Announcement of Classes: Spring 2017

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
The Great Depression, The Great Recession, and The "Grapes of Wrath" Narrative

MWF 10-11

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1A (as of early December).

In this course, we will read, analyze, and interpret various artistic responses to the Great...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Theater and Magic in Shakespeare’s England

MWF 12-1

Like our 16th- and 17th-century ancestors, in the 21st century we remain fascinated by the supernatural. Yet while witches, wizards, and werewolves abound in the movies and TV shows of today, we have (for the most ...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Literatures of the African Diaspora

MWF 1-2

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1A (as of January 13).

The course material addresses the writings of the African diaspora in a broader definition of ...(read more)

Nanda, Aparajita

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Girls: Feminism, the Feminine, and Fictions after 1945

MWF 2-3

This course focuses on texts of young womanhood, examining the place of female adolescence in the cultural imagination. It also seeks to interrogate the term “girl” – its fungible application across childhood, adolescence, and ad...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Morality: Psychological Explanations and Literary Explorations

MWF 3-4

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description (as of Dec. 15).

Is homicide ever morally justifiable? . . .  Is lying? Is it moral or immoral to lie to a murderer in pursuit of a victim? Humanity has ...(read more)

Carr, Jessica

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Reading Other People's Letters

TTh 8-9:30

“Oh no, no! the letter had much rather be all your own. You will express yourself very properly I am sure. There is no danger of you not being intelligible, which is the first thing.” – Jane Austen, Emma(read more)

Gaston, Lise

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Mission Creep: Writing in Wartime

TTh 5-6:30

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, course description, and book list of this section of English R1A (as of 11/4/16).

We're still fighting "The Forever War." We've learned to live with it. But how do...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Gay, Innocent, and Heartless

MWF 11-12

The last words of Peter Pan allude to an endless cycle in which children become adults, adults produce more children, and the cycle goes on and on “so long as children are gay and innocent and heartless.” If we should pause ov...(read more)

Callender, Brandon

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Raising the Dead: Time, Memory, & History in Nineteenth-Century America

MWF 12-1

This course will explore the ghosts, corpses, graveyards, and living dead of nineteenth-century American literature. Through an array of fiction, poetry, cultural history, and criticism (as well as potential field trips to local cemeteries), we wi...(read more)

Bondy, Katherine Isabel

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Evidence of Things Not Seen

MWF 12-1

The biblical book of Hebrews famously defines faith as “the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen” (11:1, KJV). But in eighteenth-century Europe and North America, “unseen” things were as m...(read more)

de Stefano, Jason

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Self and Lyric Form

MWF 12-1

The journey to self is a theme that we can all relate to and, perhaps for this reason, one that has been explored by many poets and philosophers from many cultures and traditions. Yet, writing about self often seems much like lifting a cup of water...(read more)

Tchetgen, Pierre

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Friends and Fiends: Imagining the Social in the British Romantic Period

MWF 1-2

Since the nineteenth century, the popular image of Romanticism has been that of the solitary genius. Typically poised atop some cloud-capped mountain or madly penning his verse in candlelight, this lone figure appears as a testament to the soverei...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing and Rights: Literature and the Fight Against Oppression in Nineteenth-Century America

MWF 1-2

"The artist . . . is the holiest reformer of them all, for she is creating."—Paulina Wright Davis, The Una, 1853

"Polemics . . . are not likely to be epics. They are likely to be pamphlets, even when they are d...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy

R1B/7

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/8

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/9

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/10

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/11

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/12

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/13

Reading and Composition

MW 5-6:30

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Investigating Fiction

MW 5-6:30

“The distortion of a text is not unlike a murder. The difficulty lies not in the execution of the deed but in the doing away with the traces.” —Sigmund Freud, Moses and Monotheism

Freud suggests that murder myster...(read more)

Magarik, Raphael

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Senses of Magic

TTh 8-9:30

In one common sense, we use the word “magic” to refer to the extraordinary, the otherworldly or the supernatural.  We associate this sense of “magic” with the belief that one can gain control over external events throu...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Manufactured Monsters

TTh 8-9:30

This course investigates monsters—from the stitched-together creatures of The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) to present-day vampires, werewolves, body snatchers, and other frightening creatures of lore and lit...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Walking America

TTh 5-6:30

With beauty before me, may I walk  
With beauty behind me, may I walk  
With beauty above me, may I walk
With beauty below me, may I walk
With beauty all around me, may I wal...(read more)

Gillis, Brian

R1B/18

Reading and Composition

TTh 5-6:30

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts and Literature at Berkeley and Beyond

W 4-5

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets; study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum; attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall; see and discuss films at the Pacific Fi...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 5-6

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as on...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Post-Apocalypse Now

Wed. 3-4

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic stories—are these really two different things?—have been told for centuries. But novels and movies that imagine the end of the world (and what comes after that) seem to have inundated us recently. In thi...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

28/1

Introduction to the Study of Drama

MWF 10-11

The work of this class will be to understand the drama as literature in company. Lots of other literary forms make claims about what social life is like, and strive to act upon the social life of their readers beyond the reading experienc...(read more)

Landreth, David

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This is an introductory course on writing short fiction. Its aim is twofold: to help students become more practiced and confident fiction writers, and to foster reflection on and mindful engagement with the writing process.

