Announcement of Classes: Summer 2017


Shakespeare

English N117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Arnold, Oliver
Time: MTTh 12-2
Location: Dwinelle 109


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Norton Shakespeare (3rd edition; ed. S. Greenblatt)

Description

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, extravagantly beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, something like an obsession—for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to George Eliot to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Sarah Kane and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Žižek.  This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main issues we will focus on is the oscillation between "regular" and "irregular." What is the rule, and what is the exception in Shakespeare's works? How is a comedy supposed to end? How does it end? What makes a tragic hero?  What are the rules of theater? What are the rules of literature? Who creates them and why? When do they get transgressed, and why? A tentative reading list includes Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, The Tempest, and a substantial helping of sonnets.  We will also screen clips from both stage productions and film versions of the plays. 

Course requirements: two short essays and a final exam.

We have ordered The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd edition (ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al).  If you already own another complete Shakespeare (e.g., The Riverside, The Pelican, the first or second edition of The Norton Shakespeare, etc.), you are welcome to use it for this course.  Good single-play editions—Signet, Folger, Arden, Oxford World Classics, Pelican—would also serve you well.  

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 22 to June 29.


Shakespeare

English N117S

Section: 2
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MTTh 4-6
Location: Barrows 166


Description

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 3 to August 10.


The 20th-Century Novel

English N125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MTTh 2-4
Location: Dwinelle 215


Book List

Dreiser, Theodore: Sister Carrie; Garcia Marquez, Gabriel: One Hundred Years of Solitude; Gibson, William: Neuromancer; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics--history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: How have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel? How has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel? And lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 22 to June 29.


Special Topics: Film Noir

English N166

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 4-7
Location: Barrows 140


Other Readings and Media

Films:  The Maltese Falcon (John Huston, 1941); Double Indemnity (Billy Wilder, 1944); Scarlet Street (Fritz Lang, 1945);

Mildred Pierce (Michael Curtiz, 1945); The Big Clock (John Farrow, 1948); The Night of the Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974)

 

Description

A survey of classic mystery and crime films produced in Hollywood between the 1940s and the 1970s. We will consider film noir’s antecedents in German Expressionist cinema and hard-boiled crime fiction as well as its representative themes, techniques, and character types. Requirements include weekly written responses, one group presentation, a final exam, and a research essay anticipated by several short assignments.

 

All readings available in PDF format.

 

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 23 to June 29.

 


Special Topics: Arthurian Literature

English N166

Section: 2
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MTTh 12-2
Location: Barrows 140


Description

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 3 to August 10.


Special Topics: American Poetry, 1650-2016

English N166

Section: 3
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: MTTh 2-4
Location: 56 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

All primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a Course Reader.

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with 17th- and 18th-century poems by two women, Anne Bradstreet and Phyllis Wheatley, move to another (19th-century) pairing in Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and then touch down in expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Rather than cover all major figures briefly, we'll spend extended time with the work of a few: poets considered will include Paul Dunbar, Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Morgan Parker, and Graham Foust. Along the way we'll consider renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter, the task and materials of the long poem, seriality, citationality, who and what counts as a poetic subject, and how U.S. poetries have imagined community over and against their actual Americas. 

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 3 to August 10.


The Language and Literature of Films: The Hollywood Western, 1940-1963

English N173

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: M 2-5 & W 2-4
Location: Barrows 110


Other Readings and Media

Photocopied materials will be handed out in class.

Description

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This class is open to UC Berkeley students only.

This course will be taught in Session C, from June 19 to August 9.


Science Fiction

English N180Z

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: MTTh 10-12
Location: 140 Barrows


Book List

Capek, Karel: R.U.R.; Dick, Philip: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; Wells, , H. G.: The Island of Dr. Moreau; Whitehead, Colson: Zone One

Other Readings and Media

Films: The Matrix; Stalker; Bladerunner

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature's encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material, and technological mediation stands the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of 'being,' a consciousness deeply rooted in the human epperience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course.

This course will be taught in Session A, from May 22 to June 29.