Announcement of Classes: Fall 2016


Reading and Composition: Issues

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Ling, Jessica
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Book List

Dickens, Charles: Hard Times; Dreiser, Theodore: Sister Carrie

Other Readings and Media

Selections include:  Thomas Carlyle, "Signs of the Times"; Adam Smith, A Theory of Moral Sentiments; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin; Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, The Gilded Age; Henry Mayhew, London Labor and the London Poor; Rebecca Harding Davis, "Life in the Iron Mills"; Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Man the Reformer"; Friedrich Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England; Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty, "Striking It Richer"; n+1, "Occupy!"; Nathan Schneider, Thank You, Anarchy!

Description

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 20).

How bad are things, really? This class puts problems of past and present up for debate. We take as our starting point the nineteenth century, looking at techniques by which writers called for change and tracing how reformist language and description evolved across a number of issues: the condition of the industrial laborer, abolition, income inequality, corruption and enfranchisement. Our premise is that how something is argued is just as important as what. We'll therefore think about the relationship between representation and argument; how the scale, seriousness, and persuasiveness of certain issues rest on inflationary or urgent rhetoric; the ways literature gets conscripted into arguments (good and bad); the ambitions and limitations of literature in the public sphere. Other areas of inquiry include the uses of satire and vitriol; facts and "realist" description; the rhetoric of crisis; the effects of continuing coverage and the 24-hour newsfeed. We will approach contemporary activist journalism and election-year debates with a skeptical ear. In examining arguments about hard and "workful" times, we'll start to craft arguments about our own.

Our emphasis is on independent thinking, critical reading, and analysis. You'll be asked to build balanced, well-researched cases on literature and contemporary issues. In-class debates and short papers (3-4 pages) will be the culmination of your work.


Reading and Composition: The Fugitive

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Johnson, Sarah Jessica
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

Condé, Maryse: I, Tituba; Black Witch of Salem; Davis, Angela: An Autobiography; Northup, Solomon: Twelve Years a Slave

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Films:  Jim Jarmusch: Down By Law; Steve McQueen: 12 Years a Slave; Stuart Baird: U.S. Marshalls 

Description

Run. Now. Don’t look back. (Wait, come back.) This class will consider the American fugitive. What does it mean for someone to escape some form of imprisonment without being able to lawfully reenter society? Does it mean they sneak in? Take on another identity? Or remain “off the grid”—outside society, looking in? We will read depictions of the fugitive through three narrative lenses: recounting, reporting, and recording.

In thinking about your own position as a student and budding writer, we will confront a couple of  pertinent questions: Does the fugitive speak? Can he write? Does she write? Can writing play a role in a fugitive’s reentry into or rejection of society? In addition to these questions concerning the elusiveness of the fugitive and fugitive writing, we will discuss examples of fugitive meaning. 

Over the course of the semester, we will read of the escape of an enslaved house servant in Maryse Condé’s voicing of one of America’s first and most interesting recorded prisoners, Tituba, an early scapegoat in the Salem witch trials; we will investigate the forms of flight taken by African-American slaves escaping bondage after the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act; we will examine journalistic prose about modern day fugitives of the law including Angela Davis, “El Chapo,” and prisoners at Alcatraz. Finally, through film we will analyze fictional narratives of fugitives that imagine the everyday emotional and practical concerns of someone fleeing law enforcement. 


Reading and Composition

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English R1A has been canceled.


Reading and Composition: Reading Ads: They'll Tell You What You Want, What You Really Really Want

English R1A

Section: 4
Instructor: Ehrlinspiel, Hannah Kathryn
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Barthes, Roland: Mythologies

Other Readings and Media

All other readings will be in the course reader, available at Metro Publishing on Bancroft.

Description

Think of something that you want right now, at this very moment. Now tell me why you want it. Are you sure? Do you really want it, or do you want to want it? Or does someone else want you to want it? How do you know that your desire is your own, that it originates from within and is not imposed from without? When ads surround us—and especially as we enter into the online era of personalized, bespoke marketing—it can be difficult for contemporary existence not to feel pre-packaged, technicolored, high-glossed, unreal. Are we doomed to be dupes, to buy into Kinfolk’s whitewashed minimalism or GQ’s cool-guy kitsch? What type of marketing captures you, and why?

Our efforts in this class will be two-fold. During the first half of the semester, we will endeavor to be more critical consumers by applying the literary skill of close-reading to less traditionally “literary” texts: ads in a number of media. We all know that sex sells, but what other (perhaps more subtle) tricks and tactics do companies use to catch our interest? What associations might a color scheme conjure? How can an image trigger identification? And what kind of identification? When shopping for soup, for instance, do you prefer the old-school nostalgia of a can of Campbell’s or the new-age wholesomeness of Amy’s Organic? From typefaces to taglines, we will pay close attention to the detail in order to see how design determines desire. We will also attempt to understand how ads not only cater to but also create consumers. Who is included in—and excluded from—the “target audience”? In the second half of the semester, we will focus on resistances to advertising’s pervasiveness, discussing the creative types of “antiviruses” available to combat this viral marketing.  

Through careful attention to the way ads seduce and produce us, we will engage in and with the practices of close reading, argumentative analysis, persuasive writing, and critical thinking—skills that will enable you, in turn, to persuade your reader into “buying” the products of this class: the dazzling arguments of your written work.


Reading and Composition: The Self and Lyric Form

English R1A

Section: 5
Instructor: Viragh, Atti
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Carruth, Hayden: The Voice that is Great Within Us: American Poetry of the Twentieth Century; Ramazani, Jahan: Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry: Volume 1

Description

 "I longed to be that thing, / The pure, sensuous form," writes Theodore Roethke, in a poem about watching a young snake glide out of the shadows. American poets from a wide variety of backgrounds and traditions have imagined poetic form as a space of self-creation or self-exploration. Far from being a conventionalized structure through which ideas pass, literary form for many poets becomes a site of longing, projection, embodiment, and more. Using concepts of the self taken from modern psychology, this course will examine how poets set out to discover and assert something of their identity that is made available to them when they experiment with poetic elements such as line-breaks, narrative, voice, and the lyric “I.” We will put language under a microscope in order to answer the enormous question of how poets encounter the self through the pure, sensuous constructs of lyric form.

The goals of this class are to develop your abilities to read closely, critically and sensitively; to persuasively argue for unique and significant interpretations of your reading; and to craft your own writing with the same attentiveness that we will be giving to the poetry we are reading.

 


Reading and Composition: Wild Women in America

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Bondy, Katherine Isabel
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 138 Morgan


Book List

Morrison, Toni: Sula; Robinson, Marilynne: Housekeeping; Rowlandson, Mary: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, Together with the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed: Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson

Other Readings and Media

Course reader with selections of documents pertaining to the Antinomian Controversy, the Salem Witchcraft Trials, & the Seneca Falls Convention, along with works by Anne Bradstreet, Phyllis Wheatley, Judith Sargent Murray, Margaret Fuller, Mary Prince, Harriet Jacobs, Emily Dickinson, Sojourner Truth, E. Pauline Johnson, Zitkala-Sa, and others. 

Mandatory screening of Robert Eggers’ The Witch (2015).  

Description

Wild women come in all shapes and sizes: spiritual prophets, melancholic captives, alleged witches, radical reformers, reclusive poets, cunning runaways, intimate rivals, and meditative drifters are just some of the alluring, often challenging, figures we will explore in our survey of American history and literary form. Since its colonial beginnings, American society has been in turn vexed, enchanted, and upended by the presence of transgressive and law-breaking females, both fictional and historical. With a particular eye to the relation between femininity and form, we will read a wide array of women-authored prose and poetry spanning the first three centuries of the nation’s existence. Our inquiries will include, but not be limited to: female spirituality, prophecy, and revelation; gender reform, politics, and early activism; Native American writing and rights; questions of authorship, popularity, and canonization; sentimentality and sympathy; slavery and black womanhood; motherhood and kinship; domesticity and its experimentations; the potentials of female friendship; women and non-human relations. In our final turn to the twentieth-century with Toni Morrison’s 1973 Sula and Marilynne Robinson’s 1980 Housekeeping, we will shift these questions into a more contemporary moment as we continue to wonder: what difference do women make in American literature?

The authors in this course will unanimously challenge and destabilize our expectations, literary and otherwise. We will therefore spend the semester learning how, as readers and thinkers, to respond critically, creatively, and compassionately. This is a writing intensive course: you will be expected to produce 32 pages of writing in total, which will take the form of weekly reading responses, short essays, and longer revisions. Beyond sharpening basic critical writing skills through the development of strong close reading practices, our objective will be to discover how to incorporate literature’s language into our own—to echo it, converse with it, and expand upon it.


Reading and Composition: Forms of Humiliation

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Callender, Brandon
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 41 Evans


Book List

Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Chee, Alexander: Edinburgh; Kincaid, Jamaica: A Small Place; Kingston, Maxine, Hong: The Woman Warrior; Rankine, Claudia: Citizen; Torres, Justin: We the Animals

Other Readings and Media

Other texts will be made available through the course website. This will include work by a range of authors, such as Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Thomas Glave, Wayne Koestenbaum and others. 

Description

What do bullying, body-shaming, and bashing do to one’s experience of language and the world? Often, scenes of humiliation involve an encounter between some private ideal we have of ourselves and our public reception. But what is humiliation – this word that has humility at its core, and expresses the common fear of being outcast, misaligned, and misunderstood? In this course we will examine the shifting forms of identity and belonging to see how humiliation can reinforce national, racial, and gendered identities while also providing murky escapes from these categories. To that end, we will consider the role that humiliation plays in the politics of individual and group representation, especially pertaining to questions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. How does humiliation transform our relationships with our bodies and the world that they inhabit? What happens when we understand works of fragmentation not as broken or impaired forms, but as differently-abled modes of artistic expression?

The goal of the course will be to improve your writing and critical abilities. We will work to develop compelling arguments and clear, artful prose. You will be expected to write and revise three papers over the course of the semester.


Reading and Composition: The Essay and American Life

English R1A

Section: 8
Instructor: de Stefano, Jason
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Als, Hilton: White Girls; Robinson, Marilynne: When I Was a Child I Read Books

Other Readings and Media

All other readings will be provided in a course reader.

Description

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 10).

The social theorist and cultural critic Theodor Adorno described the essay as a curious hybrid, at once more open-ended and more hermetically closed than we might expect. If that's the case, then the essay might be the quintessential American genre, for the nation's own political experiment has often involved confronting tensions between openness and closure: the ideal inclusiveness of a democratic society versus a coherently defined national identity; cosmopolitanism versus communitarianism; neighborliness versus self-reliance; freedom of information versus personal privacy; open borders versus closed. In our readings we will investigate how writers from the earliest days of the United States to today have used the essay as a means to think through these and other aspects of American life, broadly defined. We will also ask how the essay as a genre has been and can be called upon to situate the lives and identities of particular individuals with respect to American culture and society writ large.

Of course, R1A is also designed to engage students in their own extensive essay writing. In this course you will develop your writing practice and experiment with and hone your skills in critical thinking, rhetoric, and intellectual analysis by writing and reading essays. To that end, we will ask of our essays and of those of some of the form's most famous practitioners: what is an essay, or what can it be? how do essays "work"? and how do we understand the essay's place within a broader intellectual and literary culture, both in history and today? An essay is more than an exercise in composition. In its original sense, an essay is "a trial, testing, proof"—an "experiment" (OED, entry 1a.) Writing assignments in this course will allow students to experiment with different kinds of writing, from the more creative and personal to the analytic and scholarly. We will also put our work on trial, as it were, through continuous and thoughtful peer review. The goal is less to critique, however, than to create an open and engaged conversation about writing well and how to make our own writing better.


