Announcement of Classes: Fall 2016

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Issues

MWF 9-10

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 20).

How bad are things, really? This class puts problems of past and present up for debate. We take as our starting point th...(read more)

Ling, Jessica

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Fugitive

MWF 10-11

Run. Now. Don’t look back. (Wait, come back.) This class will consider the American fugitive. What does it mean for someone to escape some form of imprisonment without being able to lawfully reenter society? Does it mean they sneak in? Take ...(read more)

Johnson, Sarah Jessica

R1A/3

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1A has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Reading Ads: They'll Tell You What You Want, What You Really Really Want

MWF 12-1

Think of something that you want right now, at this very moment. Now tell me why you want it. Are you sure? Do you really want it, or do you want to want it? Or does someone else want you to want it? How do you know that your des...(read more)

Ehrlinspiel, Hannah Kathryn

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Self and Lyric Form

MWF 1-2

 "I longed to be that thing, / The pure, sensuous form," writes Theodore Roethke, in a poem about watching a young snake glide out of the shadows. American poets from a wide variety of backgrounds...(read more)

Viragh, Atti

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Wild Women in America

MWF 2-3

Wild women come in all shapes and sizes: spiritual prophets, melancholic captives, alleged witches, radical reformers, reclusive poets, cunning runaways, intimate rivals, and meditative drifters are just some of the alluring, often challenging, fi...(read more)

Bondy, Katherine Isabel

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Forms of Humiliation

MWF 3-4

What do bullying, body-shaming, and bashing do to one’s experience of language and the world? Often, scenes of humiliation involve an encounter between some private ideal we have of ourselves and our public reception. But what is humiliation...(read more)

Callender, Brandon

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Essay and American Life

TTh 8-9:30

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 10).

The social theorist and cultural critic Theodor Adorno described the essay as a curious hybrid, at once more open-ended ...(read more)

de Stefano, Jason

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
The Rest is Commentary

TTh 5-6:30 PM

"The verse," writes an early interpreter of the Bible, "cries out, 'interpret me.'" Commentators often justify themselves in this way, deferentially insisting that earlier texts desire, need, and therefore authorize s...(read more)
Magarik, Raphael

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Walking America

MWF 9-10

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B.

From Walt Whitman's walks through Manhattan to Leslie Marmon Silko's treks through the Tucson wilderness, American writers have...(read more)

Gillis, Brian

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Literature and Popular Culture

MWF 9-10

Note the change in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 19).

How does a poem about a road merely taken become a poem about a road less traveled? What happens when literature bec...(read more)

Le, Serena

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Signs of the Times

MWF 10-11

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 16).

Do you ever feel like the faster you go, the less time you have? In the nineteenth century, rapid but uneven changes mad...(read more)

Terlaak Poot, Luke

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
"One Fine Day": Diurnal Narratives of the 20th Century

MWF 11-12

Some of the most powerful stories we tell are constrained within the temporal limits of a single day. This course embraces "the day" as a significant unit of narrative time, exploring diurnal fictions as vital sites of personal reflectio...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn

R1B/5

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/6

Reading and Composition

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Lost Literature: Recovering and (re)-Discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

MWF 1-2

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and practice literary criticism as a dynamic process of discovery. ...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

MWF 1-2

The drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries offers a fascinating site for the analysis of gender and sexuality as historical and theoretical constructs, rather than as the timeless and universal ‘facts’ of human experience which th...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR

R1B/9

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Monomanias

MWF 2-3

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 10).

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can't stop thinking ...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan

R1B/11

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
London: Self and the City

TTh 8-9:30

“What strange phenomena we find in a great city, all we need do is stroll about with our eyes open,” exclaimed Baudelaire in Fleurs du Mal, his 1857 book of urban poetry: “Life swarms with innocent monsters.”

(read more)
Wise, Diana Catherine

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Queer/of Color Cultural Productions

TTh 5-6:30 PM.