Toward those end...(read more)

Mansouri, Leila

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 3:30-5

This course is primarily a poetry workshop.  Reading and writing assignments will help generate our workshop material and give us the language and tools to treat that material.  Readings will include poetry and poetics from the last seve...(read more)

Gregory, Jane

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

English 45A introduces students to the foundations of literary writing in Britain, from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance and English Civil War. This semester I'd like to focus on how that foundational narrative--the story of how Britis...(read more)

Landreth, David

45B/1

Literature in English:
Mid-17th to Late-19th Century

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose fiction, autobiography, and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotlan...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English:
Late-19th through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course will survey British, American, and global Anglophone literature from the end of the 19th century through the beginning of the 21st. Moving across a number of genres and movements, this course will examine the ways...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

45C/2

Literature in English:
Late-19th through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course examines radical changes and unexpected continuities in literature in English from 1850 to (almost) the present.  We will read poetry and fiction from Britain, Ireland, North America and Africa in order to explore a range of liter...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

80K/1

Children's Literature

MWF 12-1

This course has two principle aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children’s literature in English; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical questions such literature has posed. A...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture: Woody Allen

W 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film ...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

105/1

Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 2-3:30

“Britain, once called Albion, is an island of the ocean...” When the priest Bede set out in the early 700s to write the history of the place we now call England, he portrayed it as a new nation with a deep past, a remote corner of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

111/1

Chaucer

TTh 3:30-5

The course will read Chaucer's two greatest works--the Canterbury Tales (easily one of the most entertaining works and one of the most compelling works in English) and the Troilus and Criseyde (perhaps less entertaining, but ...(read more)

Justice, Steven

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117S/1

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

This course will be an exercise in unabashed celebration of genius.  I will be continually asking what work these plays are doing in order to render dynamically certain basic features of human experience and to raise significant questions abo...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

117S/2

Shakespeare

TTh 3:30-5

Shakespeare wrote a massive number of plays.  Focusing on a selection of them, we’ll consider the range of Shakespeare's dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dram...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

118/1

Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Probably the most influential and famous (and, in his own time, infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

In an age of commercial print expansion, men and women writers negotiated the possibilities, limits, and perceived dangers of publishing. In this class, we will explore the forms and strategies writers deployed in those negotiati...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

125C/1

The European Novel:
The Many Faces of the 19th-Century European Novel

MWF 3-4

The novel emerged as the principal literary genre in 19th-century Europe and has continued to dominate the literary market in Europe and North America ever since.  What were the constitutive formal elements as well as social and ps...(read more)

Golburt, Luba

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

In this class, we will read a selection of 21st-century novels written in English, as well as some book reviews, interviews, and critical essays. We will consider the formal and thematic elements of these contempora...(read more)
Snyder, Katherine

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 12-1

This course surveys the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the impact of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-sho...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

132/1

The American Novel

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course is a survey of major American novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on realism, naturalism, and modernism. Rather than trace a single history of the novel in this period, we will explore a range of genres...(read more)

Goble, Mark

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Fields: California Farmworker Literature

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on the lives and struggles of Mexican farm workers in California as represented in Chicano/a literature from the 1970s to the early twentieth-first century—or roughly the period that coincides with the rise of neoliber...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx/Latinx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we’ll read a cluster of post-1970 Chicanx/Latinx novels.  We’ll explore a variety of issues and experiences—race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, political activism, revolution, philosophy, art, storytelling, a...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

139/1

The Cultures of English:
(Post)colonial Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine some British colonial novels within the socio-political-economic context of late British colonialism and some (post-)colonial novels written after the devolution of formal British colonialism.

...(read more)
JanMohamed, Abdul R.

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 12:30-2

We'll study some of the ways that fiction writers, essayists, story-tellers, and poets have responded to the worlds that their cultures have built.  We'll look at "high" forms and "low" forms and write in both and ...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 3:30-5

The aim of this course to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Studen...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop is designed to hone basic elements of the short story: style, voice, perspective, structure, plot, character, and so on. We will read some exceptional short stories in a variety of genres. We will compose and revise 1-3 short stories...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

143A/3

Short Fiction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A fiction workshop in which students will be expected to turn in material approximately every third week, to be edited and discussed in class.