Reading and Composition: The Rest is Commentary

English R1A

Section: 9
Instructor: Magarik, Raphael
Time: TTh 5-6:30 PM
Location: 134 Dwinelle


Book List

Broido, Luci: The Master Letters; Dante: La Vita Nuova; Eliot, T. S. : The Waste Land and Other Poems; Nabokov, Vladimir: Pale Fire

Description

"The verse," writes an early interpreter of the Bible, "cries out, 'interpret me.'" Commentators often justify themselves in this way, deferentially insisting that earlier texts desire, need, and therefore authorize secondary supplements. But verses do not, of course, cry out, and commentators rarely serve the commented-upon text as straightforwardly as they insist. Rather it is the oddly self-effacing genre of commentary itself that calls for explanation. (Though commentary in its narrow sense involves an  exegetical text that explains a target text whose sequence it follows, we will also look at several examples that impose their own order on the target text.) What drives a writer to annotate, gloss, and explain another's work rather than writing "their own"? What do commentators owe their base texts? Why and how do different commentators disagree? Is commentary creative or parasitic?
 
In this class, we will examine a wide range of these second-order texts: ancient commentaries on the Bible, auto-commentary like Dante's essays discussing his romantic lyrics, and T.S. Eliot's notes to The Waste Land, all deranged commentaries that diverge wildly from their ostensible subjects, as well as harshly critical online "fiskings" and digital annotation platforms like Rap Genius, even so-called supercommentaries (that is, commentaries on other commentaries).
 
Wrestling with these questions will inform our own work as writers. After all, commentary straddles the boundary between reading and composition. You will do lots of writing and revision, frequently commenting on each others' drafts. We will practice the tools of analytic writing—from the elements of a good thesis to the details of sentence structure and citation—as we craft our own commentaries.


Reading and Composition: Walking America

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Gillis, Brian
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

Anderson, Sherwood: Winesburg, Ohio; Baum, L. Frank: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter; Solnit, Rebecca: Wanderlust: A History of Walking; Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom's Cabin, or, Life Among the Lowly; Thoreau, Henry David: Walking (this one will be an electronic text to be supplied by the instructor)

Other Readings and Media

Map: Berkeley PATH Wanderers Association, Berkeley and Its Pathways (to be provided by the instructor with the generous support of the Koshland Course Development Grant).

Movies:  The Wiz (1978); Manhatta (1921)

Short Stories:  Kate Chopin, "A Morning Walk"; Ray Bradbury, "The Pedestrian"

Poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Walt Whitman

Description

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B.

From Walt Whitman's walks through Manhattan to Leslie Marmon Silko's treks through the Tucson wilderness, American writers have long been preoccupied with the subject of walking and its political, aesthetic, and social meanings. This course will examine the theme of walking from a variety of interpretative frames, and from the perspectives of a wide array of American authors. Our goal will not just be to consider the history of walking in America, but more crucially to understand how that history has shaped American literature and culture and consequently the ways in which we each walk in the world.

The main objective of this course is to equip you with the skills needed to read, write, and analyze literature coherently, and to fine-tune the techniques you use to produce persuasive research essays. The essential skills you learn and refine in this class can become the foundation of your future studies even if your major is outside the humanities, because we will focus on skills generalizable across all classes: reading, writing, researching, and critical thinking. You can expect that the essays and strategy assignments due for this course will build on each other to aid in your compositions and to help you reach new and exciting levels of analysis.


Reading and Composition: Literature and Popular Culture

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Le, Serena
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Carroll, Lewis: Alice in Wonderland; Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein: They Say, I Say; Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Shakesepeare, William: Hamlet

Other Readings and Media

A small course reader with poems and short texts (available in print and online); will include work by William Shakespeaere, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Frost, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, among others. Accompanying media (video and audio clips) will be made available thorugh our course website, and we will also schedule a few screenings of film adaptations.

Description

Note the change in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 19).

How does a poem about a road merely taken become a poem about a road less traveled? What happens when literature becomes an instrument of individuation and socialization—when something read becomes something talked about, told, retold? In this course, we will look at how and why certain literary works entice, infuse, sustain, and are sustained by popular culture and communal imagination, often at the expense of their source meanings and contexts. From Piper's unwelcome (albeit analytically sound) takedown of Taystee's Robert Frost reference on Orange is the New Black to Lana Del Ray's unabashed (and arguably unwitting) reenvisioning of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita character in the tracks of "Born to Die," we will discuss contemporary portrayals of literature and literariness alongside our own attentive readings of some of the most frequently cited works in the English language.

As a student in this class, you will develop skills in debate and argumentation, as well as in research and reportage. Using Gerald Graff and Cathy BIrkenstein's book, They Say, I Say, as our point of departure for thinking and learning about academic writing, we will grapple with the questions of intention and interpretation that lie at the heart of compelling critical analysis. Short written assignments and exercises will build toward a final research paper on a topic of your choosing within the themes of our course.


Reading and Composition: Signs of the Times

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Terlaak Poot, Luke
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Eliot, George: The Mill on the Floss; Hardy, Thomas: Tess of the d'Urbervilles; Morris, William: News from Nowhere; Scott, Walter: The Bride of Lammermoor

Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 16).

Do you ever feel like the faster you go, the less time you have? In the nineteenth century, rapid but uneven changes made this paradox difficult to ignore. In this class, we will look at the way nineteenth-century British writing responds to changes in what we'll call the "temporal structure of society." This is a dauntingly abstract phrase, but in practice it means we will be thinking about signs of the times: debates over the length of the working day, celebrations and condemnations of technological changes rendering transportation, communication, and production ever faster, and anxieties about historical progress and decline. We will read some of the century's most important literary forms (the historical novel, the sketch, the periodical essay, the realist novel, and science fiction) and consider how these genres both represent different forms of time and are themselves shaped by those forms.

Students will learn how to conduct research in support of their own original, persuasive writing. Short assignments will provide opportunities to practice all stages of the writing and revising process, and the course will culminate in a longer research paper.


Reading and Composition: "One Fine Day": Diurnal Narratives of the 20th Century

English R1B

Section: 4
Instructor: Fleishman, Kathryn
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

Baker, Nicholson: The Mezzanine; Isherwood, Christopher: A Single Man; Pinter, Harold: The Birthday Party; Solzhenitsyn, Aleskandr: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

Some of the most powerful stories we tell are constrained within the temporal limits of a single day. This course embraces "the day" as a significant unit of narrative time, exploring diurnal fictions as vital sites of personal reflection, dull routine, social change, self-identity, anticipation, and surprise. Focusing on the textures and sensations of everyday life (as well as their disruption), the theoretical basis of the course will lie in some canonical studies of time, consciousness, and the everyday, such as the writings of Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Michel de Certeau. Fictional texts will include excerpts from James Joyce's Ulysses, novels by Virginia Woolf, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Christopher Isherwood, and Nicholson Baker, the poetry of T.S. Eliot and Frank O'Hara, short stories by Raymond Carver and John Updike, the drama of Harold Pinter, and films like Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Roman Holiday, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Goundhog Day, Jeanne Dielman, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and The Hours.

In R1B, students build on the techniques of both reading and rhetoric introduced in R1A. As such, we will engage a variety of texts across genres (novels, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, film, and criticism). We will also practice responding to such texts variously, writing and rewriting an analytical paper, a film review, and a research esay on a related topic of your choice over the course of the term.


Reading and Composition

English R1B

Section: 5
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English R1B has been canceled.


Reading and Composition

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Other Readings and Media

This section of English R1B has been canceled.


Reading and Composition: Lost Literature: Recovering and (re)-Discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Sirianni, Lucy
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Alcott, Louisa May: A Long Fatal Love Chase (Dell, 1996; ISBN: 978-0440223016; Bennett, Paula Bernat: Nineteenth-Century American Women Poets (Wiley-Blackwell, 1997; ISBN: 978-0631203995); Crafts, Hannah: The Bondwoman's Narrative (Ed.: Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; Warner, 2002; ISBN: 978-0-7595-2764-5); Sedgwick, Catharine Maria: Hope Leslie (Ed.: Mary Kelley; Rutgers, 1987; ISBN: 8601403037727)

Other Readings and Media

Please note that while you are welcome to purchase the required texts for this course from the bookseller of your choice, you must purchase the editions specified above.

Description

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and practice literary criticism as a dynamic process of discovery.  In order to explore this notion of discovery, we'll consider the phenomenon of literary recovery.  We will look, that is, at a number of texts that have long been ignored by literary scholars but that are now coming to be seen as deserving of critical attention.  Some of these texts were at first wildly popular, out-selling the works we read and remember today, only to be relegated to obscurity in later eras.  Others were never allowed the chance to be appraised at all as they languished unread in attics and private collections before finding their way into the hands of appreciative scholars.  Some have been denigrated, some have been suppressed, and many contain a perceived element of danger, troubling the status quo in ways that have kept them from attaining an uncontested place in the so-called "canon" of universally admired literary works.  Though we will begin with a group of late eighteenth-century texts and end with a recent murder mystery that dramatizes the pleasures and perils of recovery-based literary research, our primary focus will be on the American nineteenth century, a period in which both forgotten bestsellers and newly-found manuscripts abound.  We will read works by marginalized and silenced figures ranging from early feminists to fugitive slaves, and as we do so, we will consider, with the help of leading critics, the aesthetic and political forces that led them to be first overlooked and subsequently (re)-discovered.

As we consider this array of texts and the scholars who have resuscitated their critical reputations, students, too, will engage in exciting critical projects.  The course is designed to help you prepare for future writing and research at Berkeley and beyond, so over the course of the semester, you will outline, draft, workshop, write, and rewrite a series of papers, refining along the way your ability to read meticulously and write persuasively.  Your work will culminate in the writing of a substantial research paper based on the issues central to the course as they relate to your own interests.


Reading and Composition: Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Scott, Mark JR
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 134 Dwinelle


Book List

Ford, John: 'Tis Pity She's a Whore; Lyly, John: Gallathea; Marlowe, Christopher: Edward II; Shakespeare, William: As You Like It

Other Readings and Media

Edward II (film), dir. Derek Jarman (1991).

A course reader will also be produced containing additional primary and secondary texts including works from Renaissance antitheatricalists like Philip Stubbes and Stephen Gosson, as well as modern theorists of gender and sexuality such as Michel Foucault and Judith Butler.

Description

The drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries offers a fascinating site for the analysis of gender and sexuality as historical and theoretical constructs, rather than as the timeless and universal ‘facts’ of human experience which they are often assumed to be. In a ‘transvestite theatre’ in which all roles, male and female, are played by boys and men, assumptions regarding the absolute and fixed nature of gender difference are called into question, while the fact that scenes of heterosexual desire are played out between men creates a space for the expression of homosexual and other transgressive desires. At the level of both form and content, the early modern theatre above all underlines the status of gender as performance. We will read a set of plays produced between the 1580s and 1630s which pose gender and sexuality as central problems, studying these in conjunction with a variety of both Renaissance and modern-day texts confronting these debates. We will seek to reflect upon the immense shaping power of the societal norms which govern sex and gender, and to locate those instances where non-normative identities and sexualities assert themselves.

The broader academic purpose of this course is to develop your critical reading and writing skills, whatever your major might be. You will write and revise three papers of increasing length over the semester, and work with peers to improve your writing and critical thinking.


Reading and Composition

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English R1B has been canceled.


Reading and Composition: Monomanias

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: McWilliams, Ryan
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 41 Evans


Book List

Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick; Orleans, Susan: The Orchid Thief; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include critical essays as well as short stories.

Films may include: Spike Jonze, Adaptation; Werner Herzog, Fitzcarraldo; Les Blank, The Burden of Dreams; Francis Ford Coppola, The Conversation, etc. 

Description

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 10).

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can't stop thinking about anyways. Throughout the semester we'll pay attention to the role of monomania as an epistemological coping strategy for a world bewideringly overburdened with significance. Our readings will explore the potential of such fixations while also considering the darker side of obsession. We will ask how and why the seemingly random or arbitrary interest—a flower, a sperm whale, a mysterious symbol—consumes the attention of literary protagonists and readers alike. In addition to investigating the complex psychological mechanisms of such attention, we will consider why certain objects, hobbies, and texts tend to cause monomaniacal absorption.

