Announcement of Classes: Fall 2016


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: W 4-5
Location: 180 Barrows


Book List

Thoreau, Henry: Walden

Description

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 24 has been canceled; it will be offered in Spring '17 instead.


Freshman Seminar: Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco's Palestine

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: Note new time: Tues. 9-11 (for seven weeks only)
Location: note new location: 575 McCone


Book List

McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Sacco, Joe: Palestine

Description

"The landmark work of comics journalism," Joe Sacco's Palestine is "a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality." In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Palestine, informed by comics scholarship. Maintaining an open and inclusive discussion, we will consider the comics form and its possibilities for reportage and narrative, Sacco's representation of the Occupied Territories, and Sacco's self-representation in relation to his encounters with diverse Palestinian perspectives. Students should be prepared for active participation and at least 6 pages of informal writing.

Note that this section of English 24 will meet for seven weeks only (two hours per week): August 30 through October 11.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to the Study of Fiction

English 27

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Literature of American Cultures: Immigrant Inscriptions

English 31AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 310 Hearst Mining


Book List

Adichie, C.: Americanah; Diaz, J.: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Fukunaga , C. (dir.): Sin Nombre; Kazan , E. (dir.): Gentleman's Agreement; Kincaid, J.: Lucy; Martinez, O.: The Beast; Robbins and Wise (dirs.): West Side Story

Other Readings and Media

Short fiction by Edwidge Danticat, Jonathan Lethem, and Jhumpa Lahiri as well as contextualizing works of history, sociology, and cultural criticism.

Description

In this course we will consider a variety of texts—contemporary fiction, classic and new film, journalism, history, and cultural criticism—that help us explore the possibilities for writing the migrant self and experience. The shifting terrain of race in the United States, shifts that occur in part because of successive waves of migration here, complicates how migrant experience can be imagined and represented. We will discuss this shifting terrain in an effort to understand more deeply the context within which immigrant experiences can be rendered. And we will analyze the dynamic ways in which artists respond to the complexities of race and the sometimes painful complications of migration.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales: A Selection; Donne, John: Poetry; Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Shakespeare, William: Macbeth; Shakespeare, William: Sonnets

Description

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earlier middle ages through 1667: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton will get our closest attention, but they will also provide the scaffolding on which to hang a more detailed picture of the imaginative and intellectual development of literature. It will work hard to give you the skills to read easily and intelligently (and out loud) the earlier forms of the language in which these works are written, and to develop also the skills by which you can take writing apart and see how it works. It will also take up the big questions raised by the whole undertaking: what literary art is good for, what forms of reason and understanding are most at home in it, and why the past is worth bothering with--all, in fact, questions that the works themselves are preoccupied with.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 370 Dwinelle


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Jill Mann; Dickson, Donald, ed.: John Donne's Poetry; Liuzza, R. M.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation; Marlowe, Christopher: Doctor Faustus, ed. David Wootton; Milton, John: Paradise Lost, ed. William Kerrigan et al.

Description

This course will introduce you to some central works from the earlier centuries of English literary history in order to help you develop strategies within which to read early literatures. Its particular focus on Beowulf, the Canterbury Tales, Dr. Faustus, the poetry of John Donne, and Paradise Lost will allow us to engage the early literature of England from a variety of perspectives. We will explore various genres (among them, epic, romance, lyric, drama) and the expectations created by these forms. Throughout, we will be thinking about contemporary literary conventions and the cultural contexts of the works on which we focus. And we will attend closely to matters of language, observing how English changes over the centuries.


Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Description

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in England), political revolution (English, American, French), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse viewing them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation—including debates about what constitutes “proper” language and Literature itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups—British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, men and women—use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices—from linguistic register to generic conventions and innovations—and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and reading quizzes.


Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 370 Dwinelle


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Gay, John: The Beggar's Opera; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Criticism; Essay on Man; The Rape of the Lock; Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft: Frankenstein; Sterne, Laurence: A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass (1855 edition); Wordsworth, William: The Prelude (1805 text)

Description

This course has two fundamental purposes. The first is to provide a broad working overview of the development of literature in English, from the end of the 17th century, in the wake of civil war, revolution, and restoration in England, to the mid-19th century, on the cusp of civil war in the United States. We will thus trace English literature’s expansion and transformation, from an insular cultural form to an incipient global fact, from a writing produced in England to a writing produced in English. We will also attend to the particular forms that emerged in this process--poetry and criticism, satire and novel--exploring the ways in which they revise and readapt older traditions to new historical circumstances, often constructing the categories that shape our own habits and styles of reading in the process.

Our second purpose is to offer an introduction to some of the basic techniques and methods of critical reading and writing that guide our collective interpretation of that literature. Lectures in the course will seek to provide a sense of essential conceptual, historical, and literary-historical contexts, while both lectures and discussion sections will be designed to inculcate a sense of the formal diversity, complexity, and significance of the texts at hand.


Literature in English: Late-19th through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Eliot, T.S.: Selected Poems; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modernity as we closely investigate a selection of the major texts from this period. At times the lectures will zoom in on particular features of texts, and at other times they will zoom out to cultural conditions and aesthetic tendencies. In addition to the books listed, there will be a small reader with texts by Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Stein, Stevens, Moore, Hughes, and Beckett. There will be two essays, and a final exam.


Literature in English: Late-19th through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 251 LeConte


Description

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovations that show us some of the most provocative ways that literature operated as a means of cultural response in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will also consider modernism alongside other literary modes and styles (realism, naturalism, postmodernism) that look to different strategies for representing the experience of the modern world--and of finding a place for literature within it. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and questions of literary form even as we think about such larger issues as the relationship between reading and entertainment, the changing status of art in respect to new technologies of information and representation, and the challenges to traditional conceptions of the self posed by new languages of psychological, national, and racial identity. Assignments will likely include two short papers, a midterm, and a final.


Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Sposito, Gary
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week
Location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

The required books for the course will be available at University Press Books, and the Course Reader, Introduction to Environmental Studies, will be sold exclusively at Metro Publishing; both of these establishments are located on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Ave. There will also be a required envornmental science textbook (possibly provided as an eBook).

Description

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the basic science of the environment, an introduction to environmental literature, philosophy, and policy issues, and analytic tools to evaluate a range of environmental problems. The course requires some time spent outdoors in observation as well as a lot of reading and writing.

This course is cross-listed with E.S.P.M. C12.


Sophomore Seminar: The Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5 (note new time)
Location: note new room: D1 Hearst Annex


Book List

Lahiri, J.: Interpreter of Maladies

Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fiction and attend events at the Pacific Film Archive and Cal Performances.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.