Emphasis will be upon editing and revising. Quality rather than quantity is the ideal, but each s...(read more)

Oates, Joyce Carol

143B/1

Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-li...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

TTh 3:30-5

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry.  Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

143C/1

Long Narrative:
The Novel

TTh 2-3:30

The purpose of this workshop is to begin to write a novel. It is unlikely that you will finish writing a novel in the three months we spend together. Novels take time. There are some reported exceptions to this—Jack Kerouac wrote the first d...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in the assigned anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments w...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

165/1

Special Topics:
The Graphic Memoir

MWF 10-11

A graphic novel is often defined as “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nat...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

165/2

Special Topics:
Incarcerations: The Literatures of Physical Confinement and Spiritual Liberation

TTh 3:30-5

This is a course primarily on the literature of incarceration variously defined and experienced across a range of control systems that attempt to stunt the entire human being. We will read prison narrative/poetry (George Jackson's prison lette...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

166/1

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 1-2

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism...(read more)

Lye, Colleen

166/2

Special Topics:
Studies in Literature and Environment (Shelter and Weather)

MWF 3-4

What makes environmental violence hard to represent and how can literature bear witness to the silence, slowness, and invisibility of ecological relations? Of what use is the problematic concept of “nature” in ordering our relations to...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

166/3

Special Topics:
Slavery and Conspiracy

MWF 3-4

This is a multidisciplinary seminar on the law and literature of slave conspiracy. We will be reading novels and stories by authors such as Martin Delany and Herman Melville alongside contemporary newspapers, confessions, warrants, witness deposit...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

166/4

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

MW 5-6:30 PM

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stori...(read more)

Goble, Mark

166/5

Special Topics:
Modern Irish Literature

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will focus on one of the major canons in modern literature, one that includes, some would argue, the most significant English-language poet, the most important novelist, and the most remarkable playwright of the 20th century. &...(read more)
Falci, Eric

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America

MWF 1-2

This aim of this survey is two-fold: First, to interrogate the concept of nationhood and, particularly, what it means to be American.  Focusing on writings by and about peoples of Asian descent across the twentieth century and into the twenty...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in antiquity (Sappho, Catullus, et al.) to its 20th and 21st century rejections ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

C181/1

Digital Humanities, Visual Cultures:
Digital Travels

MWF 10-11

This course introduces tools and methods of the Digital Humanities as they can be used in studying the art and literature of the early modern period. Our focus is on how, around 1600, things were in motion: people, but also objects and ideas. By 1...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth

190/1

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

MW 9:30-11

This is a course that weds postcolonial literary theory to cultural studies to critical geography to art. We'll read novels and watch films from several cities--London, Kingston, Johannesburg, New York, New Orleans, Lagos, Bombay/Mu...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/2

Research Seminar:
Harlem Renaissance

MW 11-12:30

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural and intellectual movement of black artists and writers in the 1920s. Centered in the Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan, the movement extended outward through international collaboration that reached all the way...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

190/3

Research Seminar:
Literature and the Linguistic Turn

MWF 12-1

In the early twentieth century, philosophers began to suspect that all their ancient problems—from the riddle of selfhood to the mystery of other minds to the imprecision of sensation—were actually problems with language. We could fix ...(read more)

Blevins, Jeffrey

190/4

Research Seminar:
Jane Austen and the Theory of the Novel

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form.  The gender bias of classic continental novel theory...(read more)

Miller, D.A.

190/5

Research Seminar:
Writing a World in Crisis: Medieval and Modern

MWF 1-2

Please note the changes in the topic, book list, and courses description of this class (as of November 22).

This course looks at two distinct moments in which individual authors attempted to create encyclopedic visions in an attemp...(read more)

Perry, R. D.

190/6

Research Seminar:
Shakespeare: From the Globe to the Global

MWF 2-3

William Shakespeare's works have been staged all over the world, adapted as films, operas, musicals, ballets, and novels.  They have been transposed into diverse settings, from fascist Italy to the Wild West, medieval Japan to the fiction...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M

190/7

Research Seminar:
Place-Love: Fiction and the Melancholy of Form

MWF 3-4

Philosophy as a form has been governed by a sense of “homesickness.” Literary discourse has similarly grappled with a longing for remembered places. Thornfield Hall, Satis House, Brideshead Castle, the Isle of Skye, Manderley—fro...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literatures of the Ocean

TTh 9:30-11

In this seminar we’ll explore literary (and some non-literary) representations of life at sea and of sailors, both offshore and on, primarily but not exclusively during the expansion of Britain’s first empire during the eighteenth cent...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

190/9

Research Seminar:
Beowulf

TTh 9:30-11

Beowulf is the longest, subtlest, and in many ways the strangest and most difficult Old English poem that has survived from Anglo-Saxon England. Since its rediscovery in the 18th century, we have learned much about its language...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

190/10

Research Seminar:
Hollywood in the 1930s

TTh 12:30-2

Our subject will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in Hollywood from the birth of talking pictures to the start of W.W. II.  We'll sample the extraordinary range of films that Golden-Age Hollywood offered its consumers: fro...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

190/11

Research Seminar:
The Literature of Immortality

TTh 12:30-2

"Check back later for more information!"