To aid these investigations, we will consider the ways that obsessions have been theorized: as a sign of madness, creative brilliance, or both; as addictions; as fixations, fetishes, and projections; as commodities, collections, and collations; and as "possessions" that own or inhabit us even while we think we control them. Later in the semester we will turn out attention to the question of academic obsession, asking what differentiates research from monomania. As we refine our own research projects through formal research questions, annotated bibliographies, drafts, and peer review, we will keep in mind Barbara Tuchman's observation that, "Research is endlessly seductive, but writing is hard work," using our insights into the nature of obsession to help us manage the transition from prolonged investigation to selective application and synthesis. Over the course of the semester you will produce 32 pages of written work.


Reading and Composition

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English R1B has been canceled.


Reading and Composition: London: Self and the City

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Wise, Diana Catherine
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 175 Dwinelle


Book List

Boswell, James: Boswell's London Journal, 1762-1763; Dickens, Charles: Bleak House; Pepys, Samuel: The Diary of Samuel Pepys; Smith, John Thompson: The Cries of London; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader: Robert Herrick, “His Return to London”; William Wordsworth, “London, 1802”; William Blake, “London”; etc.

Description

“What strange phenomena we find in a great city, all we need do is stroll about with our eyes open,” exclaimed Baudelaire in Fleurs du Mal, his 1857 book of urban poetry: “Life swarms with innocent monsters.”

But what exactly is the relationship between these monsters and the city they’re roaming? Do they produce the city? Does the city create the monsters? What does it mean to be an individual in the enormous, sprawling, complicated, built-up wilderness of London?

This class tackles the self and the city, hopscotching through a long tradition of urban writing about London from the 16th century to the 21st. Beginning with two famous English diaries and the question of fashioning a self in 17th- and 18th-century London, we spend time with 19th-century civic improvements in the form of Dickens’s great novel Bleak House and anthropological documentations of London’s street scenes. We round out the course with Virginia Woolf’s high-modernist exploration of mental and urban wandering and Zadie Smith’s meditation on immigration and the city at the turn of the millenium.


Reading and Composition: Queer/of Color Cultural Productions

English R1B

Section: 13
Instructor: Valella, Daniel
Time: TTh 5-6:30 PM.
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Book List

Anzaldúa, Gloria: Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza; Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Hagedorn, Jessica: Dogeaters; Hwang, David Henry: M. Butterfly; Womack, Craig S.: Drowning in Fire

Other Readings and Media

Required Films (both available in Moffitt Library and on Netflix, Amazon, and Google Play): Paris Is Burning and Boys Don’t Cry

Other Required Texts (all available on bCourses): Short pieces by Chrystos, the Combahee River Collective, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Junot Díaz, David L. Eng, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Achy Obejas, and Andrea Smith; episodes of the TV shows Orange Is the New Black and How to Get Away with Murder

Description

What meanings do the terms “queer” and “of color” carry? How do different literary and artistic genres represent the experiences of (racial, sexual, gender, or other social) minorities? What relationships can we trace between textual legibility (how a work of art can, or asks to, be interpreted) and cultural legibility (how an individual or community can, or asks to, be identified)? In this course, we will explore these questions as we read, watch, and evaluate artistic works that transport us across the globe—from Parisian bars to the Rio Grande Valley to Philippine jungles to Oklahoman Indian settlements.

In our travels across space, time, and genre, we will consider the benefits—as well as the limitations—of understanding the term “queer” not simply as a reference to LGBT identities but, more expansively, as a signifier of deviation from any number of sociopolitical norms. Similarly, we will contemplate what can be gained (or lost) by taking comparative and intersectional approaches to the study of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation. How useful is it, for instance, to understand subjects as “of color” rather than “black” or “Asian”? What do we learn when we shift our focus from, say, “Latinos” or “the poor” to “working-class U.S. Latina lesbians”?

As we analyze the various methods of research and exposition that our authors employ to convey social and literary meaning, we will work on developing our own methods of research and analysis for effective critical writing. To this end, we will focus throughout the semester on asking precise and significant questions, on identifying useful print and online sources to help us refine and answer these questions, and on translating our research findings into strong scholarly arguments. Early in the term, we will visit our campus’s Bancroft Library to learn how to work with archival materials. Later, we will meet with a librarian in Doe to learn how to navigate the wide array of library resources available to us as UC Berkeley students. Finally, we will work together to outline, draft, and revise our own research papers (one 6- to 8-page essay and one 10- to 12-page essay) on topics related to the major themes of our course.


Reading & Composition

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Mezur, Katherine
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 233 Dwinelle


Book List

Condry, Ian: The Soul of Anime; Lamarre, Thomas: The Anime Machine, A Media Theory of Animation; McCarthy, Helen: Hayao Miyazaki, Master of Japanese Animation; Napier, Susan: Anime, From Akira to Howl's Moving Castle; Odell, Colin and Le Blanc, Michelle (Studio Ghibli): The Films of Hayao Miyasaki and Asao Takahata

Description

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.


Reading & Composition

English R1B

Section: 15
Instructor: Mezur, Katherine
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 61 Evans


Book List

Condry, Ian: The Soul of Anime; Lamarre, Thomas: The Anime Machine, A Media Theory of Animation; McCarthy, Helen: Hayao Miyazaki, Master of Japanese Animation; Napier, Susan: Anime, From Akira to Howl's Moving Castle; Odell, Colin and Le Blanc, Michelle (Studio Ghibli): The Films of Hayao Miyasaki and Asao Takahata

Description

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: W 4-5
Location: 180 Barrows


Book List

Thoreau, Henry: Walden

Description

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Hutson, Richard
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 24 has been canceled; it will be offered in Spring '17 instead.


Freshman Seminar: Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco's Palestine

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: Note new time: Tues. 9-11 (for seven weeks only)
Location: note new location: 575 McCone


Book List

McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art; Sacco, Joe: Palestine

Description

"The landmark work of comics journalism," Joe Sacco's Palestine is "a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality." In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Palestine, informed by comics scholarship. Maintaining an open and inclusive discussion, we will consider the comics form and its possibilities for reportage and narrative, Sacco's representation of the Occupied Territories, and Sacco's self-representation in relation to his encounters with diverse Palestinian perspectives. Students should be prepared for active participation and at least 6 pages of informal writing.

Note that this section of English 24 will meet for seven weeks only (two hours per week): August 30 through October 11.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to the Study of Fiction

English 27

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Literature of American Cultures: Immigrant Inscriptions

English 31AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 310 Hearst Mining


Book List

Adichie, C.: Americanah; Diaz, J.: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Fukunaga , C. (dir.): Sin Nombre; Kazan , E. (dir.): Gentleman's Agreement; Kincaid, J.: Lucy; Martinez, O.: The Beast; Robbins and Wise (dirs.): West Side Story

Other Readings and Media

Short fiction by Edwidge Danticat, Jonathan Lethem, and Jhumpa Lahiri as well as contextualizing works of history, sociology, and cultural criticism.

Description

In this course we will consider a variety of texts—contemporary fiction, classic and new film, journalism, history, and cultural criticism—that help us explore the possibilities for writing the migrant self and experience. The shifting terrain of race in the United States, shifts that occur in part because of successive waves of migration here, complicates how migrant experience can be imagined and represented. We will discuss this shifting terrain in an effort to understand more deeply the context within which immigrant experiences can be rendered. And we will analyze the dynamic ways in which artists respond to the complexities of race and the sometimes painful complications of migration.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 166 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales: A Selection; Donne, John: Poetry; Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Shakespeare, William: Macbeth; Shakespeare, William: Sonnets

Description

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earlier middle ages through 1667: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton will get our closest attention, but they will also provide the scaffolding on which to hang a more detailed picture of the imaginative and intellectual development of literature. It will work hard to give you the skills to read easily and intelligently (and out loud) the earlier forms of the language in which these works are written, and to develop also the skills by which you can take writing apart and see how it works. It will also take up the big questions raised by the whole undertaking: what literary art is good for, what forms of reason and understanding are most at home in it, and why the past is worth bothering with--all, in fact, questions that the works themselves are preoccupied with.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 370 Dwinelle


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Jill Mann; Dickson, Donald, ed.: John Donne's Poetry; Liuzza, R. M.: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation; Marlowe, Christopher: Doctor Faustus, ed. David Wootton; Milton, John: Paradise Lost, ed. William Kerrigan et al.

Description

This course will introduce you to some central works from the earlier centuries of English literary history in order to help you develop strategies within which to read early literatures. Its particular focus on Beowulf, the Canterbury Tales, Dr. Faustus, the poetry of John Donne, and Paradise Lost will allow us to engage the early literature of England from a variety of perspectives. We will explore various genres (among them, epic, romance, lyric, drama) and the expectations created by these forms. Throughout, we will be thinking about contemporary literary conventions and the cultural contexts of the works on which we focus. And we will attend closely to matters of language, observing how English changes over the centuries.


Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 141 McCone


Description

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in England), political revolution (English, American, French), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse viewing them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation—including debates about what constitutes “proper” language and Literature itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups—British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, men and women—use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices—from linguistic register to generic conventions and innovations—and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and reading quizzes.


Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 370 Dwinelle


Book List

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe; Gay, John: The Beggar's Opera; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Pope, Alexander: Essay on Criticism; Essay on Man; The Rape of the Lock; Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft: Frankenstein; Sterne, Laurence: A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass (1855 edition); Wordsworth, William: The Prelude (1805 text)

Description

This course has two fundamental purposes. The first is to provide a broad working overview of the development of literature in English, from the end of the 17th century, in the wake of civil war, revolution, and restoration in England, to the mid-19th century, on the cusp of civil war in the United States. We will thus trace English literature’s expansion and transformation, from an insular cultural form to an incipient global fact, from a writing produced in England to a writing produced in English. We will also attend to the particular forms that emerged in this process--poetry and criticism, satire and novel--exploring the ways in which they revise and readapt older traditions to new historical circumstances, often constructing the categories that shape our own habits and styles of reading in the process.

Our second purpose is to offer an introduction to some of the basic techniques and methods of critical reading and writing that guide our collective interpretation of that literature. Lectures in the course will seek to provide a sense of essential conceptual, historical, and literary-historical contexts, while both lectures and discussion sections will be designed to inculcate a sense of the formal diversity, complexity, and significance of the texts at hand.


Literature in English: Late-19th through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Eliot, T.S.: Selected Poems; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of modernity as we closely investigate a selection of the major texts from this period. At times the lectures will zoom in on particular features of texts, and at other times they will zoom out to cultural conditions and aesthetic tendencies. In addition to the books listed, there will be a small reader with texts by Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Stein, Stevens, Moore, Hughes, and Beckett. There will be two essays, and a final exam.


Literature in English: Late-19th through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 251 LeConte


Description

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovations that show us some of the most provocative ways that literature operated as a means of cultural response in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will also consider modernism alongside other literary modes and styles (realism, naturalism, postmodernism) that look to different strategies for representing the experience of the modern world--and of finding a place for literature within it. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and questions of literary form even as we think about such larger issues as the relationship between reading and entertainment, the changing status of art in respect to new technologies of information and representation, and the challenges to traditional conceptions of the self posed by new languages of psychological, national, and racial identity. Assignments will likely include two short papers, a midterm, and a final.


Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Sposito, Gary
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week
Location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

The required books for the course will be available at University Press Books, and the Course Reader, Introduction to Environmental Studies, will be sold exclusively at Metro Publishing; both of these establishments are located on Bancroft Way, a little west of Telegraph Ave. There will also be a required envornmental science textbook (possibly provided as an eBook).

Description

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the basic science of the environment, an introduction to environmental literature, philosophy, and policy issues, and analytic tools to evaluate a range of environmental problems. The course requires some time spent outdoors in observation as well as a lot of reading and writing.