What meanings do the terms “queer” and “of color” carry? How do different literary and artistic genres represent the experiences of (racial, sexual, gender, or other social) minorities? What relationships can we trace betwe...(read more)

Valella, Daniel

R1B/14

Reading & Composition

MWF 1-2

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.

...(read more)
Mezur, Katherine

R1B/15

Reading & Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.

...(read more)
Mezur, Katherine

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

W 4-5

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as on...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

24/2

Freshman Seminar

This section of English 24 has been canceled; it will be offered in Spring '17 instead.

...(read more)
Hutson, Richard

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco's Palestine

Note new time: Tues. 9-11 (for seven weeks only)

"The landmark work of comics journalism," Joe Sacco's Palestine is "a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality." In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Palestine, ...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Immigrant Inscriptions

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will consider a variety of texts—contemporary fiction, classic and new film, journalism, history, and cultural criticism—that help us explore the possibilities for writing the migrant self and experience. The shifting...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earlier middle a...(read more)

Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This course will introduce you to some central works from the earlier centuries of English literary history in order to help you develop strategies within which to read early literatures. Its particular focus on Beowulf, the Canterbur...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly beco...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course has two fundamental purposes. The first is to provide a broad working overview of the development of literature in English, from the end of the 17th century, in the wake of civil war, revolution, and restoration in England, to the mid-...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

45C/1

Literature in English:
Late-19th through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

(read more)

Falci, Eric

45C/2

Literature in English:
Late-19th through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovati...(read more)

Goble, Mark

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Sposito, Gary

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

W 2-5 (note new time)

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some ficti...(read more)

Bader, Julia

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to r...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

110/1

Medieval Literature:
Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland: Visions of Other Worlds in Medieval British Literature

MWF 9-10

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the a...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 3-4

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare:
Shakespeare after 1600

TTh 9:30-11

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomic romances). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their...(read more)

Landreth, David

117S/1

Shakespeare

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, extravagantly beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively mea...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

117T/1

Shakespeare in the Theater:
Performing Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida

TTh 2-3:30

Imagine that the play is an exquisite silk dress. In lectures, we look at it from many different angles; we consider the materials it’s made of; we imagine who created it and why; we listen to the sounds it makes as it moves. If you ever won...(read more)

Marno, David

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic-era writers revolutio...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 1-2

(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

126/1

British Literature, 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

(read more)

Gang, Joshua

131/1

American Poetry

WF 5-6:30 P.M

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of major works by African American writers. Themes in the course include law and violence, freedom and deliverance, culture and commerce, passing and racial impersonation.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

134/1

Contemporary Literature:
21st-Century American Writing

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

In this course we will take seriously the notion of “the contemporary” as that which coexists with us and is relevant to our times—or our spaces. All the works on the syllabus have been published in the past ten years, most withi...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

C136/1

Special Topics

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Global Cities

MWF 1-2

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives—fictional and ot...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

TTh 3:30-5

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 2-3:30

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  St...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This section (section 2) of English 143A has been canceled.  If you are interested in applying for this course, please see the listing for 143A section 1 instead.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

143B/1

Verse

MW 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing lyric poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and l...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This workshop will draw inspiration from the counsel of Ralph Waldo Emerson: "People wish to be settled: only as far as they are unsettled is there any hope for them." In this spirit, we will experiment with different generative exercise...(read more)

Szybist, Mary

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing

TTh 9:30-11

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain.  But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a bo...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
Life Writing

TTh 12:30-2

A seminar on auto/biography, with a special emphasis on what it means to write lives that are hidden, overlooked, circumscribed. An unconventional seminar/workshop 1) that will be as experimental as the work we’ll be trying to produce; 2) ...(read more)
Ellis, Nadia

143N/3

Prose Nonfiction:
Covering Culture

TTh 12:30-2

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you’ll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from theater and visual art to music and TV — in other words, the genres that one finds discussed in the culture-and-art...(read more)

