dialectics of Value and Knowledge; Fisher, M.: Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?; Foster, J.B. and Magdoff, F.: The Great Financial Crisis: Causes and Consequences; Harman, C.: Zombie Capitalism: Global Crisis and the Relevance of Marx; Kliman, A.: The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession; Mattick, P.: Business as Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism; McNally, D.: Global Slump: The Economics and Politics of Crisis and Resistance; Robinson, W. I. : Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity

Description

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-08 and the onset of the “Great Recession,” a small but growing number of literary scholars have strived to theorize the relation between capitalist crisis and literary studies. Two short articles in the January 2012 issue of PMLA—one each by Christopher Nealon and Joshua Clover, and each entitled “Value|Theory|Crisis”—are prime examples of this kind of innovative research. The purpose of this course will be to test some of the theoretical claims that have been made about the relation between capitalist crisis and literature.

To do this, we’ll read works by Andrew Kliman, Chris Harman, and other Marxist scholars to scrutinize three theoretical claims in particular. One, the recurring economic crises of capitalism should not be understood as anomalies or temporary interruptions in productive continuity; they are rather symptoms of a system in which crisis is the norm, not the exception. Two, since the early 1970s, a period commonly associated with the dominance of neoliberalism, global capitalist production has experienced profound structural stagnation, and the attempts by capitalists to resolve stagnant production with financialization and debt have only prolonged the inevitable and unresolvable recurrence of economic (and hence political) crises. And three, all aspects of social life during the neoliberal period—including literature and cultural production generally—can be understood to one degree or another as formal and/or thematic expressions of capitalist crisis. Sociologist William I. Robinson refers to this third point as “the crisis of humanity.”

Most of the works we’ll read draw on current research in the Marxist theory of value to formulate a critique of economic crisis.  During the last few weeks of the semester, however, we’ll read three novels—John Rechy’s City of Night, Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange, and Salvador Plascencia’s The People of Paper—to bridge the divide between theory and literature.  Our purpose will not be to study “literary representations” of economic crisis in these novels, but to trace the determinate relation between capitalism and literary form—that is, to explore the ways that capitalist crises have profoundly influenced the internal logic of the literature.

This section of English 250 will count toward the Critical Theory Designated Emphasis, and it is cross-listed with Critical Theory 290 section 5.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: The Limits of Historicism

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 115 Barrows


Book List

Bennett, Jane: Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things; Hartman, Saidiya: Lose Your Mother; Liu, Alan: Local Transcendence: Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database; Love, Heather: Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy

Description

Fredric Jameson famously enjoined critics to “Always historicize!,” and while many responded by committing to ideology critique and the project of demystification, of late a number have sought to satisfy the imperative by “practic[ing] the principles of the craft in full awareness of their poverty” (Constantin Fasolt, The Limits of History).  This course will take a particular interest in this more recent response: the paradox of satisfying the historicist imperative through methods consciously intended to moderate, discount, and contain historical ambition.  Our conversations will center around recent interventions in the fields of queer theory, African-American literature/slavery studies, and postcolonial theory, asking what it is about the objects and archives in these fields that have led to the raising once again of the question of the limits of historicism.  We will focus on a range of methodological experiments in these fields including queer anti-historicism and the elucidation of queer time, the affective turn and critical melancholy, deep time and the new incrementalism (scaling up versus scaling down), objects and the new materialism, and surface reading.

As this is a course on method, we will begin by trying to define what historicism is, whether it is a method or has affinities for certain methods.  We will survey specific attempts to posit a relation between the literary and the historical (e.g., New Historicist anecdotalism, Foucauldian genealogy, metahistory) and will also compare a recent string of “ends of history” special issues (in American Literary History, New Literary History, Representations, and Victorian Studies) to previous debates regarding historical criticism.  The course will consider “the long nineteenth century” in relation to what the critics Rachel Buurma and Laura Heffernan term the “nineteenthcentricity” of the current moment of critical historicist reflection.  Students will be encouraged to think comparatively about their own fields and to consider the various “nineteenth centuries” in literary history – i.e., Victorian and American nineteenth centuries of archival abundance and an African American nineteenth century of relative archival scarcity.  How do new archives change our sense of what historicism is or does?  Should historicist methods be applied differently to different archives?  To different ethnic literatures?  Does the degraded archive of slavery (a literature forged under duress) continue to call for the “suspicious” modes of 1980s historicism?  Do the minor, the lost, and the left aside require a commitment to recovery?  We will seek answers in some recent examples of minoritized historiography that proffer alternatives to the narrative of retrieval, ones that attempt to grapple with the stubborn negativity of the past (Love, Feeling Backward), the ambition and failure to unearth what others haven’t (Hartman, Lose Your Mother), and the recognition that sexuality may be an impossible object within the colonial archive (Arondekar, For the Record).