This course is cross-listed with E.S.P.M. C12.


Sophomore Seminar: The Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5 (note new time)
Location: note new room: D1 Hearst Annex


Book List

Lahiri, J.: Interpreter of Maladies

Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fiction and attend events at the Pacific Film Archive and Cal Performances.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to Old English

English 104

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Book List

Marsden, Richard: The Cambridge Old English Reader, 2nd ed.; McGillivray, Murray: A Gentle Introduction to Old English

Description

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to read?  We will look at some of the best kept secrets in (Old) English—short heroic poems, accounts of war, poems of meditation and elegies, history, saints’ lives, and romance—and get a taste of the curious (recipes, charms, prognostications) as well as the humorous (riddles). To complement our work with these Old English texts we’ll be using on-line and library resources to learn about the material culture of Anglo-Saxon England. With these resources we will also experiment with deciphering the texts as they appear in their manuscripts.  While we work on language in the beginning of the course we will also be reading and discussing the texts. Once you are up and running with the language, the rest of the course will provide practical experience in reading and discussing Old English works on a range of topics: the portrayal of monsters, saints, and heroes, cultural identity and the problem of the Vikings, the composition of Old English poetry, and the search for Anglo-Saxon paganism. In-class discussion will cover questions of cultural difference, translation, and otherness.

No prior experience with Old or Middle English is necessary for this course.

Required work: Quizzes, mid-term assessment, final examination, daily class participation, a short paper, one or two in-class reports.

**Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit with additional reading and work. Please see the professor for additional information.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 


Medieval Literature: Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland: Visions of Other Worlds in Medieval British Literature

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: note new location: 219 Dwinelle


Book List

Borroff, Marie: The Gawain Poet: Complete Works; Davies, Sioned: The Mabinogion; Gardiner, Eileen: Visions of Heaven and Hell Before Dante; Treharne, Elaine: Old and Middle English c. 890–c. 1450: an Anthology. 3rd edition.

Other Readings and Media

Readings on bCourses

Description

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the afterlife (heaven, hell, and purgatory), with a particular eye toward understanding how these transcendent realms reflected the more immediate concerns of medieval authors. We’ll consider the physical connection of these places to the normal world, as well as the moral connection they have to human lives; we’ll also look at texts that depict other, less transcendent worlds existing alongside our own. After taking this course, students will know how to find the airport nearest to Purgatory, and what to do if they end up in the fairies’ country: they’ll also be able to analyze the classic motifs and meanings of otherworldly vision literature.

No prior study of medieval literature is necessary. We will read most Middle English texts in the original, while texts in other languages (Old English, Latin, Old French, Middle Welsh) will be available in translation.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 215 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare: Shakespeare after 1600

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Shakespeare, W.: The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd Ed., Volume 2: Later Plays

Description

We will read ten or eleven plays from the later half of Shakespeare's career (which covers the late "problem" comedies, the major tragedies, and the tragicomic romances). Taking our cue from the plays' self-consciousness of their medium of theater, we'll consider how the actions and utterances of performing bodies can define and reshape the boundaries between what's present, what's represented, and what is made real.

I've ordered the Norton Shakespeare at the bookstore, but you may use any recent edition of the plays.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 3 LeConte


Book List

Recommended: Shakespeare, William: The Norton Shakespeare (ed., Stephen Greenblatt, et al)

Description

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, extravagantly beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, something like an obsession—for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to Emily Dickinson to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Toni Morrison and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Zizeck.  We will be especially concerned with five large issues: compassion; political representation and its discontents; the nature of identity and subjectivity; colonialism; and the relation between the ways Shakespeare’s plays make meaning and the ways they produce emotional experience.  Our readings will include: Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Coriolanus, and The Tempest.

I have ordered the third edition of The Norton Shakespeare (ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al) in a two-volume format (The Early Plays and The Late Plays).  If you already own another complete Shakespeare (e.g., The Riverside, The Pelican, the first or second edition of The Norton Shakespeare, etc.), you are welcome to use it for this course.


Shakespeare in the Theater: Performing Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida

English 117T

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 209 Dwinelle


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Troilus and Cressida, ed. Anthony B. Dawson

Description

Imagine that the play is an exquisite silk dress. In lectures, we look at it from many different angles; we consider the materials it’s made of; we imagine who created it and why; we listen to the sounds it makes as it moves. If you ever wondered what it would feel like to put it on, this is a class for you. During the semester, we will not only close read and interpret one of Shakespeare’s strangest plays, Troilus and Cressida, we will also have an opportunity to perform our own version of it. To be sure, this is a literature class, and our purpose isn't to stage the best-ever version of the play, but to use performance as one more tool that can help us understand Shakespeare’s text. In addition to the play, we will read some of its textual precedents, including excerpts from Homer’s Iliad and Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde; critical essays on Shakespeare and Renaissance drama, some performance theory, and we will also watch theatrical and film adaptations of various Shakespeare plays. Assignments include two brief analytical papers (5 pages) and active contribution to the class. No previous acting experience required.

Members of the class will participate in a variety of capacities--as actors, extras, musicians, costume designers, prop builders, stage-hands, publicists, etc.

NOTE:  Students should plan to attend, in addition to the lectures, the twice-weekly rehearsals, which will take place TTh 3:30-5 in D1 Hearst Annex. Some additional rehearsals may also be needed as the performance date approaches.

NOTE ALSO:  Because this course concentrates on one play only, it will not satisfy the Shakespeare requirement for English majors.


The Romantic Period

English 121

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new location: 229 Dwinelle


Book List

Austen, J.: Persuasion; Blake, W.: Blake's Poetry and Designs ; Byron: Major Works; Keats, J.: Complete Poetry and Selected Letters; Shelley, M.W.G.: Frankenstein; Wordsworth: The Prelude; Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads

Description

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic-era writers revolutionized the concept of literature?  What is the relation between Romantic writing and the signal historical and social events of the period: the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the Napoleonic wars, the rise of finance capitalism, the dominion of “the news”?  With so much happening of the level of world history, why do Romantic writers sometimes turn to the past, to the provinces, to nature, to the everyday? Why, given the increased popularity of the novel, do so many writers turn to poetry-- to evoke nostalgia for the past or to forge an aesthetic avant-garde?  Through extensive reading of major poets (Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, and Keats), novelists (Godwin, Austen, Mary Shelley) and essayists (Hazlitt, Burke, Paine) we will explore the event of Romanticism by examining literary events.  What “happens” in Romantic texts:  how do they understand origins, events, and effects?  


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: note new location: 145 McCone


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Ishiguro, Kazuo: Never Let Me Go; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Zola, Emile: La Bete Humaine

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics--history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: How have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel? How has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel? And lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?


British Literature, 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Gang, Joshua
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note lew location: 56 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Readings will likely include: Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Lewis, BLAST; West, Return of the Soldier; Joyce, Ulysses (selections); Woolf, Orlando; Spark, The Prime of MIss Jean Brodie; Greene, The Third Man; Brecht, The Good Person of Szechuan; Synge, Playboy of the Western World; manifestos by Marinetti and Loy; and poetry by Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Smith, Thomas, WWI combatants and others.

Description

How did the form, content, circulation, and ambitions of British literature change over the first half of the twentieth century? How did writers contend with historical upheavals such as Irish nationalism, World War I, suffrage, and the fluctuations of empire? With the advent of electronic media? These are some of the questions this course will try to answer.


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: WF 5-6:30 P.M
Location: note new location: 106 Moffitt


Book List

Foust, Graham: Time down to Mind; Parker, Morgan: Other People's Comfort Keeps Me up at Night

Other Readings and Media

All readings save the two books will be in a course reader available during the first week of class.

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than cover all major figures briefly, we’ll spend extended time with the work of a few: poets considered will include Paul Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, T. S. Eliot, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer,  Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Morgan Parker, and Graham Foust. Along the way we’ll consider renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter, the task and materials of the long poem, seriality, citationality, who and what counts as a poetic subject, and how U.S. poetries have imagined community over and against their actual Americas. In addition to the two required books, primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a Course Reader. There will be a take-home midterm, a term paper, and a final exam.


African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

English 133A

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 247 Dwinelle


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles W.: Conjure Tales and Other Stories of the Color Line; Chesnutt, Charles W.: The Marrow of Tradition; Douglass, Frederick: The Portable Frederick Douglass; Du Bois, W. E. B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Equiano, Olaudah: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; Harper, Frances E. W.: Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted; Hopkins, Pauline E.: Of One Blood; or, the Hidden Self; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Walker, David: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Wheatley, Phillis: Complete Writings

Description

A survey of major works by African American writers. Themes in the course include law and violence, freedom and deliverance, culture and commerce, passing and racial impersonation.


Contemporary Literature: 21st-Century American Writing

English 134

Section: 1
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 160 Kroeber


Book List

Brown, Brandon: Top 40; Clevidence, Cody-Rose: Beast Feast; Coates, Ta-Nehisi: Between the World and Me; Cole, Teju: Open City; Dutton, Danielle: Sprawl; Díaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Gladman, Renee: Event Factory; Lerner, Ben: 10:04; Moten, Fred: The Service Porch; Notley, Alice: Certain Magical Acts; Rankine, Claudea: Citizen: An American Lyric; Robertson, Lisa: Nilling; Spahr, Juliana and Buuck, David: The Army of Lovers

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, available from Copy Central on Bancroft Ave.

Description

In this course we will take seriously the notion of “the contemporary” as that which coexists with us and is relevant to our times—or our spaces. All the works on the syllabus have been published in the past ten years, most within the past three. They offer examples of current literature’s attempts to dwell in the present while thinking both about that temporal situation (“the present”) and that activity (“dwelling”). Not all the works are readily categorizable as to genre; the syllabus is weighted toward prose, but some of the prose works are, arguably, poetry. In many, communication, and even humanness, appear to be in question. Or, perhaps, they are evolving into new forms. But, as many of the books on the course reading list suggest, one thing that is not vanishing is the centrality of desire in the experiencing of lived life.

The first two books on the syllabus are Open City, by Teju Cole, and SPRAWL, by Danielle Dutton. It is suggested that at least the first, and preferably both, be purchased in advance, so that the course can proceed without anyone’s falling behind.


Topics in American Studies

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This class has been canceled.


Studies in World Literature in English: Global Cities

English 138

Section: 1
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Book List

Boo, Katherine: Behind the Beautiful Forevers; Buekes, Lauren: Zoo City; Cole, Teju: Open City; Smith, Zadie: White Teeth

Description

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives—fictional and otherwise—that live in those cities, the stories those cities give birth to. Our itinerary will take us to five global cities: New York, London, Johannesburg, Mumbai, and Hong Kong. At each stop we will consider representations of these cities and their inhabitants from above and from below, from theories of transnational capital to narratives of the dispossessed. Are these cities sites of interconnection and aspiration, or do they indicate a world increasingly unequal and divided? How do the local and the foreign intersect in these global urban spaces? What do they tell us about globalization, its histories, and the literary and cultural forms it now takes?


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Abrams, Melanie
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 140 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

Description

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercise and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 2-3:30
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Book List

Boyle, T. C.: The Best American Short Stories 2015

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing ((510) 704-9700; 2138 University Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704).

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course.  To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file.  The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 2066 Hearst Annex


Description

This section (section 2) of English 143A has been canceled.  If you are interested in applying for this course, please see the listing for 143A section 1 instead.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Other Readings and Media

The only text will be a course reader, available at Krishna Copy (University and Milvia).