Jones, Donna V.

190/13

Research Seminar:
California Literature & Film Since WWI

Tues. 5-8:30 PM (see the course description)

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califo...(read more)

Starr, George A.

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

This course is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by David Marno in Fall 2016. No new students will be admitted, and no new application needs to be submitted. Professor Marno will give out permission codes in class in November.

Th...(read more)

Marno, David

H195B/2

Honors Course

TTh 9:30-11

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Celeste Langan in Fall 2016. No new students will be admitted, and no new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Langan will give out permission codes in class in November.

...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

203/1

Graduate Readings:
World Systems Theory and the Asian Anglophone Novel

MW 9:30-11

World literature theories that have borrowed from the work of Immanuel Wallerstein on early capitalism to conceptualize the dynamics of literary centers and peripheries have difficulty accounting for the Asian Anglophone novel, an ascendant form o...(read more)

Lye, Colleen

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Political Economy of Life and Death in African American Literature and Culture

W 3-6

Using psychoanalytic, phenomenological, and economic theorization of death and life, this course will examine instances of the political economy of life (and birthing) and death in African American literature.   

We will read the ...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

205B/1

Old English:
Anglo-Saxons and the Law

TTh 12:30-2

In the last decade, there has been considerable interest in Anglo-Saxon law from the perspectives of history and literature, including a new, international project to re-edit the corpus. This course will consider both the social and textual dimens...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

211/1

Chaucer:
The Canterbury Tales

TTh 2-3:30

This course will introduce specialists and non-specialists alike to the close reading of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.  You need have no previous experience with Middle English; ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about ...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop:
Creative Nonfiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

A graduate-level writing workshop, open both to graduate students from any department as well as to undergraduate students from any department who have taken English 143-level writing seminars or have equivalent skills or experience.

Drawin...(read more)

Farber, Thomas

246C/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Renaissance

TTh 11-12:30

In this survey, we follow how authors from Francesco Petrarca and Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, ostensibly defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture woul...(read more)

Marno, David

246H/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Victorian Period

MW 11-12:30

We will read and discuss some major works of Victorian poetry, fiction, and critical and scientific prose, in light of nineteenth-century discussions of aesthetic, social, and natural conceptions of form, as well as current debates over the status...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

F 12-3

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

250/1

Research Seminar:
Wordsworth and Coleridge in Collaboration

M 3-6

This class will study the major poetry and prose that emerged from the remarkable literary collaboration and conflict between William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor C...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

250/2

Research Seminar:
Modernism in Poetry and in Art

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is still a work in progress.  The basic idea is to develop the possibility that new developments in materialism offer tremendous possiblities for appreciating Impressionist art and Imagist writing.  But they also make it impe...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

250/3

Research Seminar:
Idols and Ideology—Readings in Augustine, Milton, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Kant, Marx, Freud, Althusser

W 2-5

The history of Western literary theory is often told in terms of the concept of mimesis. But there is another, equally powerful, anti-mimetic strand to this history, and that is the critique of mime...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

T. B. A.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 14-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1-2 and 5-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students, while English 198BC sections 3 and 4 are intended for new (spring) junior transfer students (as well as other juniors and seniors).

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43A, 43B, 143A, 143B, 143C, 143N, 243A, and 243N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only lower-division students should apply for 43A and 43B; only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143C, and 143N; and only graduate students (and upper-division students with considerable writing experience) should apply for 243A and 243N.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 11 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the partition "wall" for the desk area just inside the entrance to the English Department, at the Hearst Field Annex, Building B, on Thursday, November 3. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 3, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE SPRING.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only already-declared majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of spring '17 will be able to enroll in this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet delcared will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted later (probably towards the end of Phase II) if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2016 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give each of you a permission code for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2017 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the work-study student at the front desk of the English Department Office (in the Hearst Field Annex, Builiding B), addressed to the attention of the Chair of the English Department, BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair, the following for approval: (1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on DE-Cal’s website at http://www.decal.org, for 98 and 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; (2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; (3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course; (4) a unit value worksheet (obtainable by following these steps: log onto: academic-senate.berkeley.edu; click "committees" [in the left-hand toolbar]; click "COCI"; click "Information on student-facilitated courses"; scroll down and click "unit value worksheet"). A few days after the October 27 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in the Hearst Field Annex, Building B, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written petition, available from the rack on the front counter as you enter Hearst Field Annex, Building B. Completed petitions should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the "undergraduate petitions" drop box on the same counter as the rack containing the blank petition forms. Students will subsequently be emailed the Class Number that they will use to actually enroll in the class. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the Class Number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.