Readings by Anjali Arondekar, Ian Baucom, Lauren Berlant, Georges Didi-Huberman, Rita Felski, Joel Fineman, Michel Foucault, Catherine Gallagher and Stephen Greenblatt, Saidiya Hartman, Heather Love, Walter Benn Michaels, Friedrich Nietzsche, David Scott, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Valerie Traub, and Kenneth Warren, among others.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: How It Strikes a Contemporary: Reading the Novel in the 21st Century

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katie
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Adichie, Chimamanda: Americanah; Atwood, Margaret: Oryx and Crake; Coetzee, J.M.: Slow Man; Cole, Teju: Open City; Egan, Jennifer: A Visit From the Goon Squad; Hamid, Mohsin: The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Lahiri, Jhumpa: The Namesake; McCarthy, Cormac: The Road; McCarthy, Tom: Satin Island; Sebald, W.G.: Austerlitz; Whitehead, Colson: Zone One

Description

As a generic term, the “novel” has always been entangled with the new, the up-to-the-moment, the contemporary. If the weft of the genre of the novel is fiction, then its warp is modernity. So what might distinguish our own contemporary novels from novels of earlier historical moments that have also viewed themselves as distinctly modern? In this seminar, we will read a selection of novels published in the 21st century, asking not only “what is the contemporary?” but a related question of scale and duration: “when is the contemporary?” Along with open questions of temporality and periodization, we will consider an array of topics that inform contemporary novelistic, critical, and theoretical writings: (post) apocalypse and futurity; globalization and world literature; neoliberalism and risk; terror and trauma; digital technologies and information networks; postmodernism, post-postmodernism, and meta-modernism; hysterical realism and national allegory; the neuro-novel and cli(mate)-fi(ction); MFA style and genre fiction. Rather than attempting to develop a unified field theory of the contemporary, we will draw selectively from this laundry list of perspectives to see what they can do for us as readers of the contemporary novel at the present time.

The book list for the course is provisional, subject to revision by the instructor and by participants in the seminar. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th[- 21st-] Century) requirement.
 


Research Seminar: Modernism's Metaphysics

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: F 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

Over recent decades, we have become accustomed to speaking of the ‘cultural logic’ of modernism, using a periodizing term to delineate a larger complex of historical effects, while also insinuating its availability to the integrated descriptions of critical reason. And understood broadly enough, modernism itself seems to comprise a series of variations on the problem of logic or critical reason, ranging from the analytic to the psychoanalytic, from dialectics to phenomenology. It is less clear, however, that one might speak with confidence of modernism’s metaphysics, its attempt to think first causes. Indeed in 1929, Martin Heidegger argued that the enterprise of metaphysics could only be authentically pursued by forswearing logic as such, trading the conceptual claims of Hegelian negation for a more primordial Nothing ultimately designed to banish Western metaphysics altogether.

This course constitutes the first stirring of a counter-hypothesis, testing the proposition that Heidegger’s own modernist moment developed its own distinctive metaphysics, even when it failed or refused to provide a proper metaphysical language. Our reading will tangle in passing with the philosophical traditions already mentioned and more, as well as the discourses of literary criticism that the period spawned. We will attend to the period’s epistemological experiments and the rise (from several directions, both artistic and technical) of inductive modes of knowing. Centrally, however, we will concentrate on four major canonical figures, attempting to grasp the metaphysical consequences of the formal logics they develop as distinctive conceptual styles.

Our largest work will begin with two poets, both of whom seem to press the limits of what a poem can know. For W. B. Yeats, the sequence of volumes following the first war (The Wild Swans at Coole, Michael Robartes and the Dancer, The Tower, The Winding Stair) seem to predicate their boldest visions on ignorance rather then insight, incognition rather than cognition. By comparison, T. S. Eliot’s early work, culminating in Ara Vos Prec and pointing to the more radical experimental break marked by “Gerontion” and The Waste Land, seems to trade vision for the more modest relevance of satire, even as the mode’s underlying referentiality seems to slide into mere inference. In each case, we are confronted with what a poet seems not to know, even as the poem essays a logic that operates behind his back.

We will pursue the larger implication of that division in the work of two novelists. Wyndham Lewis’ Human Age trilogy takes the period between the wars as a logical and historical singularity, a moment when the future is experienced in advance, before it is known, when a second future war emerges as the cause of the first. For Samuel Beckett, Lewis’ unfashionable experiment in teleology is reinscribed as occasionalism, developed from the first trilogy (Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable) to the late Comment c’est (How It Is) as a categorical incommensurability between the physical and the metaphysical.

This section of English 250 will count toward the Critical Theory Designated Emphasis, and it is cross-listed with Critical Theory 290 section 1.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TBA
Location: TBA


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning October 19. No one will be admitted after the first week of spring classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.