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing lyric poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms; the first, second, and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision. Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, with an eye and ear to renovating traditions. We will also read a number of poems by graduates of my 143B sections who have gone on to publish books and win prizes.  I have no “house style” and only one precept:  you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss four or five in rotation (I’ll also respond each week to every poem you write). On alternate days, we’ll discuss illustrative poems in our course reader. If the past is any guarantee, the course will be fun and will make you a better poet.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligilbe to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Szybist, Mary
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This workshop will draw inspiration from the counsel of Ralph Waldo Emerson: "People wish to be settled: only as far as they are unsettled is there any hope for them." In this spirit, we will experiment with different generative exercises and look to contemporary as well as canonical poems to guide us, to challenge us, and to spur us on. Participants will write one poem each week and will regularly submit reflective reading journals. Our workshop discussions will devote time to carefully considering the possibilities of poems by each workshop participant, and we will look at some examples of revision processes by well-known poets to aid us in developing strategies for our own re-making.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: Traveling, Thinking, Writing

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 259 Dwinelle


Book List

Harris, Eddy: Mississippi Solo; McCarthy, Andrew: Best American Travel Writing 2015; Niemann, Linda : Boomer; Pyle, Robert Michael: Where Bigfoot Walks

Description

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain.  But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes’ autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adventures in Europe and Africa; Canadian writer Gladys Hindmarch takes on Melville with her Watery Part of the World and Zora Neale Hurston travels to Haiti in Tell My Horse and through the American south in Mules and Men.  The point of this course is multiple and full of inquiry.

We’ll consider what “travel writing” might be.  We’ll read selections from the Best American Travel Writing series and from the Ian Duncan and Elizabeth Bohls anthology, Travel Writing: 1700-1830; but we’ll also read some unlikely travel narratives—Eddy Harris’s Mississippi Solo (the adventures of an African-American canoeist), Linda Niemann’s Boomer (her account of her life as a railroad brakeman following the work through the west), and Robert Michael Pyle’s Where Bigfoot Walks (a lepidopterist’s inquiry into mythology and the ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest).

The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay.  Philip Lopate (from The Art of the Personal Essay): “The essay form as a whole has long been associated with an experimental method.  The idea goes back to Montaigne and his endlessly suggestive use of the term essai for his writings.  To essay is to attempt, to test, to make a run at something without knowing whether you are going to succeed.”

We’ll write micro-essays, longer essays, and final prose projects.  (Cross-genre projects are welcome.)  We’ll also keep journals and work on one or two collaborative pieces.  We’ll workshop.

There will be one field trip—11-13 November, a long weekend.  (The 11th is Veterans Day, a university holiday.)  We’ll travel, as a gang of writers, to the interior of northern California—into the southern reaches of the Bigfoot country that Robert Michael Pyle has documented, a racially and economically contested and profoundly interesting space—and spend our days seeking visions and meeting the locals.  Class members may need to pay for a couple of nights’ lodging (off-season rates) in the north.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: Life Writing

English 143N

Section: 2
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 285 Cory


Other Readings and Media

A Course Reader with selections from writers including Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Frida Kahlo, Hilton Als, Alison Bechdel, Maggie Nelson, Lidia Yuknavich, amongst others, will be required.

Description

A seminar on auto/biography, with a special emphasis on what it means to write lives that are hidden, overlooked, circumscribed. An unconventional seminar/workshop 1) that will be as experimental as the work we’ll be trying to produce; 2) in which we’ll be spending more of our time together analyzing masterful and previously published works than our own works-in-progress (I’ll be providing extensive comments on drafts); 3) in which at certain moments during the semester we’ll connect with an aligned non-fiction seminar, Covering Culture, with Professor Scott Saul; 4) for which writers with little previous experience in creative writing workshops are encouraged to apply.
 

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragrah concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: Covering Culture

English 143N

Section: 3
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Description

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you’ll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from theater and visual art to music and TV — in other words, the genres that one finds discussed in the culture-and-arts pages of major newspapers and magazines. By the end of the class, students should come away with a working knowledge of how to write reviews, interviews, profiles, “think pieces,” and essays of cultural criticism. Participants in the class will try their hands at all these forms and analyze classic and contemporary examples of each. Since writing is a craft that requires constant exercise of the appropriate muscles, students can expect to be writing for this class on a weekly basis.

Two special features of the course bear specific mention. First, on four separate occasions, we will be honored to host a visit with an esteemed writer, such as New Yorker music critic Hua Hsu and TV critic Lili Loofbourow, whose work we will discuss in class. Second, the class will take us out of the classroom and have us engage with artists, curators, and the public: you will be connecting with local arts organizations, such as the Berkeley Art Museum and Shotgun Players, and will be publishing some of your work in digital form so as to shape ongoing cultural conversations in the Bay Area and at large.

This course is sponsored by the Art of Writing curriculum initiative.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 87 Evans


Book List

Fanon, Frantz: The Wretched of the Earth; Gilbert, Sandra and Gubar, Susan: Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism; Williams, Raymond: Marxism and Literature

Description

This course offers an introduction to literary theory with a focus on 20th- and 21st-century social and political approaches, including Marxism, feminism, race and ethnicity, post-colonialism, and ecocriticism. The course will strive to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts, methods, and vocabulary employed in these various theoretical systems, as well as the differences between them.  We will ground our study of literary theory by reading and discussing several works of short fiction.  The course will require a substantial amount of reading and writing.  You will need to purchase a course reader.


Special Topics: Telling Stories: The Power of Narrative in Academic Writing

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: note new location: 242 Dwinelle


Book List

Fish, Stanley: How to Write a Sentence; Hayot, Eric: The Elements of Academic Style; Sword, Helen: Stylish Academic Writing

Description

This seminar is dedicated to the principle that because narrative is at the core of how we come to understand the world, narrative is also an especially powerful method of scholarly practice. We will study the art of storytelling as it is practiced in several academic disciplines – literary criticism, cultural studies, history, anthropology, psychology, medicine – to learn how scholars combine story and argument, imagination and analysis, vivid perspective and broader provocation.  Through discussions and workshops, students will develop individual research projects that experiment with narrative as a stylistic choice, as vehicle for analysis, and as a method for asking deeper questions by sinking into the place where so many questions begin: the story.  We will read works concerning (among others) poets and housewives, kidnapped Africans, 16th century French workers and peasants, early psychiatric patients, and survivors of modern disasters natural and perpetrated.  There will be a rich collection of texts available in a course reader, and a few books to purchase on the craft of writing.

This small seminar will be limited to twelve students.


Special Topics: Aesthetics and the Environment in the Eighteenth Century

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Book List

Burke: A Philosophic Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful; Gilpin: On Picturesque Beauty; Goldsmith: Poems; Gray: Poems; Hogarth: Analysis of Beauty; Hutcheson: An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (Part 1: concerning Beauty, Order, Harmony, Design); Kame: Elements of Criticism; Shaftesbury: The Moralists, a Philosophical Rhapsody; Walpole: Essay on Modern Gardening

Other Readings and Media

Note:  Students will be given PDFs to access the texts.

Description

Why do we take pleasure in contemplating the natural world? What sort of pleasure is this? The eighteenth century was preoccupied with this question, which abutted on others: What is beauty? Is it something we perceive directly, or do we experience it by more roundabout means? What concepts aside from beauty do we need to explain our pleasure? Is there a correlation between certain kinds of pleasure and certain environmental conditions? We will explore some influential attempts to grapple with these questions and use them as a guide to various forms of aesthetic practice in the period, focusing on poetry, with some excursions into the visual arts and landscape design.

Class requirements: Two short papers (5 pages) or one longer one (10 pages), a final exam, and mandated class participation, including informal presentations.

This section of English 166 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Special Topics: Vladimir Nabokov

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Naiman, Eric
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 370 Dwinelle


Book List

Nabokov, Vladimir: Laughter in the Dark; Nabokov, Vladimir: Lolita; Nabokov, Vladimir: Pnin; Nabokov, Vladimir: The Gift

Other Readings and Media

Short stories

Description

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beginning with several short stories, we will examine some of the fiction of his European period, before turning our attention to Lolita and Pnin. Competing interpretations of Nabokov will be considered, but our emphasis will be on metafiction, the theme of perversity and Nabokov's cultivation of a perverse reader.

“Curiously enough, one cannot read a book: one can only reread it.” Students should expect to devote a considerable amount of time to reading and rereading and should come to class prepared to discuss the assigned texts. Participants in the class should anticipate reading (and then, in a perfect world, curiously rereading) 150 pages per week. Written work will consist of two papers (5 to 8 pages) on topics to be chosen in consultation with the professor. Penalties will be assessed for late papers. There will be a midterm and a final examination.

This section of English 166 is cross-listed with Slavic 134F.


Literature and the Arts: The Deaths and Lives of Saints

English 170

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: note new location: 105 Dwinelle


Book List

Bjork, Robert E.: The Old English Poems of Cynewulf; Ferguson, George: Signs and Symbols in Christian Art; Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love; King, John N.: Foxe's Book of Martyrs: Select Narratives; Stace, Christopher: Jacobus de Voragine: The Golden Legend: Selections; White, Carolinne: Early Christian Lives; White, Carolinne: Lives of Roman Christian Women

Other Readings and Media

Further material on bCourses

Description

The paradox of Western sainthood is summed up by a phrase from Latin calendars: dies natalis, “birthday.” Marking a saint’s chief feast, the dies natalis celebrates the day of his or her death: death as birth will form one of the central threads in our examination of the literature and art surrounding holy people. Though our primary focus will be the Western Middle Ages, our study will begin with the early Christian period, and range up to the profound religious transformations that accompanied the discovery of the New World and the Protestant Reformation.

In this course, we will read classic works of hagiography—stories of the lives and deaths of saints—that formed a central part of the Western literary tradition, inspiring thousands of related narratives and creating tropes that remain important to this day; and we will also analyze the visual art, especially painting and sculpture, connected with the cult of saints. Central themes and issues that we will confront include the nature of the historical and the miraculous; imitation in art and life; and the value placed on human suffering. Though we will only be able to cover a small part of this vast tradition, students who complete this course will be well-equipped for further study of the literature and art on saints.

This section of English 170 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Literature and the Arts: Opera and Literary Form

English 170

Section: 2
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 250 Dwinelle


Book List

Nietzsche, Friedrich: The Birth of Tragedy / The Wagner Case; Pushkin, Alexander: Eugene Onegin, trans. Falen; Scott, Walter: The Bride of Lammermoor; Shakespeare, William: Henry IV, Part One; Shakespeare, William: The Merry Wives of Windsor; Virgil: The Aeneid, trans. Fitzgerald; Wedekind , Franz: Earth Spirit + Pandora's Box

Other Readings and Media

Course reader: essays & excerpts from Hoffman, Kierkegaard, B. Williams, S. Zizek, et al.; recommended recordings and DVDs of operas tba.

Description

Together with the novel, opera became one of the characteristic European art forms of the long nineteenth century. Attending to the hybrid status of opera as a dramatic as well as a musical form, the course will focus on a series of major musical-dramatic works produced across the period 1787-1935 in relation to the literary genres they invoke (epic, lyric, comedy, tragedy, novel, film); to philosophical debates they generated; and/or to major models, sources, and subsequent adaptations. We will attend to questions of translation not only across languages (especially vexed in the case of Eugene Onegin) but across genres and media. (Pushkin's Onegin is a "novel in verse"; Tchaikovsky's, "Lyric scenes in three acts" ...) If there's an overarching theme or topic across our readings, it's opera's staging of the relations between eros and empire -- contending fantasies of absolute liberty, jouissance, and power -- in the era of bourgeois ascendancy: from (to cite tutelary demons, masculine / feminine, of imperial decline and fall) Don Giovanni to Lulu ...

We will be paying serious attention to the music; however, prior technical knowledge or musicological training is not a prerequisite -- although it will be very welcome!

Recommended recordings / DVDs of operas to be assigned.