Saul, Scott

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

MWF 11-12

This course offers an introduction to literary theory with a focus on 20th- and 21st-century social and political approaches, including Marxism, feminism, race and ethnicity, post-colonialism, and ecocriticism. The course wil...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

165/1

Special Topics:
Telling Stories: The Power of Narrative in Academic Writing

MWF 1-2

This seminar is dedicated to the principle that because narrative is at the core of how we come to understand the world, narrative is also an especially powerful method of scholarly practice. We will study the art of storytelling as it is practice...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

166/1

Special Topics:
Aesthetics and the Environment in the Eighteenth Century

MWF 12-1

Why do we take pleasure in contemplating the natural world? What sort of pleasure is this? The eighteenth century was preoccupied with this question, which abutted on others: What is beauty? Is it something we perceive directly, or do we experienc...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

166/2

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After be...(read more)

Naiman, Eric

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
The Deaths and Lives of Saints

MWF 11-12

The paradox of Western sainthood is summed up by a phrase from Latin calendars: dies natalis, “birthday.” Marking a saint’s chief feast, the dies natalis celebrates the day of his or her death: death as birth wi...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

170/2

Literature and the Arts:
Opera and Literary Form

TTh 3:30-5

Together with the novel, opera became one of the characteristic European art forms of the long nineteenth century. Attending to the hybrid status of opera as a dramatic as well as a musical form, the course will focus on a series of major musical-...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Postcolonial Sex

MWF 3-4

This course will explore the intersection of theories of gender and sexuality and the postcolonial world. We will consider how gender and nation are shaped and represented in literature and film. Why are nations routinely imagined as women, a...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

171/2

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 2-3:30

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist ...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

174/1

Literature and History:
The Seventies

TTh 3:30-5

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.&rdqu...(read more)

Saul, Scott

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a cor...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180H/1

The Short Story

MWF 12-1

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                          &...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

190/1

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

MWF 10-11

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attentio...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/2

Research Seminar:
Slow Seeing / Slow Reading

MWF 11-12

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading poems and seeing paintings. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” po...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

190/3

Research Seminar:
Moby-Dick, and More

MW 3:30-5

We will read Moby-Dick scrupulously, and we also will consider historical and literary contexts, Melville’s range of sources, 19th-century responses, 20th- and 21st-century literary criticism, and the pres...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

190/4

Research Seminar:
U.S. Modernism

MW 5-6:30 PM

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a ran...(read more)

Goble, Mark

190/5

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

W 5-8 PM

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings wil...(read more)

Bader, Julia

190/6

Research Seminar:
The Medium Is the Message: Reading Poetry in Manuscript & Print, 1300-1600

TTh 9:30-11

Modern readers almost exclusively encounter medieval and Renaissance literature in highly mediated anthologies and scholarly editions, far removed from the manuscripts and early print books in which they first circulated. In this course, we will p...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M

190/7

Research Seminar:
Note new topic: Troy and Tragedy

TTh 11-12:30

Note the new topic (and book list and instructor):

From the earliest moments of the western literary tradition, the story of the fall of Troy has been associated with the genre of tragedy. This course charts that association from Ancient Ro...(read more)

Perry, R. D.

190/8

Research Seminar:
James / Baldwin

TTh 12:30-2

James Baldwin never made a secret of the importance of Henry James to his creative life.  The numerous quotations, echoes, and nods to James sprinkled throughout Baldwin’s writings all but directly invite us to think of James as we read...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

190/9

Research Seminar:
On Style

TTh 2-3:30

NOTE: The topic, course description, book list, and instructor for this section of English 190 changed on May 2.

Good style is easy to spot but tough to imitate, and "style," good or bad, is itself difficult to define: does style ...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica

190/10

Research Seminar:
Do I Dare? Indecision and Modernist Literature

TTh 3:30-5

From Prufrock's peach to Frost's two roads, modernism gave us many famous moments of indecision. We will follow along with texts depicting speakers and characters as they hesitate, delay, cavil, evade, hedge, sidestep, prevaricate, tergive...(read more)

Blevins, Jeffrey

190/11

Research Seminar:
Modern California Literature and Film

Tues. 5-8 PM

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califo...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/12

Research Seminar:
Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Thurs. 5-8 PM

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.