Works include:

W.A. Mozart / L. Da Ponte, Don Giovanni + E.T.A. Hoffmann, “Don Juan”; S. Kierkegaard, Either/Or (“The Immediate Stages of the Erotic”)

G. Donizetti, Lucia di Lammermoor + W. Scott, The Bride of Lammermoor (ed. Robertson, Oxford World's Classics)

H. Berlioz, Les Troyens + Virgil, The Aeneid (Books I – IV) (trans. R. Fitzgerald)

P.I. Tchaikovsky and A.S. Pushkin (and V. Nabokov), Eugene Onegin (trans. V. Nabokov / J. Falen)

R. Wagner, Tristan und Isolde OR Die Walküre + F. Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy (and other philosophical writings)

G. Verdi / A. Boito, Falstaff + W. Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, 1 Henry IV

A. Berg, Lulu + F. Wedekind, Earth Spirit / Pandora’s Box + G.W. Pabst, Pandora’s Box (1929 film)

In addition the class will attend the San Francisco Opera’s fall production of L. Janáček’s The Makropoulos Case

 


Literature and Sexual Identity: Postcolonial Sex

English 171

Section: 1
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 109 Dwinelle


Book List

Forster, E. M.: A Passage to India; Foucault, Michel: The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1; Keller, Nora Okja: Comfort Woman; Selvadurai, Shyam: Funny Boy: A Novel

Description

This course will explore the intersection of theories of gender and sexuality and the postcolonial world. We will consider how gender and nation are shaped and represented in literature and film. Why are nations routinely imagined as women, and imperial dominion expressed in terms of sexual conquest? Western academic models of gender and sexuality provide one set of frameworks by which to discuss desires, identities, and affects—in this class we will ask how well they travel to a postcolonial context. How do theories, practices, and identity categories translate? What do they elide? What do they take as “natural”? We will suggest alternative frameworks for describing sexuality around the world and for exploring non-Western literary representations of non-normative gender identities and sexualities.

This section of English 171 is cross-listed with LGBT 100 section 1.


Literature and Sexual Identity: Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

English 171

Section: 2
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 240 Mulford


Book List

Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Cunningham, Michael: The Hours; James, Henry: Selected Tales; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Truong, Monique: The Book of Salt; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway;

Recommended: Stein, Gertrude: Tender Buttons

Other Readings and Media

An electronic course reader will contain poetry, essays, and short stories. Films will be available for screening at the Media Resource Center.

Description

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and forth across a century (from Virginia Woolf to Michael Cunningham, from James Joyce to Alison Bechdel, from Gertrude Stein to Monique Truong) to stage a series of encounters between the aesthetic practices and discourses of modernism and those of contemporary queer theory and cultural production.  As we map the shifting contours of some key forms and terms, we will pause to consider (among other things) the mobile dimensions of queer time and space; the historical migration of concepts such as perversion, inversion, masquerade, abjection, and shame; the mutual implication of race, gender, and sexuality; the formal and hisorical components of the closet; the legibility of transsexual/transgender bodies; and the composition of affective histories. To complement (and complicate) the chronological axis of this inquiry, we will also attend to the metropolitan spaces in which sexual boundaries blurred and subcultures thrived, especially the three urban sites central to modernist experimentation: London, New York, and Paris.

This section of English 171 is cross-listed with LGBT 145 section 1.


Literature and History: The Seventies

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: note new location: 3111 Etcheverry


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.”

Yet we can see now that the ’70s was a time of cultural renaissance. It gave us the New Hollywood of Scorcese, Coppola and others; the music of funk, disco, punk and New Wave; the postmodern comedy of Saturday Night Live and the postmodern drama of Sam Shepard, Maria Irene Fornes and others; and a great range of literary fiction written by women authors from Ursula LeGuin and Margaret Atwood to Toni Morrison and Maxine Hong Kingston. It was also a period of intense political realignments — the moment the United States was roiled by the oil crisis, the fall of Nixon and the fall of Saigon; by the advent of women’s liberation, gay liberation, and environmentalism as mass grassroots movements; and by the rise of the Sunbelt and the dawning of the conservative revolution. One might even say that the ’70s were the most interesting decade of the post-WWII era -- the period when the dreams of the ‘60s were most intensely, if achingly, fulfilled.

Films discussed in the class will include The Godfather, Taxi Driver, Network, and Saturday Night Fever. Authors to be discussed will include, among others, Walter Abish, Raymond Carver, Joan Didion, Michael Herr, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, and others.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Kleege, Georgina
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: note new location: 141 Haas Pavilion


Book List

Barker, P.: Regeneration; Finger, A.: Call Me Ahab; Friel, B.: Molly Sweeney; Lewis, V. : Beyond Victims and Villains; Nussbaum, S.: Good Kings, Bad Kings; Shakespeare, W.: Richard III

Description

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a core course for the Disability Studies Minor).


The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: note new location: 56 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing ((510) 704-9700; 2138 University Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704).

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                                                                  -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artefacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty – how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories.  So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


Research Seminar: Emily Dickinson

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Dickinson, Emily: Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters; Dickinson, Emily: The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition

Other Readings and Media

There will be a course reader, available at Krishna Copy (Milvia and University).

Description

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attention to her hymn forms and her figures.  We’ll also consider how her poems might be read in relation to history and her biography.  Since Dickinson wrote most of her poetry in the span of a few years, we’ll group and read her poems largely by topics.  Our topics will include love and gender, definition and riddle, poetics, nature, religion, death and dying, suspense, horror, loneliness, exaltation and despair, self in society and by itself, abolition and war.  We’ll also delve into her manuscripts of individual poems (now available online), packets of poems, and letters. Especially with her later poems, the distinctions between verses, poems, and letters become hazy and controversial.  To better gauge Dickinson’s singularity and commonness, we will also read poems and essays by her contemporaries (e.g., Lydia Sigourney, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Ralph Emerson, Henry Longfellow, Helen Hunt Jackson).  Your first paper will be a reading of a single poem.  Your seminar paper will gather a collection poems on a topic of your choosing, in conversation with recent criticism and theories.  By the end of the seminar, you will be reading and writing on Dickinson with pleasure and brilliance.  (No kidding!)  

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Slow Seeing / Slow Reading

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 41 Evans


Book List

Altieri, Charles: Reckoning with the Imagination: Wittgenstein and the Aesthetics of Literary Experience; Clark, T.J.: The Sight of Death

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, available from Copy Central on Bancroft Ave.

Description

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading poems and seeing paintings. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” poems. Each student will also undertake a similar engagement with a 20th/21st century painting of his or her choice from the permanent collection of the Berkeley Art Museum. Poems by W. B. Yeats, Claude McKay, Rae Armantrout, Elizabeth Bishop, Ed Roberson, Marianne Moore, Juliana Spahr, and Susan Howe are among the poems that will be considered. Paintings by Philip Guston, Hans Hoffman, Willem de Kooning, and Helen Frankenthaler are among the paintings that will be available for repeated viewing. The individual poems and paintings will be read/seen against the backdrop of their historical moment and contextual purport and in conjunction with assigned critical texts, but students will be expected to conduct their own research, using primary and secondary sources in the process of coming to relevant, meaningful readings/seeings of the works. Students will be asked to maintain a reading/seeing journal and to write two critical papers.

“English 190: Slow Seeing / Slow Reading” is an experiment, and is offered as a collaboration between Lyn Hejinian, of the English Department, and Apsara DiQuinzio, of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. Among the outcomes of the course will be an exhibition at BAMPFA that will be part of a new exhibition series at the museum titled Cal Conversations; the materials for the “Slow Seeing / Slow Reading” exhibition will be determined by the seminar’s students and include some of their course writings.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Moby-Dick, and More

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MW 3:30-5
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Book List

Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Booth, Wayne: Craft of Research; Harris, Joseph: Rewriting; Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick

Other Readings and Media

Photocopied reader

Description

We will read Moby-Dick scrupulously, and we also will consider historical and literary contexts, Melville’s range of sources, 19th-century responses, 20th- and 21st-century literary criticism, and the presence of the book in global culture. Course requirements include oral presentations and a substantial research paper (20-25 pages) written in stages across the semester.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: U.S. Modernism

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: MW 5-6:30 PM
Location: 50 Barrows


Description

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a range of responses to such events as World War I and the Great Migration, while also reflecting on some of the subtler transformations that made everyday life in these decades feel "modern." Our readings will be accompanied by a look at the period's visual culture, including painting, photography, and film. Texts by William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot, and more.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 5-8 PM
Location: note new room: D1 Hearst Annex


Book List

Deutelbaum, M.: A Hitchcock Reader; Modleski, T.: The Women Who Knew Too Much

Description

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will consider socio-cultural backgrounds, gender problems, and psychological and Marxist readings as well as star studies.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Medium Is the Message: Reading Poetry in Manuscript & Print, 1300-1600

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Bahr, Stephanie M
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 50 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Primary Works: A course reader including selections from the following: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and 16th-c. Apocrypha; Malory's Morte d' Arthur; Sir Orfeo, the Findern Manuscript; the Devonshire Manuscript; Tottel's Miscellany; lyric poetry of Wyatt and Surrey; Golding's Metamorphoses; Sidney's Defense of Poetry; Spenser's Faerie Queene.

Secondary Works: Selections from: Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History, ed. Brian Cummings & James Simpson; Understanding Media, Marshall McLuhan; The Marketplace of Print: Pamphlets and the Public Sphere in Early Modern England, Alexandra Halasz; Fragments & Assemblages: Forming Compilations in Medieval London, A.W. Bahr; English handwriting, 1400-1650: an introductory manual, Jean F. Preston & Laetitia Yeandle; The Medieval Book, Barbara A. Shailor; Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance England, William Sherman.

Description

Modern readers almost exclusively encounter medieval and Renaissance literature in highly mediated anthologies and scholarly editions, far removed from the manuscripts and early print books in which they first circulated. In this course, we will peer behind the veil of modern editions for a vibrant look at this literature in its original context. How might our often static understanding of canonical literature change when read in idiosyncratic volumes full of scribblings, where doodles cover up transcription errors? How should we read a love lyric when it rests beside a storeroom inventory, or a misogynist poem whose refrain is rewritten to praise rather than mock women? A broad range of English readers participated in their literary culture in ways that can shape our own reading. We will examine how books were made, read, and circulated—censored and even smuggled—and how these practices changed with the emergence of the printing press. How did medieval and Renaissance poets respond to the materiality of their works and the particularities of their medium? In the words of Marshall McLuhan's famous aphorism, was the medium the message?

To help you engage these questions, you'll learn skills in both codicology (the study of material books) and paleography (the study of historical handwriting), working with digital resources and the Bancroft Library's rare books collection. These new skills will complement your training as close readers of literature and will bring material books into your analysis. This will enable you to interpret not just individual works by Chaucer, Wyatt, Surrey, etc. in isolation, but collections of works—to reconstruct the cultural logic by which multiple works were assembled in particular orders and to analyze the new meanings these compilations generate. We will also consider the implications of page layouts, illustrations, marginalia, and commonplacing, as we study the broader literary culture of the middle ages and Renaissance.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Note new topic: Troy and Tragedy

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Perry, R. D.
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 54 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: Troilus and Criseyde; Lydgate, John: Troy Book: Selections; Shakespeare, William: Hamlet; Shakespeare, William: Richard II; Shakespeare, William: Troilus and Cressida; Virgil: The Aeneid

Other Readings and Media

Additional materials, available online

Description

Note the new topic (and book list and instructor):

From the earliest moments of the western literary tradition, the story of the fall of Troy has been associated with the genre of tragedy. This course charts that association from Ancient Rome to Early Modern England. Along the way we will consider the changing nature of the genre of tragedy and its relationship to another genre, the epic. As we consider the changing notions of tragedy throughout history, we will explore in turn whether or not we understand history as anything other than a variety of tragedy. We will wonder, following Shakespeare's Richard II, whether tragedy is something more than sad stories about the death of kings. And ultimately, we will ask, along with Hamlet, what's Hecuba to us, or we to her, that we should weep for her?

We will begin with what is arguably the most tragic ancient retelling of the Troy story in VIrgil's epic, The Aeneid. From there, we will turn to Shakespeare's blending of tragedy and history in his play, Richard II, about the monarch who ruled while Chaucer wrote. We will then look at Chaucer's version of Troy, Troilus and Criseyde, in addition to the one by John Lydgate, his most prominent medieval successor. Finally, we will look at Shakespeare's version of Chaucer's poem, as well as his reflections on Troy in what may be the paradigmatic work of modern tragedy, Hamlet.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: James / Baldwin

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Baldwin, James: Another Country; Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Baldwin, James: Go Tell It on the Mountain; James, Henry: The Ambassadors; James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady; James , Henry: The Wings of the Dove

Description

James Baldwin never made a secret of the importance of Henry James to his creative life.  The numerous quotations, echoes, and nods to James sprinkled throughout Baldwin’s writings all but directly invite us to think of James as we read Baldwin’s work.  The two certainly shared a great deal in life and art, having chosen European exile and then turned that exile into a major theme within their art.  But why the affinity of the firebrand black writer for one concerned with the workings (both psychic and social) of American elites?  Our contemporary bias for self-disclosure might predispose us to the view that Baldwin felt he found a fellow queer writer in James; however, James’s reticence on such matters means that “queer” (if it should signify anything) names the moment when the relationship gets awkward.

This class will explore the major themes these writers share as well as queer “sensibilities” that, always deniable if not always denied, may or may not be there -- the many effects, both dramatic and formal, that keep us at a loss for knowledge of our subject, i.e., reticence, renunciation, opacity, bewilderment, and belated recognition.

We will read three novels by each author.  By James: The Portrait of a Lady, The Wings of the Dove, The Ambassadors. By Baldwin: Go Tell It on the Mountain, Giovanni’s Room, Another Country.  Both writers also produced a vast number of essays and short stories; we will read selections from their wider oeuvre.  

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for  more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: On Style

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Xin, Wendy Veronica
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Book List

Austen, Jane: Sense and Sensibility; Bronte, Charlotte: Villette; Eliot, George: Middlemarch; Ishiguro, Kazuo: The Remains of the Day; Wilde, Oscar: The Importance of Being Earnest

Other Readings and Media

Selected essays and excerpts from T. W. Adorno's "The Essay as Form" and Aesthetic Theory, Roland Barthes's The Fashion System, Charles Baudelaire's The Painter of Modern Life, Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction, Thomas Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, E. M. Forster's A Room with a View, John Ruskin's Modern Painters, D. A. Miller's Jane Austen or, The Secret of Style, Tzvetan Todorov's "The Place of Style in the Structure of the Text," Paul Valéry's "Style," Helen Vendler's The Breaking of Style, and Oscar Wilde's "Aristotle at Afternoon Tea"

Films: Rear Window (1954) - dir. Alfred Hitchcok; Clueless (1995) - dir. Amy Heckerling

Description

NOTE: The topic, course description, book list, and instructor for this section of English 190 changed on May 2.

Good style is easy to spot but tough to imitate, and "style," good or bad, is itself difficult to define: does style constitute a particular method of engagement? Might we say it expresses a mode of intentionality? Or, conversely, is style only style when it produces the effect of effortlessness? Is style everything but substance, or is it nothing but "mere form"? In this course we will investigate these mercurial aspects of style by examining literary depictions of its multifarious manifestations: in the Victorian novel it can act at once as a marker of cultural taste, a form of social engagement, and as expressing a set of moral judgments; in the contemporary British novel style is a trace of a long-lost history that the labor of everyday life and the relentless drive of mass production can no longer spare the time to accommodate; and in theories of fashion, art, and aesthetic form, style can be taken as  a sociology, a self-conscious cultivation of identity or psychic management of shame. We will make the transition from thinking about styles of literary representation and literary representations of style to fashioining writerly personas of our own, interrogating the qualities shared by authors, critics, filmmakers, and fictional characters from Adorno to Wilde. While we will spend a good deal of class time puzzling over the intricacies and idiosyncrasies of the selected texts, we will also theorize, through longer writing assignments, the very elements needed to produce that always extraordinary, often volatile, and almost alchemical substance that is style. With this in mind, students will build upon skills gained in upper-division literature courses, honing their writing and research through one shorter 5-page close-reading essay and a final 15-to-20-page research paper due at the end of the semester.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enroling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Do I Dare? Indecision and Modernist Literature

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Blevins, Jeffrey
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Book List

Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Barth, John: The End of the Road; Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; James, Henry: The Golden Bowl; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Other Readings and Media

A reader that may contain short pieces by Simone de Beauvoir, Samuel Beckett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Cleanth Brooks, Kenneth Burke, E.E. Cummings, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, James Joyce, Alain Locke, Marianne Moore, John Crowe Ransom, I.A. Richards, Bertrand Russell, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone Weil, Edith Wharton, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and others.

Please note that the book list and and the contents of the reader were revised on April 18.

Description

From Prufrock's peach to Frost's two roads, modernism gave us many famous moments of indecision. We will follow along with texts depicting speakers and characters as they hesitate, delay, cavil, evade, hedge, sidestep, prevaricate, tergiversate, equivocate, and otherwise wring their hands over even the most inconsequential choices. Their protracted deliberations foreground states of uncertainty and feelings of doubt, which we will investigate by closely reading the ambiguous and often paradoxical language that constrains and displays them. These uncertainties and doubts will provide openings for discussions of how texts present the situations that elicit indecision in the first place: temerity, alienation, physical peril, disaffection, ethical vagueness, mental exhaustion, circumstantial complexity, and so on. At the same time, we will see how indecision provokes fantasies about other outcomes and speculations on alternative possibilities, which become microcosms for the broader imaginative procedures behind literary world-building.

In tandem we will consider contemporaneous essays on the role of ambiguity and paradox in literature, and we will study how the early history of literary criticism dramatized its own indecisiveness over just how to read and evaluate (modernist) texts. We will also touch on broader philosophies of decision, judgment, choice, will, and selfhood.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Modern California Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 5-8 PM
Location: note new room: D1 Hearst Annex


Book List

Chandler, R: The Big Sleep; Didion, J: Slouching toward Bethlehem; West, N: The Day of the Locust;

Recommended: Dick, P. K.: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Stegner, W: The Angle of Repose

Description

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California, such as E. v. Stroheim's Greed, J. Ford's Grapes of Wrath, B. Wilder's Sunset Boulevard, R. Polanski's Chinatown, the Coen brothers' Man Who Wasn't There, T. Haynes's Safe, &c.  Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades. Most works on the book list are not required but recommended; all the poetry and some of the secondary material will be posted on bCourses or photocopied.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Thurs. 5-8 PM
Location: note new room: D1 Hearst Annex


Book List

Recommended: Zamiatin, E: We; Atwood, M : The Handmaid's Tale; Burgess, A: A Clockwork Orange; Gilman, C. P.: Herland; Huxley, A: Brave New World; Ishiguro, K: Never Let Me Go; Orwell, G: 1984; Wells, H. G.: Three Prophetic Novels

Description

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers to try to realize the ideal society, most of it has had limited practical impact, yet has managed to provoke readers in various ways--for instance, as a kind of imaginative fiction that comments on "things as they are" indirectly yet effectively, with fantasy and satire in varying doses. Among the critical questions posed by such material are the problematic status of fiction that is not primarily mimetic, but written in the service of some ulterior purpose; the shifting relationships between what is and what authors think might be or ought to be; how to create the new and strange other than by recombining the old and familiar; and so on. Various films (such as Metropolis, Modern Times, 1984, Brazil, THX1138, A Clockwork Orange, and  Children of Men) will be included in the syllabus and discussed in class. The works on the book list are not required, but recommended==in some cases, as classics of their genre, in others, for purposes of comparison with film adaptations. Writing will consist of one long essay of 16-20 pages. There will be no quizzes or exams, but seminar attendance and participation will be expected, and will affect grades.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

The Honors Thesis is a long research essay. Length, however, is not the only way it differs from every essay you have ever written in the English Department. In most literature classes, the function of essay assignments is to help you deepen your engagement with the readings within the course. In Honors, we reverse this order, and our goal in reading literary and critical texts is to help you write an essay on a subject of your own choosing, using your own archive. Most of the actual research and writing will take place in the Spring, when you will work closely with your peers in the course, with your faculty mentor, and with me. In the Fall, we will be preparing for the Spring semester’s research and writing process by reading a selection of criticism from Aristotle to T. S. Eliot, Roland Barthes, Hayden White, Eve Sedgwick and other critics in a ruthlessly pragmatic way, with the sole purpose of learning what we can and should (and sometimes what we cannot or shouldn’t) imitate from the ways these authors write about texts. In addition to exemplary critical works, we will read a small selection of prose and poetry by John Donne, Heinrich Kleist, Emily Dickinson, and Jorge Luis Borges, and use the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics to understand fundamental categories such as metaphor and metonymy, oral and scribal culture, the sublime and the uncanny.

You do not have to come to this class knowing what you want to write about. That’s what the first semester is for, and the course is designed to have a certain flexibility built into it to accommodate your specific needs. Short assignments throughout the Fall will help you think about your research topic, which you will be asked to describe in a brief proposal by the end of the semester. All readings will be posted on bCourses and also available for purchase as a course reader.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

     • Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

     • a PDF of your college transcript(s),

     • a PDF of your spring 2016 course schedule,

     • a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality), and

     • a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application is midnight, FRIDAY, MAY 13.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 247 Dwinelle


Book List

Barthes, R: S/Z; Culler, J: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; Muller, J. P.: The Purloined Poe;

Recommended: Leitch, V., et al.: Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

 In the fall semester, we will consider what makes a research question, problem, or project a significant one. Does it merely involve choosing to study a “significant” writer or text? (And what makes some writers/texts more significant than others?) Or do new issues and objects emerge as significant in response to different historical conjunctures and intellectual agendas?  Together we will read and discuss essays that raise key issues about representation, imagination, communication, interpretation, and critique, undertaking what might be called (after “The Purloined Letter”) “a thorough research of the premises” of literary study.  Individually, students will consult with me to construct bibliographies on specific texts or issues relevant to their own interests, and use these bibliographies to define a compelling, workable thesis topic.  Each student will also participate in a “working group” responsible for designing a week’s syllabus, choosing the texts and leading discussion of them. 

Prospective students should read Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction over the summer. They should also begin to consider a writer or text or issue for research. A useful strategy in this selection might be: what writer or text or subject matter has most challenged or cemented my ideas about what literature is and what happens when it is read?

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major.  (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

     • Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

     • a PDF of your college transcript(s),

     • a PDF of your spring 2016 course schedule,

     • a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality), and

     • a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application is midnight, FRIDAY, MAY 13.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Book List

Barthes, Roland: S/Z; Dickinson, Emily: Complete Poems; Melville, Herman : Benito Cereno; Michaels, Walter: The Shape of the Signifier; Moretti, Franco: Distant Reading

Other Readings and Media

Photocopied reader

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies the Group 1 requirement (problems in the study of literature).


Graduate Readings: On Life: Life Philosophy and Culture

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MW 9:30-11
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Other Readings and Media

The reading will be composed of both selections and whole texts from the following books.  Items marked with an * indicate chapters or articles found on bcourses:

Introduction
Elizabeth Grosz, The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution and the Untimely
Roberto Esposito, Bios: Biopolitics and Philosophy
*  Melinda Cooper, Life as Surplus: Biotechnology and Capitalism in the Neoliberal Era

Nietzscheanism
Friedrich Nietzsche, On The Genealogy of Morals
*  Gregory Moore, Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor 
Thomas Mann, Dr. Faustus: The Life of the Composer Adrian Leverkühn as Told by a Friend

Bergsonism
Henri Bergson, Creative Evolution
D.H. Lawrence, Women in Love
Aimé Césaire, Cahier d’un Retour Au Pays Natal (English and French edition), ed. Abiola Irele
*  Souleymane Bachir Diagne, African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson and the Idea of Négritude 
*  Mark Antliff, Avant-garde Fascism: The Mobilization of Myth, Art and Culture in France, 1909-1939

Biopower, Biopolitics, Empire and Race
Michel Foucault, Society Must Be Defended
Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go
Octavia Butler, Clay's Ark 
Amitav Ghosh, The Calcutta Chromosome

Description

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s The Meaning of Life and Elizabeth Grosz’s The Nick of Time. In exploring the meaning of life, Eagleton takes us on a tour of the many meanings of life. In readings of Darwin, Nietzsche, Bergson and Deleuze, Grosz identifies life with temporality or a way of holding the past, present and future together.