H195A/1

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

The Honors Thesis is a long research essay. Length, however, is not the only way it differs from every essay you have ever written in the English Department. In most literature classes, the function of essay assignments is to he...(read more)

Marno, David

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

(read more)

Langan, Celeste

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12:30-2

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies t...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

203/1

Graduate Readings:
On Life: Life Philosophy and Culture

MW 9:30-11

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Early African American Literature

TTh 12:30-2

Major works in the context of slavery and its aftermath. Advance syllabus (read more)

Wagner, Bryan

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schol...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Lyric, Poetry, Poetics

W 3-6

This course will provide an introduction to poetics and theories of poetry, especially lyric poetry, since the early 19th century.  We will watch as conceptualizations of poetry, lyric, and verse torque a...(read more)

Falci, Eric

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2016-17 (or the following year, either), but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English) in its place; see the listing for that course in ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

212/1

Readings in Middle English

MW 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval trhough Sixteenth Century) requirement.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

217/1

Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

An introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the graduate level. We'll examine a range of contemporary approaches to Shakespeare's plays and poems, and consider how they emerge from longstanding preoccupations across four hundred years o...(read more)

Landreth, David

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

F 11-2

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Graham Foust, Sarah Nicholson, Morgan Parker, Juliana Spahr, Jenny Zhang, and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to app...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

250/1

Research Seminar:
Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

M 3-6

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope, and contemporary debates...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

250/2

Research Seminar:
Ethnic Modernisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This seminar will explore the convergence of modernist and ethnic cultures in twentieth-century America and Europe, placing race and ethnicity in dialogue with the modernist compulsion to "make it new" and the avant-gardist compulsion to...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

250/3

Research Seminar:
Literature and the Brain

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

As imaging and computational technologies become more adept at measuring the neurology of reading and writing, literary study faces a number of challenges. Some of ...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

T. B. A.

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in section...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 3, 4, 6, and 9 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 5, 7, and 8 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143N, and 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, and 143N; only graduate students should apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these classes, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY MIDNIGHT, THURSDAY, APRIL 28, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall directly across from the English Department office (322 Wheeler) on Thursday, May 5. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, May 5 to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone (and please come within a few days after May 5, as Wheeler Hall will be closing for a year by mid-May). ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL ENROLLMENT CODE  FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST OR SECOND CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE FALL.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only already-declared majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of fall '16 will be able to enroll in this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted later (probably towards the end of Phase II) if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must electronically apply, using the link on the course listing in this "Announcement of Classes"; your submittal will need to include: (a) the on-line application form, along with PDFs of: (b) your college transcript(s); (c) a list of your spring 2016 classes; and (d) a critical paper (in a PDF or Word document) that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality). These applications must be submitted, via the corresponding link, BY MIDNIGHT, FRIDAY, May 13. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2016 semester, and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, applicants will be contacted by email sometime between late July and late August to be informed if they have been selected for admission, and, if so, to which section. (Since there might be more applicants for one section than the other, some students might end up being placed in the section that was not their first choice.)  EACH STUDENT ADMITTED TO H195A WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS OR HER INDIVIDUAL ENROLLMENT CODE AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM THE CORRESPONDING INSTRUCTOR.  NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THIS PARTICULAR COURSE BEFORE INSTRUCTION BEGINS IN THE FALL.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2016 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the English Department Chair’s office (in 322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, APRIL 28. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair’s office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the April 28 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available (until mid-May) from the racks outside 319 Wheeler Hall. Completed applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the drop box inside 319 Wheeler Hall. Students will be emailed a course control number they will use to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses. Note that as of mid-May, the English Department Office will be moving to B45 Hearst Field Annex, so that is where the application forms will be available as of that time.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.