The course will then be divided into three major sections, combining literary and philosophical works: Nietzscheanism, Bergsonism, and Biopower.

Our study of Nietzscheanism will culminate in a reading of Mann’s Dr. Faustus, whose protagonist embodies the temptations and dangers of Nietzschean Lebensphilosophie, but we shall begin with Nietzsche’s own affirmation of life against asceticism. We shall also study the interpretation of his philosophy developed by Georg Simmel, whose influence on cultural studies and philosophy is still underestimated. Anticipating Martin Heidegger, and in response to The Great War, Simmel registers the cultural shift from the affirmation of life to the authentic facing of death.

We shall then move to the study of Bergsonism. We shall read Bergson’s most culturally influential work, not his more strictly philosophical works. We shall investigate the fear of mechanical inelasticity and becoming automaton, his critiques of limits of mechanistic thinking about life, and his valorization of intuition and process as the epistemology and ontology suited to life, respectively. We shall then discuss how these ideas are thematized in works by D.H. Lawrence, Aimé Césaire and Leopold Senghor. But we will also attend to the visual arts to explore how vitalist themes were played out. On the one hand, Bergsonism provided a language with which to appreciate African art; on the other hand, the vitalist themes of Bergson and Georges Sorel were appropriated by the European fascist avant-garde.

The course will conclude with the recent discussion of the nature of life in the theorization of biopower, biopolitics, empire and critical race studies.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.

 


Graduate Readings: Early African American Literature

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 106 Mulford


Book List

Chesnutt, Charles W.: Conjure Tales and Stories of the Color Line; Chesnutt, Charles W.: The Marrow of Tradition; Douglass, Frederick: The Portable Frederick Douglass; Du Bois, W. E. B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Equiano, Olaudah: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; Harper, Frances E. W.: Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted; Hopkins, Pauline E.: Of One Blood; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Reed, Austin: The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict; Walker, David: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Wheatley, Phillis: Complete Writings

Description

Major works in the context of slavery and its aftermath. Advance syllabus here.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

Recommended: Hayot, Eric: The Elements of Academic Style

Other Readings and Media

Weekly writing assignments will be uploaded to our bCourses site.

Description

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar. The workshop will provide a collaborative critical community in which to try out successive versions of your dissertation project and to learn how your peers are constructing theirs. Weekly writing assignments will structure points of entry into these projects. Beginning with exercises to galvanize your thinking, the assignments will map increasingly onto the specific components of the prospectus. We will also review a range of prospectuses from the past to demystify the genre and to gain a better understanding of its form and function. The goal is to insure that by the end of the semester, every member of the workshop will have submitted a prospectus to his or her committee. For students who complete a draft of the prospectus early in the semester, we will reserve time to consider it fully and to structure assignments relevant to the writing of the first chapter (including the question of which chapter should be written first). We will also discuss the dissertation in relation to the job market, conference papers, scholarly journals, and publishable articles.


Graduate Readings: Lyric, Poetry, Poetics

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: W 3-6
Location: 107 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

All readings will be available online and in a course reader.  Among a few other selections, we will most likely read texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Mill, Keats, Arnold, Mallarmé, Pater, Hopkins, Yeats, Eliot, Moore, Pound, Stein, Olson, Richards, Empson, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Brooks, Valéry, Benjamin, Adorno, Abrams, de Man, Culler, Riffaterre, Lacoue-Labarthe, Celan, Derrida, Freud, Jakobson, Glissant, Barbara Johnson, Susan Stewart, Virginia Jackson, Lyn Hejinian, Charles Altieri, Marjorie Perloff, Robert Kaufman, Giorgio Agamben, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Denise Riley, Juliana Spahr, Caroline Bergvall, Claudia Rankine, Lisa Robertson, and Simon Jarvis.

Description

This course will provide an introduction to poetics and theories of poetry, especially lyric poetry, since the early 19th century.  We will watch as conceptualizations of poetry, lyric, and verse torque and shift throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, beginning, roughly, with Wordsworth’s “Preface” to Lyrical Ballads and moving through the “New Lyric Studies” of our own critical moment.  We’ll look at a number of the key nineteenth- and twentieth-century statements on poetry and lyric as we reconsider the projects of the New Critics alongside of other types of formalist scholarship, the place of poetry within structuralism and deconstruction, and the importance of poetry in several varieties of Marxist aesthetics and psychoanalytic theories. As we come to more recent writings, we’ll investigate poetry in relation to matters of perception, subjectivity, cognition, technology, politics, ecology, and history. We will pay close attention to the shapes (formal, spatial, metrical, acoustic, generic) and textures (sonic, graphic, etymological, figural, rhythmic) of a small handful of poems, most of which will be dictated by our theoretical and critical readings, but some of which we’ll choose as a class at the start of the semester.  My hope is that the class is able to follow three interweaving tracks over the course of the semester: 1) the longer tradition of thinking about poetics since Wordsworth; 2) the course of contemporary scholarship on lyric and poetry over the past several decades; and 3) the routes taken by contemporary poets as they refashion lyric within their own practice.  All enrolled students will have the option of writing two conference-length papers (8-10 pages) or one article-length essay (20-25 pages).

This course satisfies the Group 4 or Group 5 requirement.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: No instructor assigned yet.
Time:
Location:


Description

This course will not be offered in 2016-17 (or the following year, either), but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English) in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes.


Readings in Middle English

English 212

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: note new location: D1 Hearst Annex


Description

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval trhough Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Shakespeare

English 217

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Shakespeare, W.: Norton Shakespeare, 3rd ed.

Description

An introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the graduate level. We'll examine a range of contemporary approaches to Shakespeare's plays and poems, and consider how they emerge from longstanding preoccupations across four hundred years of critical reception. I've ordered the Norton Shakespeare at the bookstore, but you may use any recent edition of the texts.

This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement or the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: F 11-2
Location: B40 Hearst Annex


Other Readings and Media

All readings will be available online.

Description

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Graham Foust, Sarah Nicholson, Morgan Parker, Juliana Spahr, Jenny Zhang, and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the applicaiton you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is midnight, THURSDAY, APRIL 28.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Research Seminar: Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Time: M 3-6
Location: 107 Mulford


Book List

Browne: The Garden of Cyrus; Darwin: The Botanic Garden; Derham: Physico-Theology; Godwin: The Man on the Moone; Goodman: The Creatures Praysing God; Hooke: Micrographia; Hutchinson: Order and Disorder; Power: Experimental Philosophy; Smart: Jubilate Agno; Sylvester: The Divine Weeks of the World's Birth; Topsell: The History of Four-Footed Beasts; Walwyn: Spirits Moderated

Other Readings and Media

Note:  Students will be given PDFs to access the texts.

Description

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope, and contemporary debates over reproduction and the possibility of extra-terrestrial life. Alongside questions related to medium and genre, we’ll consider when the representation of other creatures becomes representation in an almost political sense, casting the animal as a voiceless subject on whose behalf (and from whose “place”) the author tries to speak. We will also track how new approaches to the physical investigation of animals and plants affected their traditional status as natural symbols (of various vices and virtues, for example). Finally, we will consider the special challenges and opportunities posed by representing creatures that continued to elude empirical study, such as angels.

Secondary reading will be drawn from the history of science, with some philosophy.

All readings will be made available for free on the course site and for money as a course reader.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (Seventeenth through Eighteenth Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Ethnic Modernisms

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 129 Barrows


Book List

McKay, C: Banjo; Toomer, J: Cane

Description

This seminar will explore the convergence of modernist and ethnic cultures in twentieth-century America and Europe, placing race and ethnicity in dialogue with the modernist compulsion to "make it new" and the avant-gardist compulsion to bring art into life.  The aim of these juxtapositions will be to arrive at new understandings of both ethnicity and modernism--specifically, new ways of thinking about these terms in relation to space, time, identity, and aesthetics.  After gaining a firm grounding in critical race theory and theories of modernism and the avant-garde, we will examine a wide range of novels, poems, films, and paintings.  Our focus will be on American minority artists drawn to modernist experimentation (for instance, Langston Hughes’s translations of Vladimir Mayakovsky), but also on modernist engagement with non-Western cultures (for instance, Pablo Picasso’s incorporation of African masks).  How do the aims of ethnic literature (cultural recognition, the disruption of canons) correspond with the aims of modernism and the avant-garde?  How does the juxtaposition of these terms help us to see beyond the fissures contained within each, as well as to bridge the larger divide between art and politics?

Most readings will be distributed via bCourses.  We'll definitely be reading McKay's Banjo and Toomer's Cane; other texts for purchase will be announced at the first class meeting.

This course satisfies the Group 5 (Twentieth Century) or Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: Literature and the Brain

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Gang, Joshua
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

As imaging and computational technologies become more adept at measuring the neurology of reading and writing, literary study faces a number of challenges. Some of these challenges—like instrumentalizing fMRI data or working with live subjects—are relatively recent and raise new questions about what literary criticism can entail. But other difficulties—like literary study’s approach to empirical problems of mind, or the relation between aesthetic experiences and brain states, or the apparent gap between quantitative research and determinations of value—aren’t new at all. These problems already have long literary, scientific, philosophical, and critical histories. And as interest intensifies in cognitive literary study, these older problems intensify and their histories become even more important to know.

Looking across literary periods and national traditions, “Literature and the Brain” will examine both the opportunities and difficulties that cognitive science and philosophy of mind afford to literary criticism. Topics of discussion will include: the relation of self-knowledge, other minds, and dualism to literary form and convention; language acquisition and use; theories of physicalism, supervenience, and multiple realizability; intention, interiority, and memory; theory of mind; the relation of cognitive literary study to older models of literary criticism and “theory”; and recent discussions of neuroaesthetics, cultural neuroscience, Darwinian approaches to literature etc.

Literary readings will likely include those by Dante, Cavendish, Mary Shelley, Coleridge, Woolf, Faulkner, Beckett, Pinter, Haddon, Fanon, Coetzee, McEwan, and Kronovet.

Philosophical and scientific readings will likely include those by Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hobbes, Hume, Hartley, Kant, Bell, James, Lashley, Watson, Skinner, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, Ryle, Sellars, Anscombe, Place, Fodor, Putnam, Davidson, Nagel, Churchland, Gleason, Libet, Mele, Searle, Johnson-Laird, Goldman, Chalmers, Noë, and others.

Critical readings will likely include those by Richards, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Lukács, Kramnick, Lynch, Scarry, Dames, Bérubé, Zunshine, Phelan, Starr, Spiller, Richardson, Jager and Savarese, Ohmann, Vermeule, Spolsky, Phillips, Easterlin, and others.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: T. B. A.
Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 1. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: Thurs. 10:30-12:30
Location: C57 Hearst Annex


Other Readings and Media

Recommended texts:  Davis, B. Tools for Teaching (e-text available through UCB library website); Rosenwasser, D. and Stephen, J.: Writing Analytically (Cengage Learning, 7th ed. 2012) 

All required readings will be posted on bCourses and/or available in a Course Reader. 

Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections linked to English 45 and select upper-division courses, as well in R1A and R1B, and beyond. At once a seminar and a hands-on practicum, the class will cover topics such as strategies for leading discussion, teaching critical reading skills and the elements of composition, responding to and evaluating student writing, developing paper topics and other exercises, and approaching the other responsibilities that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere. The course will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the discovery of each member's pedagogical style. We hope to pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A or R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes besides their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed teaching and to receive feedback during the term. 

This course satisfies the Pedagogy Requirement.